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LSUAdman
02-29-2012, 10:02
Hey guys-

My wife and I are still in our infancy on prepping, but we've got together two nice car kits, a 72Hr BOB and some other things hidden away for emergencies.

One thing we struggle with is coming up with ideas that we've missed. In our brainstorming sessions (usually on road trips) we come up with some pretty interesting ideas to add to our kit.

Some of these ideas may be old hat to some of you, but we felt pretty smart when we came up with them. Since we all know flashlights, MREs, med kits and chem lights are necessities, what unorthodox items do you store in your car kits and BOBs? Here are some of ours:

Dryer Lint - Yes, dryer lint. I store it by the baggy full. Handy for starting fires, costs zero and weighs next to nill. I have three pretty good sized baggies hidden away in both cars and the BOB, as well as three more baggies sitting above the dryer. Great way to start your firepits for parties too.

Safety Pins - Probably a duh here, but they are just so darned useful. Need to punch a whole, hold something together or excise a splinter? We also keep a few paper clips of different sizes. I figure they do pretty much the same thing, but without the ability to punch small holes.

eReader - Okay, bear with me on this one. My wife and I both have kindles, but for Christmas we got a Sony eReader as a gift. Off topic, but it's crap compared to the Kindle. After no luck trying to sell it, I uploaded a ton of my family's favorite books and some of the classicsto it as well as adding a small Power Curve solar charger to the kit. We can carry thousands of books on a variety of topics, and keep the device charged for as long as we need. Contingent on no EMP or total blackout situation, but still.

Baby Wipes - I totally understand why soldiers love these. After a few days without water, just having anything to wipe away the sweat and oil is awesome. It may not keep you warm or feed you, but it does a lot for the spirit.

So those are my unorthodox preps. What are yours?

Bolster
02-29-2012, 10:42
Good thread start... you're talking the less "tactical" but very "practical" stuff.

Not sure your items are so terribly unorthodox...I store lint with vasoline in sealed straw tubes (waterproof). Also at least a half dozen safety pins each GHB. I also carry wipes, in "single serving" units.

Some of my more oddball items include:

Crayons - for marking messages on rough surfaces. In emergency situations there's often the need to leave messages on buildings, gates, etc.

Earplugs - for sleeping in crowded rooms, cuts down on the snoring I have to hear.

Headlamp - not just a handheld flashlight. Headlamps are just so much more useful when working.

N95 masks - heavy on these (carry 3) as I'm urban and buildings will be going down, dust everywhere.

SAS Survival Manual (Wiseman) -- something to read. There will be dull hours to endure and I plan to memorize the SAS manual someday.

Pipette -- for dropping bleach into water.

Tarp anchors - "Grip Clips" by Sierra Designs (http://www.sierradesigns.com/p-120-grip-clips-4-pack.aspx). Love these, can make a shelter out of a tarp, sheet, or poncho easily with these, and they don't damage the fabric.

Tubing - a few feet of it, could be used for either sucking water out of a solar still, or siphoning gasoline (but not both!)

kirgi08
02-29-2012, 10:46
tagged.

LSUAdman
02-29-2012, 11:35
Crayons
Earplugs
Headlamp
N95 masks
SAS Survival Manual
Pipette
Tarp anchors
Tubing


Good list Bolster. I have the earplugs, SAS Manual and N95 masks as well - definately great equipment and light (well, the SAS Book is heavy, but not terribly so). Plus the SAS Manual makes a good read while traveling.

I need to add the other things to my list. Any brand headlamp you would suggest? I have lots of lights scattered around the house and in the cars, but no hands free type lights.

Another thing I keep are those little pocket guides of local flora and fauna. They are light, water proof and easy to slip into the pages of a book. They are pricey - usually about $7-$8, but they ca take a ton of abuse.

Let's keep this thread going, I'm sure a lot of us have stuff we consider to be "duhs" that some of us (okay, me) didnt think of! :supergrin:

Bolster
02-29-2012, 12:52
Any brand headlamp you would suggest?

Don't tempt me OT!! I've written volumes on this, so:

http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?310856-Flood-Beam-Headlamp-List-2011

http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?313328-To-Consider-Before-You-Purchase-a-Headlamp

syntaxerrorsix
02-29-2012, 13:12
A sewing kit.

quake
02-29-2012, 16:46
Earplugs - for sleeping in crowded rooms, cuts down on the snoring I have to hear...


Fwiw, in my ghb I carry the old Sonic-II earplugs with the baffles. They keep out wind, cold, and even insects when sleeping, but still let you hear normal-level noises around you. One earache too many while in the woods is what had me start carrying them, as they substantially reduce the effect of cold, windy days without hampering your ability to hear what's going in in the vicinity.

id1otbox
02-29-2012, 16:51
I have a couple thousand feet of 24 gauge wire for snares

M1A Shooter
02-29-2012, 20:23
if you use certain types of tubing, you could also use it as a slingshot.

RedHaze
02-29-2012, 20:38
A sewing kit.

Or just a 100yard case of floss with some HD needles added.

That was my sewing kit for two deployments to iraq. And will continue to be.

G23c
02-29-2012, 20:40
zip ties (varying sizes)
plastic bags
bike flasher
whistle
small cans of sterno

Bolster
02-29-2012, 22:34
Or just a 100yard case of floss with some HD needles added.

That was my sewing kit for two deployments to iraq. And will continue to be.

Did it work well? Stuff you sewed up with dental floss held up well? Now I'll be searching for dental floss of the correct colors...I've seen red (cinnamon) and turquoise.

racerford
02-29-2012, 22:47
Did it work well? Stuff you sewed up with dental floss held up well? Now I'll be searching for dental floss of the correct colors...I've seen red (cinnamon) and turquoise.

I don't think I would use flavored floss, you can never be sure what your would attract if you were in the wilderness. :wow:

RedHaze
02-29-2012, 22:54
Did it work well? Stuff you sewed up with dental floss held up well? Now I'll be searching for dental floss of the correct colors...I've seen red (cinnamon) and turquoise.

We fixed EVERYTHING with floss. Blown out boots, buttons, cammies, molle webbing, sleeping bags. You name it, if it ripped, we sewed it up with floss. Hell, I just go ahead and remove the buttons on pants after I buy them now and resew it with floss.

It's a billion times stronger than ordinary thread. And much easier to find than sail thread or other HD upholstery thread.

Not many color options. As long as you like it in white. Some say don't go with waxed. I haven't found any difference. As long at it's not that stupid flat floss.

RMTactical
02-29-2012, 23:00
Did it work well? Stuff you sewed up with dental floss held up well? Now I'll be searching for dental floss of the correct colors...I've seen red (cinnamon) and turquoise.

I dont see how floss wouldnt hold up well if it were stitched well.

Airhasz
03-01-2012, 00:04
This thread is cracking me up:rofl: live a little and don't worry so much about insignificant petty things...just saying.

Javelin
03-01-2012, 00:40
Cologne... lots of Cologne.


For my Irish bath... :rofl:

syntaxerrorsix
03-01-2012, 04:22
This thread is cracking me up:rofl: live a little and don't worry so much about insignificant petty things...just saying.


Maybe you haven't noticed what forum you are in. Just sayin'.

LSUAdman
03-01-2012, 06:58
This thread is cracking me up:rofl: live a little and don't worry so much about insignificant petty things...just saying.

Hey, thanks for stopping by. Maybe next time you can contribute like a big boy!

LSUAdman
03-01-2012, 06:59
We fixed EVERYTHING with floss. Blown out boots, buttons, cammies, molle webbing, sleeping bags.

