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Bolster
03-28-2012, 11:01
We have a rectangular pantry with shelves. 4' wide 4' deep 5' tall. Recently bought cans (of various sizes) and boxes (of various sizes) tend to get mashed into the front; the back slowly accumulates with old food and is eventually deemed too old to eat, and thrown out. Very wasteful.

What organizational devices make it easier to eat the older food first, to follow the FIFO rule? A lazy susan, being round, would waste a large amount of space in the corners, and would still leave the center to fill up with old food. But maybe that's my best bet?

As you make recommendations, keep in mind that the wife is the queen of the kitchen, and any system must have her approval for "ease of use." If it's not easy for her to do, she won't do it. (I say that in the most loving way, but it is what it is.)

Previous attempts by me to organize our pantry have been met with the grumpy face, which means, "What are you doing messing with my system? Now I can't find anything."

Breadman03
03-28-2012, 11:21
I always put fresh food in the back. It takes a little work on my part, but is easy for everyone else.

jason10mm
03-28-2012, 11:29
They make home use can rollers like what they use in gocery stores. You put a fresh can on top and pull the oldest can from the bottom. If there are 4-5 types of cans you use regularly then those might help. Or you can split the pantry in two, eat from one side, stock the other, then switch.

02LimitedX
03-28-2012, 17:28
If you built slide out shelves, you could more easily stock the back.


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SFCSMITH(RET)
03-28-2012, 18:33
yep, I would go with slide out shelves, and a rolling cabinet if possible.

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w88/maypo59/P7050006.jpg

Bolster
03-28-2012, 20:00
yep, I would go with slide out shelves, and a rolling cabinet if possible.

Nice. I like that.

DrSticky
03-29-2012, 08:55
Nice pic. Anyone else have cool pantry pics for those of us planning a pantry remodel?

quake
03-29-2012, 11:11
They make home use can rollers like what they use in gocery stores. You put a fresh can on top and pull the oldest can from the bottom. If there are 4-5 types of cans you use regularly then those might help. Or you can split the pantry in two, eat from one side, stock the other, then switch.
Home-made version; lets you size it to fit your space, and even size the raceways for odd-size cans such as corn niblets, tuna cans, etc:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/canrackcropped-1.jpg

Bolster
03-29-2012, 11:39
I like the design, and am impressed with the craftsmanship, but we typically don't have 10 cans of exactly the same thing. How does one reach into the middle of the stack and pull a particular can?

OTOH, it's a compelling design. Do you have dimentioned plans, by chance?

G29Reload
03-29-2012, 14:34
We have a rectangular pantry with shelves. 4' wide 4' deep 5' tall. Recently bought cans (of various sizes) and boxes (of various sizes) tend to get mashed into the front; the back slowly accumulates with old food and is eventually deemed too old to eat, and thrown out. Very wasteful.


Dude. Stock rotation!

You don't have to change her system. But you do have to maintain it for her. (Grocery day, pull the old stuff forward, put the new stuff in the back, etc).

There are also can racks.

Also, if you cut her out of the equation and relegate that pantry to working stock, while you maintain

The Strategic Stockpile

In another location. (Codename: Cheyenne Mountain) You become Mr Rice and Bean Buckets. Mr Bulk canned goods by the case. Mr MRE orderer and stockboy/slash warehouse manager.

honey, what are you doing down there?

NOTHING, I'll BE UP IN A SECOND….

Take it offline. Let her remain distracted fiddling with her domain while you go out and do What Needs To Be Done.

They're like little kids. Just distract them when they're bad.

racerford
03-29-2012, 15:17
I like the design, and am impressed with the craftsmanship, but we typically don't have 10 cans of exactly the same thing. How does one reach into the middle of the stack and pull a particular can?

OTOH, it's a compelling design. Do you have dimentioned plans, by chance?

The point is if you are stocking up, you DO have 10 cans of the same thing. That is especially true if it is something you eat on a regular basis (once a week?).

R_W
03-29-2012, 16:20
The point is if you are stocking up, you DO have 10 cans of the same thing. That is especially true if it is something you eat on a regular basis (once a week?).

True, but maybe not in the queen's kitchen pantry.

I have settled on a large pantry (food storage room) in the basement that gets FIFO'd by flats at a time. Everyone knows to load on the left, remove from the right, and the kids keep the upstairs pantry filled with only a meal's worth of each item.

