Interrogation [Archive] - Glock Talk

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emt1581
03-18-2012, 19:00
What place does this have during a SHTF? How important would it be to successfully extract information from others?

Maybe it would lead to the revealing of attack plans, supply storage, etc. But it does raise the issue of ethics and morality.

I suppose we can get to methods if the conversation gets that far but if it helps you to discuss the subject an interrogation can be as simple as a conversation between two people.

What are your thoughts on the issue?

Thanks

-Emt1581

Bolster
03-18-2012, 19:08
But it does raise the issue of ethics and morality.

You? Bring up a big divisive moral issue? Say it ain't so.

cowboy1964
03-18-2012, 19:15
Ask Jack Bauer.

Big Bird
03-18-2012, 19:15
Ask my wife...

Sam Spade
03-18-2012, 19:18
Ultimately, you'll get farther with interview than interrogation. Yes, there is a difference.

eyelikeglasses
03-18-2012, 19:21
What place does this have during a SHTF? How important would it be to successfully extract information from others?

Maybe it would lead to the revealing of attack plans, supply storage, etc. But it does raise the issue of ethics and morality.

I suppose we can get to methods if the conversation gets that far but if it helps you to discuss the subject an interrogation can be as simple as a conversation between two people.

What are your thoughts on the issue?

Thanks

-Emt1581

What are you going to do to torture someone?:dunno:
Do your toughguy schtick somewhere else.

emt1581
03-18-2012, 19:24
Ultimately, you'll get farther with interview than interrogation. Yes, there is a difference.

Here on GT or in reality?

-Emt1581

eyelikeglasses
03-18-2012, 19:31
Here on GT or in reality?

-Emt1581

:whistling:

Commander_Zero
03-18-2012, 19:43
What place does this have during a SHTF? How important would it be to successfully extract information from others?

Maybe it would lead to the revealing of attack plans, supply storage, etc. But it does raise the issue of ethics and morality.

I think youre mixing 'interrogation' with 'torture'.

emt1581
03-18-2012, 19:54
I think youre mixing 'interrogation' with 'torture'.

Not at all although that is the impression some are obviously getting.

-Emt1581

nightwolf1974
03-18-2012, 20:40
Problem is..... in order to get some details when time is short, interrogation usually leads to torture. And most people when faced with torture, will tell you anything you want to hear just to either stop the pain or have you kill them to stop the pain.

So, I feel that interrorgation has real flaws, morals set aside for another argument in the future.

emt1581
03-18-2012, 20:56
Problem is..... in order to get some details when time is short, interrogation usually leads to torture. And most people when faced with torture, will tell you anything you want to hear just to either stop the pain or have you kill them to stop the pain.

So, I feel that interrorgation has real flaws, morals set aside for another argument in the future.

Thanks for that response!! Other readers, take note here. This is what it looks like to share your thoughts on the issue of interrogation.

You sounded a little like Michael Weston with those thoughts. However, I've read as much several times.

The wonderful thing about interrogation is that there are tons of different techniques/methods...some of which have to work or no one, good or bad, would use them...but I am by no means an expert on the issue.

I know you said you wanted to skip morality but you've done a beautiful job thus far...what are you thinking in regard to your capability of carrying out the job on a moral/ethical level?

Thanks

-Emt1581

Syclone538
03-18-2012, 21:16
If you are only talking interrogation, and not torture, I don't see much of a moral issue there. If they are not free to leave, you need to have a good reason for that imo.

RedHaze
03-18-2012, 21:29
Probably not a road many of use are qualified to head down...

Unless you worked with the HET guys (Human Exploitation Team).
http://static.fjcdn.com/large/pictures/9b/21/9b215c_2320607.jpg

lawman800
03-18-2012, 22:07
We conduct interviews with suspects as well as interrogate suspects, but you have to have some basic techniques down before you are effective with either.

