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rppnj
03-08-2012, 11:28
I'm retired and was taking my morning walk within our development. Coming the other way on the same side of the street was a woman walking a dog. Whenever that happens, I automatically cross to the other side so as not to cause an issue in case the dog is a little "jumpy". As I got closer, I could see that the woman was small; maybe 5'2" and was walking a large Pit Bull with a head like a "block of granite". The woman was holding the leash with both hands, the dog was pulling her and she was having a hard time controlling it; then the dog started "huffing" and pulling toward me. My first thought was, "If that dog decides to break away from this little woman, there's no way that she would be able to hold it back; and living in NJ, I have absolutely no way of protecting myself since it's impossible for a normal citizen to get a CCW in New Jersey (only politicians and/or celebrities can get them). Has anyone else encountered an issue like this? What did you or what would you do in a situation like this? I'm certainly not going to stop my walks!

saxconnection
03-08-2012, 11:32
Not to sound like a smart ass, but I would move to a more "rights friendly" state if possible.

Adam

rppnj
03-08-2012, 11:39
Not to sound like a smart ass, but I would move to a more "rights friendly" state if possible.


I agree with you and I wish that I could leave this corrupt state but my grandchildren live here and most other members of my family so leaving the state is not an option.

H&K 4 LIFE
03-08-2012, 11:53
I've heard OC spray works well on dogs. There's one option that is better than nothing.

Travclem
03-08-2012, 12:22
Carry a 7 iron with you... or a good hickory "walking cane" with a knob handle.

rppnj
03-08-2012, 12:32
I've heard OC spray works well on dogs. There's one option that is better than nothing.

My OC spray is "out of date"...I'll get more. Thanks!

rppnj
03-08-2012, 12:37
I've heard OC spray works well on dogs. There's one option that is better than nothing.

Carry a 7 iron with you... or a good hickory "walking cane" with a knob handle.

I like that! OC and a walking stick...that should do it...although I'd prefer my Glock 26!

mdlott
03-08-2012, 12:58
You could always gut it w/ a sharp folder, if necessary. You WILL get bit first, however.

pipedreams
03-08-2012, 13:50
Carry a 7 iron with you... or a good hickory "walking cane" with a knob handle.

Being your retired a good oak or hickory cane would fit right in. You can carry a cane anywhere including airports to protect yourself. Take a look at the following site to get an idea about defending yourself with a cane.

http://www.canemasters.com/

Rumbler_G20
03-08-2012, 13:55
I'd be far far more concerned by the human than the dog.


. . but that could be just me.:upeyes:

Dogs are people too. Just far better behaved and lots more predictable.

poodleplumber
03-08-2012, 14:08
I am not sure what you mean by "huffing," but did the dog show any signs of aggression? Ninety-nine percent of the scores of bulldogs I have encountered wanted to lick my face. He might have been pulling on the leash to come greet you.

mdsn969
03-08-2012, 16:37
Bear spray...

1smoothredneck
03-08-2012, 17:00
Pepper spray, for sure, however, I urge against "sprays" and think guardian pyrotechnic a better option, and also, be advised that a pit is one of the most resistant breeds to non lethal defense ime. Good Luck.

ZekerMan
03-08-2012, 17:10
Climb a tree...............???:-)

Brucev
03-08-2012, 17:24
A few years ago I was walking my dog Molly to the Post Office. As we passed by a house located very near to the street a very large heavily muscled bull dog jumped off the front porch bounded through the open cab of his owners pick-up truck and attacked. He got Molly by the back of the head and neck. I had no handgun handy. So, I kicked him hard enough to punt him into the next zip code. Amazing what a very hard kick will do to such an animal when it is put in the right place! The owner saw it and came running hollering, "Don't hurt my dog!" His dog didn't show any sign of wanting a second dose of what I gave him. And as he acted like he wanted to get all bowed up and show himself, I told him not to step across the ditch and he'd be alright. Then I walked down to the local police station and told them precisely what had happened. Amazing how that gentleman discovered he had responsibility to control his animal. What was really amazing was that later that afternoon I went back to his house to apologize for the incident happening. If I'd known his dog was out, Molly and I would have taken a different route. Odd thing was... the man had cleared out. He had vacated the house. Really odd.

rppnj
03-08-2012, 17:43
I am not sure what you mean by "huffing," but did the dog show any signs of aggression? Ninety-nine percent of the scores of bulldogs I have encountered wanted to lick my face. He might have been pulling on the leash to come greet you.

I like dogs and I'm not afraid of them. On my walks, I'll often approach a friendly dog and pet it (with the owner's permission). My problem in this instance was that the dog was obviously too big and strong for a tiny woman like this to control. By "huffing" (probably not the correct word to have used) I meant a kind of coughing sound caused by the dog pulling so hard on the leash toward me. Note: a good friend of mine owns a Pit Bull / Boxer mix so I'm used to being around similar breeds. My question was meant to be more of a "what if?" scenario since the "Peoples' Republik of New Jersey does not allow CCW.

CTfam
03-08-2012, 18:53
I love Pits! I would have petted that monster on the head!

To answer your hypothetical question... I would move out of NJ, or carry anyway, or buy a large folding knife. Or buy a big dog with a head like a "block of granite" to guard you. :rofl:

Fastbear
03-08-2012, 21:41
If you are concerned about possibly stopping an aggressive dog from attacking your animal while walking it consider this. Had a large loose dog (breed unknown) rush up to intertwine with the two small Corgis I was walking. Hard to control one dog in this circumstance well alone two, but the little ones are small enough for me to one hand the leashes. Whipped out the OC spray and cut loose. The can was not a stream spray but and angle spray which makes more of a cloud. The big dog and me downwind received a small fragrance of it. The big guy lost all interest and ran off fast. I've been through direct stream spray and it will get your attention right now. Anyway wife and I no longer carry the fog type spray which looses effectiveness after 5 feet. Moved up to stream spray which should work from 8 to 12 feet depending on the wind direction.
In the worst situation I will shoot the offending animal if control cannot be established. Just remember that animals and humans will recover from the effects of OC spray. Great sinus cleaner.

garebel
03-08-2012, 22:00
Bear Spray, cane, knife, asp baton.... all of the above, if necessary.
If she can't control it, and it charges you, then you control it.
I beg to differ with the poster as to the predictability of pitbulls, but we are certainly entitled to our differing opinions.
I have heard the tape of a seven year old girl screaming as a pitbull ripped off her arm, and I've seen the pictures of what was left of a young mother here in my city who ran to protect her child from a pitbull attacking him.
I have no patience for pitbulls that are not COMPLETELY controlled/restrained by owners, including the situation posted by the OP.
Ownership of any animal capable of even possibly harming an individual carries with it the responsibility to maintain control over it at all times.