I just couldn't get a rotator to work in our pantry, either :dunno:

Bolster
03-29-2012, 16:27
...In another location. (Codename: Cheyenne Mountain) You become Mr Rice and Bean Buckets. Mr Bulk canned goods by the case. Mr MRE orderer and stockboy/slash warehouse manager.

honey, what are you doing down there?

NOTHING, I'll BE UP IN A SECOND….

Take it offline. Let her remain distracted fiddling with her domain while you go out do What Needs To Be Done.

They're like little kids. Just distract them when they're bad.

For some reason, I find this to be an extremely compelling argument. Maybe I just stay the heck out of the kitchen altogether. It's just...all those cans in the back that go old and we throw away each year... it eats away at my soul. But, still...this may be the solution. You are a wise man, Reload. You may be one of the rare few who knows how to handle women.

G29Reload
03-29-2012, 17:06
For some reason, I find this to be an extremely compelling argument. Maybe I just stay the heck out of the kitchen altogether. It's just...all those cans in the back that go old and we throw away each year... it eats away at my soul. But, still...this may be the solution. You are a wise man, Reload. You may be one of the rare few who knows how to handle women.

Dude. With or without her, you need to become acquainted with stock rotation. "Food going bad in the back" is not acceptable with or without wifely involvement.

Stock what you eat
Eat what you stock,
ROTATE ROTATE ROTATE.

Imagine whirled peas…peas whirled right to the front of the line, never to go bad again. Plus, most canned stuff doesn't really go bad…but keep the parade moving.

Rotate her stuff when she's not looking.

rotate your stuff in the basement, and use the expiring stuff to backfill hers.

Never out, always fresh.

You, in LA are more likely than ANYONE to face the prospect of a looted store. Need to stay in for a few weeks till the riots subside? Gotta have a pristine pantry, upstairs AND down.

kirgi08
03-29-2012, 17:16
"Dates" on canned goods are very conservative,we've used cans that are years past their "dates".'08.

Bolster
03-29-2012, 18:10
Just had a discussion with the wife, who tells me emphatically that she DOES rotate the stock, I just don't notice. "I know what's there," she says, "and I get it from anywhere it is, when I need it." She also says I'm grossly exaggerating the amount of waste.

I purchase date everything with a sharpie when I load it in, and I load to the back...but...I'm getting the impression I need to butt out. She said I can't mess with her pantry till I built her the linen closet I promised, so...maybe I need to stock staples in my closet and enjoy familial harmony.

Bolster's Wife: 1, Bolster 0. Starvation is bad, but grumpy looks by the wife are immediately deadly. Not giving up, just changing tactics. Reload's right, if there's a hiccup, LA will be starving first and longest.

quake
03-29-2012, 19:25
I like the design, and am impressed with the craftsmanship, but we typically don't have 10 cans of exactly the same thing. How does one reach into the middle of the stack and pull a particular can?

OTOH, it's a compelling design. Do you have dimentioned plans, by chance?

I bought the plan years ago from http://www.canracks.com
Don't have the paper versions anymore, but it's pretty simple & easy to reproduce once you see it in person.

They have another approach as well, one that hangs flat on the wall, protruding not much more than the diameter of one can. It can also be retrofit right into a wall cavity between studs if you prefer. I haven't done the "in the wall" version, but did a wall-hung one for a family member. I'll be at their house tonight; I'll try & remember to snap a picture of it.

quake
03-29-2012, 19:44
...we typically don't have 10 cans of exactly the same thing.
Not to preach, but at the risk of sounding patronizing or sarcastic, I don't know how to "stock up" or "prep" with less than ten cans of "X"; epecially if it's for a family.

Fwiw, that rack is strictly for my wife's convenience; to allow her to just grab a can out of the kitchen cabinet, and keep her from having to go into the pantry. (Once a week or so, we restock the rack from the pantry.) The pantry:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/1-19-08052B-1.jpg


The rack holds 11 cans in each of six slots, except the tuna slot, which holds only ten.

(Only three of the six slots shown in that pic). Left to right is tuna, corn, diced tomatoes, tomato sauce, green peas and green beans. When I went to take a pic of it in place, the diced tomato slot wasn't full, so my wife propped a can in place at the top to make it "look" full. Unfortunately, it also confuses things, as you can see the empty void in the middle; so I cropped the original pic to show just the genuinely full ones. This is the original pic:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/canrackcropped.jpg

In that small space (one shelf of one lower-cabinet space, or half the space below one kitchen drawer), that's 65 cans always neatly arranged, and always rotated.


