1st time out, need some suggestions [Archive] - Glock Talk

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FriscoCHL
02-27-2012, 20:21
Took the new sport out this Sunday. Just to get it out of the way the rifle was flawless. %100 reliable, no problems at all....except for me. Keep in mind this is my first semi auto or any type of rifle for that matter. I do have a shot gun and a 22lr. But thatís more put the bead on it and squeeze and anyone can shoot a .22lr well. Anyway, I couldnít hit the broad side of the hover dam with this thing. I would say at 100ftish I could keep it in a 7 or 8 in group. At the same distance I could not hit a bottle for the life of me. I was far enough away to completely cover the bottle with the front sight post. Gave the rifle to a friend and he had no problems picking them off one by one. I stripped and cleaned it and didnít find anything loose or anything like that. So my first question is, does the thing need to be "dialed" in and how do I go about that. 2nd is, do you cover the POI with the post or hold the tip of it on POI. 3rd is, any advice on how to shoot this thing well? Besides practice, which is in the plans but itís just a little frustrating the first time out.

My next question is, how can I make the forend grip longer? I realize I would need to buy one but the front sight is in the way. I found that I couldnít get my support hand far enough forward to feel comfortable and in control of the muzzle. I kept trying to hold it past the grip and the gas block gets REALLY hot! Thanks for your help and for reading my rant.

farmer2
02-27-2012, 22:08
Took the new sport out this Sunday. Just to get it out of the way the rifle was flawless. %100 reliable, no problems at all....except for me. Keep in mind this is my first semi auto or any type of rifle for that matter. I do have a shot gun and a 22lr. But that’s more put the bead on it and squeeze and anyone can shoot a .22lr well. Anyway, I couldn’t hit the broad side of the hover dam with this thing. I would say at 100ftish I could keep it in a 7 or 8 in group. At the same distance I could not hit a bottle for the life of me. I was far enough away to completely cover the bottle with the front sight post. Gave the rifle to a friend and he had no problems picking them off one by one. I stripped and cleaned it and didn’t find anything loose or anything like that. So my first question is, does the thing need to be "dialed" in and how do I go about that. 2nd is, do you cover the POI with the post or hold the tip of it on POI. 3rd is, any advice on how to shoot this thing well? Besides practice, which is in the plans but it’s just a little frustrating the first time out.

My next question is, how can I make the forend grip longer? I realize I would need to buy one but the front sight is in the way. I found that I couldn’t get my support hand far enough forward to feel comfortable and in control of the muzzle. I kept trying to hold it past the grip and the gas block gets REALLY hot! Thanks for your help and for reading my rant.

First off congratulations on the new rifle! I will attempt to address a few of your questions. You first asked if it needs to be "dialed" in, and the answer is usually yes. However, this needs to be done from a bench with a good rest, so you can be eliminated from the equation. Also, bring your friend or someone else familiar with the platform. They can help eliminate human error. Your second question, about making the forend longer is a little more tricky. I assume you have a pinned gas block. You would have to remove these pins (very difficult without the right tools) then you would have to buy a low profile gas block, new forend, and new front sight. This would be a considerable amount of work and cost. My suggestion would be to shoot it a few more times and get it sighted in on a bench. If you still do not like the forend, you would be much better off selling it and buying what you want.


edit: Additionally, most people sight in their rifles so that the top of the front sight post is centered on the target. You do not want the sight post obstructing your target.

good luck

farmer2

WoodenPlank
02-27-2012, 22:35
Sounds like the OP isn't using the proper sight picture. Imagine a small dot sitting atop the front sight post. This dot should be centered in the rear sight's outer ring, and the imaginary dot should cover the target. You should not be covering the target with the front post any more than is needed to properly position this imaginary dot.

The only way to get your hand out farther (safely) would be to replace the A-frame gas block with a low-profile gas block, and install an extended free float rail system. A replacement block, quality rail, and labor can add up fast, however.

cyphertext
02-27-2012, 22:38
Hey FriscoCHL, how were you aligning your sights for the sight picture? Check out this link for sight picture and holds.

http://www.ocabj.net/?p=760

Another thought without seeing you shoot is you want to get your eye close to that rear sight. Adjust the stock to where your nose is kissing the charging handle when you shoulder the firearm. This will also help to get a consistent cheek weld.