Frankly, I don't care if any individual loves, owns, pets, kisses in the mouth, whatever....just keep your animal under control at all times, especially where leash laws apply.
If you don't, and I hurt or kill it when it comes charging at me or anyone else, thats on you.

1canvas
03-08-2012, 22:15
i have raised pit bulls years ago and i can tell you if its a tuff pit [all are not tuff dogs] any impact weapon is pretty useless. a large gun or a good K-Bar knife is what is needed, bear spray would also be a good option. if its a tuff pit the average person can not comprehend both the damage the dog can do or the abuse it can endure. if i am around a strange pit i will have my hand on my gun, they can turn on in the blink of an eye. i have worked with many breeds in personal protection for over 20 years and nothing compares to a tuff pit. that said, i would trust my trained pits with my life when i had them and you won't find a more loyal dog.

Sharkey
03-08-2012, 22:22
Carrot and stick.

Milk Bone in one pocket
Ball Peen Hammer in the other.

My pit mix would have cowered behind me. She doesn't like strangers until you get down to her level and start talking softly to her.

Wasatch
03-08-2012, 22:48
I'd be far far more concerned by the human than the dog.


. . but that could be just me.:upeyes:

Dogs are people too. Just far better behaved and lots more predictable.

Are you kidding, or are you drunk? :dunno:

@ OP: Maybe a kubotan would work for you. Other than that, study up on your local laws -- concerning dogs, specifically -- and plan accordingly.


i have raised pit bulls years ago and i can tell you if its a tuff pit [all are not tuff dogs] any impact weapon is pretty useless. a large gun or a good K-Bar knife is what is needed, bear spray would also be a good option. if its a tuff pit the average person can not comprehend both the damage the dog can do or the abuse it can endure. if i am around a strange pit i will have my hand on my gun, they can turn on in the blink of an eye. i have worked with many breeds in personal protection for over 20 years and nothing compares to a tuff pit. that said, i would trust my trained pits with my life when i had them and you won't find a more loyal dog.

Well said. You're probably only person I know who's had pit bulls and has admitted their potential for danger. Everyone else seems too hellbent on selling/defending the breed to mention their possible downside.

ScottieG59
03-08-2012, 23:41
When it comes to powerful dogs, I understand it is common to be a bit nervous. Dogs come with all sorts of personalities and the OP seems to describe a dog trying desperately to say hello. It is also clear that the dog considered the owner to be inferior to itself.

The dynamic changes if the dog perceives a threat to the owner. Most dogs will warn you to back off.

I have seen some dogs very aggressively show where they consider the line is.

Anyway, history has plenty of examples of how people adapt when the ruling class deems the common people not worthy of dell defense. One response it to find an alternate, like that lady did. She got a large powerful dog. It is also worth training and socializing these dogs.

Depending on where you live and how much effort you are willing to make, a couple trained dogs can help. My preference is the English Mastiff, but they eat a lot and produce great amounts of slobber.

Another alternative is find someone experienced in the handgun permit process. It might help in avoiding the pitfalls in the process.

If you do get to carrying a weapon, try not to shoot a dog who is just trying to say hello. Our English Mastiff loved to greet people and would run quickly up to say hello. Some have thought he was attacking for no other reason than the fact he was very large. A neighbor's large dog used to charge at people barking. He was a sweetheart, but was very energetic when he came by to say hello.

mdsn969
03-08-2012, 23:54
When it comes to powerful dogs, I understand it is common to be a bit nervous. Dogs come with all sorts of personalities and the OP seems to describe a dog trying desperately to say hello. It is also clear that the dog considered the owner to be inferior to itself.

The dynamic changes if the dog perceives a threat to the owner. Most dogs will warn you to back off.

I have seen some dogs very aggressively show where they consider the line is.

Anyway, history has plenty of examples of how people adapt when the ruling class deems the common people not worthy of dell defense. One response it to find an alternate, like that lady did. She got a large powerful dog. It is also worth training and socializing these dogs.

Depending on where you live and how much effort you are willing to make, a couple trained dogs can help. My preference is the English Mastiff, but they eat a lot and produce great amounts of slobber.

Another alternative is find someone experienced in the handgun permit process. It might help in avoiding the pitfalls in the process.

If you do get to carrying a weapon, try not to shoot a dog who is just trying to say hello. Our English Mastiff loved to greet people and would run quickly up to say hello. Some have thought he was attacking for no other reason than the fact he was very large. A neighbor's large dog used to charge at people barking. He was a sweetheart, but was very energetic when he came by to say hello.

All excellent points but if a PB or your Mastiff is running up to me on the street, I have no idea if it just wants to say hello or is attacking. If I think for an instant that the dog is attacking then the threat will be eliminated.

It is the responsibility of the owner to control the dog and keep it from approaching people or other dogs.

I would venture to say there is not a LEO that would fault you for defending yourself against a PB or other similar dog.

garebel
03-09-2012, 18:10
When it comes to powerful dogs, I understand it is common to be a bit nervous. Dogs come with all sorts of personalities and the OP seems to describe a dog trying desperately to say hello. It is also clear that the dog considered the owner to be inferior to itself.

The dynamic changes if the dog perceives a threat to the owner. Most dogs will warn you to back off.

I have seen some dogs very aggressively show where they consider the line is.

Anyway, history has plenty of examples of how people adapt when the ruling class deems the common people not worthy of dell defense. One response it to find an alternate, like that lady did. She got a large powerful dog. It is also worth training and socializing these dogs.

Depending on where you live and how much effort you are willing to make, a couple trained dogs can help. My preference is the English Mastiff, but they eat a lot and produce great amounts of slobber.

Another alternative is find someone experienced in the handgun permit process. It might help in avoiding the pitfalls in the process.

If you do get to carrying a weapon, try not to shoot a dog who is just trying to say hello. Our English Mastiff loved to greet people and would run quickly up to say hello. Some have thought he was attacking for no other reason than the fact he was very large. A neighbor's large dog used to charge at people barking. He was a sweetheart, but was very energetic when he came by to say hello.

With all due respect, my dog loves to run up and say hello as well...but she is on the end of a LEASH that I control.
Why subject someone to the anxiety of having an unfamiliar dog "run up" to them?
You are not asking, but rather demanding, a person to gamble on whether or not the large dog running towards them is about to attack them, in a matter of just a few seconds....Why the hell would you do that?

You were also gambling that the individual(s) that your dog ran up to would not be armed and prepared to defend against, what they perceived to be, an attacking dog.
That could have ended tragically for your dog, and who would you have blamed?

AA#5
03-09-2012, 18:25
When it comes to powerful dogs, I understand it is common to be a bit nervous. Dogs come with all sorts of personalities and the OP seems to describe a dog trying desperately to say hello. It is also clear that the dog considered the owner to be inferior to itself.

