What shelving do you use? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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emt1581
02-26-2012, 18:29
As far as storing your preps, what shelving do you use? I'd like to get going on my prep room...well...organizing it rather than having organized piles.

I'm not sure what shelving to buy/build.

Even if you are not comfortable sharing pics, at least tell us what models you went with.

Thanks

-Emt1581

R_W
02-26-2012, 18:38
Most of mine are the chrome wire rack shelves from Costco or Sams. 48" wide by 18" deep. When I started they were $68 each, now I think they are right at a C note.

I use them everywhere--they are in my pantry, basement storage room, clothes closets, garage. They aren't TOO big so they will fit into smaller rooms, but big enough to get a flat of jars onto the shelf. But mostly they are universal and modular. I can piece them together to fit a particular space, or roll it to a different place if I need to repurpose a room.

Plywood and 2x4 are cheaper, and I will do that when I get my store room permanent (reconfiguring the basement AGAIN, hopefully I get it right this time).

Glock30Eric
02-26-2012, 18:42
Treated Cedar woods 2x4x8. I could change the shelf into whatever I need at that time. I could use it to keep us warm for a night.

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emt1581
02-26-2012, 18:50
http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11233458&whse=BC&Ne=4000000&eCat=BC|114|3327&N=4014849&Mo=43&No=8&Nr=P_CatalogName:BC&cat=4540&Ns=P_Price|1||P_SignDesc1&lang=en-US&Sp=C&topnav=

I was looking for those shelves at Costco and I found this. I wouldn't pay $300 for it. $300 can buy a LOT of supplies. But it is a cool concept. I'm pretty sure I could replicate it with about $50 worth of supplies from HD or Lowes.

-Emt1581

lslubecki
02-26-2012, 20:13
I use the Lowes or Home Depot closet shelving wire shelf kits. I find the studs and screw only into them for support and support brackets.

emt1581
02-26-2012, 20:16
I've been looking at different big box stores and this looks like the best deal for adjustable steel shelving. SUPER cheap as well...

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Edsal-Home-E-Quip-Gray-Steel-Canning-Shelving/17444292

-Emt1581

R_W
02-26-2012, 20:26
1) That shelf reliance rotator is really slick. IF you use their mix of can sizes. Yes you can build something like it--really easy if you do a back-load setup, not so easy if you front or top load like they do.

2) Inspect those super cheap shelves. Some make pop can metal look thick.

emt1581
02-26-2012, 20:31
1) That shelf reliance rotator is really slick. IF you use their mix of can sizes. Yes you can build something like it--really easy if you do a back-load setup, not so easy if you front or top load like they do.

2) Inspect those super cheap shelves. Some make pop can metal look thick.

I figure if it's on wheels, it wouldn't be hard to load from the back and put into position. But I usually buy cases. That setup would be fine for distributing a case or two...but when looking to store hundreds of cases...wouldn't work.

I know what you mean, I've seen some seriously flimsy shelves! The wire ones are pretty tough but I like plain steel without wheels unless those wheels can support half a ton or so

-Emt1581

medic2258
02-26-2012, 22:06
We built ours with 2x4's and 3/4 inch plywood. Very sturdy and can handle a lot of weight. Plus as others have said, we can use them for firewood if needed.

RWBlue
02-26-2012, 22:54
I think I am using some of these.

http://www.globalindustrial.com/g/storage/shelving/steel-heavy-duty/Vari-Tuff-Brute-Shelving-Shelf-Pack
72Hx48Wx18D It has hanger brackets so I can move the shelves. I went with a medium weight steel shelves. This allows me to load the shelves pretty heavy, but I caution you to not over load the shelves. Ammo weighs A LOT and 48 inches is a long spread.

I have also made a shelf which when mounted upside down makes shelves with wheels. This allows me to have my shelves multiple levels deep.

One more note: These shelves are strong, very strong. Maybe stronger than your floor.:shocked:

Dexters
02-27-2012, 05:51
Treated Cedar woods 2x4x8. I could change the shelf into whatever I need at that time. I could use it to keep us warm for a night.

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+1

In all things you must think about multiple uses.

Wood planks with brick or cinder block supports can be used as shelves and then later for repairs or to build something.

NDCent
02-27-2012, 06:13
I've got a couple of these https://www.sevilleclassics.com/products.php?pid=194 in 24x60x72 and really like them. We added a couple extra shelves per unit. KInd of expensive but look and work great for in our pantry area. The roller/wheel kit was useless and we took them off a month or so after we really started to get it loaded down (bummer to unpack and redo). We loaded them very heavy (as advertised) and had a holler try to bend over. It didn't hurt the shelf leg or insert at all, just started to bend the wheel shaft as their made to set on an angle. But used on there regular adjustable leveling feet they come with I don't think you could over load them.

