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emt1581
02-04-2012, 22:09
My boss asked me to attend a week long training clear across the state. It is a good 4.5-5 hours away. They'll pay for my hotel, food, gas, etc...but to be honest, I haven't left this area with or without my family overnight in years.

My GHB is based on the 14mi. commute and 20mi. radius I travel from day to day.

How do I adapt it to be effective for a 5hr distance? Does it remain a GHB or does it turn into a BOB? I've got TONS of room in it.

Going on a similar trip, how much cash? Food/water?

I might be over-reacting and if so, I'm sure plenty will chime in to let me know it. But not having gone on such a trip since I was in high school/undergrad...I'm wondering what I should take S&P-wise?

Thanks

-Emt1581

Arvinator
02-04-2012, 23:04
When my wife and I took a 5 hour trip every couple of months to see family, I carried a 3 day supply of food, plenty of water, and a GOOD first aid it. I also took a SKS and 200 rds of ammo, in addition to my pistol and 100 rds ammo I kept in the truck. Shovel, axe, chain, extra oil and trans fluid went also. A blanket, tarp and CB radio as well as all of my wife's meds to cover 2 weeks. Clothes were part of the trip, and I had a portable radio and 3 flashlights. A reflective triangle and orange vest for visibility in case of trouble and we needed to be seen.
I never had a problem and the rifel was fun to go shooting one weekend... Good luck to you on your trip.

emt1581
02-04-2012, 23:31
When my wife and I took a 5 hour trip every couple of months to see family, I carried a 3 day supply of food, plenty of water, and a GOOD first aid it. I also took a SKS and 200 rds of ammo, in addition to my pistol and 100 rds ammo I kept in the truck. Shovel, axe, chain, extra oil and trans fluid went also. A blanket, tarp and CB radio as well as all of my wife's meds to cover 2 weeks. Clothes were part of the trip, and I had a portable radio and 3 flashlights. A reflective triangle and orange vest for visibility in case of trouble and we needed to be seen.
I never had a problem and the rifel was fun to go shooting one weekend... Good luck to you on your trip.

As far as food, I'm thinking a little more than 3 days worth of food will be needed...mostly sugar/carbs and protein though, not big meals.

For first aid, I've got a trauma kit with some extra supplies in it, so whether it's a paper cut or a gsw, I can tend to it...temporarily anyway. We're talking away from home, not TEOTWAWKI.

Blanket..good idea there! I've wanted to pick up some of those heatsheets for a while now.

I've got my rotator/reflective vest/etc. with me in case of an accident or something like that.

I'll take plenty of lights/batteries as well as blades (I've got two on me at all times).

As far as firepower, my MSAR will fit in my bag easily once the barrel is taken out. But I've already got a Draco/G19 in my bag plus a 4 pack of 30rd mags in my trunk. The MSAR would just give me accuracy at a distance more than the Draco.

Thanks

-Emt1581

cowboy1964
02-05-2012, 01:45
:couch:

DoctaGlockta
02-05-2012, 11:09
Extra cash and few gallons of drinking water.

Tools which should include a portable pump and a tire plug kit. I've needed my plug kit at least 2 times in the past few months.

Lone Kimono
02-05-2012, 11:40
Good to be prepared. Expanding my GHB is not something I've ever thought about on short trips.

Bilbo Bagins
02-05-2012, 14:59
Disregard your Boss, quit and stay bunkered in you home where its safe. :whistling:

Get out and enjoy life, don't fear the EMP boogey man. Even if something happens, use your body and mind and you can get back.

By car going approx 60mph going 300miles = 5hours

Riding a bike going approx 20mph = 15 hours

Riding a scooter going approx 6mph, riding 10 hours a day = 5 Days

Walking 3mph , walking 10 hours a day = 10 days

Here is my vacation/long distance trip plan.

Go to the nearest Walmart, and purchase or loot (only if everything is broken down and looting is the only option)

A Bike
A backpack
Food
Water
bleach or water purification tablets in the sporting goods/camping dept.
Knife
Hatchet
Lighters
Flashlight
Batteries
A sleeping bag if you are going multi day
A tarp or a small tent if they have one
Duct tape
Cord

emt1581
02-05-2012, 16:59
Disregard your Boss, quit and stay bunkered in you home where its safe. :whistling:

Get out and enjoy life, don't fear the EMP boogey man. Even if something happens, use your body and mind and you can get back.