The dynamic changes if the dog perceives a threat to the owner. Most dogs will warn you to back off.

I have seen some dogs very aggressively show where they consider the line is.

Anyway, history has plenty of examples of how people adapt when the ruling class deems the common people not worthy of dell defense. One response it to find an alternate, like that lady did. She got a large powerful dog. It is also worth training and socializing these dogs.

Depending on where you live and how much effort you are willing to make, a couple trained dogs can help. My preference is the English Mastiff, but they eat a lot and produce great amounts of slobber.

Another alternative is find someone experienced in the handgun permit process. It might help in avoiding the pitfalls in the process.

If you do get to carrying a weapon, try not to shoot a dog who is just trying to say hello. Our English Mastiff loved to greet people and would run quickly up to say hello. Some have thought he was attacking for no other reason than the fact he was very large. A neighbor's large dog used to charge at people barking. He was a sweetheart, but was very energetic when he came by to say hello.

"Our English Mastiff loved to greet people and would run quickly up to say hello. Some have thought he was attacking for no other reason than the fact he was very large. A neighbor's large dog used to charge at people barking. He was a sweetheart, but was very energetic when he came by to say hello."

Besides not caring much for your dog's safety, you and your neighbor are not responsible dog owners. You can't reasonably expect people to interpret why your dog is running up to them. Relying on them to assume they won't be attacked isn't wise & you'll likely end up with a dead dog or a lawsuit.

Wasatch
03-09-2012, 21:38
Like most other dog threads, this thread once again drives the point home that if you ever have to defend yourself against a dog, then be prepared to defend yourself against its rabid owner. If that self-defense includes a firearm in that equation, then carry enough ammunition to deal with both the dog and the owner.

Pretty pathetic, IMO: There are too many ignorant and/or inconsiderate dog owners today, yet if you do anything to harm their pet, regardless of how justified you are, they're likely to put a bullet in your head. All over a friggin' dog.

usmc2537gunny
03-09-2012, 21:52
Approximately a year ago while walking my own pit, I was approached by two pitbulls running loose. One of the pits tried to attack my pit and ended up with a 230 gr. pdx-1 to the head. The police were called and in the end I was told job well done. I was also told a young lady that lived near by had been mauled by two pitbulls just weeks earlier. I'm lucky I live in a state that allows you to protect yourself. I also own a home in Baltimore and have wondered what I would do if the same problem presented itself while in Maryland.

G30Mike
03-09-2012, 22:12
Like most other dog threads, this thread once again drives the point home that if you ever have to defend yourself against a dog, then be prepared to defend yourself against its rabid owner. If that self-defense includes a firearm in that equation, then carry enough ammunition to deal with both the dog and the owner.

Pretty pathetic, IMO: There are too many ignorant and/or inconsiderate dog owners today, yet if you do anything to harm their pet, regardless of how justified you are, they're likely to put a bullet in your head. All over a friggin' dog.

I recall another dog thread, can't remember if it was on GT or not, where a poster/dog owner actually said that if someone shot his dog, self defense or not, that he would shoot that person. You're right, pathetic.

Warp
03-10-2012, 01:20
Like most other dog threads, this thread once again drives the point home that if you ever have to defend yourself against a dog, then be prepared to defend yourself against its rabid owner. If that self-defense includes a firearm in that equation, then carry enough ammunition to deal with both the dog and the owner.

Pretty pathetic, IMO: There are too many ignorant and/or inconsiderate dog owners today, yet if you do anything to harm their pet, regardless of how justified you are, they're likely to put a bullet in your head. All over a friggin' dog.

To some people their dogs/cats/etc are extremely important and completely irreplaceable, loved individuals who are full fledged members of the family.

Wasatch
03-10-2012, 08:27
To some people their dogs/cats/etc are extremely important and completely irreplaceable, loved individuals who are full fledged members of the family.

I understand that. I have very fond memories of my dogs growing up, and I'd have one today if I had a fenced yard.

But even growing up, our dogs -- a Springer Spaniel, a West Highland White Terrier, and German Shorthair -- escaped from our yard. (One day the Westie never returned.) I'm admitting now that we weren't the most responsible dog owners ourselves, due to the fact that we didn't take more measures to contain our dogs -- harmless though we might have thought them to be.

So what I'm saying here is this: Endearing and irreplaceable member of the family or not, if a dog is not in its owner's control at all times, I consider it irresponsible and inconsiderate of others; and if the dog is pepper-sprayed, kicked, hit, shot, or run over by a car while it's "running free," then so be it.

It's even more unfortunate when dog owners on this forum make blanket, chest-thumping declarations that they'd gun down anyone who dared to harm their pet dog, "because he wouldn't hurt a flea" -- which is why I advocate carrying enough ammo to defend yourself against the rabid owner.

I admitted my own prejudice that I never thought my Springer or German Shorthair would hurt anyone (the Westie I'm not so sure about), so I've been on both sides of the argument. But the fact is, a large percentage of dog owners in today's culture don't understand canine behavior -- but even those that do are still prone to baseless prejudices and unreasonably high expectations of others with regard to reacting to their pet dogs.

garebel
03-10-2012, 08:29
To some people their dogs/cats/etc are extremely important and completely irreplaceable, loved individuals who are full fledged members of the family.

My family falls into that category.
We've had dogs since my daughter was three. Our oldest passed away this past August, the week after my daughter left for her freshman year at UGA. He was fifteen.
That was a VERY tough time for our family, to say the least.

There is a distinct difference between owning a dog, and treating it as a member of the family, as opposed to knowingly putting it in jeapordy by letting it run loose to possibly harm or certainly frighten innocent people.

This analogy is the best I could come up with:
There are irresponsible people, such as those that you might have to gently remind to please refrain from continually sweeping you, and others, with their firearm while at the range. Most are ignorant due to inexperience, and respond positively to gentle encouragement and instruction.

There are still others who behave in a more sinister manner, putting others at even more risk with their behavior in the same setting....firing uncontrolled, rapidly and without bothering to aim, even engaging in horseplay and using bad language. Their intent IMO, is to intimidate and try to show how tough they are by use of that behavior while handling something potentially deadly.


I would equate the dog owner who lets a large dog run free and uncontrolled, causing needless anxiety to individuals, and putting the dog at risk of being possibly shot, with the latter group.

I've always been of the mind of "You don't cause me or mine any harm, and I'll do the same for you and yours, and that includes our dogs too."

Warp
03-10-2012, 09:50
Please be aware my post was a response to the "all over a friggin dog" comment I bolded from the end of the quoted post. I just wanted to point out how referring to them as a "friggin dog" doesn't really do the situation justice for a lot of folks.

