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Gnflorida
04-24-2012, 17:22
I know i know "wrong forum" I want to hear top 10 things in a Glock Talkers 72 hour bag. Must haves?

faawrenchbndr
04-24-2012, 17:39
"72 hour bag" :dunno:

SJ 40
04-24-2012, 17:44
Bugout bag,SHTF bag I think. SJ 40

9mm +p+
04-24-2012, 17:50
Weapon/ammo, Knife, flashlight/batts, 1st aid, food, water or means of purification, means for making fire, spare socks!, small binos/monocular, any meds you would need.
Down and dirty quick list but there are so many variables that 10 is unrealistic. My stuff is a bit more in depth than just the list, some folks will need bug spray if you live in the south for example. A blanket or 2 would make sense in the cold north etc.

Gnflorida
04-24-2012, 18:34
Bugout bag,SHTF bag I think. SJ 40

Exactly, prepare for the worst hope for the best. I know there's alt of variables, just for a bit of fun.

Ocean_glocker
04-24-2012, 18:40
in my get home/out bag:

2- days clothes (wife and I)
2- G17 mags
box of 9mm and buckshot
2- MREs
firestarter
matches
flashlight
first aide kit
water containers
multi-tool
Knife
cash (small bills)

I'm sure I'm forgetting something

GRT45
04-24-2012, 19:03
Sootch made a video on his Gun & Gear Reviewer channel that's filled with useful ideas and some recommendations for suppliers of the gear.

Bug Out Bag Survival Bag

Motown Fire
04-25-2012, 01:17
So what are you "Bugging Out" from ??? Is your ex old lady really that mean ???

Folsom_Prison
04-25-2012, 01:35
I don't have a bug out bag.

Bruce M
04-25-2012, 06:02
Toilet paper. Towlettes. Tylenol. Ibuprophen. Maalox. Antacid. Paper towels.
Dehydrated beer. Laptop. Extra laptop battery. All original Star Trek episodes on a flash drive.

ADK_40GLKr
04-25-2012, 06:28
Lotsa ammo!

I'm probably where everybody else wants to bug out to! :tongueout:

bam1131
04-25-2012, 07:28
I get stuff together during hurricane season but I don't have a "bug out" bag. I think someone has been watching too much Doomsday Preppers. The world isn't on December 22nd. The Aliens aren't coming on independence day.

What is going to happen so quickly that you need to leave in less than 20 minutes? (beside a tornado,but then wouldn't you go into your cellar or something like that?)

If hoards of people are heading your way I'm sure that you would know and have ample time to pack and leave. Maybe I'm wrong but so far I haven't seen a reason to bug out.(except for a hurricane evac but even then you still have days to get your crap and leave) Hell maybe I'm wrong. IDK

Could someone enlighten me on a situation that requires a 20 min or less evac?

RobG
04-25-2012, 07:47
I don't have a bug out bag.

Ditto....:dunno:

ron59
04-25-2012, 07:52
I know i know "wrong forum" I want to hear top 10 things in a Glock Talkers 72 hour bag. Must haves?

So... you KNOW it's the wrong forum, but you go ahead and do it anyway?

Hmmmm... if this was my site, instant ban.

bam1131
04-25-2012, 07:57
So... you KNOW it's the wrong forum, but you go ahead and do it anyway?

Hmmmm... if this was my site, instant ban.

When you start a sentence with " I know it is the wrong _____ but.." that immediately should tell you "Stop and find the correct forum"

SFCSMITH(RET)
04-25-2012, 08:55
I KNOW! I KNOW!!

Put in the right forum, and you will get good answers.. Put it in the wrong one, ON PURPOSE.. not so much.

BTW. I am bugged out. No bag.

pugman
04-25-2012, 09:07
Could someone enlighten me on a situation that requires a 20 min or less evac?

House fire.

I'm not sure what is in your BOB, 72 hour Bag or whatever you want to call it but amongst my stuff is a flash drive inside a waterproof/crush resistant case. This flash drive is a backup to the backup I keep in my safety deposit box and is updated monthly.