Okay, now I need to add some floss. Great add.

bdcochran
03-01-2012, 08:29
Basic training, US Army. Sgt. advised silk half socks inside army socks to stop chaffing, petroleum jelly to avoid chaffing butt cheeks. He was right. Also dental tape (flat) and wire tooth picks for teeth. Swiss army knife and triple ointment and a couple of bandaids.

When you think of getting from here to there, it is the little things that take you down, not pacmen or zombies.

B.Reid
03-01-2012, 08:38
Good stuff.

Ronaldo
03-01-2012, 08:46
tagged

Airhasz
03-01-2012, 10:25
Maybe you haven't noticed what forum you are in. Just sayin'.

Sorry Guys.....I guess I couldn't resist. Really just started to learn about prepping and it does stick in the back of my mind now. It is a interesting subject and recently I have been stocking bottled water and ammo when I shop and I did stop by to see what I could learn...I have a long way to go and seeing what happened in Japan does make one think what the heck would we do!

Javelin
03-01-2012, 10:32
Sorry Guys.....I guess I couldn't resist. Really just started to learn about prepping and it does stick in the back of my mind now. It is a interesting subject and recently I have been stocking bottled water and ammo when I shop and I did stop by to see what I could learn...I have a long way to go and seeing what happened in Japan does make one think what the heck would we do!

You are forgiven.


This end of the world prepping is serious stuff.

kirgi08
03-01-2012, 10:46
Most preps are designed as a safety net.I started prepping after being unemployed and living off rice for 3mths.'08.

LSUAdman
03-01-2012, 11:24
Most preps are designed as a safety net.I started prepping after being unemployed and living off rice for 3mths.'08.

For me, it was very basic. We went to a large festival about 30 miles from home. On average this event draws about 10k people a day, is in a heavily wooded area and has only two roads out, both over rail roads.

Someone had a few drinks and got into a very bad wreck on the main road right when the event ended. The other entrance was needed for emergency vehicles so all 10k people left were stuck in their vehicles, in 30* weather for about 12 hours until everything was over.

It didnt hurt my wife and I. We had plenty of water in the car, blankets, plenty of gas in the engine, some snack food, entertainment. We didnt have a kid at the time and we dont require any meds. For us, it was just a long wait. For others...

There were people who needed their meds, kids who had no diapers or needed food, cars which ran out of gas, etc. It's funny, but in those 12 hours it was like minor SHTF event. The prepared were happy in their cars, enjoying their preps. The unprepared were stuck, some of them having major issues.

The following year we had our son, and after that event and my son's birth we decided we never wanted to be the person who had to rely on the kindness of strangers during a bad event.

We prepare for Huricanes mostly, but I wont lie - our preps go beyond that. Probably wont need much of this (a hurricane will hit, so some will be used) but I'd rather have it than sit starving, cold, sick, etc.

It's not always about zombies, government take overs or EMP blasts. Some times it's the small events that get us, and not the big ones.

LSUAdman
03-01-2012, 11:27
Back on topic - who packs vasoline in their preps? I havent done this yet - can someone speak to what uses vasoline would have in preps (let's even list the simple things like using it for rashes/chaffing, etc).

Also, thanks to everyone who's contributed to this thread. It's always good to swap stories and builds - we might not be able to use all of these ideas for our kits, but seeing something you didnt think of is always useful.

wjv
03-01-2012, 12:23
You are forgiven.


Hell no!!!

He's a Heretic. . . Burn him at the stake!!!

:tongueout:

kirgi08
03-01-2012, 12:31
Settle down Bill.Wishbone?.'08. :dunno:

Batesmotel
03-01-2012, 13:00
Box of paperbacks and kids books.

Art supplies. (paper pencils crayons string)

Games.

Things to entertain kids and fill up down time.


Jars of spices. You can eat about anything if you cover up the taste.

Bolster
03-01-2012, 13:10
can someone speak to what uses vasoline would have in preps

Forgive the wikipedia dump, but it fits here:

After petroleum jelly became a medicine-chest staple, consumers began to use it for myriad ailments and cosmetic purposes, including chapped hands and lips, toenail fungus, male genital rashes (non-STD), nosebleeds, diaper rash, chest colds, and even to remove makeup or stains from furniture.

During World War II, a variety of petroleum jelly called red veterinary petrolatum, or Red Vet Pet for short, was often included in life raft survival kits. Acting as a sunscreen, it provides protection against ultraviolet rays

It can prevent moisture loss and chapped lips, soften nail cuticles, and provide rectal lubrication for conditions like hemorrhoids or anal fissures.

It can be used as a release agent for plaster molds and castings.

It can be used to coat corrosion-prone items such as metallic trinkets, non-stainless steel blades, and gun barrels prior to storage as it serves as an excellent and inexpensive water repellent.

It can be used to condition and protect leather.

It can be used to finish wood, much like a mineral oil finish.

It can be used for tinder, lightly coated on a cotton ball.

It is used to protect and prevent moisture loss of the skin of a patient in the initial post-operative period following laser skin resurfacing.

Improper uses:

Petroleum jelly weakens latex condoms, increasing the chance of rupture.

Petroleum jelly should not be applied to the inside of the nose due to the risk of lipid pneumonia.

kirgi08
03-01-2012, 13:15
Crochet/Knitting will produce garments.'08.

lawman800
03-01-2012, 13:38
Be careful storing dryer lint so that you don't end up burning your house down by accident. Good idea though and I will look into that.

How about depending flame sources other than that magnesium stick firestarter? I have tons of matches and matchbooks. Disposable lighters aren't terribly dependable but I try to be redundant in the fire making area and keep all 3 types around.

Baby wipes are a must. I have a lot of moist towelettes around. But I keep 2 solar showers around that you hang during the day to soak up solar heat and then use the 5 gallons of warm water to shower. Does do a lot for the spirit.

syntaxerrorsix
03-01-2012, 15:12
Back on topic - who packs vasoline in their preps? I havent done this yet - can someone speak to what uses vasoline would have in preps (let's even list the simple things like using it for rashes/chaffing, etc).

Also, thanks to everyone who's contributed to this thread. It's always good to swap stories and builds - we might not be able to use all of these ideas for our kits, but seeing something you didnt think of is always useful.


Absolutely. PJ cotton balls are great tinder and will burn in water.


You can do neosporin cotton balls and have the same great tinder with antibiotic properties :)

racerford
03-01-2012, 15:42
.........

When you think of getting from here to there, it is the little things that take you down, not pacmen or zombies.

Zombies are easy. Never under-estimate the Pacmen they can be fast! and eat you whole in one bite!:wow:

HAMMERHEAD
03-01-2012, 17:22
Vinegar. Lots of vinegar. White and apple cider. It's a fungicide, a topical medicine, it preserves food, a sanitizer, waterless bathing, lots of uses.

http://www.angelfire.com/cantina/homemaking/vinegar.html

banger
03-01-2012, 17:37
Sorry, double tap.

banger
03-01-2012, 17:40
Condoms...

Small, light weight, easy to carry.

Good for barrel covers and make a decent way of toting water in arid areas.

Heavy duty trash can liners, small, fairly light, fold flat, and can be used for rain coats, or shelter halves, even boot covers to some extent.

They can even be used as floats for crossing deep water.

lawman800
03-01-2012, 19:04
Condoms...

Small, light weight, easy to carry.

Good for barrel covers and make a decent way of toting water in arid areas.

Heavy duty trash can liners, small, fairly light, fold flat, and can be used for rain coats, or shelter halves, even boot covers to some extent.

They can even be used as floats for crossing deep water.