I am not in any way condoning free/roaming dogs (outside of their own private property) nor am I suggesting that a large, off-leash dog in a public area (or another's private area!) won't do something to get themselves justfiably harmed.

We have two German Shepherds. The male is 95-100 lbs and the female is about 60 lbs but still growing. One of the reasons I generally keep the male on a tie-out when I am in the front/side yard with them is to keep him from being sprayed, kicked, shot, etc if he decides he needs to let somebody know they are getting too close to me or to his house. I know it is extremely unlikely that he would attempt to harm somebody unless it was called for, and I know that he really likes kids, but with his bark and appearance the other person may not be able to make the determination. Not that I would expect them to.

Not all big/aggressive dog owners seem to think this way.

ZO6Vettever
03-10-2012, 15:49
Can't keep a lab outta the water and a springer will point. No training needed, it's in the breed. Sorry Pit lovers but they are a breed we need to worry about. Stats don't lie. Brother in law stopped by with a buddy and the buddy's pit. I told him keep it out of my house and if he went after my dog I would shoot it. I know pit lovers will flame me but the stats are out there for all to see. Please just treat man's best friend with the same lovin' they give you.

steve581581
03-10-2012, 16:09
I have two "pitbulls" and I assure you that a stick or cane won't have any effect. The first time my male got attacked by a loose dog I was totally unprepared for it. After punching and kicking my dog to get him off the stray with absolutely no reaction from him I ended up getting a old of his collar and had to choke him to stop him. Bully breed dogs are extremely strong, fast, and determined. Pepper spray seems to work well. The next time I had a small thing ofpepper spray and stopped the fight before it started.

Wasatch
03-10-2012, 16:59
Deleted. I'll post later when I have more time.

AA#5
03-10-2012, 17:09
Can't keep a lab outta the water and a springer will point. No training needed, it's in the breed. Sorry Pit lovers but they are a breed we need to worry about. Stats don't lie. Brother in law stopped by with a buddy and the buddy's pit. I told him keep it out of my house and if he went after my dog I would shoot it. I know pit lovers will flame me but the stats are out there for all to see. Please just treat man's best friend with the same lovin' they give you.

Of course the stats are out there to see, but.....none so blind as those who don't want to see.

cloudbuster
03-10-2012, 18:46
I am not sure what you mean by "huffing," but did the dog show any signs of aggression? Ninety-nine percent of the scores of bulldogs I have encountered wanted to lick my face. He might have been pulling on the leash to come greet you.

This is what I was thinking. I have a pitbull and if he's huffing and puffing at the leash to get to you, it's just because he wants to check you out and give you a good sliming.

On the other hand, I can see how from your side of the leash, it might be difficult to tell. You might try addressing the owner in that case. From a distance, just be direct -- ask her if you need to be concerned. I have one dog that *is* quite fierce and protective (not the pitbull) and the last thing I want is him to injure an innocent bystander. If I'm concerned about how he's reacting to someone, I'll warn them back.

I've been in the middle of some dog fights. If a dog is fierce enough and determined enough, and in attack mode, it is very difficult to get him to stop. If there are two or more dogs cooperating in the attack, you should be prepared to kill, and kill quickly, because if you delay, you may find yourself unable to effectively fight back. One big dog is dangerous. Two or more are lethal.

Regarding New Jersey: I spent middle school and high school years in New Jersey and now that I live in a comparatively free state, you couldn't pay me to move back to that socialist enclave.

Sharkey
03-10-2012, 19:22
Can't keep a lab outta the water and a springer will point. No training needed, it's in the breed. Sorry Pit lovers but they are a breed we need to worry about. Stats don't lie. Brother in law stopped by with a buddy and the buddy's pit. I told him keep it out of my house and if he went after my dog I would shoot it. I know pit lovers will flame me but the stats are out there for all to see. Please just treat man's best friend with the same lovin' they give you.

Stats don't lie. You and Jimmy the Greek are visionaries.

1canvas
03-10-2012, 21:05
Can't keep a lab outta the water and a springer will point. No training needed, it's in the breed. Sorry Pit lovers but they are a breed we need to worry about. Stats don't lie. Brother in law stopped by with a buddy and the buddy's pit. I told him keep it out of my house and if he went after my dog I would shoot it. I know pit lovers will flame me but the stats are out there for all to see. Please just treat man's best friend with the same lovin' they give you.
two problems i see with many tuff pit or other bad dog owners, they and their dogs have no training and many owners have no common sense. as a former dog trainer when i see a dog pulling the handler, that speaks volumes. both the dog and handler is untrained and undisciplined, BEWARE. kind of like the customer at the gun store when handed a gun. first thing is the finger on the trigger and he is sweeping everyone with the muzzle.

1canvas
03-10-2012, 21:08
[QUOTE=steve581581;18692769]I have two "pitbulls" and I assure you that a stick or cane won't have any effect. The first time my male got attacked by a loose dog I was totally unprepared for it. After punching and kicking my dog to get him off the stray with absolutely no reaction from him I ended up getting a old of his collar and had to choke him to stop him. Bully breed dogs are extremely strong, fast, and determined. Pepper spray seems to work well. The next time I had a small thing ofpepper spray and stopped the fight before it started.[/QUOTE
:goodpost:.

clarson_75
03-11-2012, 02:26
i've been around pits, and many other breeds, my whole life and "huffing" isn't a sign of an agressive dog. It is a sign of a dog pulling on an owner. I will agree that this is a bad sign. I have never tollerated behavior like this out of any of my pets. I think the best thing you could do for the two of them would have been to; 1. stop 2. pull a spray if you had it 3. ask the lady if he was agressive. lots of people back away from these dogs which is a bad idea. It is just like spoiling a child. when they see everyone show fear they think they are in charge. It is actually very helpful to have people teach a dog how to approach new people, and not just retreat in fear. z06vettelover is right. Statistically a pit is dog agressive. but they are very much not people agressive. I also wouldn't jump to conclusions about what breed it was either, because pits, mastiff, some bulldog, all look very similar. But every time someone gets "attacked" or chased it just had to be a pitbull.

Ryobi
03-11-2012, 06:02
Why in the world would you think a gun is best thing for this? Mace works great. Here's hoping freeze +p is okay for you to have. The best thing is to mace their six after you spray their face. Try as they might, dogs cannot outrun their own butt.

writwing
03-11-2012, 06:02
I'm retired and was taking my morning walk within our development. Coming the other way on the same side of the street was a woman walking a dog. Whenever that happens, I automatically cross to the other side so as not to cause an issue in case the dog is a little "jumpy". As I got closer, I could see that the woman was small; maybe 5'2" and was walking a large Pit Bull with a head like a "block of granite". The woman was holding the leash with both hands, the dog was pulling her and she was having a hard time controlling it; then the dog started "huffing" and pulling toward me. My first thought was, "If that dog decides to break away from this little woman, there's no way that she would be able to hold it back; and living in NJ, I have absolutely no way of protecting myself since it's impossible for a normal citizen to get a CCW in New Jersey (only politicians and/or celebrities can get them). Has anyone else encountered an issue like this? What did you or what would you do in a situation like this? I'm certainly not going to stop my walks!