By car going approx 60mph going 300miles = 5hours

Riding a bike going approx 20mph = 15 hours

Riding a scooter going approx 6mph, riding 10 hours a day = 5 Days

Walking 3mph , walking 10 hours a day = 10 days

Here is my vacation/long distance trip plan.

Go to the nearest Walmart, and purchase or loot (only if everything is broken down and looting is the only option)

A Bike
A backpack
Food
Water
bleach or water purification tablets in the sporting goods/camping dept.
Knife
Hatchet
Lighters
Flashlight
Batteries
A sleeping bag if you are going multi day
A tarp or a small tent if they have one
Duct tape
Cord

As far as getting out and enjoying life, I do what I like I just don't have to travel much to do it. I do need a vacation BADLY though...my wife and I haven't been on one in 12 years!

A bike...the last time I rode one my rear end hurt for a week. No thanks...but an excellent back-up method of transportation for someone who can use it. I'm just wondering what would happen that I would 1) Not be able to hop on a bus but 2) Would be able to drive clear back to my home for 15hrs. without issue...? :dunno:

As for your list, my CS Gurkha Kukri serves me better than a hatchet or axe...thing is worth it's weight in gold to me!! The other stuff I already have in my GHB.

Thanks

-Emt1581

emt1581
02-05-2012, 17:04
Another question....when going on a trip, what information about the area you are going to do you research and have ready? I'm thinking police station, bus/train station, hospital, gas stationS, and wal-mart/grocery store.

How about you?

Thanks

-Emt1581

lawman800
02-05-2012, 22:20
Vegas is about a 4 hour trip from home. I make sure I have enough cash on hand to get my car serviced and get home. Also up your AAA to premium if you haven't yet so you can get your car towed too if needed.

That is assuming that civilization will still be around when you need to use your preps. If not, better have your shotgun with a bandoleer and some camping supplies.

emt1581
02-05-2012, 22:25
Vegas is about a 4 hour trip from home. I make sure I have enough cash on hand to get my car serviced and get home. Also up your AAA to premium if you haven't yet so you can get your car towed too if needed.

That is assuming that civilization will still be around when you need to use your preps. If not, better have your shotgun with a bandoleer and some camping supplies.

I don't have AAA. Obviously (nowadays) I rarely travel out of town and my insurance pays for towing.

As far as a shotgun, I know I mentioned my MSAR earlier and now I'm wondering if long guns in general will be allowed for this trip according to PA law. Usually you can only take them to/from a range, store or to get repaired if not going to a different home. I'm thinking my Draco, which is still a VERY capable gun, is what I'm stuck with.

-Emt1581

lawman800
02-05-2012, 22:26
Not sure how PA law is but in CA, your hotel room is considered a domicile and you surely can transport your weapons between domiciles.

emt1581
02-05-2012, 22:33
Not sure how PA law is but in CA, your hotel room is considered a domicile and you surely can transport your weapons between domiciles.

That makes sense.

My only concern is security. If the cleaning lady comes in or someone else that has a master key or something guns have to be locked up. Now the Draco is already in my lockable Maxpedition Doppelduffel. As I said, detaching the barrel would be detached the gun WOULD fit in my bag to be locked...I'm just wondering if most would advise even bringing it?

Realistically, what role would a rifle play in getting home or defending myself 5hrs away from home that my Draco would/could not?

I have some ideas such as distance shots over 200yds, fast/accurate follow-ups, etc...but what are some of your thoughts on the subject of long guns on trips/in hotels?

Thanks

-Emt1581

lawman800
02-06-2012, 01:07
Personally, I never carried a long gun on trips unless it was part of the purpose of the trip. I have always found a sidearm to be sufficient because it's always on me instead of being socked away in the car or hotel room.

As for security while it's in the room... there are ways such as a hardcase with cable locks or just leave it in the hardcase locked in the car with a cable lock. That's assuming you have a sidearm on you while you fight back to the long arm.

Arourasphere
02-06-2012, 01:37
I also only take a side arm. That may change once I can find a Sub2000 though.

Dexters
02-06-2012, 06:06
It is a good 4.5-5 hours away.

-Emt1581

270 - 300 miles going to the training and maybe longer if you were to walk home because you would want to avoid populated areas.

If you were to walk 20mi/days that would be 15 days - without a day off.