I know people who have gone through nightmares with insurance companies trying to recoup payouts on their insurance; their claims were legitimate but they had a difficult time coming up with the receipts, pictures and paperwork to support large insurance claims. This drive also contains pictures of pets in case during a fire they got out but ran away. It also contains copies of birth certificates, our passports, driver's licenses, social security cards, titles to our cars, taxes, deeds to properties, our wills, etc.

I could easily have this drive in my nightstand but in my BOB seems easier.

It took a weekend of home scanning to put together - I showed it to my agent who showed it to an underwriter and basically if I have a house fire I will have no problem getting the maximum payout on my insurance.

A BOB covers a lot more ground than just a zombie attack.

kirgi08
04-25-2012, 09:30
Yep,been a guest of honor in one.'08.

Bolster
04-25-2012, 09:37
To the OP:

Did you catch the stickied thread on BOBs? It's very good.

http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=812551

thesurefire
04-25-2012, 09:39
A 72 BOB can be useful for a number of reasons:

House fire, wildfire, break in, crime near your area, sporting event getting out of hand, tornado, riot, nuclear, chemical or bio weapon event, pandemic, mother in law drops by unexpectedly the list goes on and on.

I'll assume you have a quality bag.

1. 10 liter dromedary bag, re-fill it every 6 months, with hanging hook, tubing, mouth pieces ect

2. Leatherman/Gerber/Sog quality multi tool

3. Glock + 2-3 mags

4. Cash. Lots of it.

5. Copies of important documents, credit cards, passport, birth certificate ect. DONT HAVE PHYSICAL COPIES. use truecrpty on a thumb drive so if someone steals the bag they dont steal your identity.

6. Change of cloths. Get quality smartwool socks, no cotton.

7. First aid kit. All the normal stuff, sanitizing kit, bandaids, antibiotic ointment, blister kit, ect.

8. Quality flashlight + batteries. I like surefires.

9. Radio + batteries. You need to be able to hear the outside world.

10. hygiene kit. toilet paper, powder, body wipes, soap, hand sanitizer.

Id say thats the more important 10, but it really does depend on where you are and what youre preping for.

Food, a map, a compass, a cook kit, a prepaid cellphone + charger, lighters, a sleeping bag, and a big knife are also pretty important, but you'd still be ok without them.

Gnflorida
04-25-2012, 09:41
So... you KNOW it's the wrong forum, but you go ahead and do it anyway?

Hmmmm... if this was my site, instant ban.

Wow go cry about it, eww wrong forum oh my god! Hopefully people like you will be the first to go.

Dexters
04-25-2012, 10:07
1. Knowledge - when to stay home, when to go
2. Knowledge - Everything you need to know about a Bug Out Location
3. Knowledge - physical limits
4. Knowledge - Gray Man
5. Knowledge - Operational Security
6. Knowledge - Map reading and Orienteering
7. Knowledge - Physical/Health preps
8. Knowledge - Emergency Medical
9. Knowledge - Mental preps
10. Knowledge - How to use the stuff in the bag

I know i know "wrong forum"

Considering you knowing got the forum wrong - your bag is likely to be empty.

G29Reload
04-25-2012, 10:27
5. Copies of important documents, credit cards, passport, birth certificate ect. DONT HAVE PHYSICAL COPIES. use truecrpty on a thumb drive so if someone steals the bag they dont steal your identity.


ALTERNATE METHODS

For the Mac

.dmg files with the Disk Utility in Utilities…64bit password protected encryption. Go to open the .dmg file so configured and you are prompted for a password. No tickee, no laundry. Password mounts the file as though a drive and everything in a file or folder are revealed and available.

Universal PC or Mac,

Encrypted .PDF files.

Scan your stuff up and paste it to an MS Word or Pages document and export to .pdf, take the encryption option. Needs password to open or no get.

MS Excel:

Can copy your essential numbers, DL #, insurance policy, etc. and can probably paste in images.

Save the file with a password. Will then NOT open without one. Data safe. MS Excel on the Mac or PC.