I know Pit Bulls well, the dog probably just wanted to play. They are very friendly dogs. Gotta stop believing what you hear from the media.

writwing
03-11-2012, 06:05
Can't keep a lab outta the water and a springer will point. No training needed, it's in the breed. Sorry Pit lovers but they are a breed we need to worry about. Stats don't lie. Brother in law stopped by with a buddy and the buddy's pit. I told him keep it out of my house and if he went after my dog I would shoot it. I know pit lovers will flame me but the stats are out there for all to see. Please just treat man's best friend with the same lovin' they give you.

You have no idea that you are talking about. Lets see those stats you talk of.

Do you also believe that a gun in your home is dangerous????

series1811
03-11-2012, 06:15
i have raised pit bulls years ago and i can tell you if its a tuff pit [all are not tuff dogs] any impact weapon is pretty useless. a large gun or a good K-Bar knife is what is needed, bear spray would also be a good option. if its a tuff pit the average person can not comprehend both the damage the dog can do or the abuse it can endure. if i am around a strange pit i will have my hand on my gun, they can turn on in the blink of an eye. i have worked with many breeds in personal protection for over 20 years and nothing compares to a tuff pit. that said, i would trust my trained pits with my life when i had them and you won't find a more loyal dog.

Even guns can be less than perfect on a pit bull. The last one we shot, we shot in the head, and it didn't die, it didn't even stop (as far as I know, it's still alive somewhere (and it went through a closed screen door, right through the screen, to attack us). I'm having to argue with our guy at headquarters, who is saying "What do you mean you shot it in the head and it didn't die? I don't believe that."

I told him he would have believed it if he was there and afraid the thing was going to jump on him next.

Bill Lumberg
03-11-2012, 06:19
Naturally aggressive. This can be mitigated but not eliminated through training. Responsive to mace.

tnstaafl
03-11-2012, 06:33
There are a lot of people like me that respect other's rights to do their thing within the law (like having pets), but just simply do not like dogs - or cats. When I'm in my yard or out walking, I don't want them to run over to me to say "Hi", I don't want them to "slime" me, I don't care if their owners think that they are friendly and say "Don't worry - he's friendly" - I'm just not interested - keep your dog and cat controlled, keep them away from me, pick up after your animal, and if he's barking and annoying me, shut him up. Why is that so hard to understand?

And by the way - I don't care if it's a pit bull, a rescue dog of some sort, a friendly Lab, or one of those yip-yip dogs - enjoy them yourself, but keep them away from me.

TENWHEELER
03-11-2012, 06:55
Can't keep a lab outta the water and a springer will point. No training needed, it's in the breed. Sorry Pit lovers but they are a breed we need to worry about. Stats don't lie. Brother in law stopped by with a buddy and the buddy's pit. I told him keep it out of my house and if he went after my dog I would shoot it. I know pit lovers will flame me but the stats are out there for all to see. Please just treat man's best friend with the same lovin' they give you.

Are you serious? What "stats" are you referring to?




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series1811
03-11-2012, 07:16
I guess my main problem with pit bulls is that when you see one, you never know if he is one of the ones that is going to try and tear your leg off, until he does it. We have to shoot about 100 dogs a year that attack us. About 98 of them are pit bulls.

It doesn't matter that there are a few sweet pit bulls out there. I know there are. I have seen them, including 47 pits we found on a warrant that were bred to fight (I didn't realize the first time that happened that fighting pit bulls have to be non-aggressive to humans, or they couldn't be handled when fighting).

Pits are very easy dogs for owners to lose control of, and not many Pit owners seem to recognize that fact, or maybe actually like that about their dogs. I have found pit owners to be as unpredictable as the dogs.

G26AZ
03-11-2012, 07:36
I know Pit Bulls well, the dog probably just wanted to play. They are very friendly dogs. Gotta stop believing what you hear from the media.


In my case its not the media but personal experience.

Several years ago I was walking with my youngest son to a Cub Scout meeting. We passed by a yard that had a low (3 ft?) fence around the front yard. As we were passing the yard, a pit bull ran across the yard, jumped up, and bit a piece out of my sons arm. How do I know it was a pit bull? That's what the owner stated in the hearing about the dog. (the judge ordered it to be put down).

2nd example was last year. A very large pit bull atacked our little dog while we were out walking and I had to shoot it. I know it was a pit bull because the owners had the police record the cause of death on some sort of pure-bred pedigree certificate.

100% of the violent encouters that I've had with dogs have been with Pit Bulls. (not Bull Dogs, Mastiffs, etc) In both cases the dogs were not provoked in any way, yet chose to attack us.

garebel
03-11-2012, 08:17
You have no idea that you are talking about. Lets see those stats you talk of.

Do you also believe that a gun in your home is dangerous????

On the contrary, he is well aware of what he is talking about.

http://www.dogsbite.org/dog-bite-statistics.php

There is a wealth of information regarding pitbull attacks out there. Rather than chiding others for "listening to the media", go do some research on it yourself.
You guys who hurl insults at others for simply pointing out the fact that the pitbull breed is responsible for the overwhelming number of attacks (that is undeniable) are contributing to the problem.
If you want to own one of those dogs, keep it controlled and don't let it hurt someone. Thats pretty simple.


BTW, my personal opinion regarding aggressive dog behavior is a result of my personal experience, coupled with the overwhelming numbers (see above) that are available for all to see, and learn from.

And, yes, I do have guns in my home. Are they dangerous?
If left to fall into the wrong hands, they are indeed.
Thats why I keep them under my control, same as my dog.

Travclem
03-11-2012, 09:10
[QUOTE=steve581581;18692769]I have two "pitbulls" and I assure you that a stick or cane won't have any effect. The first time my male got attacked by a loose dog I was totally unprepared for it. After punching and kicking my dog to get him off the stray with absolutely no reaction from him I ended up getting a old of his collar and had to choke him to stop him. Bully breed dogs are extremely strong, fast, and determined. Pepper spray seems to work well. The next time I had a small thing ofpepper spray and stopped the fight before it started.[/QUOTE
:goodpost:.

A good hickory cane with a heavy knob end will work great when I start breaking legs with it... Ball peen hammer to the base of the skull works well to. Don't ask how I know.

Travclem
03-11-2012, 09:12
You have no idea that you are talking about. Lets see those stats you talk of.