I may be looking closely at those 'valley craft' industrial shelves RWBlue posted about up above if/when I add a couple more in my shop.

RWBlue
02-27-2012, 08:16
+1

In all things you must think about multiple uses.

Wood planks with brick or cinder block supports can be used as shelves and then later for repairs or to build something.

My issue with brick/cinder block and wood is they waist space and do not hold up well to earthquakes.

But for the money......they are hard to beat.

RWBlue
02-27-2012, 08:22
I've got a couple of these https://www.sevilleclassics.com/products.php?pid=194 in 24x60x72 and really like them. We added a couple extra shelves per unit. Kind of expensive but look and work great for in our pantry area. The roller/wheel kit was useless and we took them off a month or so after we really started to get it loaded down (bummer to unpack and redo). We loaded them very heavy (as advertised) and had a holler try to bend over. It didn't hurt the shelf leg or insert at all, just started to bend the wheel shaft as their made to set on an angle. But used on there regular adjustable leveling feet they come with I don't think you could over load them.

Those would be much better than mine for food service areas.
Mine will rust when scratched. Mine also look....lets say industrial. They are not pretty and shiny.

I think I will consider some of these for the pantry, and get more of my current shelves for garage, basement, .....

As far as over loading them.....ammo is heavy.

kirgi08
02-27-2012, 09:44
Check out food equipment auctions.We got got a ton of storage cheap.Also look inta plastic soda crates,they stack and can be a good lt wgt base.'08.

WolfNotSheep
02-27-2012, 10:40
My local WalMart has sheet metal shelves with particle board inserts (replaced with laminate whenever I get my hands on some scrap materials) for roughly $35 a piece. They're rated to hold 900 pounds and, while they seem somewhat flimsy when empty, once loaded down with a little weight they are bomb proof. I've lagged them each to the wall which they stand against and bolted them together. My only criticism is the particle board. As I mentioned, I've replaced most of the particle board in mine with various types of plywood and lamintaes but, I still think they're a solid investment.

sebecman
02-27-2012, 11:20
Check out food equipment auctions.We got got a ton of storage cheap.Also look inta plastic soda crates,they stack and can be a good lt wgt base.'08.

+1 we have gotten a few great deals at resturant equip auctions.

Hummer
02-27-2012, 12:05
I use the heavy duty chrome Seville wire shelving from Sam's Club (http://www.samsclub.com/sams/shop/product.jsp?productId=152201&navAction=) that is 48"x72"x18". They come with 6 shelves, shelf liners and wheels. I bought some extra shelves so some units have seven shelves for smaller things like canned goods and extra kitchen items. Can't beat it for the price and strength. You can load them down and still roll them without having to unload. You can't do that with most angle iron type shelving.

I decided to go with them because of their strength and portability. There are a dozen of them in my garage and the store room, and I could use a few more. I have a couple in the wine room to store equipment, empty carboys and cases of wine and beer. Others are stacked with food and other supplies we buy in bulk. One in the garage holds my power tools, another plumbing and irrigation supplies, etc.

In the garage I also have a 16' long x 8' high cinder block 1x12 shelving on one wall, but like RWBlue said, they're not space efficient. I plan to take it out and replace it this year with two or three of the wire rack units--safer and better all around.

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g292/COHummer/Miscellaneous/storage-shelves.jpg

kirgi08
02-27-2012, 12:09
A Reusable is better than paper,unless youse outta preps.'08.

cowboy1964
02-27-2012, 12:12
Preps? I don't have any preps. I don't have any guns either. But if I DID have preps I'd get some of those chrome wire shelves too.

racerford
02-27-2012, 13:36
A Reusable is better than paper,unless youse outta preps.'08.

Paper is good for short events that you know will be over in a few days, like main brake with low pressure.

It is also good long term, as bait for scavenger animals that can be eaten.

M1A Shooter
02-27-2012, 16:28
2x4 and 1/4" plywood. built to fit.

quake
02-27-2012, 16:58
1) That shelf reliance rotator is really slick. IF you use their mix of can sizes. Yes you can build something like it--really easy if you do a back-load setup, not so easy if you front or top load like they do.

2) Inspect those super cheap shelves. Some make pop can metal look thick.

