Why are so many people "afraid" of using corrosive ammo? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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427
03-18-2012, 00:41
Why are so many people "afraid" of corrosive ammo?

I read on threads where corrosive ammo is mentioned, some people seem to think that their weapon will be irreparably damaged if it's used. Is it ignorance, laziness or an innate/inane fear of the word "corrosive"? I'm not sure...

It's one extra step of cleaning with water, preferably warm/hot, (swabbing the bore wiping the bolt face), then just doing the regular cleaning ritual. That's it.

BTW, Water is all that's needed. Water has been used to clean firearms long before windex and other chemicals were invented.

I don't know, I'm just curious, I guess.

Folsom_Prison
03-18-2012, 00:47
What exactly is corrosive ammo?

427
03-18-2012, 01:03
Corrosive ammunition has a primer, that, when fired, ignites the powder and leaves a residue, (corrosive salts) that will attract moisture and will rust/pit the bore if not cleaned.

Most pre 50's surplus ammo tends to be corrosive. Commie ammo will certainly be corrosive. There's no such thing as "mildly" corrosive, either it is or it isn't.

To prevent any damage corrosive ammo, all that needs to be done is to clean immediately after being done for the day.

Folsom_Prison
03-18-2012, 01:13
Do you consider tul ammo corrosive?

427
03-18-2012, 01:25
Do you consider tul ammo corrosive?

Tula ammo?

I treat all russian/soviet ammo as corrosive.

FLIPPER 348
03-18-2012, 01:28
Tula ammo?

I treat all russian/soviet ammo as corrosive.



that's just silly

427
03-18-2012, 01:32
that's just silly

Why is that silly? I clean as though russian/soviet ammo is corrosive. One extra step. Besides, that stuff is dirty.

HKLovingIT
03-18-2012, 01:32
Why are so many people "afraid" of corrosive ammo?

I read on threads where corrosive ammo is mentioned, some people seem to think that their weapon will be irreparably damaged if it's used. Is it ignorance, laziness or an innate/inane fear of the word "corrosive"? I'm not sure...

It's one extra step of cleaning with water, preferably warm/hot, (swabbing the bore wiping the bolt face), then just doing the regular cleaning ritual. That's it.

BTW, Water is all that's needed. Water has been used to clean firearms long before windex and other chemicals were invented.

I don't know, I'm just curious, I guess.

It just scares me. Nah, but for me it's just a pain so I spend a little more for the non-corrosive Russian stuff. If it's all that was available for sale I would of course use it without hesitation.

Javelin
03-18-2012, 01:34
I don't like the idea of my barrel rusting>

Javelin
03-18-2012, 01:48
And the idea of rust in my action makes me even more unsettled. Not saying I don't mind shooting a Nagant w/ corrosive ammo and washing it like a dirty dog when I am done. But that's a $79 rifle. Nothing important.

But to each their own.

:wavey:

Folsom_Prison
03-18-2012, 01:53
Tula ammo?

I treat all russian/soviet ammo as corrosive.

Yea Tula, never had a problem with it in my 19.

Nakanokalronin
03-18-2012, 02:43
Most, if not all corrosive ammo is surplus, not commercial. If your buying Wolf, Tula, Brown Bear, Silver Bear and the like, it won't be corrosive and should say it on the box.

I prefer non-corrosive ammo but sometimes the corrosive stuff can be had so cheap, it's too hard to pass up.

Sheepdog Scout
03-18-2012, 03:53
Tula ammo?

I treat all russian/soviet ammo as corrosive.
:upeyes:

PlasticGuy
03-18-2012, 08:07
There are a few calibers where shooting corrosive ammo makes sense. The 5.45x39 and 8mm Mauser are prime examples, as are the 7.62x25 and the 7.62x54 cartridges. Corrosive ammo for these is significantly less expensive than non-corrosive ammo, and the guns themselves are often pretty inexpensive. It's worth the slight risk to the guns, and it's worth the extra cleaning steps.

That said, I don't agree with how casual some shooters are about the use of corrosive ammo. The extra cleaning steps are not that big of a deal, but the penalty can be severe if you do it wrong or wait too long to do it. I have an AKM that has a lot of erosion on the bolt face from corrosive ammo fired during previous military service. It still shoots good enough to be a solid training rifle, but it is pretty rough due to the use of corrosive ammo and improper cleaning techniques. I also saw an AKM seize up on day 2 of a class because the owner forgot to flush out the gas tube after a day of shooting corrosive ammo on a rainy first day of training.