...How does one reach into the middle of the stack and pull a particular can?...
You don't; it's strictly a fifo thing.

Bolster
03-29-2012, 20:04
Thanks for the awesome photos; very motivating. I must get to working on this as soon as Mrs. B. has left town for a day or two.

Regards the lack of repeats; we've fallen into the habit of shopping about a dozen different stores, and so a dozen cans of beans are a dozen different brands and sizes. It's shameful. It would not hurt us to regularize a bit.

Thanks again for the photos.

Question: are the dowels solid all the way through, or cut into sections?

G29Reload
03-29-2012, 23:08
Bolster's Wife: 1, Bolster 0. Starvation is bad, but grumpy looks by the wife are immediately deadly. Not giving up, just changing tactics.

Don't forget the makeup sex. :rofl:


Fixes EVERYTHING. Well, almost. It will NOT cover a babe rotation scheme. Wives like to be the only can on that shelf. :supergrin:

kirgi08
03-30-2012, 00:01
:faint:

SFCSMITH(RET)
03-30-2012, 06:23
Regards the lack of repeats; we've fallen into the habit of shopping about a dozen different stores, and so a dozen cans of beans are a dozen different brands and sizes. It's shameful. It would not hurt us to regularize a bit.

Thanks again for the photos.

Question: are the dowels solid all the way through, or cut into sections?

So what you mean is you have 45 cans of peaches, but they are not all the same brand?

We have that too... peaches are peaches. I care not what brand each can is (this does not mean I don't care about brand, but there are several that are acceptable) I just put the new ones in the back.. eat from the front. I am soon to build a rolling can rotator, should hold around 800 cans if my math is right.

quake
03-30-2012, 08:01
...Question: are the dowels solid all the way through, or cut into sections?
Solid, thru holes in the section dividers. Screwed in place on the ends only, just to keep them in place laterally.

Bolster
03-30-2012, 08:25
Solid, thru holes in the section dividers. Screwed in place on the ends only, just to keep them in place laterally.

Got it. I need to make at least a couple of those. Thanks.

Bolster
03-30-2012, 08:45
http://www.wikihow.com/Build-a-Rotating-Canned-Food-Shelf

http://foodstoragemadeeasy.net/2009/02/16/build-your-own-can-rotating-rack/

http://www.canracks.com/ <- looks like Quake's

R_W
03-30-2012, 09:02
So what you mean is you have 45 cans of peaches, but they are not all the same brand?

We have that too... peaches are peaches. I care not what brand each can is (this does not mean I don't care about brand, but there are several that are acceptable) I just put the new ones in the back.. eat from the front. I am soon to build a rolling can rotator, should hold around 800 cans if my math is right.

Not all cans are the same size anymore.

It used to be a 16 oz can was a 16 oz can. as they shrunk the cans, some went shorter and some went narrower. :steamed:

quake
03-30-2012, 14:05
Fwiw, the small wall rack that I did for a family member a few years ago. It's based on a design from www.canracks.com, but changed slightly. The original design has the bottom (dispensing area) kick the cans slightly forward, where mine doesn't. Mine makes it slightly narrower to the wall, which was paramount in this particular location; she has almost no space to spare. The downside to doing it the way I did was that it's harder to remove the cans at the bottom. The original design offsets the bottom can slightly and mine doesn't, so on mine, there's more weight pushing straight down on the can that you're trying to pick up. Makes it slimmer, but more awkward to use. If you have the extra 3-4 inches of depth to work with, their design (unmodified) would probably be substantially easier to use; in this case there just wasn't the room to spare.

Four rows, can hold up to ten cans each, but she only keeps them a little over half full so it's easier to use. (She's over 70, so I don't give her grief over it. :cool:) The hangers aren't centered on the rack, but that's where the wall studs were:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/Wallrack.jpg


Construction is simple 3/4" MDF board and 1/4" masonite, glued and stapled. The angled cutout is just to make it somewhat easier to grab the can - wouldn't be necessary in the original design:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/Wallrack-detail.jpg

This vertical-rack approach would probably lend itself very well to building in a wall, built in the cavity between studs; probably three cans wide on 16" studs or 4-5 cans wide in a 24" stud cavity..? For that matter, you could use "off" size cans (tuna, vienna sausages, etc) to maximize hard-to-fit widths.