Thinking about it as a long backpacking trip in cold weather would be appropriate.

bdcochran
02-06-2012, 06:53
Non humorous -
1. I also do not travel far. I map out the costcos and walmarts. The merchandise sold in each store is different and based upon demographics. I visit a particular Walmart once a month because I am in the area one time a month and it carries a product no handled by any other Walmart in 50 miles. I save $3 a unit of product.

2. Your plan is only to run home in an emergency. You have to be prepared to stay in place (particularly if you are urban, which you are not-in your mind). The wife and the kid(s) have to have plans of being able to take care of themselves. Particularly the kid(s) when they can walk and talk - I raised a son alone. I think you have a newborn. Well, the "bugout bag" in the car trunk has to be rethought whether you live in Oklahoma or Philadelphia, particularly in the winter time.

3. Time will be your enemy or challenge when you really have to take care of yourself. 09/11/2011- I had to be some place. I gave myself 15 minutes to think about what I wanted to take along to my appointment in addition to the bug out bag. If it is unsafe to go the 14 miles home in an emergency, you risk your life (and your family's survival) by not being prepared to stay in place. So, with a wife and kid at home, you need to gain a different perspective.

4. Ok, so I was in one of those day long traffic schools (essentially driving too slow on the freeway on the desert). The instructor asked people what they kept in the trunks of their cars for an emergency. Of course, I professed that I kept nothing and listened. Few people carried water or a jacket. Those are the people that you will have to deal with in an emergency - and be forced to stay in place.

emt1581
02-06-2012, 15:16
Non humorous -
1. I also do not travel far. I map out the costcos and walmarts. The merchandise sold in each store is different and based upon demographics. I visit a particular Walmart once a month because I am in the area one time a month and it carries a product no handled by any other Walmart in 50 miles. I save $3 a unit of product.

2. Your plan is only to run home in an emergency. You have to be prepared to stay in place (particularly if you are urban, which you are not-in your mind). The wife and the kid(s) have to have plans of being able to take care of themselves. Particularly the kid(s) when they can walk and talk - I raised a son alone. I think you have a newborn. Well, the "bugout bag" in the car trunk has to be rethought whether you live in Oklahoma or Philadelphia, particularly in the winter time.

3. Time will be your enemy or challenge when you really have to take care of yourself. 09/11/2011- I had to be some place. I gave myself 15 minutes to think about what I wanted to take along to my appointment in addition to the bug out bag. If it is unsafe to go the 14 miles home in an emergency, you risk your life (and your family's survival) by not being prepared to stay in place. So, with a wife and kid at home, you need to gain a different perspective.

4. Ok, so I was in one of those day long traffic schools (essentially driving too slow on the freeway on the desert). The instructor asked people what they kept in the trunks of their cars for an emergency. Of course, I professed that I kept nothing and listened. Few people carried water or a jacket. Those are the people that you will have to deal with in an emergency - and be forced to stay in place.

I see what you're saying with preparing to stay put. And really I am. It's how I designed my GHB. It'll help me move or stay in place because it's got the essentials. Long term food and water would be an issue but short term, no big deal.

-Emt1581

syntaxerrorsix
02-06-2012, 16:45
My GHB is basically a mini BOB.

I travel about a thousand miles per week and need the ability stay put or get home.

I have a Kifaru Spike Camp:

20oz water
Integrated Design's Silshelter
Snugpak's jungle sleeping bag.
USA bivy sack shell.
DriDucks wet weather top.
Katadyn mini filter and tabs
Camelbak bladder.
2 Fenix lights and spare batteries.
ESEE Izula.
Steel camp cup.
Ti spork.
Cliff bars and jerky.
Fire steel and tinder.
Maps and compass.
Passport, cash.
Bug repellent
Quick clot, steri-strips, antibiotic, tape and gauze, moleskin, OTC's.
Boonie hat, spare socks.
Kimber 1911 and 2 spare magazine plus holsters.