M2 Carbine
03-18-2012, 08:29
That said, I don't agree with how casual some shooters are about the use of corrosive ammo. The extra cleaning steps are not that big of a deal, but the penalty can be severe if you do it wrong or wait too long to do it.
True.

Corrosive ammo is like spraying your gun's action with salt spray. Some corrosive ammo is worse than others.
Everything that comes in contact with the residue must be cleaned with water. Just do a half ass cleaning job and in a couple weeks you will see rust in parts of the gun you thought you had cleaned.
Magazines for instance.
I have a PPSH 41 shooting corrosive ammo. When I first got it I forgot to clean the magazines. Later when I looked at them the top of the magazines and followers were badly rusted.
Also, even though I thought I washed and oiled the gun throughly, a few weeks later I found a little rust in the bolt and action.


Some years ago I forgot to clean a CZ52. A week or two later I happened to look at the gun and the barrel was BADLY rusted and pitted. There was also rust in other parts of the action. I had probably fired no more than a box of 7.62x25 foreign ammo that was sold as non corrosive.


Just recently I had a ND in my shop when I used the hammer drop safety on a CZ52 and the gun fired.
I forgot to clean the gun. A couple weeks later I was suprised to see that the forward half of the barrel was rusted bad from just one shot of corrosive ammo. At least this time I caught it before the gun was ruined.


I've been shooting corrosive ammo since 1956 (M1 Garand) and I'll continue to shoot it because it's cheap but the guns must be cleaned well and checked several times in the weeks after cleaning to make sure rust isn't still showing up.


The ammo is better now but the foreign 9x18, 7.62x39, etc, that they labeled "Non Corrosive" on the box, years ago, was still corrosive. I did the nail test and some of the "Non Corrosive" was more corrosive than what was considered corrosive.
As a rule I consider most any foreign ammo made before about 1980 and all foreign 7.62x25 as corrosive.

hogship
03-18-2012, 08:58
I can remember very hot or boiling water in a 55 gallon drum for cleaning M14 rifles. This was basic training at Ft.Lewis,WA in 1967. I doubt seriously that we were using corrosive ammo back then, but I can imagine the hot water was a hold over from and earlier time......and we just cleaned our rifles like it's always been done.

This is the only time I can remember hot water being used for cleaning firearms......and after basic, we pretty much did it like we do it now......with solvent and oil, brushes and cleaning rods.

In Vietnam, we had a solvent tank and brushes for cleaning M60s and M16s for the flight crews......no water. The grunts didn't have that luxury.......they cleaned their weapons individually.

I've wondered about that hot water cleaning bath in basic, but it never really dawned on me that the reason we did it that way was probably inspired by corrosive ammo.......

ooc

banger
03-18-2012, 09:12
Tula ammo?

I treat all russian/soviet ammo as corrosive.

I agree completly!

The worst rusting from corrosive ammo, that I ever had was after shooting Norinco ammo in 7.62X39.

The kicker is that the boxes were clearly marked "non-corrosive"!

Someone on this forum (sorry I can't give credit to the author), once said words to the effect that, "don't trust the ammo from any country where you would not drink the water".

As far as I am concerned, this is good advise.

Now, to the actual topic....

Do I KNOWINGLY fire corrosive?.....You bet!

It becomes a matter of simply using the correct cleaning procedure when I do.

Consider, when you buy Russian "non-corrosive" ammo and find out your barrel is rusted to pieces, what do you do, complain to... Vladimir Putin?

BTW, before I get "jumped" I do realize that Norinco is Chinese! I use it to illustrate a point.

eracer
03-18-2012, 09:56
I shot two of my rifles yesterday. They are sitting in my safe, uncleaned. They will probably remain uncleaned until after the next range session - or maybe the one after that.

Why would I ever want to shoot corrosive ammo? Non-corrosive is not that much more expensive.

Ruble Noon
03-18-2012, 10:54
Why are so many people "afraid" of corrosive ammo?

I read on threads where corrosive ammo is mentioned, some people seem to think that their weapon will be irreparably damaged if it's used. Is it ignorance, laziness or an innate/inane fear of the word "corrosive"? I'm not sure...