All these options are free if you have the platform and software. .PDFs are probably the best, work everywhere .pdf does.

ron59
04-25-2012, 13:10
Wow go cry about it, eww wrong forum oh my god! Hopefully people like you will be the first to go.

Seeing as the owner of this site has a BIG RED BANNER at the top of that forum saying DON'T DO exactly what you did?

I'd say he was serious about it too.
And seeing as your post has since been moved (by a moderator, not me)... I guess there's someone else who did as well.

Don't start crying just because I pointed out your obvious d-baggery.

Lastly... if we ever have a EOTWAWKI... it'll most likely be caused by d-bags who figure the rules don't apply to them and just do whatever they want. Like you.

Bilbo Bagins
04-25-2012, 13:24
I don't have a bug out bag.

+1 .... well sort of

I hike and camp a lot so I have a few Backpacks already packed, ready to go for anything from a 3 day/50 mile hike on the Appalachian trail, to a hike out of town because some SHTF even happened.

Sorry but I laugh at some of the BOB I seen out there and the guys who use them.

1) Some are crazy short on food. A pound of food per person per day should be the rule of thumb. If you really think you are going to walk 50 miles on 6 granola bars for a family of Four you are sadly mistaken. You will turn into a zombie looter on day two.

2) Some people are retarded tactical gearheads. I need a Maxpedition backpack with zero lumbar support, and I need to carry 60 pounds of useless and redundant gear, along with my 1911 and 6 mags and my AK with 14 mags. Yea sure tubby, let's see you walk a mile with that let alone 50. Seriously, to a hiker or even those in the military, these Geardo BOBs have the mentality of an Airsofters in the firearm world.

What you need to do is check out what "REAL" hikers do. People how have traveled long distance with just what is on their back. Do research on ultralight hiking, people who have done long distance trips or expeditions, even modern day hobos, and get an idea of what they carry with them.

Foxtrotx1
04-25-2012, 13:29
Condoms, 6 pack of mikes hard (fruity flavor), water based kiwi strawberry lube, bottles of water, Advil, Cliff bars.

I keep that in the car for the weekends here at ASU.

quake
04-25-2012, 14:08
I'm a fan of lists, so my first suggestion would be to make a list of what your family may need during that 72 hours. Specific items for specific people - feminine products, baby formula, diapers, medications, whatever. See what you use in a normal week, and then see how you can distill that list down to something manageable.


...1) Some are crazy short on food.

...2) Some people are retarded tactical gearheads.
...60 pounds of useless and redundant gear, along with my 1911 and 6 mags and my AK with 14 mags. Yea sure tubby, let's see you walk a mile with that let alone 50.
Those bear repeating and considering. Recently there was a video posted here of a 72-hour bag that included a 5.7x28 rifle with 1500 rounds of ammunition, recommended an unused (untested) knife since a used (tested) one would be dull (tells me that he can't sharpen a knife), and had what looked like a $8 auto-parts-store LED flashlight; all from a guy who was a good 100 pounds overweight and was noticeably breathing heavier just 6 or 7 minutes into the video demonstrating his "bugout" gear. Dude's gonna fail miserably & painfully if he ever has to actually use what he's planning on using. Not hating on the guy; it's just so sad and common.


...What you need to do is check out what "REAL" hikers do. People how have traveled long distance with just what is on their back. Do research on ultralight hiking, people who have done long distance trips or expeditions, even modern day hobos, and get an idea of what they carry with them.
While I'll never truly join the 'ultralight packing' crowd, this also is a very good suggestion imo. Appalacihan trail hikers, rocky mountain hikers, etc, have a lot of hours invested in their activities, and there are a lot of forums & blogs that have massive amounts of info (some good some maybe not) out there.

Learning from others - even others' mistakes - is a very good idea imo; and there are a lot of gear reviews that are worth much more than the time it takes to look them up.

On top of all that, USE and TEST things; and "things" encompasses not just gear, but plans, techniques, and assumptions as well.

Glocksanity
04-25-2012, 18:25
Could someone enlighten me on a situation that requires a 20 min or less evac?