Total weight is 18 pounds and I have 1/4 of the bag left. If I leave town it's going with me.

http://i370.photobucket.com/albums/oo144/syntaxerrorsix/2012-02-06_18-42-07_551.jpg?t=1328571786

tuica
02-06-2012, 16:53
WOW!!! I just take a pistol. With that, you can usually obtain the remainder of what you need. Really, I think sometimes one should maybe take a "vacation from apocalyptic worries." I carry everyday while at home, but recently vacationed for 10 days in the LA area armed with nothing but my wits - and lived to tell the tale! Seriously; not mocking those who wish to be super prepared under any/all circumstances - just not my cup o' tea. Have a great trip!

syntaxerrorsix
02-06-2012, 16:56
WOW!!! I just take a pistol. With that, you can usually obtain the remainder of what you need. Really, I think sometimes one should maybe take a "vacation from apocalyptic worries." I carry everyday while at home, but recently vacationed for 10 days in the LA area armed with nothing but my wits - and lived to tell the tale! Seriously; not mocking those who wish to be super prepared under any/all circumstances - just not my cup o' tea. Have a great trip!

I'm not worried. Didn't you read the list? :tongueout:

This is exactly what I take camping as well so it gets used at least monthly. You think that's a lot you oughta see my truck :supergrin:

emt1581
02-06-2012, 17:17
My GHB is basically a mini BOB.

I travel about a thousand miles per week and need the ability stay put or get home.

I have a Kifaru Spike Camp:

20oz water
Integrated Design's Silshelter
Snugpak's jungle sleeping bag.
USA bivy sack shell.
DriDucks wet weather top.
Katadyn mini filter and tabs
Camelbak bladder.
2 Fenix lights and spare batteries.
ESEE Izula.
Steel camp cup.
Ti spork.
Cliff bars and jerky.
Fire steel and tinder.
Maps and compass.
Passport, cash.
Bug repellent
Quick clot, steri-strips, antibiotic, tape and gauze, moleskin, OTC's.
Boonie hat, spare socks.
Kimber 1911 and 2 spare magazine plus holsters.

Total weight is 18 pounds and I have 1/4 of the bag left. If I leave town it's going with me.

http://i370.photobucket.com/albums/oo144/syntaxerrorsix/2012-02-06_18-42-07_551.jpg?t=1328571786

I'm lovin that list of cover/shelters you have there!!!

-Emt1581

syntaxerrorsix
02-06-2012, 17:36
I'm lovin that list of cover/shelters you have there!!!

-Emt1581

Extremely lightweight and versatile. I can recommend everything I posted even though I could do without some items.

emt1581
02-06-2012, 18:00
Extremely lightweight and versatile. I can recommend everything I posted even though I could do without some items.

For my needs I'm thinking one of those S.O.L. Heatsheets and a good blanket will do me just fine. Better yet, heatsheets and a good fire as blankets aren't exactly compact.

Thanks

-Emt1581

syntaxerrorsix
02-06-2012, 18:19
For my needs I'm thinking one of those S.O.L. Heatsheets and a good blanket will do me just fine. Better yet, heatsheets and a good fire as blankets aren't exactly compact.

Thanks

-Emt1581

I'm definitely interested in a review. Those look pretty handy. Like I said, I camp all my gear. They say they are reusable, I'm wondering about longevity. Still looks like a better option that the traditional space blanket.

emt1581
02-06-2012, 18:30
I'm definitely interested in a review. Those look pretty handy. Like I said, I camp all my gear. They say they are reusable, I'm wondering about longevity. Still looks like a better option that the traditional space blanket.

Actually LG1 did a review and seemed to really like them. He said compared to the cheap space blanket it held up well whereas the space blanket ripped immediately.

I looked at that bag you have. It's only rated for 36deg. That might be fine for your AO. Personally I'd like something rated to at least the teens and hopefully sub zero especially if I'm hoofing it.

-Emt1581

Big Bird
02-06-2012, 18:57
Ehh, I travel about 5-6 hours one way on business trips regularly. I think a few things over and above the standard BOB are in order. For example I usually carry a fairly decent small mechanics tool bag stocked with all kinds of pliers, screwdrivers, sockets, duct tape, hose clamps/repair kits, tire plugs etc. A set of jumper cables. A tow strap, a decent hydrolic jack. Stanley multi-tool--prybard, hammer, axe thingy. I have a couple of flares, an orange signal panel, a mini battery powered air pump. A keep a Special forces shovel in the trunk as well as a 4 way tire tool and a decent size first aid kit. There's no reason to skimp on these things in a vehicle you use for extended travel and why would you want to resort to a GHB when you could fix your vehicle? So that's the first thing I'll tell you...have a way to fix the stupid car or keep it running!

In terms of the GHB, If you are forced to abandon your vehicle the worst case is you'll walk a REALLY long way. What kind of footwear do you have with you. I always have a decent pair of well broken in hiking boots, several changes of decent socks vaccuum sealed in individual packages and foot powder. So think about your backup mode of transportation (your feet) and how well shod you are for a 200+ mile trek...