It's one extra step of cleaning with water, preferably warm/hot, (swabbing the bore wiping the bolt face), then just doing the regular cleaning ritual. That's it.

BTW, Water is all that's needed. Water has been used to clean firearms long before windex and other chemicals were invented.

I don't know, I'm just curious, I guess.

It doesn't bother me in the least but, I have also been shooting front stuffers for a few decades.

Ruble Noon
03-18-2012, 10:56
I shot two of my rifles yesterday. They are sitting in my safe, uncleaned. They will probably remain uncleaned until after the next range session - or maybe the one after that.

Why would I ever want to shoot corrosive ammo? Non-corrosive is not that much more expensive.

Depends on what you are shooting. I have some 7.62x54r that cost $30 for 300 rounds.

El_Ron1
03-18-2012, 11:15
Corrosive ammo be berry berry good to me.

Warp
03-18-2012, 11:17
Most, if not all corrosive ammo is surplus, not commercial. If your buying Wolf, Tula, Brown Bear, Silver Bear and the like, it won't be corrosive and should say it on the box.


This.

Perhaps OP should learn what is and is not corrosive before starting a thread about it.

PlasticGuy
03-18-2012, 11:37
I agree completly!

The worst rusting from corrosive ammo, that I ever had was after shooting Norinco ammo in 7.62X39.

The kicker is that the boxes were clearly marked "non-corrosive"!
The Chinese are commonly known to have lied about that. To the best of my knowledge, the Russians never have. I've fired tens of thousands of rounds of Russian commercial ammo, and have never had problems with corrosion.

M2 Carbine
03-18-2012, 12:26
I've wondered about that hot water cleaning bath in basic, but it never really dawned on me that the reason we did it that way was probably inspired by corrosive ammo.......

The 30.06 ammo we were using in the M1 Garands (USMC) was corrosive. I don't know but I doubt by the time the M14 came out there was any .308 corrosive ammo made.

faawrenchbndr
03-18-2012, 12:45
I have some "special" M2 ball ammo that is corrosive.
Rarely shoot the stuff, I'm saving it for the Zombie Apocalypse

hogship
03-18-2012, 13:18
The 30.06 ammo we were using in the M1 Garands (USMC) was corrosive. I don't know but I doubt by the time the M14 came out there was any .308 corrosive ammo made.

Howdy M2..........

I suspect that is the case, too.......no corrosive ammo in 1967. Back then, there were still plenty of Korean veterans, and even some WW2 veterans still on active duty, and the water bath rifle cleaning I saw in basic training was very likely a product of some of these older veterans.......because that's the way they had always done it.

I'm clearly guessing about all this, but it makes sense.......

ooc

deserttactical45
03-18-2012, 13:43
I've put several hundred rounds of Russian Walmart ammo through my saiga and haven't cleaned it yet and theirs no rust or pitting anywhere on the rifle. Is that ammo corrosive?

hogship
03-18-2012, 13:50
I've put several hundred rounds of Russian Walmart ammo through my saiga and haven't cleaned it yet and theirs no rust or pitting anywhere on the rifle. Is that ammo corrosive?

If it's been more than a few weeks, it's not corrosive.......

I've used a lot of Russian ammo in the past, and have never run into any corrosive ammo yet.

I've heard the stories about Chinese ammo being corrosive, even though it was marked as being non-corrosive. I think there is probably some that may have been, although I've used many thousands of rounds of Chinese ammo that was marked as non-corrosive......and it's all been non-corrosive. I can remember some bulk packed tins of Chinese ammo that was corrosive, and was sold as being non-corrosive, but all the corrosive ammo is not marked as being corrosive (or, in English, for that matter).

There really isn't any reason to produce corrosive ammo these days. It isn't any cheaper to produce......no reason in the world to make it.

Except for some obscure shipments in the past, I wouldn't hesitate to believe it when newly produced ammo is marked on the box as being non-corrosive.

As someone else mentioned, the only ammo to worry about is the surplus ammo that's been in storage for years........I just don't buy any of that stuff anymore. Let those who want it, have at it! :wavey:

ooc

deserttactical45
03-18-2012, 14:16
If it's been more than a few weeks, it's not corrosive.......

I've used a lot of Russian ammo in the past, and have never run into any corrosive ammo yet.