Also, in a SHTF where there is no rule, the effectiveness of some of the techniques become a non-issue such as the prospect of punishment in a judicial system and the deals that can be made. When there is no law and order, what incentive would someone have to talk to you at all other than resorting to external pressures such as food, water, comfort, sleep, and ultimately, pain?

racerford
03-18-2012, 22:45
I have worked in internal audit and been involved in fraud invesigations in the corporate world. I have had some training in interview techniques, especially what could not be done. I worked with a security investigator (former Detroit Police), even with limitations we had in the corporate world he was very effective. i was on his side of the table and I felt the desire he created for them to spill their guts, even when they were not the suspect. I definately did not want to be on the other side of the table from him.

In the corporate world we only interviewed people. We never interogated them. I was stunned by some of the things people would say.

cdog533
03-18-2012, 23:41
My SHTF Interrogation/Interview kit fits nicely into a internally-lit briefcase and consist of the following items:

- Propane torch (M. Wallace brand)
- Various sets of pliers
- one 12" length of pipe, one 9" length of pipe (for hard-ass hitting)

.... I'm kidding.

lawman800
03-19-2012, 00:29
Really, unless you are really good or the guy is just dying to spill the beans, or both, you are not really going to get much out of the SHTF "interview" with just no incentive to back your game.

wjv
03-19-2012, 10:36
Who would you Interrogate?

:dunno:

Once you take a prisoner you have to feed him, house him and such. . You'll have to keep him under guard 24x7.

Now what?

While your Interrogating him, he will be collecting info on you.

If you release him, he will likely just run back to his group with his new found info.

So are you going to not release him? Are you going to kill him?

:dunno:

Sometimes your better off not starting something that you don't have an "endgame" plan for.

lawman800
03-19-2012, 10:38
Who would you Interrogate?

:dunno:

Once you take a prisoner you have to feed him, house him and such. . You'll have to keep him under guard 24x7.

Now what?

While your Interrogating him, he will be collecting info on you.

If you release him, he will likely just run back to his group with his new found info.

So are you going to not release him? Are you going to kill him?

:dunno:

Sometimes your better off not starting something that you don't have an "endgame" plan for.

You let him go, he will bring his group back and rape and pillage. It's not a choice anymore. It's a matter of survival.

We are all carriers of the disease.

WolfNotSheep
03-19-2012, 11:05
You catch a lot more flies with honey than you do vinegar... meaning, trying to relate yourself to the person and verbally minimizing the severity of their crime/wrong-doing often works with surprising results. If you can just get the person as comfortable as possible, get them talking, gently direct the flow of the conversation towards what you need to know, and then shut the hell up and let them spill their guts then you can successfully interview just about anyone. The shutting the hell up part is what most interviewers have a problem with.

Interrogation has a time and a place too, but is not so friendly and should always, always, always be backed with a few nasty threats you can quickly make into realities.

However, if you find yourself being on the receiving end of an interview/interrogation then my best advice is as follows; admit nothing, demand proof, and make wild accusations. Also, not fidgeting or wringing your hands, keeping calm and cool, and being vague is always best. Unless you are flat out asked if you are guilty then never give a yes or no answer. If they ask if you were in the area on a given time, say you don't recall. If they ask if you've seen/knew the victim just say that you aren't sure but it's possible.

The purpose of an interview is always to gain information and leverage. If someone can get you to flat out deny even just a few seemingly small details pertaining to an incident (such as your whereabouts, knowledge of the victim/scene, motives, etc) then they can lock you into a story by process of elimination.

Bilbo Bagins
03-19-2012, 11:34
What place does this have during a SHTF? How important would it be to successfully extract information from others?

Maybe it would lead to the revealing of attack plans, supply storage, etc. But it does raise the issue of ethics and morality.

I suppose we can get to methods if the conversation gets that far but if it helps you to discuss the subject an interrogation can be as simple as a conversation between two people.

What are your thoughts on the issue?


Thanks

-Emt1581


The odds of some sort of a SHTF event will cause the need for civilians to house and interrogate prisoners is really really remote. I would leave it to a professional in the group, like a police detective.

All you really have to do ask specific questions, document, and re-question later or question other prisoners and see if things match up. Also you will be suprised how many murders have been solved by holding a suspect in a cell for a few hours, then questioning him with a can of coke and some chips at the ready.