If you are going to use condoms as preps that way, make sure it's not the lubricated kind. That can ruin the taste of your water.

wrenrj1
03-01-2012, 19:09
9v batteries and steel wool, great fire starter. Also consider what you can buy cheap and barter when the time comes. Ammo is a good one.

Lone Kimono
03-01-2012, 22:15
If anyone finds a good deal on the dental floss please post it. Sounds like a really good idea.

Devans0
03-01-2012, 22:55
I like the idea of a strong string, but dental floss is expensive for what you get. Would a stout fish line serve better?

Cavalry Doc
03-02-2012, 06:25
Clothes pins, solar shower.

Just a couple if things that became very useful when living off FOB in Kosovo.

LSUAdman
03-02-2012, 06:31
I like the idea of a strong string, but dental floss is expensive for what you get. Would a stout fish line serve better?

I wondered the same thing about fishing line last night.

syntaxerrorsix
03-02-2012, 07:21
I wondered the same thing about fishing line last night.

Power Pro or any braided line would far surpass dental floss in strength to diameter comparisons.

Cavalry Doc
03-02-2012, 07:24
I wondered the same thing about fishing line last night.

Look at 550 cord, the nylon "guts" are useful.
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2539/3764315336_9f11bd33a6.jpg

TangoFoxtrot
03-02-2012, 07:49
I carry 2 small rolls Army issue trip wire. This stuff is great for snares.

lawman800
03-02-2012, 08:08
Clothes pins, solar shower.

Just a couple if things that became very useful when living off FOB in Kosovo.

How do you like the solar showers? I have 2 but never had to use them. Wanted to see how they are in the real world.

Cavalry Doc
03-02-2012, 08:24
How do you like the solar showers? I have 2 but never had to use them. Wanted to see how they are in the real world.

The ones I have include a temperature gauge. That's helpful because the water can and does get too hot. Of course they work best in warmer temps. I used one exclusively for about 4 months, and it kept 5 people clean. I still have it, it's still serviceable. I used it in Kosovo in 1999, and a few times after up until 2002.

HAMMERHEAD
03-02-2012, 09:54
Books. (information without electronics)
Books on gardening, blacksmithing, animal husbandry, chemistry, engineering.......

Cavalry Doc
03-02-2012, 10:57
...War surgery manual, Merck manual, wilderness medicine..,

HAMMERHEAD
03-02-2012, 12:21
Paraffin.

Food preservation, candles, fuel, bullet lube.......

Bolster
03-02-2012, 12:51
OP was asking about BOBs -- are these items you'd recommend for BOBs?

LSUAdman
03-02-2012, 14:06
OP was asking about BOBs -- are these items you'd recommend for BOBs?


Thanks Bolster.

These are all good ideas, but I'm thinking more portable things. Think ~1-2lbs, preferably less.

Where I was going with this is trying to find alternate uses for common things, like the vasoline idea, or how to make use of something other people toss out.

These are all still good ideas, but some are outside the scope.

kirgi08
03-02-2012, 14:09
There is really no "box" when it comes ta prepping.'08.

HAMMERHEAD
03-02-2012, 15:11
OP was asking about BOBs -- are these items you'd recommend for BOBs?

No, I think there's been a little drift.

Bolster
03-02-2012, 15:47
No, I think there's been a little drift.

Or maybe just a really, really big BOB? A LongGun sized BOB!! :embarassed:

Interesting thread, despite the drift, so carry on, men...

Airhasz
03-02-2012, 19:54
[QUOTE=LSUAdman;18651865]For me, it was very basic. We went to a large festival about 30 miles from home. On average this event draws about 10k people a day, is in a heavily wooded area and has only two roads out, both over rail roads.

Someone had a few drinks and got into a very bad wreck on the main road right when the event ended. The other entrance was needed for emergency vehicles so all 10k people left were stuck in their vehicles, in 30* weather for about 12 hours until everything was over.

It didnt hurt my wife and I. We had plenty of water in the car, blankets, plenty of gas in the engine, some snack food, entertainment. We didnt have a kid at the time and we dont require any meds. For us, it was just a long wait. For others...

There were people who needed their meds, kids who had no diapers or needed food, cars which ran out of gas, etc. It's funny, but in those 12 hours it was like minor SHTF event. The prepared were happy in their cars, enjoying their preps. The unprepared were stuck, some of them having major issues. "Qoute"

Sounds very inconvenient, but I hardly call no diapers and not eating for 12 hours after eating and drinking at a festival "Major Issues"...heck there were emergency personnel up the road and everybody's got a cell phone

kirgi08
03-02-2012, 20:11
No alternate route.'08. :dunno:

bdcochran
03-02-2012, 20:41
1. a deck of cards and an unread novel - boredom is a big challenge.

2. a set of stretching exercises - I have a 25 minute routine that can be done anywhere where there is a tree, pole, car hood or a fence. You keep in shape and use your time productively.

3. a couple of pens and a steno pad. If you are stuck, you can make up to-do lists, prioritize purchases and make detailed notes about anticipated projects.

racerford
03-02-2012, 21:29
[QUOTE=LSUAdman;18651865]For me, it was very basic. We went to a large festival about 30 miles from home. On average this event draws about 10k people a day, is in a heavily wooded area and has only two roads out, both over rail roads.

Someone had a few drinks and got into a very bad wreck on the main road right when the event ended. The other entrance was needed for emergency vehicles so all 10k people left were stuck in their vehicles, in 30* weather for about 12 hours until everything was over.

It didnt hurt my wife and I. We had plenty of water in the car, blankets, plenty of gas in the engine, some snack food, entertainment. We didnt have a kid at the time and we dont require any meds. For us, it was just a long wait. For others...

There were people who needed their meds, kids who had no diapers or needed food, cars which ran out of gas, etc. It's funny, but in those 12 hours it was like minor SHTF event. The prepared were happy in their cars, enjoying their preps. The unprepared were stuck, some of them having major issues. "Qoute"

Sounds very inconvenient, but I hardly call no diapers and not eating for 12 hours after eating and drinking at a festival "Major Issues"...heck there were emergency personnel up the road and everybody's got a cell phone

You don't have kids in diapers, do you? A child crying for 11 hours because their parts hurt and they are hungry is a major issue for a parent. And if you have a fan in the car then SHTF may be an actual situation and nobody wants that when they are stuck in a car for 12 hours..... well maybe you are ........ different. :whistling:

LSUAdman
03-02-2012, 23:44
[quote=Airhasz;18658409]

You don't have kids in diapers, do you? A child crying for 11 hours because their parts hurt and they are hungry is a major issue for a parent. And if you have a fan in the car then SHTF may be an actual situation and nobody wants that when they are stuck in a car for 12 hours..... well maybe you are ........ different. :whistling:


Not sure if you mean me or Airhasz, but yes, I do currently have a child and whoa...I would not want to be stuck without food, water, and all the other needed items for a child.

To Airhasz - Have you ever had to take meds? Have you ever ran into someone with diabetes who could not take their meds on time? If not, then yes 12 hours isnt long.

For people who are dependend on meds, diapers and food (read elderly, sick and children) being unprepared sucks.

It must be awesome not to have to worry about those things. For those of us who do, it's a different story entirely. :dunno:

Edit - Sorry, the quoting seems to be off. I see you mean Airhasz.

racerford
03-03-2012, 22:26
[quote=racerford;18658841]


Not sure if you mean me or Airhasz, but yes, I do currently have a child and whoa...I would not want to be stuck without food, water, and all the other needed items for a child.