Build one that loads at around 7 1/2 feet up and dispenses at 5 1/2 feet or so, and one below it that loads at 5 feet & dispenses at 2 1/2 or 3 feet or so, would make a lot of self-rotating "stacked" cans, and having it split into two racks that way would keep it from having so much weight on any single bottom can. Never tried it myself, but it would probably work pretty well that way.

G29Reload
03-31-2012, 08:27
Fwiw, the small wall rack that I did for a family member a few years ago. It's based on a design from www.canracks.com, but changed slightly. The original design has the bottom (dispensing area) kick the cans slightly forward,
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f360/quake316/preps/Wallrack-detail.jpg

This vertical-rack approach would probably lend itself very well to building in a wall, built in the cavity between studs; probably three cans wide on 16" studs or 4-5 cans wide in a 24" stud cavity..? For that matter, you could use "off" size cans (tuna, vienna sausages, etc) to maximize hard-to-fit widths.

Build one that loads at around 7 1/2 feet up and dispenses at 5 1/2 feet or so, and one below it that loads at 5 feet & dispenses at 2 1/2 or 3 feet or so, would make a lot of self-rotating "stacked" cans, and having it split into two racks that way would keep it from having so much weight on any single bottom can. Never tried it myself, but it would probably work pretty well that way.

I am going to get the parts to start something like this today, a wall free in my pantry is gonna get it.

I don't know what is with the folks at can racks charging for such a design. It ain't rocket science, you can figure it out yourself.

36" in height will give you a row 12 cans tall. I am gonna make a 4 row so that will hold 4 lids (cases)

The verticals will be 1x4's.
The base will be 1x6"s.
I will mitre the top of the verticals and the cap will be a probably a 1x2.

Another 1x2 for a lip on the base to keep the cans from popping out the chute.

Bolt it to the wall with screws. No back, the wall will serve as that.

I will find some 2" wide and 3 inch wide thin material for the front to on-center the verticals to hold in the cans.

three slots will be 4 3/4 " for standard cans and one slot on the end will be an extra 1/2 inch wide to be the Chunky Soup slot.

You can build the whole thing with a chop saw and a driver drill with screws.

Bolster
03-31-2012, 09:09
I don't know what is with the folks at can racks charging for such a design. It ain't rocket science, you can figure it out yourself.

Dude! Make your own design and then compete at a lower price!

G29Reload
03-31-2012, 10:35
Dude! Make your own design and then compete at a lower price!


They could probably sell you a rack for what they charge for the plans. I designed mine on the back of an envelope this morning with a piece of scrap lumber and a tape measure.

Gettin the materials later today will try and post a pic when time.

Bolster
03-31-2012, 16:10
That's a valuable envelope, better sell it on eBay!!

quake
04-01-2012, 06:19
...I don't know what is with the folks at can racks charging for such a design. It ain't rocket science, you can figure it out yourself.

...Bolt it to the wall with screws. No back, the wall will serve as that.

...You can build the whole thing with a chop saw and a driver drill with screws.

I didn't mind buying the plans initially - I bought one each of the horizontal & vertical - as the $30 or so spent probably saved me some degree of mistakes, re-do's and "wish-I-would've" time up front. Either way has its own upsides & downsides; in time, expense, annoyance or regret, if nothing else. That said, their vertical design is more involved than mine; and probably easier to use as well.

You could probably do a "no back" version of the free-hanging version, but with the back adding only 1/4" of depth, to me it was worth that little bit of material. There's a lot of weight there - that rack completely full is probably 60-80 lbs on the wall, plus the jolts & jarring of loading & unloading. The solid back lends a lot of strength to it. (Another reason an "in the wall" version would be neat imo.)

I used a few screws, but mostly staples (pneumatic trim stapler) & glue. The staples can be set to be just barely countersunk so the finished surface is bump-free, and the glue adds a lot of strength, making it more monolithic structurally. You wouldn't think so to look at it, but there's a surprising amount of weight there.

Bolster
04-01-2012, 09:09
Well Quake, I am in the market for a set of used plans, if you know of any.