I've heard the stories about Chinese ammo being corrosive, even though it was marked as being non-corrosive. I think there is probably some that may have been, although I've used many thousands of rounds of Chinese ammo that was marked as non-corrosive......and it's all been non-corrosive. I can remember some bulk packed tins of Chinese ammo that was corrosive, and was sold as being non-corrosive, but all the corrosive ammo is not marked as being corrosive (or, in English, for that matter).

There really isn't any reason to produce corrosive ammo these days. It isn't any cheaper to produce......no reason in the world to make it.

Except for some obscure shipments in the past, I wouldn't hesitate to believe it when newly produced ammo is marked on the box as being non-corrosive.

As someone else mentioned, the only ammo to worry about is the surplus ammo that's been in storage for years........I just don't buy any of that stuff anymore. Let those who want it, have at it! :wavey:

ooc
I've never cleaned the gun except when I first bought it which was a year ago. If that ammo was corrosive I would know right?

hogship
03-18-2012, 14:22
I've never cleaned the gun except when I first bought it which was a year ago. If that ammo was corrosive I would know right?

Absolutely........

ooc

deserttactical45
03-18-2012, 14:29
Absolutely........

ooc

Awesome thanks for the info man I appreciate it

427
03-18-2012, 14:38
I'm simply curious as to why some people refuse to shoot the stuff. I'm not telling anybody what they should or shouldn't do, I'm saying what I do. They aren't my weapons.

If some people think it's silly that I view commercial russian/eastern bloc ammo as corrosive, and clean as such, I'm doing what I think is necessary for MY weapons.

Warp
03-18-2012, 14:48
I'm simply curious as to why some people refuse to shoot the stuff. I'm not telling anybody what they should or shouldn't do, I'm saying what I do. They aren't my weapons.

If some people think it's silly that I view commercial russian/eastern bloc ammo as corrosive, and clean as such, I'm doing what I think is necessary for MY weapons.

The issue people are having is that there is a difference between thinking it is necessarily to clean YOUR weapons after firing Russian manufactured ammo and calling all Russian ammo corrosive. There is a well established and understood definition of the word corrosive and you seem to be attempting to alter that definition.

427
03-18-2012, 15:04
The issue people are having is that there is a difference between thinking it is necessarily to clean YOUR weapons after firing Russian manufactured ammo and calling all Russian ammo corrosive. There is a well established and understood definition of the word corrosive and you seem to be attempting to alter that definition.

I said I treat all russian/soviet as corrosive and I clean as such. Where, in the above statement, have I altered the definition of the word corrosive? Where?

oldnoob
03-18-2012, 15:05
Every week we will see thread like "how many rounds before you clean your gun?" or "My gun just survived X rounds without cleaning". Those are the reason why some shooter stay away from corrosive ammo. If they don't even clean their gun normally. They ain't gonna start cleaning with an extra step.

Haldor
03-18-2012, 15:26
I am not terribly concerned about shooting corrosive ammo through guns that have a chrome lined chamber and bore. I wash them out with hot soapy water after use, but it doesn't otherwise bother me.

I have run my CZ52 through the dishwasher (when my wife wasn't looking). Oil everything down afterwards of course. The main attraction to the CZ52 is the incredibly cheap surplus ammo and it is all corrosive.

My Glocks? My carry piece (G26) gets cleaned after every use (if nothing else to keep my clothes clean). The G17 gets cleaned about every 3rd or 4th range trip (between 600 to 800 rounds). So far neither has ever malfunctioned on me. I am tempted to see how many rounds I can fire through the G17 before it effects functioning. I'll bet it is a lot.

Warp
03-18-2012, 16:07
I'm simply curious as to why some people refuse to shoot the stuff. I'm not telling anybody what they should or shouldn't do, I'm saying what I do. They aren't my weapons.

If some people think it's silly that I view commercial russian/eastern bloc ammo as corrosive, and clean as such, I'm doing what I think is necessary for MY weapons.

Since you started this thread talking about other people and their use of "corrosive ammo", your definition of corrosive ammo is an important factor.

427
03-18-2012, 16:21
Since you started this thread talking about other people and their use of "corrosive ammo", your definition of corrosive ammo is an important factor.

I'm confused. Did I alter the definition of the word corrosive or not, as you alleged in an earlier post? If so, where?