In terms of survival crap...water containers along with a WAY to make water like a Katadyb Pocket filter or any of the other similar type products. Some water purification tablets (what if the mechnical filter breaks?). So two ways to make water and several containers to carry it. Three ways to make fire. I carry GI Windproof matches a butane cigar lighter, and a fire steel. No more than two knives. A utilitarian 3-4" fixed blade and my backup is the knife on my Leatherman Wave.

If you carry food some plain old dehydrated backpacking food is fine and enough for three or four days only weighs a pound or so. I also throw in a block of Datrex in my packs. A small backpack stove and a small lighweight pot to boil water.

Toothpaste, toothbrush. toiletries, toilet paper, bug repellant, sunscreen lip balm, hand cream and hand sanitizer.

I pack a HAM HT transceiver and a Repeater Guide.

I have a Poncho liner and a lightweight bivy that I can stay comfortable in down to about 40 degrees. I can add a Space blanket for added protection but the space blanket doesn't breath and if you've ever used one you'll find your perspiration will collect in your clothes if you are wrapped too tightly for too long in Mylar. Lots of things like parachute cord etc.

All in all your GHB shouldn't weigh more than about 30 lbs. If it does you will be diasspointed unless you are in superb shape and used to toting backpacks. If you doubt this do yourself a favor and take the pepsi challenge. Go for a 3-4 mile walk after dinner tomorrow night with your GHB on your back and see how you fare. A lot of the stuff I described above stays with the car.

syntaxerrorsix
02-06-2012, 19:25
Actually LG1 did a review and seemed to really like them. He said compared to the cheap space blanket it held up well whereas the space blanket ripped immediately.

I looked at that bag you have. It's only rated for 36deg. That might be fine for your AO. Personally I'd like something rated to at least the teens and hopefully sub zero especially if I'm hoofing it.

-Emt1581

Central Florida.

I've slept it down to 28 inside the bivy/shelter but I wasn't happy about it. My system is probably the bare minimum for being on foot pretty much anywhere in Florida.

I keep a tent, poncho liner, pillow and Thermarest in the truck as a matter of convenience.

That and everything BB mentioned above and then some. Even the axe thingy :thumbsup:

lawman800
02-06-2012, 22:52
I read that those space blankets that look like big aluminum foil sheets don't work? Are they at least better than nothing?

Big Bird
02-07-2012, 04:18
In the winter I always travel with a sleeping bag rated to 0 degrees. It never gets that cold around here . But still--come November I usually put the sleeping bag in the truck--usually opening weekend of waterfowl season when I head down to Arkansas. If I get caught in a snowstorm and can't make progress on the road I have the option of pulling off the road and sleeping in the vehicle etc. Come March/April I stash the sleeping bag back in the house.

A good flashlight and half dozen batteries. A backup small LED clip on light and a Petzl Headlamp. I almost always have the headlamp. Try repairing your car at night without one!

You have to tailor your kit to your needs. In Florida I'd probably never need a sleeping bag. But a poncho liner is light--fits into a small compression sack and is about perfect for Florida or the desert southwest. I can't tell you guys enough...a poncho liner is an awesome GHB addition. The space blankets are an emergency measure and work to a limited degree. A poncho liner is small and light enough to not make it prohibitive but is big enough and has just enough insulation to make it useful down into the 50's or more. I kept one in my helmet bag on my tank and any time I could catch a 30 minutes or a few hours sleep would curl up somehwere out of the way with my poncho liner. I spent many hours curled up in my Hummer in Iraq in 50 degree temps with nothing more than my poncho liner. They are very useful--you can buy a new one from a MILSURP store for $20-30. Buy yourself a smallish stuff sack and you are good to go.

Likewise, if you live in the southwest you'll need to actually carry water. Finding water in the desert SW is a REAL problem and you can have all the purification crap and filters to make enough water for a squad of infantrymen. But finding enough of the raw material is the issue. When I lived in El Paso and traveled the area I ALWAYS had a full 5 gallon military water can in my car or truck. Here in KY and the Southeast you cannot walk 400 yards in any direction and not stumble into a creek, pond, river or lake or some semblence of H2O.

lawman800
02-07-2012, 08:05
Hmmm... some thoughts... since I live and travel along major urban routes with water sources (taps, faucets, etc.), instead of lugging a lot of water, I'll have a smaller quantity of water and then I can also bring along a container of sorts with purification so I can make water as I go along or make enough at the onset of the journey home... assuming there is time.

tuica
02-07-2012, 13:23
Thanks for the Knowledge. I will be adding some items to my normal truck carry gear. Cheers.

caprice
02-07-2012, 15:45
I travel a lot for work. Sometimes I am just a couple of hours from home others I am 12-14hrs out.