Do you also believe that a gun in your home is dangerous????
Guns have to have a human controlling them, dogs act on their own. Your argument is invalid.

Warp
03-11-2012, 10:11
With the pits the stats are there, and they don't lie. I alo put a lot of stock in experience. My dad is a veterinarian with plenty of experience and he says pits are not to be trusted, especially around other dogs, smaller dogs and children. No exceptions. This he has learned through experience

Warp
03-11-2012, 10:12
You have no idea that you are talking about. Lets see those stats you talk of.

Do you also believe that a gun in your home is dangerous????

Please tell me you are joking.

cloudbuster
03-11-2012, 11:17
A good hickory cane with a heavy knob end will work great when I start breaking legs with it... Ball peen hammer to the base of the skull works well to. Don't ask how I know.

You'll discover that your cane becomes mighty ineffective when you've got a big dog latched onto your forearm like a steel press and thrashing its head. You'll get about one swing before that happens. The dog has a fraction of your pain sensitivity and anything less than a disabling injury (and not a mere broken leg) will only make it angrier. Go ahead, ask me how I know. I can show you the scars. The ball peen hammer might work. How often do you carry a ball peen hammer?

Not all dogs attack the same way. There are dogs that will snap and bite and stay mobile -- dogs with herding instincts will fight like this. You have a chance with those. When a dog with a fighting temperament like a pit bull targets you, the level of ferocity and resistance to pain is astounding. They get into a "tiger by the tail" mindset and everything you're doing to hurt them only convinces them that they ought to bite harder.

Darkangel1846
03-11-2012, 11:19
Bear spray...

Be smart ...plan an escape route, carry bear spray(the big spray can not the little personal can) A thick walking stick you can use to keep the dog off you, but remember clubs don't work well on that kind of dog. Be aware of wind direction so the spray doesn't get you also. Carry a cell phone. Maybe walk at a different time of day.:wavey:

Sharkey
03-11-2012, 12:02
In my case its not the media but personal experience.

Several years ago I was walking with my youngest son to a Cub Scout meeting. We passed by a yard that had a low (3 ft?) fence around the front yard. As we were passing the yard, a pit bull ran across the yard, jumped up, and bit a piece out of my sons arm. How do I know it was a pit bull? That's what the owner stated in the hearing about the dog. (the judge ordered it to be put down).

2nd example was last year. A very large pit bull atacked our little dog while we were out walking and I had to shoot it. I know it was a pit bull because the owners had the police record the cause of death on some sort of pure-bred pedigree certificate.

100% of the violent encouters that I've had with dogs have been with Pit Bulls. (not Bull Dogs, Mastiffs, etc) In both cases the dogs were not provoked in any way, yet chose to attack us.

I've had 2 rescue pits and 100% of the violent encounters I've had were with a cocker spaniel and a chihuahua.

Pits generally are dog aggressive. My current one is not. In your first encounter, did the dog jump over the fence or was your son real close to it?

My vet loves when I bring my dog in. She stated that she hasn't been bit by a bit yet but the last time I was in there, a chihuahua had tried to bite her that day.

We've turned this into another Pits are dangerous and vicious thread when the OP initially asked how to stop a dog, probably a pit, IF it became violent which it apparently wasn't.

Neither of mine have been big pullers of course they are mixed so that might explain it. I take them for walks very frequently and the number of people that cross the street have been plentiful. We actually had another car next to us at a light and when the kid saw our dog and mentioned the pit bull, the parents rolled the window up. :rofl:

Haters are gonna hate.............

mdsn969
03-11-2012, 12:05
Be smart ...plan an escape route, carry bear spray(the big spray can not the little personal can) A thick walking stick you can use to keep the dog off you, but remember clubs don't work well on that kind of dog. Be aware of wind direction so the spray doesn't get you also. Carry a cell phone. Maybe walk at a different time of day.:wavey:

That and my G26 is with me all the time, if a Pitt approaches me it will be dispatched.

cloudbuster
03-11-2012, 12:08
That and my G26 is with me all the time, if a Pitt approaches me it will be dispatched.

Hey, I've known some people who went to Pitt (http://www.pitt.edu/), and sure they can be obnoxious, but I still think that shooting them is overreacting!

mdsn969
03-11-2012, 12:10
Hey, I've known some people who went to Pitt (http://www.pitt.edu/), and sure they can be obnoxious, but I still think that shooting them is overreacting!

Hahahahahahahaha

jmathis84
03-11-2012, 13:59
I personally own APBT'S and have been around them for 4 yrs. I fully believe it is the owner who is the problem not the dogs. The are a very difficult breed to master. Most idiots get them to be cool and tuff. That is the wrong reason first off. They must be trained very early and not allowed to get away with anything. I have a 3yr old and have no doubt in my mind my dogs would never harm him. My male is currently going to be certified in therapy work and tracking. My female already does some therapy work and 4h club events. I am presonally sick of all the idiots who bash the dogs and have never personally owned one. The must be treated differently than other dogs. I have also never met a vicious APBT. I am allowed to take my dogs anywhere in the town I live including Wal-mart. Everyone loves them when they are encountered. I would gladly put any of my dogs against anyone's in obedience. Most of the attacks you see on TV are not performed by a APBT they are a mix of them or not even related at all. Look very hard at the pictures when they are posted. 90% of the "pit bull" attacks are NOT APBT'S. My dogs have been attacked at dog parks and have not bitten back. If they are treated right and trained well they are in my opinion the best dogs on the planet. And before the FLAMING STARTS before I met my FIANCE I was just like most of you. I hated the breed and was for the bans.:soap:

Misty02
03-11-2012, 14:35
With all due respect, my dog loves to run up and say hello as well...but she is on the end of a LEASH that I control.
Why subject someone to the anxiety of having an unfamiliar dog "run up" to them?
You are not asking, but rather demanding, a person to gamble on whether or not the large dog running towards them is about to attack them, in a matter of just a few seconds....Why the hell would you do that?

You were also gambling that the individual(s) that your dog ran up to would not be armed and prepared to defend against, what they perceived to be, an attacking dog.
That could have ended tragically for your dog, and who would you have blamed?

In addition, no animal is exempt from one day snapping and going off the deep end (it happens to humans too). My husband’s nephew’s daughter (around 5 years old at the time) was bitten on the face by their massive but adorable (either Doberman or Rottweiler, can’t remember now) dog that never hurt a fly but jumped on people to play. One day the jump was not followed by play, sadly his own daughter had to endure a multitude of surgeries to return her face to semi-normal.

To the OP: Some time ago there was an issue with stray dogs in our area, some friendly, others not so much. People continued their walks but took something with them; we saw bats, tree branches, canes, etc. Just about anything that would assist in pushing the animal away (without getting close enough to use bare hands) or beat them until they desist.