To Airhasz - Have you ever had to take meds? Have you ever ran into someone with diabetes who could not take their meds on time? If not, then yes 12 hours isnt long.

For people who are dependend on meds, diapers and food (read elderly, sick and children) being unprepared sucks.

It must be awesome not to have to worry about those things. For those of us who do, it's a different story entirely. :dunno:

Edit - Sorry, the quoting seems to be off. I see you mean Airhasz.

No problem. Yes, I did mean Airhasz.

My kids are 5 and 7 now, and I would not want to be in that situation for 12 hours with my kids, with what I have in my car right now. It has been an eye opening thread. I don't think we went anywhere without a diaper bag that had at least 6 diapers in it. I am not sure 6 would be enough for 12 hours depending on the age. I don't think we would have had enough formula for 12 hours of feeding. It would have been quite miserable.

Bolster
03-03-2012, 23:37
1. a deck of cards and an unread novel - boredom is a big challenge. 2. a set of stretching exercises - I have a 25 minute routine that can be done anywhere where there is a tree, pole, car hood or a fence. You keep in shape and use your time productively.

Smart. I also have a set of stretches, I'll make a copy and throw them in the car. And I DEFINITELY need to get some books into my cars, they have nothing to read currently.

@Airhasz, my GHB does dual duty. It's definitely a GHB, but it's also a "convenience" bag, too, for when the kid gets cold and forgot her jacket, when her hands are sticky and need cleaning, when I suddenly get hungry...none of those are emergency sits but are well within the range of what a good bag can handle. So don't denigrate LSUAdman for a less-than-lethal situation, he makes valid points that a decent stocked GHB can help.

LSUAdman
03-04-2012, 00:11
[quote=LSUAdman;18659293]

No problem. Yes, I did mean Airhasz.

My kids are 5 and 7 now, and I would not want to be in that situation for 12 hours with my kids, with what I have in my car right now. It has been an eye opening thread. I don't think we went anywhere without a diaper bag that had at least 6 diapers in it. I am not sure 6 would be enough for 12 hours depending on the age. I don't think we would have had enough formula for 12 hours of feeding. It would have been quite miserable.


I know the feeling. We keep about 6 in our diaper bag (or as I call it, the tactical daddy sling) and 6 more in my car kit. You never can have too man. I had a 12 hour drive from La to Texas twice this year and I think we used all if not close to all.

Once, we had no where to turn off to change a diaper...those 10 minutes of listening to my son in agony made both my wife and I so upset. It felt like it took three hours to find a pull off location.

LSUAdman
03-04-2012, 00:15
Smart. I also have a set of stretches, I'll make a copy and throw them in the car. And I DEFINITELY need to get some books into my cars, they have nothing to read currently.

@Airhasz, my GHB does dual duty. It's definitely a GHB, but it's also a "convenience" bag, too, for when the kid gets cold and forgot her jacket, when her hands are sticky and need cleaning, when I suddenly get hungry...none of those are emergency sits but are well within the range of what a good bag can handle. So don't denigrate LSUAdman for a less-than-lethal situation, he makes valid points that a decent stocked GHB can help.

Thanks Bolster. Never underestimate the need to be entertained or to entertain in hard up situations. We also have a set of cards in our BOB, as well as the eReader and a few small pocket books for us and the little one. This doesnt pertain to everyone, but extra pacifiers and a toy or two dont hurt.

What we forget is that while we are so ready to be the boyscout in SHTF situations, our kids are tired, hungry, scared and/or bored. The less they worry about, the easier the situation can become.

It also helps for us older children too. :supergrin:

dudel
03-04-2012, 06:14
Condoms...

Small, light weight, easy to carry.

Good for barrel covers and make a decent way of toting water in arid areas.

Heavy duty trash can liners, small, fairly light, fold flat, and can be used for rain coats, or shelter halves, even boot covers to some extent.

They can even be used as floats for crossing deep water.

+1 as well as the obvious use, I expect they would make great trade goods.


On the eReader, I keep various survival guides as well as key information I want to have with me. Most eReaders will let you upload a file you created.

Myke_Hart
03-04-2012, 12:26
What I did to test my BOB... brainstorm...assemble....then test it.

We took our BOB to a camp site and stayed for two days. This is when we found out what works and what does not.

Simple things like... Keep the toilet paper in a zip lock baggy... because you will drop it and it will roll down the hill into a creek! :steamed: My wife found that out.

A long STRONG clothesline with strong clips/pins is important. Nothing like waking up to your line broke and clothes are in the dirt or your clothes blew away in the night. Wet towels are heavy!

Or not having a clothesline and finding your clothes full of bugs because you hung them on a tree branch.

Now we have a supplementary camping box to accompany our BOB. If we need some creature comforts we have the camping box. Things we kicked out of the BOB as they were not exactly needed for survival.

Now my wife is pregnant and we need a Baby BOB! :faint:

LSUAdman
03-04-2012, 12:47
Now my wife is pregnant and we need a Baby BOB! :faint:


Oh fun, you are in for a whole new SHTF scenario! hahaha.

We have a one year old now, and let me tell you - what ever size bag you think you need, get the bigger one. Think you need 6 diapers and enough formula for a day? Bring two days and 20 diapers. And lots of water.

For the first six months, water, formula, diapers and wipes are the most important so bulk buy those bad boys. Stick them in you BOB, make a baby BOB, stick extras in both cars and if you are in a hurricane or natural disaster prone state, stock up on tons of fresh water.

Enjoy the adventure!

Dexters
03-04-2012, 14:09
Chap stick
sunscreen lotion
bug spray
wet ones
super glue
sewing kit
underwear change

As to things like dryer lint - I would suggest you look at things that have dual or more uses - like hand sanitizer, or chap stick/cotton balls from medical kit to start a fire.

garyo
03-04-2012, 14:24
LSUAdman,

I don't want to hijack... but how does the Kindle handle PDF files? I really like the idea of a good portable book database based on an e-reader but most of the technical journal articles I am interested in only come in PDF format. I also have a fair amount of older books that I love and would consider the scan to PDF so I can upload them to an e-reader. I know there are a ton of reviews on Amazon on the kindle, but I sure would like to get some info first hand on the Kindle working with PDFs. Thanks, now back to the topic at hand...

garyo

LSUAdman
03-04-2012, 18:10
LSUAdman,

I don't want to hijack... but how does the Kindle handle PDF files? I really like the idea of a good portable book database based on an e-reader but most of the technical journal articles I am interested in only come in PDF format. I also have a fair amount of older books that I love and would consider the scan to PDF so I can upload them to an e-reader. I know there are a ton of reviews on Amazon on the kindle, but I sure would like to get some info first hand on the Kindle working with PDFs. Thanks, now back to the topic at hand...

garyo

Check your PMs, going to PM you seperately so I can address everything.

PaulMason
03-04-2012, 18:26
So those are my unorthodox preps. What are yours?

I don't know if it is unorthodox but I would suggest a stove that can handle unleaded gas and then you should have a siphon.

I would also say that a lot of people forget gloves. Cold hand will make everything more difficult.

Then there is a small breaker bar to open locked areas.

quake
03-04-2012, 19:00
On the dental-floss / fishing-line thing, in my ghb I went with fishing line. Simply never occured to me to use dental floss, but it actually sounds like a good idea.

On a short piece (4"-5") off scrap 14awg copper wire, I wound 30-lb line around it, the way you'd wind wire on an electrical coil. Small piece of duct tape at the beginning to hold it in place, then wound & wound for three traverses along the wire so you end up at the opposite end; then another small piece of duct tape to secure it. Then cut it and start over for another similar layer; doing that three or four layers deep (securing it at the beginning & end of each layer), you end up with a cylinder around 3/8" diameter, weighing probably less than an ounce, and with three or four lengths of fishing line; each around 10 yards long.

