Bore brush question [Archive] - Glock Talk

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got2hav1
02-21-2012, 20:40
I have some SS bore brushes coming. Is it safe to use these on any bore on a regular basis. I would assume that the bristles would be harder than brass. But would think that SS bristles would not harm a gun barrel. Any thoughts?

sns3guppy
02-22-2012, 01:19
I wouldn't use them. Phosphor bronze is enough.

I don't use nylon brushes, either.

got2hav1
02-22-2012, 17:14
I wouldn't use them. Phosphor bronze is enough.

I don't use nylon brushes, either.

OK I will not use them . Thanks for the reply.

m2hmghb
02-22-2012, 17:19
The only time I use a stainless brush is when the fouling is real bad, think lead fouling or mil surp weapons. Once in a while won't hurt, but using them often will hurt.

Markasaurus
02-22-2012, 23:11
The bore brush that comes with every new Glock is made of: Nylon. Obviously glock feels steel or even brass is too harsh to use in their bores. That or they just get a helluva deal on the plastic bore brushes?

After using steel, brass and nylon bore brushes, i think nylon is probably best for cleaning gun bores. Get the right chemical, let that do the work instead instead of scrubbing the bore half to death. Steel, Stainless and even brass brushes can easily damage the crown and throat of a barrel and all the scrubbing in the world won't remove lead or heavy copper deposits - so why risk it? Just use a nylon brush and your chemical of choice. If a nylon brush can't get out fouling, maybe a lead remover or foaming cleaner like wipe-out should be tried. It is better then scrubbing with a steel brush.

Batesmotel
02-23-2012, 03:34
The only time I use a stainless brush is when the fouling is real bad, think lead fouling or mil surp weapons. Once in a while won't hurt, but using them often will hurt.

This. I only use them for rust. I am in instructor and often have students bring me problem guns. Usually just real dirty including rust.

A good phosphor bronze brush will not hurt a bore.

I think Glock sends a nylon brush because they are inexpensive.

faawrenchbndr
02-23-2012, 06:56
I've only used nylon brushes for the last 10 years or so.
I find, proper use of solvents, and brush works best for me.


Breakfree Foaming Bore cleaner, is the shiznits!

Jason D
02-23-2012, 18:13
You should never use a steel brush on anything but the inside of a shotgun barrel.
Steel on steel is never good. If you have extreme fouling that won't come clean with a standard bronze brush. There are many products you can buy to help.

J&B bore compound is one.

For leaded guns a Lewis Lead remover will do the job.

Zeroskillet
04-11-2012, 10:03
Wait so the brush that comes with glocks is nylon?

AA#5
04-11-2012, 11:00
Stainless steel brushes will scratch the barrel. I used one to get lead out of my GP-100 (before I knew better) & the barrel is permanently scratched.

arclight610
04-11-2012, 11:04
From an technical standpoint, stainless steel isn't very hard as far as steels go. It is alot harder than nylon or copper, but it would just really depend on what your barrel is made of. If your barrel is made of a softer steel, like stainless, I would say the odds of damaging your bore are higher. If you have a chrome-lined bore or something nitrided or whatever, then you could probably use it without too much ill effect.

Alizard
04-11-2012, 18:01
I have some SS bore brushes coming. Is it safe to use these on any bore on a regular basis.
Absolutely NOT. I don't even use bronze anymore, I use nylon and a mild polish like chrome polish for very dirty cases. There's just no upside to jamming metal brushes down a bore.

FYI, pro shooters do not even clean the bores throughout a shooting season (they clean the guns and leave the bores alone). The majority of wear to a bore comes from cleaning.

AZ Jeff
04-11-2012, 18:46
Absolutely NOT. I don't even use bronze anymore, I use nylon and a mild polish like chrome polish for very dirty cases. There's just no upside to jamming metal brushes down a bore.

FYI, pro shooters do not even clean the bores throughout a shooting season (they clean the guns and leave the bores alone). The majority of wear to a bore comes from cleaning.

Actually, the majority of wear on bores due to cleaning is due to the CLEANING ROD grinding on the bore after it's got embedded grit and crud in it.

The actual bore brush made from anything softer than the steel of the barrel CANNOT wear on the bore, provided it's clean when used (again, no grit in it).

You will find "pro shooters" vary their cleaning habits based on the TYPE of gun their are using. High power rifle guys do NOT let their bore stay foul all season. Small bore guys will.

Alizard
04-11-2012, 22:45
The actual bore brush made from anything softer than the steel of the barrel CANNOT wear on the boreI don't know about that: water is way softer than rock, but over time the water carved the Grand Canyon out of rock.