I live in Los Angeles, so that would be earthquakes. In 94, a buddy of mine left his apartment after the quake never to return as the building was condemned. What he didn't take he lost...forever.

So, here, it is wise to have a bag that has essentials should you not be able to return to your home.

Bolster
04-25-2012, 18:45
I live in Los Angeles, so that would be earthquakes. In 94, a buddy of mine left his apartment after the quake never to return as the building was condemned. What he didn't take he lost...forever.

So we're getting 20 minute warnings of earthquakes now? Cool!

Motown Fire
04-25-2012, 23:47
So we're getting 20 minute warnings of earthquakes now? Cool!

It's about time :rofl:

TangoFoxtrot
04-26-2012, 04:18
Sootch made a video on his Gun & Gear Reviewer channel that's filled with useful ideas and some recommendations for suppliers of the gear.

Bug Out Bag Survival Bag (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_OLFDyXcRM)

That looks like my Maxpedition Malaga Gearslinger bag. Great product. I use mine as a GHB.

RatDrall
04-26-2012, 04:46
OP: Figure what you'd need to spend a few days in a hotel, on a friend's couch, in your car, in the woods, or in an alley. Then make sure it doesn't get too heavy (no more than 25 lbs) and you know how to use everything in the bag.

First aid
Water
Shelter
Warmth
Food

A lot of people pack a huge ruck full of stuff that they don't need, don't know how to use, and can't physically carry to the end of their driveway and back without getting winded. Have to remember that the 72 hr bag is not about being comfortable, it's about not dying for a few days.

Knowing my limits, my bag weighs less than 25 lbs loaded, with water. I keep non-essentials, like spare clothing etc. in a duffel bag next to my 72 hour bag. If I'm in a car, or just running out the door due to a fire or gas leak or whatever, I'll drag the duffel along. If I have to continue on foot, the duffel gets left behind. Layers FTW.


2) Some people are retarded tactical gearheads. I need a Maxpedition backpack with zero lumbar support, and I need to carry 60 pounds of useless and redundant gear, along with my 1911 and 6 mags and my AK with 14 mags. Yea sure tubby, let's see you walk a mile with that let alone 50. Seriously, to a hiker or even those in the military, these Geardo BOBs have the mentality of an Airsofters in the firearm world.


:rofl:




1) Some are crazy short on food. A pound of food per person per day should be the rule of thumb. If you really think you are going to walk 50 miles on 6 granola bars for a family of Four you are sadly mistaken. You will turn into a zombie looter on day two.

...

What you need to do is check out what "REAL" hikers do. People how have traveled long distance with just what is on their back. Do research on ultralight hiking, people who have done long distance trips or expeditions, even modern day hobos, and get an idea of what they carry with them.

I disagree about the food. I've gone almost a week eating next to nothing before, doing quite a bit of physical activity, but took in enough calories to not feel weak. This is where the dense calorie/ration bars come in handy. You won't feel full, but you also won't feel weak because those ration bars are full of fat and sugar and vitamins.

The hobos you mentioned don't have 1 lb of food per day on their back. They make do with very little, or find food as they go.

What people pack too little of is water, because most have no clue how to make what water they find drinkable.

Dexters
04-26-2012, 07:31
The hobos you mentioned don't have 1 lb of food per day on their back. They make do with very little, or find food as they go.

It probably isn't a SHTF situation if people can find food as they go along. Sound like the internet went out.



What people pack too little of is water, because most have no clue how to make what water they find drinkable.

True

quake
04-26-2012, 08:22
...I disagree about the food. I've gone almost a week eating next to nothing before, doing quite a bit of physical activity, but took in enough calories to not feel weak. This is where the dense calorie/ration bars come in handy. You won't feel full, but you also won't feel weak because those ration bars are full of fat and sugar and vitamins.

The hobos you mentioned don't have 1 lb of food per day on their back. They make do with very little, or find food as they go.

What people pack too little of is water, because most have no clue how to make what water they find drinkable.