For a while you had to mentally prepare for a quick escape when arriving from work or when trying to leave the house.

A couple of the dogs got adopted by the neighbors. We all made several calls to animal control, a few times the animal was gone by the time they got here. No clue where the animals came from; most looked unkept and hungry.

.

Misty02
03-11-2012, 14:42
To some people their dogs/cats/etc are extremely important and completely irreplaceable, loved individuals who are full fledged members of the family.

I can understand that, Wrap. Unfortunately, if your grown up child came armed to attack me or one of mine, it would likely suffer the same fate other members of your beloved family (furry or not) if they did the same thing. Survival is survival, whether defending against a two or four legged creature.

ETA: One way to ensure their safety is to make certain they don’t attack or attempt to harm others.

.

Bill Lumberg
03-11-2012, 14:47
All dogs can snap. Some are naturally prone to do so. Not hard to figure out which.

jmathis84
03-11-2012, 14:50
(jmathis84's fiance) Just so you know...it's PIT BULL, not PITT BULL or Pit Bull or even Pitbull. It is two words and spelled correctly. If you want to get technical, it's actually an American Pit Bull Terrier. Oh wait, I forgot, some of the people posting in here are a little off kilter on what a darn APBT really is. Come on people, do your research. This is NOT a dangerous breed, it is a breed with the POTENTIAL to be dangerous. I will gladly supply my telephone number, email address OR mailing address to anyone asking, and you can come and personally watch my APBT who is actually a purebred dog, blow any of these other Labs, Goldens or whatever out of the water. Secondly, God forbid something happens to any of these people on here talking crap about the breed, and they go missing. It might just be a APBT that comes and finds you. My male is trained Search and Rescue, therapy dog and certified Seizure Response service dog. As I stated, I will gladly invite anyone to my house and show you. Bring your dogs also, just to prove that this breed is NOT naturally dog aggressive. NONE of my APBTs are dog aggressive, or people aggressive. Stop bashing on a breed and shoot the idiots who aren't taking the proper precautions into being a responsible owner. -Sincerely, Kasey

Bill Lumberg
03-11-2012, 15:13
It is a breed predisposed to aggression. And as long as yours don't threaten me or folks I care about, it can live. Don't allow denial to beget complacency and everyone will be awesome.

Misty02
03-11-2012, 15:23
My personal opinion, most animals that are well trained have the potential of enriching one’s life. They can be companions, they can save lives, they can assist those in need. Much like with humans, I’ll keep my distance when dealing with animals unknown to me. Even when I’ve gotten to know them and believe they’re safe I try to remember that they’re still animals not always capable of understanding the human word, body language and intent. They deserve to be treated with kindness and care.

Still, if one attempts to attack me or mine, they’ll likely end up like swiss cheese if I can react quickly enough.

.

hikerpaddler
03-11-2012, 15:36
I agree.

1canvas
03-11-2012, 15:59
[quote=1canvas;18693968]

A good hickory cane with a heavy knob end will work great when I start breaking legs with it... Ball peen hammer to the base of the skull works well to. Don't ask how I know.

good luck :rofl:.

garebel
03-11-2012, 16:45
It is a breed predisposed to aggression. And as long as yours don't threaten me or folks I care about, it can live. Don't allow denial to beget complacency and everyone will be awesome.

This would be my take as well concerning pit bull terriers.

Warp
03-11-2012, 19:05
. The must be treated differently than other dogs.

Yup .

Travclem
03-11-2012, 19:39
[quote=Travclem;18695443]

good luck :rofl:.

I've killed WAY more than my fair share of pits. Neighbors raised them where I grew up and we lost more than a few calves to them. I've killed them with bricks, hammers, bats, rifles, shotguns, pistols, machetes, pocket knives, pickups, broad heads, 4 wheelers, and just about anything else I had handy. There were days when I'd kill a pack of 10 or more, but for every 1 we killed, they got 5 more. The owners finally were jailed when the dogs attacked and mauled our 78 year old neighbor while he was at his mailbox. After this, they sold their house and moved away, haven't had any dog problems since.

Im not against the dogs as a breed and that isnt what this post is about. I have more than a little experience at ridding the world of those critters, and it doesn't take much luck.

G26AZ
03-11-2012, 23:16
. . . . . . . .
Pits generally are dog aggressive. My current one is not. In your first encounter, did the dog jump over the fence or was your son real close to it?

.............

He was walking next to the fence, but not right next to it - about where a person would normally walk on a sidewalk when walking past a fence. The dog came up and over the fence and latched onto his arm.

Lest anyone think I hate Pit Bulls - I don't. My daughter and her husband have three pure breds that they are raising. I am a dog owner and love dogs. I was only relating my experiences with violent ones we have encountered.

I have noticed - not sure if it makes a difference or not - that both of the dogs we had encounters with were animals that were NEVER taken out for exercise - just left in their yards all day. We make sure to take our dog for two 20-30 minute walks a day -and can see a difference in his behavior if we don't. Perhaps never getting out for proper exercise has something to do with the temeprament of these dogs?

cloudbuster
03-11-2012, 23:58
I've killed WAY more than my fair share of pits. Neighbors raised them where I grew up and we lost more than a few calves to them. I've killed them with bricks, hammers, bats, rifles, shotguns, pistols, machetes, pocket knives, pickups, broad heads, 4 wheelers, and just about anything else I had handy. There were days when I'd kill a pack of 10 or more, but for every 1 we killed, they got 5 more. The owners finally were jailed when the dogs attacked and mauled our 78 year old neighbor while he was at his mailbox. After this, they sold their house and moved away, haven't had any dog problems since.

Im not against the dogs as a breed and that isnt what this post is about. I have more than a little experience at ridding the world of those critters, and it doesn't take much luck.

Your local sheriff did nothing when you showed him dead calves and a pile dead pit bulls, when you had a neighbor with apparently zombie-like hordes of killer pit bulls running loose?

You waged a war of extermination against dozens -- hundreds? -- of marauding pit bulls and The neighbors just quietly let you keep killing their dogs, replacing them at cost to themselves and you just kept losing your calves and killing pit bulls and no authorities were effectively involved until a human was mauled? It's amazing the neighbor survived, really, with a pack of dogs that was used to hunting and killing large prey.

I'd definitely 3-S dogs I caught killing or harassing my livestock if it was just isolated incidents, but if I was standing there with a pile of 10 dead pit bulls and it was an ongoing thing I'd be camping out at the sheriff's office demanding that something be done. Every dead calf is a significant loss in time and money that you can never really get back. I can't believe you weren't suing the pit bull owners for the lost revenue from every dead calf.

I'd point out, also, that there's a big difference between hunting a pit bull and being hunted by one (or 10).