I'm not using metal brushes anymore.

voyager4520
04-12-2012, 05:53
I use a Dewey brass bore rod with Dewey "No Harm" bore brushes. The rod is solid brass, the bore brushes use a brass fitting with brass center wire, and phosphor bronze bristles.

Softer materials will over time wear on harder materials, but using a phosphor bronze brush puts no more wear on the bore than shooting the gun. Phosphor bronze is softer than the copper jacket on a bullet, and isn't moving through the bore at high speed and pressure.

Bill Lumberg
04-12-2012, 06:16
Wouldn't touch them. Nothing but nylon or polymer brushes and proper chemical application is all that's required for a truly clean bore. Brass and some other brushes can be used, but aren't necessary. The only reason I have found to use anything other than the stock nylon brush is that some solvents (boretec for instance) degrade the stock nylon brush. I use Iosso polymer brushes.

Realleycat
04-12-2012, 07:44
you ask a question, and everyone has an opinion! I've used bronze brushes for over 50 years and haven't had any problems. But some people like Chevy's and some like Fords?

Bill Lumberg
04-12-2012, 08:41
This. Just because I may have used spit and a broken jumprope 100 years ago (because that's the way pappy and uncle sam taught me) doesn't mean it's the smartest or most efficent way. Nylon/polymer takes less work when used properly and are easier on the barrel. That said, bronze can be used for a long time before it causes problematic wear, and is plain better for traditionally rifled barrels.
The bore brush that comes with every new Glock is made of: Nylon. Obviously glock feels steel or even brass is too harsh to use in their bores. That or they just get a helluva deal on the plastic bore brushes?

After using steel, brass and nylon bore brushes, i think nylon is probably best for cleaning gun bores. Get the right chemical, let that do the work instead instead of scrubbing the bore half to death. Steel, Stainless and even brass brushes can easily damage the crown and throat of a barrel and all the scrubbing in the world won't remove lead or heavy copper deposits - so why risk it? Just use a nylon brush and your chemical of choice. If a nylon brush can't get out fouling, maybe a lead remover or foaming cleaner like wipe-out should be tried. It is better then scrubbing with a steel brush.

smokin762
04-12-2012, 08:53
I would only use a brush that is softer than the material that I am cleaning, so that it does not cause premature wear.

A good cleaning solvent is a big help. I like Hopps Bore cleaning Gel. Then I use Breakfree CLP as an oil.

AZ Jeff
04-12-2012, 13:20
I don't know about that: water is way softer than rock, but over time the water carved the Grand Canyon out of rock.
Poor analogy. The "water" you cite is actually water with LOTS of sand and other abrasives mixed in it. THAT is what created the Grand Canyon.

Alizard
04-12-2012, 13:44
The point is: since I can get a bore perfectly clean using a nylon brush and the proper cleaner, why would I ever put metal in the bore?

No brainer

hamster
04-12-2012, 14:12
why would I ever put metal in the bore?

Cause plastic bullets are no fun?

AK74play
04-12-2012, 14:27
The question was about stainless brushes. Thats is the only thing I will address and wont argue with anyone. I have used stainless brushes for many years on all 18 of my Glocks, my 1911's, my revolvers, my AR's, my AK's all 3 of my long range rifles and all my shotguns and have never had one hurt a single barrel, affect accuracy in any way or show any kind of scratches or wear. They are softer than your barrel no matter what it';s made of or they wouldn't flex. I'll keep using them because they last a lot longer than any brass or nylon brush and make my cleaning sessions quick, easy and very efficient...:faint:

arclight610
04-12-2012, 14:59
The question was about stainless brushes. Thats is the only thing I will address and wont argue with anyone. I have used stainless brushes for many years on all 18 of my Glocks, my 1911's, my revolvers, my AR's, my AK's all 3 of my long range rifles and all my shotguns and have never had one hurt a single barrel, affect accuracy in any way or show any kind of scratches or wear. They are softer than your barrel no matter what it';s made of or they wouldn't flex. I'll keep using them because they last a lot longer than any brass or nylon brush and make my cleaning sessions quick, easy and very efficient...:faint:

Flex isn't exactly how hardness of a material is determined... Glass fibers are flexible, but harder than alot of steels. So, if you had a glass-fiber brush it would probably scratch the crap out of your bore. However, as you noted, stainless steel should be fine.

Paul53
04-12-2012, 17:25
Dog fight in progress!

Somebody hose them down so we can stay on topic. The OP wasnt asking for the quantum physics of bore brushes.:dunno:

Alizard
04-12-2012, 17:55
OK, speaking of on topic of using steel brushes:

I remember distinctly a barrel maker warning against it. The statement was that even if the barrel is hardened steel, the heat from firing (on the barrel surface) can slightly anneal it making it softer and the steel brush will damage it.