Valid points as well. A lot of folks swing both ways on too much food or even none at all; both are mistakes imo. I only carry four actual "meals" in my ghb pack; four of the supposed two-serving mountain house packages. Do have some other small stuff like jerky sticks & coffee, but not a ton of food.

I don't want to "have to" find food as I go, but it's usually do-able, and wouldn't be a concern for half a week or so anyway.

On water, another good point. More important than food; but in our area is almost never difficult to find, and once found is easy enough to make potable. I carry a voyageur purifier and potable aqua tabs both, and if all else fails there's the boiling approach. (I also carry the secondary potable aqua tabs to reduce the iodine taste; not really necessary, but just a comfort thing for me personally.) In addition to the bottled water I keep for daily use in the back seat, my ghb pack has three (empty) stainless water bottles, and those combined with the purifier, tablets & boiling more than serve my needs.

That said, one of the water bottles isn't actually empty - that's where the jerky sticks are kept; but they can easily be removed & transferred to pockets to free up the bottle for water use. The bottle just makes a handy, airtight place to keep them.

If a person's area is dry or saltwater only, etc, they should have a much different water approach than our area requires.

FireForged
04-26-2012, 09:08
I live in the rural Southland and normally keep a emergency bag in the truck box. This bag also doubles as a camp bag.

Here are just some basic contents. I am a very minimal kind of person in that I dont have many redundant items.

Fireforge bullet points:

e- energy (food water)
82oz water (water bladder and canteen)
1 datrex food brick (16 bars)
3 cans tuna (pull top)
1 very small jar peanutbutter

e- Environment
french shelter half (basically a large triangle tarp with lanyard rings. Bic lighters in a hard case, cotton balls, fire steel, gortex rain poncho, boots, dickies brand coveralls, flexlite mesh cap

e- Enemy
defenseive tool of choice

i- Injury
personal med kit

u- utility
75ft 550 para cord
10 ft duct tape
6 towelettes
2 cr123 batteries
Fenix LED flashlight
folding knife
fixed blade knife
steel cup & stove (fits on bottom of canteen)
boyscout spork
water filter
TP


Weight under 25 pounds

Currrent Bag
LApolicegear $79 generic pack
(2) Maxpedition EDC pocket organizers

retired bag was a alice pack and ziplock baggies... Worked just fine but got tired of the straps cutting into my shoulders on long hikes.

Glocksanity
04-26-2012, 19:28
So we're getting 20 minute warnings of earthquakes now? Cool!

Nope. But when the earthquake hits, you duck and cover and when the shaking stops, you might need to get out and you may never be let back in. That is when you need a bag you can grab and go and say goodbye.

redbrd
04-29-2012, 08:36
First off I don't keep a bug out bag... currently. I don't have a specific senario to pack for.
When I did I subscribed to a pretty spartan list as weight matters. Pair of socks, extra t-shirt, water (camel back resevior), multitool, GPS/map/compass, credit card, cash, powerbars, and basic first aid. Those are the basics. Circumstances dictate the rest.

Just1More
04-30-2012, 06:17
I love the people who are unable to imagine a situation where they might need to leave their house quickly.

DustyJacket
04-30-2012, 07:52
Don't forget your towel, you hoopy frood:

“A towel, [The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy] says, is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have. Partly it has great practical value. You can wrap it around you for warmth as you bound across the cold moons of Jaglan Beta; you can lie on it on the brilliant marble-sanded beaches of Santraginus V, inhaling the heady sea vapors; you can sleep under it beneath the stars which shine so redly on the desert world of Kakrafoon; use it to sail a miniraft down the slow heavy River Moth; wet it for use in hand-to-hand-combat; wrap it round your head to ward off noxious fumes or avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (such a mind-boggingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you); you can wave your towel in emergencies as a distress signal, and of course dry yourself off with it if it still seems to be clean enough.”
― Douglas Adams

Yes, I am thinking of a bag to grab in case of fire or tornado, yet secure enough so someone is not likely to get it and all the documents in it like birth certificates, copied of drivers licenses, etc.