I'd not want to use particle board for them, though. Particle board's not the greatest material to have around food (although it wouldn't affect cans) but there's other more permeable stuff in my pantry.

Regards the "in the wall" plan, imagine if only the top and bottom slots were visible. That would make for a super-clean, nearly invisible storage system. Shoot, new houses should all be built that way.

R_W
04-01-2012, 10:33
Regards the "in the wall" plan, imagine if only the top and bottom slots were visible. That would make for a super-clean, nearly invisible storage system. Shoot, new houses should all be built that way.

There was someone out there that used to sell that. Plus you could hide the top and bottom slots behind vent covers.

Also a blog that built them into the toekick of their cabinets.

And another in the joist spaces in the basement while finishing it.

I can't find any of the links now :crying:

sebecman
04-02-2012, 10:30
I like the racks and rollers a lot but they take up so much room. We don't have a big kitchen or a lot of pantry/cabinet space but we do have an unused bedroom in the basement solely devoted to food storage, shelving is accessable from floor to ceiling on 3 sides so it makes rotation less of a chore.

Our kitchen cabinets upstairs serve as daily pantry, when we get low on a particular item we just go downstairs for more. Works well but still requires a maintenance day once every 2 or 3 months to fully ensure fifo.

quake
04-02-2012, 13:52
...I'd not want to use particle board for them, though. Particle board's not the greatest material to have around food (although it wouldn't affect cans) but there's other more permeable stuff in my pantry...
MDF, not particle board. Outgassing concerns are similar to particle board, but outgassing from both of them has dropped hugely in the past 20 years or so; particle-board outgassing is something like 80-90% less emission than it was in the 80's, and mdf is right at where particle board is now in that respect. Worth thinking about, but not a huge issue like it used to be imo.


As far as mdf vs. particle board, I wouldn't use particle board for much of anything nowadays; at least not without a melamine veneer at a minimum. Too prone to sagging over time and to eager to release when glued to something. On the other side of the coin, MDF does want to split more easily than some things, but as much as I like gluing things, it works for me. My philosophy is "the screws (staples, nails) are just to hold it until the glue dries". :cool: Trim staples from a 1/4" airgun work well with the mdf & masonite both; and the mdf & masonite don't give you chips & splinters the way dimensional wood, plywood, or even particle board do.

Hard to describe MDF if you're not familiar with it. If you look at it & feel it, you might swear it's layers of paper glued together, but it's really not - it has an almost 'velvety' feel to it on a freshly cut edge. It's also heavier than particle board I believe, but that's outweighed by its advantages to me personally.

Bolster
04-02-2012, 14:04
...outgassing from both of them has dropped hugely in the past 20 years or so; particle-board outgassing is something like 80-90% less emission than it was in the 80's, and mdf is right at where particle board is now in that respect...

Wow, I did not know that. Good to know. Maybe not so much worse than plywood, eh?

G29Reload
04-02-2012, 16:16
Done!

All the plans were in my head and inspiration from Quake's pic.

Lessons learned:

This one, while 3x10 is about the biggest you should build.

The weight is a bit much, you will have to lift slightly on the next to last can to pull the bottom one out.

Back was not needed for strength. A 2x4 the width of the rack, bolted to the wall directly underneath, was.

The can fairy will screw with you. I left wiggle room, but the shrinking can syndrome in brand variance can make double checking how they sit a necessity. every now and then, lately with cranberries, the go from 16 to 14 oz. :steamed:

Also, for once an online forum made me productive. About $40 in materials. 6 hours in the garage today, maybe less, taking my time.

Owning a chop saw is priceless.

Ta Da!

quake
04-02-2012, 16:56
Looks great. :thumbsup: Very similar to the bought plan's version; main difference was that theirs held the bottom can just a tad further forward, to avoid/minimize the weight issue you mention.

Careful now - you'll find all kinds of places & variations for these kind of things. Oversize version holding coffee cans (or baby-formula cans) of pistol brass, small versions for battery storage, it's a slippery slope... :supergrin:

G29Reload
04-02-2012, 17:29
I think I'm pretty much limited to doing one more, a 3x6deep to go just above this one, from the materials I have left.

It is fun building shelving, I think its in my blood.

G29Reload
04-02-2012, 17:37
Regards the "in the wall" plan, imagine if only the top and bottom slots were visible. That would make for a super-clean, nearly invisible storage system. Shoot, new houses should all be built that way.