Could use most any long, thin base to wind it up on, but I used the short piece of wire since I carry a few of them anyway. They make great temporary anchors; basically extra-heavy-duty twist-ties. But you could wind fishing line or floss either one around a dozen things already in your pack - the barrel of a sharpie, your flashlight, a butane lighter, heck even your spoon or fork; whatever.

One 'odd' item I carry is a couple pieces of hot-melt gluestick; the kind used in electric glue guns. They weigh almost nothing, are flexible and so won't break in the pack, and heated over a fire or even with a lighter, they can be used to repair a ton of things. Rips in a pack, poncho or tent, temporarily fix a cracked canteen or nalgene bottle, I even temporarily repaired a shoe sole with it once.

ratf51
03-04-2012, 19:47
And I DEFINITELY need to get some books into my cars, they have nothing to read currently.



Your cars can read? Dang! :supergrin::rofl:

Bolster
03-04-2012, 20:17
One 'odd' item I carry is a couple pieces of hot-melt gluestick; the kind used in electric glue guns. They weigh almost nothing, are flexible and so won't break in the pack, and heated over a fire or even with a lighter, they can be used to repair a ton of things. Rips in a pack, poncho or tent, temporarily fix a cracked canteen or nalgene bottle, I even temporarily repaired a shoe sole with it once.

Clever. Stealing this idea (not at gunpoint).

Lone Kimono
03-04-2012, 21:21
That's a really fantastic idea, Quake!! We could probably do a whole thread just on it's uses.

LSUAdman
03-05-2012, 06:30
Consider me a theif as well - winner, winner chicken dinner!

TangoCharlie
03-05-2012, 09:49
1. Small 2oz plastic bottle of bleach, stored in ziplock bag.
- Water goes stale after about 4 wks, other nasties begin to grow in filled water bottles. Use 2-3 drops per quart, wait 30 mins prior to drinking. Pour water between two cups/containers to aerate.

2. 2oz bottle of Liquid hand soap or dish soap. Lots of uses, laundry, washing hair (a bit harsh), washing eating utensils, pots, pans, etc...

3. Duct tape - half used roll (reduced weight)

4. Plastic or latex gloves

5. Zip lock bags; gallon, quart (thousands of uses- holding dirty diapers while stuck in a car)

TangoCharlie
03-05-2012, 09:53
Forgot the small Red cross wind up radio with USB or cell phone charger options

- 9 chord or 5 chord for the telecom guys out there. Although 550 para cord is preferred.

Bolster
03-05-2012, 09:59
1. Small 2oz plastic bottle of bleach, stored in ziplock bag.

3. Duck tape - half used roll (reduced weight)

Good ones. A question and a comment:

I also carry bleach (1 oz) however my GHB is stored in my car, and the inside of the car occasionally reaches 120 degrees inside. Any idea how often I need to be changing out my bleach?

Duct tape - after trying it both ways, I much prefer a "flat roll." Get a 4 to 6 inch strip of wax paper, and wind the tape onto that. You'll have a "flat roll." You're not carrying around a cardboard cylinder so a big space savings.

TangoCharlie
03-05-2012, 10:13
great question, i do not know what the shelf life is for bleach. Given that Clorox is mostly water, it will evaporate diluting the benefit. I squeeze the bottle some before putting the lid on to allow for expansion from heat and higher altitudes. I do know that it must be sealed very well. The vapors from heated bleach are primarily composed of chlorine gas and sodium oxides, and can be deadly if inhaled.

Good thought for the duct tape.

Food suggestions: small packets of honey and peanut butter ( the kinds found at in breakfast restaurants, no bread or crackers needed).

Foil, lots of foil, also stored flat. (solar oven, emergency reflector, food prep, etc...)

Compass...

MarkM32
03-05-2012, 10:42
I've not yet seen this in here:

I have an emergency phone charger. It takes 1 AA battery and can just about charge my phone all the way. Also, I carry a wide variety of batteries. At least enough to change out things like flashlights, 2 way radios.

concretefuzzynuts
03-05-2012, 17:31
This thread is cracking me up:rofl: live a little and don't worry so much about insignificant petty things...just saying.

Better to be prepared and not need it than need it and not have it. Wonder who's door you'll be knocking on when SHTF.

LSUAdman
03-05-2012, 18:30
I've not yet seen this in here:

I have an emergency phone charger. It takes 1 AA battery and can just about charge my phone all the way. Also, I carry a wide variety of batteries. At least enough to change out things like flashlights, 2 way radios.


Also a good one. I have a smaller PowerCurve Solar charger, and will be getting a Bruntun Restore aswell. Can't have enough solar power chargers. Great for putting on your car hood during a drive to charge.

wrenrj1
03-05-2012, 18:43
Foreseeability, (wow, I'm surprised that didn't get caught on spell check). Probably the biggest thing that's overlooked. Make decisions early. If you see a Hurricane coming? get out. If the weather is getting bad and a tornado may happen? prepare your plan. If a flood could be an issue in the spring? Know it may happen and have a plan and implement it in advance. Civil unrest? have a plan in implement a relocation plan, or stay in place early and not late regardless of what your plan is.

These decisions may not be yours, but my point is to look ahead at the potential threats when they are on the horizon, not when they present themselves.

Cavalry Doc
03-06-2012, 04:43
Also a good one. I have a smaller PowerCurve Solar charger, and will be getting a Bruntun Restore aswell. Can't have enough solar power chargers. Great for putting on your car hood during a drive to charge.

You put yours on the hood??

I just put mine on the front or back dash, whichever is getting more sun.

LSUAdman
03-06-2012, 06:20
You put yours on the hood??

I just put mine on the front or back dash, whichever is getting more sun.


Yikes, sorry, yes I mean the front dash. :rofl:

DoctaGlockta
03-06-2012, 10:59
JB Weld - Kwik formula.

Texas357
03-07-2012, 22:13
I carry 2 small rolls Army issue trip wire. This stuff is great for snares.

Also good for repairing things. I have some of the sets with wire wrapped around a plastic tube, with 2 nails stick in the center. If they hadn't been so conveniently cheap I'd have to make my own rolls.

Check your PMs, going to PM you seperately so I can address everything.

I'm curious about this as well.



On a short piece (4"-5") off scrap 14awg copper wire, I wound 30-lb line around it, the way you'd wind wire on an electrical coil. Small piece of duct tape at the beginning to hold it in place, then wound & wound for three traverses along the wire so you end up at the opposite end; then another small piece of duct tape to secure it. Then cut it and start over for another similar layer; doing that three or four layers deep (securing it at the beginning & end of each layer), you end up with a cylinder around 3/8" diameter, weighing probably less than an ounce, and with three or four lengths of fishing line; each around 10 yards long.
.....
One 'odd' item I carry is a couple pieces of hot-melt gluestick; the kind used in electric glue guns. They weigh almost nothing, are flexible and so won't break in the pack, and heated over a fire or even with a lighter, they can be used to repair a ton of things. Rips in a pack, poncho or tent, temporarily fix a cracked canteen or nalgene bottle, I even temporarily repaired a shoe sole with it once.

A few 1' pieces of paracord, string, etc. Often I only need a small bit, and don't want to have to dig in my bag or unwind my carefully stored bundles of cord. When I use paracord, the short leftover pieces get added to places they will be convenient to get to.