Warp
03-18-2012, 16:23
I'm confused. Did I alter the definition of the word corrosive or not, as you alleged in an earlier post? If so, where?

Totality of circumstances indicate an altered definition IMO, the details of which/why I already mentioned.

427
03-18-2012, 16:40
Totality of circumstances indicate an altered definition IMO, the details of which/why I already mentioned.

Where?

Lets sum up your posts to me:

First you allege that I don't know what corrosive ammo is.

Next, you allege that I'm "altering the definition of the word corrosive."

When I ask where, you say that my "definition of corrosive ammo is an important factor."

Now, when I ask again, you're saying that you've listed details of the "totality of circumstances".

You got nothing, dude.

Warp
03-18-2012, 16:46
Yeah, you're right, telling us you consider all Russian ammo as corrosive didn't tell us anything about your definition of corrosive ammo

427
03-18-2012, 16:55
Yeah, you're right, telling us you consider all Russian ammo as corrosive didn't tell us anything about your definition of corrosive ammo

That's right, I'm glad you agree.

eyelikeglasses
03-18-2012, 18:09
Get a room girls.

Glockz0r
03-18-2012, 20:49
I have no issues with running corrosive surplus 5.45x39 through my CAI Tantal (non-chrome lined). Half the reason I bought the gun was because of the cheap surplus ammo prices and I save about $50 every 1080 rounds buying that over commercial stuff.

I am still new enough to firearms that cleaning them is not a chore but something I look forward to doing.

glock_19guy1983
03-18-2012, 21:23
I bought 5k rounds of WWII surplus .45acp. All but one of them went bang and my pistol suffered no pitting or rusting from using it. Just clean a little more after shooting and all is well.

ReyFufuRulesAll
03-18-2012, 23:04
To prevent any damage corrosive ammo, all that needs to be done is to clean immediately after being done for the day.

which you really should do, anyway.

Sniperfox
03-19-2012, 01:32
Put windex on it.

http://img441.imageshack.us/img441/9729/windex.png (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/441/windex.png/)

Uploaded with ImageShack.us (http://imageshack.us)

ArmoryDoc
03-19-2012, 07:49
The salts do not dissolve in the ammonia in Windex. Water dissolves them. Save your money.

ca survivor
03-19-2012, 08:39
[QUOTE=Nakanokalronin;18725197]Most, if not all corrosive ammo is surplus, not commercial. If your buying Wolf, Tula, Brown Bear, Silver Bear and the like, it won't be corrosive and should say it on the box.
are you going to trust what a Russian rights on a box ? :rofl:

itstime
03-19-2012, 09:08
I still can't believe there is surplus ammo still arou d from that long ago. Geeze people just don't shoot enough.

Brucev
03-19-2012, 10:21
Re: OP. Why? Many people are just ignorant. They believe what they read. They have no experience. They have no training.

eracer
03-19-2012, 10:45
I have some "special" M2 ball ammo that is corrosive.
Rarely shoot the stuff, I'm saving it for the Zombie ApocalypseI got some of that 'special' ammo, and consider myself lucky that the lots I got were non-corrosive.

eracer
03-19-2012, 10:45
which you really should do, anyway.Why??

AA#5
03-19-2012, 10:47
When I get home from the range, I have other things to do & I'd rather clean guns when I have time off on another day to do it right. I'd say that's a pretty good reason to avoid corrosive ammo

LSUAdman
03-19-2012, 11:24
When I get home from the range, I have other things to do & I'd rather clean guns when I have time off on another day to do it right. I'd say that's a pretty good reason to avoid corrosive ammo

They're gonna say you and I are lazy for this, ya know. :crying:

But it's true. I buy x54R surplus a lot, but nothing else (as of yet). For my mosins, I spray them down with windex, flush with water, then oil and lube like normal. Follow that with a silicone rag over the wood and I am done. Or that's how it used to get done.

Now I dont shoot my mosins as much since the moment I walk through the door, my son is on me to come play and my wife wants her time too. Throw into that situation that the indoor ranges dont allow surplus ammo and the outdoor range is pretty far away...by the time I get home, I'm too tired to spend one minute cleaning, let alone two.

Sniperfox
03-19-2012, 14:26
The salts do not dissolve in the ammonia in Windex. Water dissolves them. Save your money.

It's a joke. Haven't you ever seen the movie?