Most of the time I am driving which gives me greater freedom of equipment selection. If I am driving I will have GHB/BOB which contains 3-5 days of food, usually MRE entrees and some assorted energy laden/sustainment bars or supplements. Water is at least a gallon or two in bottles and a camelback system. Other equipment consists of one fixed, two folding blades, a multitool and an expanded IFAK along with a small selection of OTC meds.

Weapons systems are designed around concealment which in a 'get home' scenario I think are paramount as I am going to be on the move and need to stay as 'grey' as possible and not become a target but still be able to maintain a viable defensive posture.

In the recent past I have taken to carrying an UZI Carbine / UZI SBR (where allowed) when traveling in addition to a Glock 17/19. While this combination does not have the 'reach out and touch' ability of an AR platform is gives me reasonable reach at 75-100 yards easily. It also gives me commonality between my pistol and long gun, something that in a true 'get home' scenario may, in my opinion, be life saving. If I am without a vehicle my ability to carry a large amount of various ammo is going to be limited so if can maximize my space/weight then I think it is a very good thing. Typically I have about three hundred rounds with me which will feed either weapon system. The UZI has an X300, sling and Trijicon RMR. Basically it is bullet proof. The Glock has an RMR and night sights and another X300 as well. Various holsters, including an AIWB holster for concealed carry and Safariland or similar OWB holster is always carried.

My thoughts are that a 'get home' scenario, no matter what the cause of such-assuming it is some type of disaster, is more akin to a military 'escape and evade' exercise rather than a combat operation. My goal is to survive and get home, not do battle. If I have to fight during my way home, I have the capability but if I can at all avoid it, I will. This is where the concealability of both the Glock and the UZI is prized beyond the long range ability or power of the rifle.

In addition to weapons, food, first aid, I have water purification tablets, matches, lighters and other small/light weight items that are carried in my pack which is currently a Cambelback Urban Assault pack which goes along with the 'grey man' concept as it fits neatly in with any urban/suburban environment and can pass at the mall or an office building with little notice.

Last thought for the original poster, think strongly about learning to ride the bike without pain as in a true SHTF long range scenario, where vehicles might not be viable for whatever reason, could mean a two day/two week trip versus a two month trip home. 30-40 miles per day is easily managed on a bike, not so on foot.

emt1581
02-07-2012, 17:50
I travel a lot for work. Sometimes I am just a couple of hours from home others I am 12-14hrs out.

Most of the time I am driving which gives me greater freedom of equipment selection. If I am driving I will have GHB/BOB which contains 3-5 days of food, usually MRE entrees and some assorted energy laden/sustainment bars or supplements. Water is at least a gallon or two in bottles and a camelback system. Other equipment consists of one fixed, two folding blades, a multitool and an expanded IFAK along with a small selection of OTC meds.



Weapons systems are designed around concealment which in a 'get home' scenario I think are paramount as I am going to be on the move and need to stay as 'grey' as possible and not become a target but still be able to maintain a viable defensive posture.

In the recent past I have taken to carrying an UZI Carbine / UZI SBR (where allowed) when traveling in addition to a Glock 17/19. While this combination does not have the 'reach out and touch' ability of an AR platform is gives me reasonable reach at 75-100 yards easily. It also gives me commonality between my pistol and long gun, something that in a true 'get home' scenario may, in my opinion, be life saving. If I am without a vehicle my ability to carry a large amount of various ammo is going to be limited so if can maximize my space/weight then I think it is a very good thing. Typically I have about three hundred rounds with me which will feed either weapon system. The UZI has an X300, sling and Trijicon RMR. Basically it is bullet proof. The Glock has an RMR and night sights and another X300 as well. Various holsters, including an AIWB holster for concealed carry and Safariland or similar OWB holster is always carried.