Safety pins, large and silly-large.
Tweezers.
Nail clippers. Just because I could trim my nails with a survival knife doesn't mean I want to have to.

edit: The bag I take to work usually has a 4-pack of single-use tubes of crazy glue. The case means the tubes won't break/leak in my pocket.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51wqgRjXGVL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

I used to always have a pack of bicycle playing cards in my school backpack. They hold up very well. I even had a little cloth bag that I put the deck in, since the cardboard box gets beat up long before the cards do. I recently got a pack of supposedly waterproof playing cards. Haven't used them yet.

wrenrj1
03-09-2012, 18:26
Also good for repairing things. I have some of the sets with wire wrapped around a plastic tube, with 2 nails stick in the center. If they hadn't been so conveniently cheap I'd have to make my own rolls.



I'm curious about this as well.



A few 1' pieces of paracord, string, etc. Often I only need a small bit, and don't want to have to dig in my bag or unwind my carefully stored bundles of cord. When I use paracord, the short leftover pieces get added to places they will be convenient to get to.

Safety pins, large and silly-large.
Tweezers.
Nail clippers. Just because I could trim my nails with a survival knife doesn't mean I want to have to.

edit: The bag I take to work usually has a 4-pack of single-use tubes of crazy glue. The case means the tubes won't break/leak in my pocket.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51wqgRjXGVL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

I used to always have a pack of bicycle playing cards in my school backpack. They hold up very well. I even had a little cloth bag that I put the deck in, since the cardboard box gets beat up long before the cards do. I recently got a pack of supposedly waterproof playing cards. Haven't used them yet.

I have one of these single use super glues in each of my Maxpedition EDC pouches. Anyone else put together a Maxpedition EDC? Check out Youtube.

PaulMason
03-12-2012, 09:57
I have one of these single use super glues in each of my Maxpedition EDC pouches. Anyone else put together a Maxpedition EDC? Check out Youtube.

Check out Shoe Glue also. It is strong and remains flexible. You can find it at Wal Mart's shoe section.

kirgi08
03-12-2012, 09:59
:cool:

PettyOfficer
03-12-2012, 10:30
Anybody say condoms yet? In a SHTF world you don't want to get the clap or syphilis without plenty of penicillin around: so do the logic thing and pack some condoms.

Can also be used to keep water out of your AR barrel a la vietnam.

MoneyMaker
03-12-2012, 12:56
Now this post is more like it,More realistic guys.

Toothbrush Small twine
Duct tape compass
Toothpaste
knife spare batteries
sterno waterproof matches
gauze toilet paper
neosporin benadryl
asprins insect repellent
multi tool camp saw
small shovel small hatchet
4 space blankets amti itch cream
anti fungl cream peroxide
alcohol femine napkins(female)
hand sanatizer liquid soap
non fragrant shampoo
Scope/Listerine
Baby powder
scissors
tweezer rain parkas
fingernail clippers
extra socks,shirt,pants ,belt,hat,gloves
3 days of food,can consist of can ham,potted meat,vieanna sausages with spork and can opener,water purifacation tabs with pantyhose to filtrate.6 bottles of water

This plus a few other items are in each bag i have a and they weigh about 29 pounds total load weight,but this will get us thru in our home or on the road for he 1st few days under most any issue

MoneyMaker
03-12-2012, 13:02
go to a dollar general store and outfit each bag for under $50 as i use alot of them small travel style products

wrenrj1
03-12-2012, 18:42
Check out Shoe Glue also. It is strong and remains flexible. You can find it at Wal Mart's shoe section.

But do they make in a single use size that would fit in a Maxpedition EDC? I've used it on running shoes in the way past.

wrenrj1
03-12-2012, 18:45
Now this post is more like it,More realistic guys.

Toothbrush Small twine
Duct tape compass
Toothpaste
knife spare batteries
sterno waterproof matches
gauze toilet paper
neosporin benadryl
asprins insect repellent
multi tool camp saw
small shovel small hatchet
4 space blankets amti itch cream
anti fungl cream peroxide
alcohol femine napkins(female)
hand sanatizer liquid soap
non fragrant shampoo
Scope/Listerine
Baby powder
scissors
tweezer rain parkas
fingernail clippers
extra socks,shirt,pants ,belt,hat,gloves
3 days of food,can consist of can ham,potted meat,vieanna sausages with spork and can opener,water purifacation tabs with pantyhose to filtrate.6 bottles of water

This plus a few other items are in each bag i have a and they weigh about 29 pounds total load weight,but this will get us thru in our home or on the road for he 1st few days under most any issue

Commas man commas! I'd hate to try guaze toilet paper! LOL...

Sgt. Rambo
03-18-2012, 06:30
Commas man commas! I'd hate to try guaze toilet paper! LOL...

:rofl::rofl::rofl: That was good...

Baby wipes are a must. Lived/showered off them for over a week in N'Orleans during Katrina, until our camp got a water tanker. I use them in my patrol bag now for everything.
Headlamp is a great tool and frees up your hands when you really need them.
A lot of GREAT suggestions on here and I'm revamping my GHB/BOB after today. Keem the suggestions coming

UneasyRider
03-18-2012, 07:43
Commas man commas! I'd hate to try guaze toilet paper! LOL...

Punctuation kills:

Let's eat Gandma!

Let's eat, Grandma.

lawman800
03-18-2012, 07:49
Punctuation kills:

Let's eat Gandma!

Let's eat, Grandma.

So does spelling...:whistling::rofl::supergrin::wavey::tongueout:

UneasyRider
03-18-2012, 08:03
So does spelling...:whistling::rofl::supergrin::wavey::tongueout:

I know that I am in no position to throw stones... but I could not resist the joke!

lawman800
03-18-2012, 08:08
I know, just givin' ya grief because I couldn't come up with a punctuation killer this early.

Bolster
03-18-2012, 09:42
Comments about floss, batteries, shoe goo, & scissors.

1. Floss: Was recommended somewhere on this forum as a thread substitute. Have tried it; not good if there's any possibility of catching or shearing the thread on anything, its strength is lengthwise only. Recently parked my manliness in the fridge, gritted my teeth, and went to the sewing store, standing in line with the heffilumps -- there I found upholstery thread, and also thread for stitching leather. Tried both, very strong. Heavy, tough, beats the crap out of floss. With a heavy needle I've stitched a 3" rip in a leather shoe, and the repair is solid. Adding these heavy threads to my kits.

2. Batteries: I've been on a standardization effort to AAs. I still have the odd AAA, C, 9v, and CR123, but most everything can run on AAs now. This could cut either way. If I run out of AAs I'm screwed. But I stock a ton of AAs (mostly rechargeables) and can rob from one to fuel another in a pinch. For example, in my PTB (Public Transport Bag) I carry no spares, but the flashlight takes 1AA and the radio takes 2AA, so I can rob one to keep the other going.

3. Shoe Goo: Works as long as you don't get your shoes wet. What are the chances of that? Shoe Goo has failed on me multiple times until I finally "got it," it doesn't withstand water. Went to the local shoe repair, asked what they used. Two-part epoxy, the waterproof 60 minute kind, he said. (5-min epoxies aren't water resistant.) So I tried that on my shoes...Devcon brand (Not LockTite brand, it fails miserably). Devcon two-part epoxy is great for shoe repair. Repairs hold up for a half year or year or more before a reapplication needed. Never again Shoe Goo, which sometimes lasted for only a day or two, and leaves a huge mess.

4. Scissors very handy. I carry a 5" pair in my travel kit. TSA allows them. Which is odd; if I undo a single screw, I now have two 5" fixed blade knives...oh well, that's TSA for ya. I also carry the "Fiskars Heritage Folding Scissors" (from Amazon) which are surprisingly useable for their compact size. Does double duty for nail clippers.