Don't know that this is practical. I see the cool factor, and its all stealth. BUT:

My first impression is, you can't see inventory. You could deal with this by putting a dummy can with a measured string or cord, with increments marked and some kind of fob on the end so you know how many cans are hiding.

The second thing, more fatal to this project is…loading is problematic. Suppose you let it run down to your last can.

Since these are FIFO racks, self rotating, you're gonna load from the top.

Ok, so what will THAT look like? Slide a can into the wall and CLANK! Well you can then put the first can in the bottom, IF the slot is empty. But if its a dozen deep? and what if it spins or tumbles when you drop it in? All the cans will get dented. What if one of the tumblers clogs things up? NOW what?:dunno:

With mine, you can top load and guide it down, no clunking or tumbling.

But dont worry, we here at the Self Rotating Can Rack Institute are hard at work on a solution. Well, usually, right now we're going out for a beer.:wavey:

Bolster
04-02-2012, 17:59
First off, nice job Reload! My competitive juices are kicking in and I may have to prove my worthiness (to myself) by building something similar.

Second, you're right, the 'dropping can' problem would queer the deal for in-wall storage. Not to mention if a can binds or gets sideways and stuck somewhere in the middle. So, I modify that suggestion to one where you have a magnetic mount "modesty panel" over the top of your rack, and only the bottom can visible when it's in place. Better get back to work--gotta make Mrs. Reload happy. (There IS a Mrs. Reload, I assume? A catch such as yourself could not possibly be single.)

G29Reload
04-02-2012, 23:03
Better get back to work--gotta make Mrs. Reload happy. (There IS a Mrs. Reload, I assume? A catch such as yourself could not possibly be single.)

No Mrs Reload. I oughta be able to attract one with shelf making skills like that. I can cook too!

Thought I had scored a nice GF locally recently…she was a prepper. But for all the wrong reasons.

A tinfoil-hat crazy type. A little scary. Conspiracy theory type, then found she never talked about anything else…went nowhere fast. Cut the rope on that one…I need someone who's feet are planted firmly in reality.

The reveal panel/service door concept has merit on the in-the-wall idea. Now, if you cleanly and efficiently can cut the sheetrock, edge it with molding, put hinges on one side and a handle on the other…

nah, sheetrock too crumbly. Uncooperative. Maybe precision-cut it out and re-frame it in wood with a wood door mounted on hinges. But I'm not sure if all that labor has the payback unless you're really hurting for space.

BamaTrooper
04-03-2012, 06:36
I like the design, and am impressed with the craftsmanship, but we typically don't have 10 cans of exactly the same thing. How does one reach into the middle of the stack and pull a particular can?

OTOH, it's a compelling design. Do you have dimentioned plans, by chance?

When we buy canned goods, we usaually buy 8-10 cans of the same kind of stuff. The main canned goods are tuna fish and salmon, kidney beans, diced tomato, stewed tomato, tomato paste, garbanzos, white beans, some ineapple, and maybe a few cans of soup (various brands).

Bagged rice and beans go in a separate area with pasta and boxed goods like cereal go in another.

Bolster
04-03-2012, 09:30
No Mrs Reload.

Well, then. The advice regards keeping multiples, backups, and redundant stock, also applies to girlfriends. That's where you need to be practicing your rotation skills.

Some people try that with wives, too, but that doesn't work so good.

Regards panels...probably neither of us are serious about it, but if I were, I'd be looking at plywood panels edged with molding. Although the magnet mount idea would probably be too anemic, and would not get you though the next earthquake, so hinges and latch would be the way to go.

I do very much like the idea of using that dead-space in the wall for storage, though. That's got merit. Who knows, maybe that can of peaches can stop a bullet.

jason10mm
04-03-2012, 10:29
You find me a way to store a 20 year old GF so I can take her out 20 years from now (still a 20 year old GF) and I'll make you a rich man :P

Hmm, wonder if dehydrating will take the crazy out...., maybe freeze dried?

kirgi08
04-03-2012, 11:36
Pressure canning.'08.

SFCSMITH(RET)
04-03-2012, 12:34
You find me a way to store a 20 year old GF so I can take her out 20 years from now (still a 20 year old GF) and I'll make you a rich man :P

Hmm, wonder if dehydrating will take the crazy out...., maybe freeze dried?


Mylar and a big bucket.. ??