Travclem
03-12-2012, 06:30
Your local sheriff did nothing when you showed him dead calves and a pile dead pit bulls, when you had a neighbor with apparently zombie-like hordes of killer pit bulls running loose?

You waged a war of extermination against dozens -- hundreds? -- of marauding pit bulls and The neighbors just quietly let you keep killing their dogs, replacing them at cost to themselves and you just kept losing your calves and killing pit bulls and no authorities were effectively involved until a human was mauled? It's amazing the neighbor survived, really, with a pack of dogs that was used to hunting and killing large prey.

I'd definitely 3-S dogs I caught killing or harassing my livestock if it was just isolated incidents, but if I was standing there with a pile of 10 dead pit bulls and it was an ongoing thing I'd be camping out at the sheriff's office demanding that something be done. Every dead calf is a significant loss in time and money that you can never really get back. I can't believe you weren't suing the pit bull owners for the lost revenue from every dead calf.

I'd point out, also, that there's a big difference between hunting a pit bull and being hunted by one (or 10).
We never called the sheriff about the dogs we killed or the calves we lost because little would come of it. We just handled it ourselves, a lot more efficiently than they would/could. The owners were probably dog fighters/drug dealers, and were busted running an illegal bar in their barn. They were not the kind of people to call the police. We'd probably have gotten nothing for suing because on paper they were very low income.

We eventually moved our cows to another place but continued to kill every loose dog we saw on our property. I'd say around 100 over the course of 4-5 years.

I have nothing against bulldogs as a breed. We would have taken the same action against poodles, yorkies, or any other breed if they were killing our livestock. The point of my post was for all the bulldog owners/enthusiasts that think these dogs are invincible. They are most definitely not.

Warp
03-12-2012, 10:04
We never called the sheriff about the dogs we killed or the calves we lost because little would come of it. We just handled it ourselves, a lot more efficiently than they would/could. The owners were probably dog fighters/drug dealers, and were busted running an illegal bar in their barn. They were not the kind of people to call the police. We'd probably have gotten nothing for suing because on paper they were very low income.

We eventually moved our cows to another place but continued to kill every loose dog we saw on our property. I'd say around 100 over the course of 4-5 years.

I have nothing against bulldogs as a breed. We would have taken the same action against poodles, yorkies, or any other breed if they were killing our livestock. The point of my post was for all the bulldog owners/enthusiasts that think these dogs are invincible. They are most definitely not.

Wait...they were bulldogs?

Travclem
03-12-2012, 10:12
Wait...they were bulldogs?
They were American Pit Bull Terriers according to the owners whom we talked to about them numerous times. Is that better?

You could sit and watch these dogs jump to the top of a 6' fence and pull themselves over the top. We told the owners they would be shot if found on our land. They acted like they didn't care.

Warp
03-12-2012, 10:15
They were American Pit Bull Terriers according to the owners whom we talked to about them numerous times. Is that better?

Well, there is a difference.

mattallamerican
03-12-2012, 17:04
allways carry dog treats most pit bulls are big babys

OMEGA5
03-12-2012, 17:07
I'm retired and was taking my morning walk within our development. Coming the other way on the same side of the street was a woman walking a dog. Whenever that happens, I automatically cross to the other side so as not to cause an issue in case the dog is a little "jumpy". As I got closer, I could see that the woman was small; maybe 5'2" and was walking a large Pit Bull with a head like a "block of granite". The woman was holding the leash with both hands, the dog was pulling her and she was having a hard time controlling it; then the dog started "huffing" and pulling toward me. My first thought was, "If that dog decides to break away from this little woman, there's no way that she would be able to hold it back; and living in NJ, I have absolutely no way of protecting myself since it's impossible for a normal citizen to get a CCW in New Jersey (only politicians and/or celebrities can get them). Has anyone else encountered an issue like this? What did you or what would you do in a situation like this? I'm certainly not going to stop my walks!

I carry one of these; have one in each vehicle and one
in the house. Unlike you, I can carry, but I have a soft spot
for dogs. Also, I have a torn MCL on my left leg which isn't
bad enough for surgery, but some days, it gives me fits.
These are made by Cold Steel. Damn near indestructable
and the ball is stainless steel. I've had the occasion to smack
one Dobbie with it and it worked like a charm. Sent him
hollering back home. Hit one with the steel ball and you'll
cave in a skull.
Dano :harley:
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y200/omega5m14/big-citystick100.jpg

BrewerGeorge
03-12-2012, 20:56
Without getting into the pit bull argument, the Cold Steel sjambok or african walking stick can be bought for less than $30 on Amazon. Whether they will stop a pit I don't know, but a 3 ft, 2 lb mace can kill a dog (or person) for sure.

mdsn969
03-13-2012, 00:13
allways carry dog treats most pit bulls are big babys

my dog treats are 9mm :rofl:

rppnj
04-02-2012, 15:27
What's going on in NJ? I'm the OP on this thread. I was at the local Home Depot yesterday to buy a lawnmower and coming the other way down the aisle (INSIDE the store) is a young teenage girl pushing a shopping cart with a pit bull (standing up in the cart) wearing a spiked collar and a shiny chrome-plated large link chain (the pit pull...not the teenager). I'm wondering if there's something going on that I don't know about regarding teenagers and pit bulls. It this some kind of new status symbol? I'm seeing more and more of this in NJ. Are dogs even allowed inside Home Depot? BTW...this was an absolutely beautiful cocoa-colored pit bull.

Wasatch
04-02-2012, 16:16
What's going on in NJ? I'm the OP on this thread. I was at the local Home Depot yesterday to buy a lawnmower and coming the other way down the aisle (INSIDE the store) is a young teenage girl pushing a shopping cart with a pit bull (standing up in the cart) wearing a spiked collar and a shiny chrome-plated large link chain (the pit pull...not the teenager). I'm wondering if there's something going on that I don't know about regarding teenagers and pit bulls. It this some kind of new status symbol? I'm seeing more and more of this in NJ. Are dogs even allowed inside Home Depot? BTW...this was an absolutely beautiful cocoa-colored pit bull.

I don't know about NJ, but here in UT, anyone can call any dog whatsoever their "service dog" (which includes "serving" as a comfort to the owner), and supposedly there's little or no action a business owner can do about it.

Don't take my word for it; that's just what I heard somewhere. But I do see more dogs in stores lately. Thanks, Paris Hilton.

Merkavaboy
04-02-2012, 16:50
Any fool that thinks that OC, bear spray, wooden canes or some other impact weapon will be useful to fend off a pitbull attack needs to watch this video.

Sorry I'm unable to get the link to post.

Nevermind here it is:

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=466_1330182561&p=1

tnstaafl
04-02-2012, 17:33
I know that they're supposed to care about animals, but the animal control guy had to be nuts going in there on a call about three pit bulls and carrying just a stick!