My thoughts are that a 'get home' scenario, no matter what the cause of such-assuming it is some type of disaster, is more akin to a military 'escape and evade' exercise rather than a combat operation. My goal is to survive and get home, not do battle. If I have to fight during my way home, I have the capability but if I can at all avoid it, I will. This is where the concealability of both the Glock and the UZI is prized beyond the long range ability or power of the rifle.

In addition to weapons, food, first aid, I have water purification tablets, matches, lighters and other small/light weight items that are carried in my pack which is currently a Cambelback Urban Assault pack which goes along with the 'grey man' concept as it fits neatly in with any urban/suburban environment and can pass at the mall or an office building with little notice.

Last thought for the original poster, think strongly about learning to ride the bike without pain as in a true SHTF long range scenario, where vehicles might not be viable for whatever reason, could mean a two day/two week trip versus a two month trip home. 30-40 miles per day is easily managed on a bike, not so on foot.


As far as meals, I have to figure that out. I think I'm going to buy a bunch of boxes of energy/meal bars at wal-mart. I figure if I figure out 2000 calories worth of them a day I should be good short term (3-5 days).

What are "grey" weapons? That mean concealed? Accessible? ???

How do you "carry" an UZI? I've seen shoulder rigs for them but is that what you meant/used?

AWIB holster...what does the A stand for?

I'm thinking I might get another water purifier for this venture. I've already got the heavy duty aluminum one (for some reason the brand and model are escaping me...Katydyn I think). But the hiking version is only $50 or so that would be good to have.

As far as a bike...again, the last one I rode showed me I may have outgrown that mode of transportation. Unless there is some seat made that is ultra padded or something. The peddling and maneuvering was no issue at all as far as being in shape...just the posterior problem...

Thanks

-Emt1581

caprice
02-07-2012, 18:09
As far as carry of the UZI, it will easily fit in a backpack with the stock folded, if you leave the carbine barrel attached the barrel itself will stick out a little but is not easy to recognize as such particularly if you put some type of cloth over it like an umbrella cover. If you have an SBR barrel in it, where legal, the weapon disappears in the pack. With the SBR barrel you can put the entire weapon in a large messenger style bag. Despite not being immediately available when on the move it is surprisingly quick to access if needed. Take for instance the assassination attempt on President Reagan where you can see the US Secret Service agent deploy and UZI from a briefcase. While the carbine length barrel makes the briefcase a no-go option the thought process is the same.

Carrying an exposed weapon, long gun in particularly, may be seen as a threat or at least makes you a target and I really want to avoid that.

AIWB-Appendix Inside (the) WaistBand basically inside the pants carry but in the front of your person near where your appendix is. Very easy to conceal a full size pistol here but it is something you have to get used to and is not for everyone.

Both the Glock and the UZI can let me move, with weapons concealed and not have to worry about being noticed. A real plus when moving around other people post-disaster. It gives you options, open carry does not always do so.

BR549
02-08-2012, 09:29
My boss asked me to attend a week long training clear across the state. It is a good 4.5-5 hours away. They'll pay for my hotel, food, gas, etc...but to be honest, I haven't left this area with or without my family overnight in years.

My GHB is based on the 14mi. commute and 20mi. radius I travel from day to day.

How do I adapt it to be effective for a 5hr distance? Does it remain a GHB or does it turn into a BOB? I've got TONS of room in it.

Going on a similar trip, how much cash? Food/water?

I might be over-reacting and if so, I'm sure plenty will chime in to let me know it. But not having gone on such a trip since I was in high school/undergrad...I'm wondering what I should take S&P-wise?

Thanks

-Emt1581

Yes, you are overreacting.

BR549
02-08-2012, 09:35
As far as getting out and enjoying life, I do what I like I just don't have to travel much to do it. I do need a vacation BADLY though...my wife and I haven't been on one in 12 years!

A bike...the last time I rode one my rear end hurt for a week. No thanks...but an excellent back-up method of transportation for someone who can use it. I'm just wondering what would happen that I would 1) Not be able to hop on a bus but 2) Would be able to drive clear back to my home for 15hrs. without issue...? :dunno:

As for your list, my CS Gurkha Kukri serves me better than a hatchet or axe...thing is worth it's weight in gold to me!! The other stuff I already have in my GHB.

Thanks

-Emt1581

When was the honeymoon? What about all those posts regarding the engagement ring and the honeymoon? and the new house you built? that was built long ago with real plaster walls, etc. etc. etc.


Take whatever you want and feel is necessary.