Homemade front-loader, based on a pattern bought off the internet years ago; don't recall the site:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/canrackcropped-1.jpg
Made to fit in a lower kitchen cabinet; those are the kitchen drawers you see above it.

Those are good for in-kitchen convenience, but most stuff is on basic flat shelves of 2x4's and osb:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/1-19-08052B-1.jpg



Another idea that isn't mine; just adopted from somewhere I saw it. A shelf unit built between ceiling joists (trusses in this case) that folds up out of the way; latching in place with simple pivot blocks:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/DSCN0062-2.jpg

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/DSCN0064.jpg

Don't want to store anything uber-heavy up there, but for extension cords, ropes, furnace filters, etc, it's a handy, out of the way place to keep them.


Agree completely on low-end metal shelving. Usually very disappointing with much weight on them.

RED64CJ5
02-27-2012, 21:05
I use the heavy duty chrome Seville wire shelving from Sam's Club (http://www.samsclub.com/sams/shop/product.jsp?productId=152201&navAction=) that is 48"x72"x18".

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g292/COHummer/Miscellaneous/storage-shelves.jpg

This is what I use because I can roll them, move them, get to all sides, clean around them, etc. Very handy.

bobby_w
02-27-2012, 23:44
I have 5 of the Sam's wire racks with the wheels installed on them so I can move the to vacuum under them. They are heavy duty. Holds lead, water and food.

NDCent
02-28-2012, 05:02
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/DSCN0062-2.jpg

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/DSCN0064.jpg

Don't want to store anything uber-heavy up there, but for extension cords, ropes, furnace filters, etc, it's a handy, out of the way place to keep them.


Agree completely on low-end metal shelving. Usually very disappointing with much weight on them.

What a novel idea! I may have to try a few of those with plexiglass bottoms . Sometimes I can even get scrap lexan pieces at a good discount from one of the local glass shops we regularly do business with.

quake
02-28-2012, 05:47
...I may have to try a few of those with plexiglass bottoms...
That'd be even better. :thumbsup:

lawman800
02-28-2012, 07:43
Got various steel/wire and plastic shelves from CostCo and some free ones from Chase Rewards. So far, they have all held up pretty well and I am going to get some more for the garage where there is a custom built plywood shelf as well.

However, being that in SoCal, our biggest threat is an earthquake, I am going to have to find ways to strap them all down to prevent spillage and tipover, which makes organizing a moot point if it all goes everywhere at first shake.

survive1999
03-01-2012, 09:22
Buy a Kreg Pocket Hole Jig and make your own.

http://www.kregtool.com/Kreg-Jigreg-Jr-Prodview.html

ca survivor
03-01-2012, 14:36
Homemade front-loader, based on a pattern bought off the internet years ago; don't recall the site:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/canrackcropped-1.jpg
Made to fit in a lower kitchen cabinet; those are the kitchen drawers you see above it.

Those are good for in-kitchen convenience, but most stuff is on basic flat shelves of 2x4's and osb:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/1-19-08052B-1.jpg



Another idea that isn't mine; just adopted from somewhere I saw it. A shelf unit built between ceiling joists (trusses in this case) that folds up out of the way; latching in place with simple pivot blocks:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/DSCN0062-2.jpg

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/DSCN0064.jpg

Don't want to store anything uber-heavy up there, but for extension cords, ropes, furnace filters, etc, it's a handy, out of the way place to keep them.


Agree completely on low-end metal shelving. Usually very disappointing with much weight on them.
good idea, I'm going to use it, thanks

SFCSMITH(RET)
03-01-2012, 14:45
Mine are home built..
A lot of my storage is under the stairs in the basement, so I have done my best to utilize it to the fullest.

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/maypo59/P7050006.jpg

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/maypo59/P7050004.jpg

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/maypo59/P7050005.jpg

I am getting ready to build a large can rotator that will move all those veggies out from there. Will then be all glass canning jars under the stairs.

My sister has a couple of the wire rack assemblies from Sam's. they seem to work really well.

Commander_Zero
03-01-2012, 18:10
If you use the steel wire shelving, be sure to buy what are called "S-hooks" (http://www.globalindustrial.com/p/storage/wire-shelving/Nexelon/s-hooks-package-of-12). These allow you to hang more shelving from an existing shelf without needing another set of legs. Sounds confusing, right? Ok, figure it this way. You have two wire shelving units standing there..the s-hooks let you hang more shelving between the two. This means for every two units of shelving you can put three shelves across, for three units of shelving you can have five shelves across. Also lets you make 90-degree turns to follow the corners of a room. These things let you get the most out of those expensive shelves.