US Intelligence to keep tabs on Americans with no ties to terror [Archive] - Glock Talk

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QNman
03-24-2012, 21:19
US Intelligence to keep tabs on Americans with no ties to terror

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/03/22/us-intelligence-to-keep-tabs-on-americans-with-no-ties-to-terror/

While we debate which brand of -R is better or worse, the COTUS continues to suffer death of a thousand cuts.

The U.S. intelligence community will be able to store information about Americans with no ties to terrorism for up to five years under new Obama administration guidelines.

Until now, the National Counterterrorism Center had to destroy immediately information about Americans that already was stored in other government databases when there were no clear ties to terrorism.

Rooster Rugburn
03-24-2012, 23:24
I think the typical democrap and repubican response is "you don't have any reason to worry, if you have nothing to hide".

Javelin
03-24-2012, 23:31
All of these new laws are sure getting interesting.

yellowhand
03-25-2012, 00:00
The bad thing about collecting millions of tonnes of useless information is that it hides the really important stuff.
If you're looking for one special tree but cut down the whole forest, yea, you got that one special tree, but where in the hell is it?:faint:

UtahIrishman
03-25-2012, 00:25
The bad thing about collecting millions of tonnes of useless information is that it hides the really important stuff.
If you're looking for one special tree but cut down the whole forest, yea, you got that one special tree, but where in the hell is it?:faint:

Data mining techniques work quite well. The size of the sample anymore is almost a moot point.

chickenwing
03-25-2012, 02:40
The police state is in complete control.

I think Orwell hit the nail on the head.

If you want a vision of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face - forever.

Par for the course when it comes to authoritarian governments. Enjoy.

QNman
03-25-2012, 07:15
I think the typical democrap and repubican response is "you don't have any reason to worry, if you have nothing to hide".

If you mean that's the typical politicians answer, you're right. With the advent of computers able to collect it all then categorize and store it with little red flags beside your name, it should concern us all.

Perhaps especially those of us actively enjoying our first amendment rights on GTPI...

A loss of Our fourth amendment rights, one chip at a time, results in the same thing as outright abolition, just more slowly.

Defend your rights now while you still have some.

QNman
03-25-2012, 07:21
The bad thing about collecting millions of tonnes of useless information is that it hides the really important stuff.
If you're looking for one special tree but cut down the whole forest, yea, you got that one special tree, but where in the hell is it?:faint:

See below...

Data mining techniques work quite well. The size of the sample anymore is almost a moot point.

Thirty years ago, it would have been nearly impossible for the government to keep track of their terrorist watch list at every airport simultaneously. Thirty years ago, it would have been impossible for the government to run an "instant" background check before firearms purchases.

The "patriot" act was sold to us with the explainations that if you weren't talking to terrorists you had nothing to worry about. Now they can LEGALLY mine data for five years on ANY citizen for ANY REASON.

That ANY member here on GT is OK with that tells me we have lost. It is now only a matter of time before the COTUS is re-written without all those pesky "rights". Complacency, it seems, has won the day.

Ruble Noon
03-25-2012, 07:36
US Intelligence to keep tabs on Americans with no ties to terror

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/03/22/us-intelligence-to-keep-tabs-on-americans-with-no-ties-to-terror/

While we debate which brand of -R is better or worse, the COTUS continues to suffer death of a thousand cuts.

Both parties are doing all that they can to destroy the COTUS. The D brand is beyond repair. The R brand might be salvageable if it goes through a serious restructuring.

Ruble Noon
03-25-2012, 07:38
The bad thing about collecting millions of tonnes of useless information is that it hides the really important stuff.
If you're looking for one special tree but cut down the whole forest, yea, you got that one special tree, but where in the hell is it?:faint:

Not anymore.


http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/03/ff_nsadatacenter/

redbrd
03-25-2012, 07:59
Scary stuff never thought I would see the day.

Restless28
03-25-2012, 08:40
Next on the list is elimination of cash. All electronic transactions are coming. The plan is coming together.

RCP
03-25-2012, 08:45
Who cares, at least we will have a strong "foreign policy".

happyguy
03-25-2012, 09:48
My government sucks.

Regards,
Happyguy :)

eracer
03-25-2012, 09:51
If you mean that's the typical politicians answer, you're right. With the advent of computers able to collect it all then categorize and store it with little red flags beside your name, it should concern us all.

Perhaps especially those of us actively enjoying our first amendment rights on GTPI...

A loss of Our fourth amendment rights, one chip at a time, results in the same thing as outright abolition, just more slowly.

Defend your rights now while you still have some.Yep.

When the Patriot Act was hustled into law after 9/11 it became clear that:

A. The plan had been in place for a long time, waiting for the right event to sell it to the sheeple.
B. The destruction of privacy had been taken to a whole new (and frightening) level.

I'm afraid that not even a strong, constitutionally-focused SCOTUS can protect us anymore.

Homeland Security is the shroud that protects governmental acts that were once considered a blatant abrogation of our rights as citizens.

QNman
03-25-2012, 12:48
Both parties are doing all that they can to destroy the COTUS. The D brand is beyond repair. The R brand might be salvageable if it goes through a serious restructuring.

Yup.

Yep.

When the Patriot Act was hustled into law after 9/11 it became clear that:

A. The plan had been in place for a long time, waiting for the right event to sell it to the sheeple.
B. The destruction of privacy had been taken to a whole new (and frightening) level.

I'm afraid that not even a strong, constitutionally-focused SCOTUS can protect us anymore.

Homeland Security is the shroud that protects governmental acts that were once considered a blatant abrogation of our rights as citizens.

Yup.

UtahIrishman
03-25-2012, 13:00
The bad thing about collecting millions of tonnes of useless information is that it hides the really important stuff.
If you're looking for one special tree but cut down the whole forest, yea, you got that one special tree, but where in the hell is it?:faint:

Data mining techniques work quite well. The size of the sample anymore is almost a moot point.

See below...



Thirty years ago, it would have been nearly impossible for the government to keep track of their terrorist watch list at every airport simultaneously. Thirty years ago, it would have been impossible for the government to run an "instant" background check before firearms purchases.

The "patriot" act was sold to us with the explainations that if you weren't talking to terrorists you had nothing to worry about. Now they can LEGALLY mine data for five years on ANY citizen for ANY REASON.

That ANY member here on GT is OK with that tells me we have lost. It is now only a matter of time before the COTUS is re-written without all those pesky "rights". Complacency, it seems, has won the day.

I don't think it's complacency so much as even those of us with extensive computer backgrounds are uncertain how to tackle the problem.

Even with an administration that is for upholding individual rights it would be very difficult to track down and delete what is already out there.

QNman
03-25-2012, 17:49
I don't think it's complacency so much as even those of us with extensive computer backgrounds are uncertain how to tackle the problem.

Even with an administration that is for upholding individual rights it would be very difficult to track down and delete what is already out there.

Understood, but the POTUS just made it more legal, therefore easier - not harder. That slippery incline just keeps getting steeper...