Warp
03-18-2012, 10:55
Since we all know flashlights, MREs, med kits and chem lights are necessities, what unorthodox items do you store in your car kits and BOBs?

I have never purchased a single chem light and I don't keep MREs in cars due to the heat/temperature cycles.


Of the above posted suggestions I think the baby wipes and a headlamp (not just a flashlight, but a headlamp!) are possibly the best.

Bolster
03-18-2012, 10:59
I have never purchased a single chem light and I don't keep MREs in cars due to the heat/temperature cycles.

Same here. I do keep vaccu-packed hard tack in the car.

IOf the above posted suggestions I think the baby wipes and a headlamp (not just a flashlight, but a headlamp!) are possibly the best.

Headlamps extremely useful. The best sub-$100 headlamps that currently exist IMO are sold by Zebralight (http://www.zebralight.com/) and Spark (http://goinggear.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?manufacturer=194&q=spark). Both offer neutral/warm tints or high-CRI tints in compact, rugged units.

My two favorites are the Zebralight H501w (soon to be replaced by the H502) and the Spark SD52 Neutral, which comes with two bezels...one for wide angle flood, the other for spot with spill.

Best sub-$20 headlamp would be the Irix Icon II. Don't waste money on those Energizers.

Warp
03-18-2012, 11:05
Headlamps extremely useful. The best headlamps that currently exist IMO are sold by Zebralight (http://www.zebralight.com/) and Spark (http://goinggear.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?manufacturer=194&q=spark). Both offer neutral/warm tints or high-CRI tints in compact, rugged units.

My two favorites are the Zebralight H501w (soon to be replaced by the H502) and the Spark SD52 Neutral, which comes with two bezels...one for wide angle flood, the other for spot with spill.

Zebralight makes very good lights. A 1xCR123 Zebralight is the headlamp in my vehicle.

LSUAdman
03-18-2012, 16:01
I am gonna order me a headlamp this week. After a weekend working on the car and in narrow, dark places, I definately have a need now. Bolster, I havent had time to read your write up, but will this week!

Again, thanks to everyone who has contributed to this thread. For those interested, I am putting together some research for a new thread for essential preps for infants, toddlers and young children. Stay tuned!

wrenrj1
03-18-2012, 18:32
Got me one of these yesterday:http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb87/wrenrj1/2012-03-17_19-07-11_991.jpg

Bolster
03-18-2012, 19:06
Does that thing fit pretty well inside your BOB?

RedHaze
03-18-2012, 19:49
Gotta get ya a fender eliminator!

M1A Shooter
03-18-2012, 20:22
i havent read through this for a bit but has anyone discussed Calcium Hypochlorite yet? Its a version of Pool Shock which is basically powdered bleach. liquid bleach basically loses half its potential about every year. the powder can be stored much longer. cost is about $7/lb and can disinfect thousands of gallons of drinking water.

wrenrj1
03-19-2012, 18:41
Does that thing fit pretty well inside your BOB?

Quite the opposite!

DrSticky
03-20-2012, 13:55
I make diaper kits and keep them in each bag we have and the glove box. These have been a lifesaver, and I use them in my Sitka and leave the Diaper bag in the car a lot. I don't know how much of this is unusual, so I will try and keep it as weird as I can. ;)


Diaper Kit(with air removed):
Inside a 1 gal ziploc(prefer the kind with zippers)
1-2 diapers per kid
1 quart ziploc (with 20-30 wipes.)
I also put a couple diaper disposal baggies(These tie up and have a powder inside to cover the smell)

I keep this "strange" stuff in my Sitka GearSlinger
(It is more EDC/GHB than BOB, but I normally clip the Sitka on the BOB so...)

Diaper Kit
1-2 books from $1 store my kids have never seen. Don't care if they get destroyed and the newness helps make up for quality.
NuSkin or generic liquid bandage. I get scratched a lot and although super glue works, this stuff sterilizes too. It is also great for ripped off blisters on hands
Magazine(You know the ones you get but never have time to read. Sometimes it is a CheaperThanDirt Catalog)
Flash Cards(right now it is Morse Code, but Spanish, GRE vocab, Dari phrases have all been in there)


Strange? I'll let you judge.

Hat(or some cover)
Yaesu VX-8dr
Gerber Recon Flashlight clips to your cover like a headlamp, multi colored light, uses AA


If you get a headlamp, make sure you get one that has a red light or red lens cover. I find it irritating navigating at night with white light because you are constantly night blind. I also prefer red chemlights(even the green ones can be too bright).

I also plan on getting a hammock, but haven't pulled the trigger on that one. You can sleep above wet ground, less worry of fire ants and cooler in the summer.

LSUAdman
03-20-2012, 14:50
That's a great kit, DrSticky. Mind if I copy a little of it for my Prepping with Children post?

nursetim
03-20-2012, 15:07
Bolster, could you please post a picture of the scissors you take on planes?

syntaxerrorsix
03-20-2012, 15:11
Bolster, could you please post a picture of the scissors you take on planes?

I don't know that he takes but I have these in my bag and I fly monthly.

https://encrypted-tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTDtqqyzjcv5PMXcj1FMC6eljcafJE375tGpsBvh8CeRIEPbFyG

nursetim
03-20-2012, 20:28
That's what I carry as well. But I'd like to see what the 5 incher looks like.

DrSticky
03-21-2012, 09:59
That's a great kit, DrSticky. Mind if I copy a little of it for my Prepping with Children post?

I would be honoured.

Bolster
03-21-2012, 13:53
Nursetim, they are 5-1/4" Gingher "classic embroidery scissors," and I believe they are these:

http://www.gingher.com/product/5-lightweight-craft-scissors-molded-handles-stainless-blades/30/

The sharpened portion is about 2-1/4 inches, well under the limit of a 4-inch blade. They have made perhaps 20 plane flights in the US in my carryon luggage and they get ZERO interest from TSA.

Notice they're legal by TSA's own guidelines:

"Scissors - metal with pointed tips and blades shorter than four inches"

http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/prohibited/permitted-prohibited-items.shtm#4

The other items I was surprised to see allowed, were screwdrivers, wrenches, and pliers if they're 7" or shorter.

nursetim
03-21-2012, 16:36
I just looked, I wish my crkt crossover scissors were an inch and a half shorter.

Bolster
03-21-2012, 20:52
Even if they were shorter, I'd be shocked if you could board a plane with those. But, who knows what the TSA is thinking about these things.

:dunno:

blueyedmule
03-25-2012, 08:23
Scan all your important identification documents--birth certificates, driver's licenses, credit cards, bank account numbers, passports, etc.. and put them into an attachment you can email from where you scanned them (if you can't scan them at home). Drag that file into a flashdrive. You can now document your identity easily. This is very important in times of social unrest and disasters. Zombies, on the other hand, will eat you whether or not they can identify you.

blueyedmule
03-25-2012, 08:25
A bottle of 90% rubbing alcohol and an Altoids tin or half a Pepsi can. In a pinch you can heat up food/water over this little makeshift stove.

LSUAdman
03-25-2012, 08:31
Scan all your important identification documents--birth certificates, driver's licenses, credit cards, bank account numbers, passports, etc.. and put them into an attachment you can email from where you scanned them (if you can't scan them at home). Drag that file into a flashdrive. You can now document your identity easily. This is very important in times of social unrest and disasters. Zombies, on the other hand, will eat you whether or not they can identify you.


Mule - do you encrypt the files? If so, what program or how would you suggest doing this?