Physical Torture is a method of last resort, and honestly is a bit over-rated.

RED64CJ5
03-19-2012, 11:38
Too many late night Mad Max / Red Dawn marathons again.

Bren
03-19-2012, 11:51
What place does this have during a SHTF? How important would it be to successfully extract information from others?

Maybe it would lead to the revealing of attack plans, supply storage, etc. But it does raise the issue of ethics and morality.


Such questions are easily answered by some moral systems - not so much by others. So?

Bren
03-19-2012, 11:52
You catch a lot more flies with honey than you do vinegar... meaning, trying to relate yourself to the person and verbally minimizing the severity of their crime/wrong-doing often works with surprising results. If you can just get the person as comfortable as possible, get them talking, gently direct the flow of the conversation towards what you need to know, and then shut the hell up and let them spill their guts then you can successfully interview just about anyone. The shutting the hell up part is what most interviewers have a problem with.

Interrogation has a time and a place too, but is not so friendly and should always, always, always be backed with a few nasty threats you can quickly make into realities.

However, if you find yourself being on the receiving end of an interview/interrogation then my best advice is as follows; admit nothing, demand proof, and make wild accusations. Also, not fidgeting or wringing your hands, keeping calm and cool, and being vague is always best. Unless you are flat out asked if you are guilty then never give a yes or no answer. If they ask if you were in the area on a given time, say you don't recall. If they ask if you've seen/knew the victim just say that you aren't sure but it's possible.

The purpose of an interview is always to gain information and leverage. If someone can get you to flat out deny even just a few seemingly small details pertaining to an incident (such as your whereabouts, knowledge of the victim/scene, motives, etc) then they can lock you into a story by process of elimination.

Having interrogated a few people into giving information against their interests...I'm betting you haven't.

kirgi08
03-19-2012, 11:59
Why.'08. :dunno:

UtahIrishman
03-19-2012, 12:01
When I played capture the flag as a kid we would bribe our 'prisoners' with candy to tell us the location of the opponents flag.

Usually worked.

Mars bars seemed to work the best.

beatcop
03-20-2012, 05:50
Civilians ask questions
police ask questions until guy doesn't want to answer
interrogate? question under threat of force
torture? question using fear and pain as a tool

I guess you can apply subtle changes to the above, but it comes down to how far you are going with your questioning. If I am "tortured" and allowed to live, there will be payback.

In some fantasy scenario where you worry about some kind of "attacks", I guess the writing is already on the wall...pretty much like the US military...if you are dealing with life and death, interview and interrogation will just be another facet of the warfight.

RWBlue
03-20-2012, 19:20
Who would you Interrogate?

And the next question, how do you capture a person to interrogate?


Sometimes your better off not starting something that you don't have an "endgame" plan for.

This we agree on. Always have a plan before you start something you may not want to finish.

lawman800
03-20-2012, 19:28
What endgame do you have as a civilian in a world that has no meaning anymore? What is your leverage to get information on someone who doesn't want to talk nor has any incentive to talk? Being friendly? Good luck.

I have learned long ago to never rely on someone's kindness for my own survival or benefit.

UneasyRider
03-20-2012, 20:18
Everyone talks.

UtahIrishman
03-20-2012, 20:31
so........emt



where were you on the night in question? :rofl:

RWBlue
03-20-2012, 20:37
Everyone talks.

Talking and telling you what you want to know are two different things.

lawman800
03-20-2012, 20:43
Talking and telling you what you want to know are two different things.

Yes. Exactly. Talking. Telling you what you want to hear. Telling you what he thinks you want to hear. Telling you the truth. Telling you the whole truth. Telling you his version of the truth... who knows. You never know.

Even your own family and best friends... you never know if you got everything 100% from them.

WolfNotSheep
03-21-2012, 10:50
Having interrogated a few people into giving information against their interests...I'm betting you haven't.

You're right. As I cop, I was only privy to interview. All my theory on interrogation is strictly second-hand, but comes from very good sources. As of yet in my life, Iv'e had no need for interrogation and I hope such a time never arises.