I had to move my rear sight a few clicks, but I didn't have to move the front sight for elevation at all. Have seen this reported by many Sport owners as well.

TangoFoxtrot
02-28-2012, 05:53
Excellent post cyphertext!

cyphertext
02-28-2012, 07:02
I forgot to address the part about getting your hand further out. You could add a rail forend that has a cutout for the FSB, but they are not cheap. You may be able to find one cheaper, but here is an example...

https://danieldefense.com/rail-systems/ar-15-lite-rail/ar15-lite-railtm-12-0-fsp-carbine.html

JASV.17
02-28-2012, 11:26
The only way to get your hand out farther (safely) would be to replace the A-frame gas block with a low-profile gas block, and install an extended free float rail system. A replacement block, quality rail, and labor can add up fast, however.

Or shave the FSP.

FriscoCHL
02-29-2012, 21:32
Thank yall very much for all the advise, and links!! Guess i just need to get out a practice. All the shooting that day was done standing so i did not have the chance to bench rest or anyway to take me out of the equation. guess I will have to get used to the hand rail length for now...

I do have another question, is .223 any different accuracy wise than 5.56?

Cole125
02-29-2012, 22:07
I know its important to know how to correctly use iron sights, but it sounds like you would have more fun shooting with a low magnification or red dot until you can get some formal instruction.

FriscoCHL
02-29-2012, 22:23
I know its important to know how to correctly use iron sights, but it sounds like you would have more fun shooting with a low magnification or red dot until you can get some formal instruction.

Ya maybe, but an optic is def not in the picture/budget right now. Its not so much the fun factor, trust me i had a blast shooting this thing, just thought i would consult the powers that be to get better...

WoodenPlank
02-29-2012, 22:25
Thank yall very much for all the advise, and links!! Guess i just need to get out a practice. All the shooting that day was done standing so i did not have the chance to bench rest or anyway to take me out of the equation. guess I will have to get used to the hand rail length for now...

I do have another question, is .223 any different accuracy wise than 5.56?

5.56 will have slightly higher velocity with the same bullet type, but it's a small difference. Otherwise, it's down to bullet weight, construction, and ballistic coeffecient.

Gunnut 45/454
03-01-2012, 10:25
FriscoCHL
Yep you found out standing (Off hand) shooting is the most challenging position and hardest to master. cyphertext post is the post to use as your base line for site picture!
Practice , practice! Learning irons is the way to go to getting proficient with the AR platform , optics are great once you have the fundementals down. Hopefully you have a good budget for ammo cause you will use alot! Enjoy. :)

Glock 1
03-18-2012, 19:15
Imagine a small dot sitting atop the front sight post. This dot should be centered in the rear sight's outer ring, and the imaginary dot should cover the target. You should not be covering the target with the front post any more than is needed to properly position this imaginary dot.

I did not know this. This is probably why I am shooting high. Might be the cure to my pistol accuracy too. I have always covered the target. Its just how I was taught. With a pistol at close range its never been a big deal. At 50yds, it appears to be an issue.

I have plans to replace my front sight block and put on a FF rail too. I have watched alot of videos and its simple enough. Gotta gather a few tools though. I used to design and manufacture car parts so I don't doubt my ability to do this and since I am hooked on the AR now I think I will put the tools to good use later too.

I agree with what the others said, they have lots of good info and advice.

WoodenPlank
03-19-2012, 03:37
I did not know this. This is probably why I am shooting high. Might be the cure to my pistol accuracy too. I have always covered the target. Its just how I was taught. With a pistol at close range its never been a big deal. At 50yds, it appears to be an issue.

I have plans to replace my front sight block and put on a FF rail too. I have watched alot of videos and its simple enough. Gotta gather a few tools though. I used to design and manufacture car parts so I don't doubt my ability to do this and since I am hooked on the AR now I think I will put the tools to good use later too.

I agree with what the others said, they have lots of good info and advice.

With some 3-dot combat sights, covering the target with the front sight is correct on a handgun. On an AR, though, it's incorrect.

For the gas block replacement, consider either getting a competent gunsmith to do the gas block (especially if they can use pins, set screws and dimple the barrel, etc to make the gas block more secure), or shaving the existing A-frame down into a low-profile block. The pins that hold the a-frame on are more secure than almost any after-market gas block will be.