I've thought about it in the past, but it just seems like a huge ID leek if you accidentally lose the drive.

blueyedmule
03-25-2012, 08:34
Mule - do you encrypt the files? If so, what program or how would you suggest doing this?

I've thought about it in the past, but it just seems like a huge ID leek if you accidentally lose the drive.

There is definitely that risk. Where I got this idea they didn't suggest encryption, only having this data available in carry form. Maybe some other sharper stick in this box could address this concern. :)

Bolster
03-25-2012, 09:20
Retracted.

LSUAdman
03-25-2012, 10:12
There is definitely that risk. Where I got this idea they didn't suggest encryption, only having this data available in carry form. Maybe some other sharper stick in this box could address this concern. :)


You know, and this probably isnt any more safe, but what about putting all the info on a micro-SD card. One of those itty, bitty ones. It would be amazing easy to conceal one or multiple ones of those inside of things.

If you lost the item it was hiding in, chances are people might not find the disc.

You'd have to carry a usb adapter or something, but that wont add much weight.

I just keep going back to the ID theft worry...so many predators out there.

blueyedmule
03-25-2012, 10:14
You know, and this probably isnt any more safe, but what about putting all the info on a micro-SD card. One of those itty, bitty ones. It would be amazing easy to conceal one or multiple ones of those inside of things.

If you lost the item it was hiding in, chances are people might not find the disc.

You'd have to carry a usb adapter or something, but that wont add much weight.

I just keep going back to the ID theft worry...so many predators out there.

You could also put it on a cd or dvd. In a pinch just whip it into a fire and it's toast.

LSUAdman
03-25-2012, 13:12
You could also put it on a cd or dvd. In a pinch just whip it into a fire and it's toast.


That is a really good idea. Name it something stupid like Justin Bieber's Greatest Hits. No one, NO ONE should ever look at that! :rofl:

quake
03-25-2012, 15:32
For files that you don't necessarily want to have "on" you, but would like to have access to from 'who-knows-where', start with Blueyedmule's email idea, but don't necessarily finish it. Write an email from an email account you can access remotely, attach the file with the info, and save it as a 'draft'. Don't have to send it anywhere; as long as you can log onto your email account, you have that file in that draft email.

I use a couple different computers and do this occasionally just for convenience's sake. Looking up part numbers, datasheets & stuff, I can save the info this way and not have to hassle with transferring it between machines. Whatever machine I'm on, I can just check my email drafts. I also sometimes use it as a type of "favorites" folder, for sites that I want to keep re-findable. Frankly, for other than scanned things, I don't usually bother with making a separate, attached file; I just type the info in the body of the email itself. Simple, as secure as any email will be, and retrievable anywhere that your email is accessible.

purrrfect 10
03-25-2012, 16:40
This thread is cracking me up:rofl: live a little and don't worry so much about insignificant petty things...just saying.

WHO CARES the first bad ass that comes along is going to take everything you have. So live today and don't worry about all that BS

Kingarthurhk
03-25-2012, 17:08
Cotton balls and petrolium jelly for fire tinder.

A waterproof bible. Heavy, but bomb proof.

wrenrj1
03-25-2012, 17:51
I've been working on a dragging limp, and have torn up some old clothes. Got some food coloring as well. It'll work well if I have to drag to the mall. It' worked for Bill Murray in "Zombieland."

MarkWhiskey
03-25-2012, 21:28
get a stack of temporary tattoos, preferably the bigger ones that last a week or two. get a set of matching ones for you, the wife and each child. then add an extra one. the design isn't important as long as they are something recognizable like a happy face, heart or a dragon, but not an intricate landscape of a smurf village. they need to be large enough to be seen from across a room, but still fit on a child's arm

asap after the shtf, everyone gets a matching tattoo on the same place such as the forearm.

if your kid goes missing you can ask people if they've seen a kid with the tattoo. the extra tattoo is kept on paper in case yours wears off and you still need to show the design to ask if anyone has seen a child with one like it

if someone grabs your kid during an emergency (it happens), the matching tattoos will help to sort out that you are the kid's real parent if the cops/soldiers find them.

if you get med-evac'd, your wife could show that she's family and get past the nurse's desk to see you.

flat, featherweight, and cheap. easy way to prove pre-emergency familial relations during shtf.

Warp
03-25-2012, 21:36
get a stack of temporary tattoos, preferably the bigger ones that last a week or two. get a set of matching ones for you, the wife and each child. then add an extra one. the design isn't important as long as they are something recognizable like a happy face, heart or a dragon, but not an intricate landscape of a smurf village. they need to be large enough to be seen from across a room, but still fit on a child's arm

asap after the shtf, everyone gets a matching tattoo on the same place such as the forearm.

if your kid goes missing you can ask people if they've seen a kid with the tattoo. the extra tattoo is kept on paper in case yours wears off and you still need to show the design to ask if anyone has seen a child with one like it

if someone grabs your kid during an emergency (it happens), the matching tattoos will help to sort out that you are the kid's real parent if the cops/soldiers find them.

if you get med-evac'd, your wife could show that she's family and get past the nurse's desk to see you.

flat, featherweight, and cheap. easy way to prove pre-emergency familial relations during shtf.


Now that is the kind of thing I like to see people thinking about.

Thinking reflexively as I read this...a section of red string around a toe would seem to serve the child identification purpose as well. Shoe/socks off and voila. Of course, I think that with most of us somebody grabbing our child would probably result in a more serious altercation long before showing strings or tattoos to authorities.

Also, reminds me of the groups I see sometimes where there are a bunch of kids and a handful of chaperones...with every kid wearing the same brightly colored, obnoxious, incredibly visible shirt.

Jon K
03-28-2012, 22:16
This may seem stupid, but here goes.
I have a harmonica in my bag.
No batteries needed, passes the time. Weighs nothing, and you can do it in the dark. Smaller than a guitar.
I also carry about 20' of thermostat wire, though phone cord works as well.

kirgi08
03-28-2012, 23:15
Spoons/music/eating ect.'08.

douggmc
03-28-2012, 23:36
Mule - do you encrypt the files? If so, what program or how would you suggest doing this?

I've thought about it in the past, but it just seems like a huge ID leek if you accidentally lose the drive.

There a couple programs you can use to encrypt either the whole thumb drive or just a "container" file on it:
http://www.FreeOTFE.org/
http://www.truecrypt.org

Alternatively, most thumb drive manufacturers sell versions of their thum drives with encryption software already built in .... For example here is one: http://www.kingston.com/us/usb/encrypted_security

sdsnet
03-29-2012, 05:44
This is a useful thread thank you for starting it. Tagged of course.

Haldor
03-29-2012, 13:05
great question, i do not know what the shelf life is for bleach. Given that Clorox is mostly water, it will evaporate diluting the benefit. I squeeze the bottle some before putting the lid on to allow for expansion from heat and higher altitudes.

Bleach decomposes back into salty water after about 6 months.

Carry a small container of pool shock powder instead. Make your own fresh bleach whenever you need it.

blkbird305
03-29-2012, 15:42
A lot of yall were talking about shoe glue and crazy glue, a glue that I like for many uses is Goat Tuff. Many places use it to glue plastic fletching on arrows and when done properly, you cannot pull the fletching off by hand, they usually have to be cut off. Of course you can eventually wear it off but it takes a bit. Dries in about 15 seconds.

Just a very small amount will do the job and be sure to avoid getting it on your skin because it will not come off very easy. If you acciently glue your finger to something your not getting it off without loosing skin.

A bit expensive but it doesnt take much.

Amazon.com: goat tuff glue