Bug out motorcycle... what would you recomend??? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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mixflip
04-25-2012, 09:42
I was browsing my local craigslist and stumbled across a few 1970's and 80's enduros/dual sports for dirt cheap. Under $1000 and running.

Many had no titles hence the low price I would assume. This had me thinking... maybe an old carburated enduro might actually make for a decent bug out vehicle? Keep a few electronic spare parts on hand in case of an EMP if you even need any at all in some cases?

It could zig zag around the sea of clogged cars on the road. I saw a picture of an entire Malaysian family of 4 on a scooter heading for high ground last week during their tsunami warning. lol.

What would you motorcycle experts recommend?

Bren
04-25-2012, 09:48
I recommend not bugging out on a motorcycle. They don't haul supplies very well or offer any protection from bad weather, bullets, etc. A 4WD SUV would be a much better choice.

Dexters
04-25-2012, 10:00
What would you motorcycle experts recommend?



First research about EMPs - carburated not needed.

Protect battery and computer of a modern one at home and you are OK. Research that.

Focus on getting it quiet and how/what to load it.

Then research you route to your bug out location.

kirgi08
04-25-2012, 10:17
KISS.A simple solid Harley or Can-Am.'08.

ChuteTheMall
04-25-2012, 10:34
No title?:alex:

itstime
04-25-2012, 10:40
Your thinking is the same as mine. Old on/offs will just go. If they are two stroke I would opt for injection and not premix. Keeps it simpler.

I wouldn't use it as my only vehicle but have one for what they are for. Strap it to an SUV .

I have an old Honda just for this purpose.

syntaxerrorsix
04-25-2012, 10:47
Urban gridlock? Bicycle :supergrin:

sebecman
04-25-2012, 11:03
I dont' understand this "no title" concern.

In Maine anyway, if a vehicle is more than 12 years old you don't need a title.

:dunno:

Rcsteffen
04-25-2012, 11:06
Military klr650 converted to diesel. Out just a gas version...

Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

F_G
04-25-2012, 12:10
Military klr650 converted to diesel. Out just a gas version...

Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
That's what I was thinkin'.
http://inlinethumb03.webshots.com/48066/2561549390064845190S600x600Q85.jpg (http://rides.webshots.com/photo/2561549390064845190YISzOV)

Bren
04-25-2012, 12:12
Urban gridlock? Bicycle :supergrin:

Probably a better choice, as is a horse. Neither requires you to carry gas and both are quiet. Honestly, a motorcycle is the worst SHTF/survival vehicle I can imagine.

If you want a motorcycle, just get one, but don't pretend it's for survival.

mixflip
04-25-2012, 12:18
Lol I just realized that I could build a faraday cage to park the bike in since it would be just sitting around as a bug out vehicle and not a primary commuter. That means I dont really need to worry about the computer on a modern bike. I have seen a few early 90's dual sports for less than $1500 and they were street legal!

I would love to have one of those old military diesel KLR's but they are hard to find.

I agree supplies and family are a major issue with a bike but as someone already mentioned...it would be nice to have a dual sport sitting in the back of my truck as a backup BOV.

I agree a bike would not provide any protection from foul weather or zombies but it also doesnt get stuck in traffic as easy as a car/truck so its not 100% useless.

As for a horse? I live in a gated community in a city of 2 million+. The cost of maintaining a horse in the meantime, before a SHTF is just not practical for me. You still have to feed and water a horse and it too suffers from the lack of protection from the weather and bad guys projectiles.

Now I do know there are a few rich guys a mile away from me who have ranches and horses but trying to take one of their horses in a SHTF event would most likely get me ventilated with a hunting rifle? Unless of course they bugged out and left a few horses behind?

Prothos
04-25-2012, 12:28
http://wwww.pauljrdesigns.com/lifestyle/bikes/gears.html

dissthis
04-25-2012, 14:02
I have a 1999 KTM L4...enduro...I wouldn't really bug out on it as I couldn't carry enough stuff or the wife and kids on it too...

I might use it to get somewhere quickly if SHTF; like to go the 5 miles to check on my parents/sister...

Maybe use it to scout ahead if wife is driving with kids in the SUV,

I have a trailer hitch carrier that IF (don't plan on it) I ever did bug out I would drive the SUV and carry the bike.

cowboy1964
04-25-2012, 15:05
http://talkingwalkingdead.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Daryl-Bike1.jpg

Donn57
04-25-2012, 15:13
Motorcycles just can't carry enough to be a practical bug out vehicle. I'm not sure why carrying one on or in your primary bug out vehicle is worth wasting the space it takes up. Whether you launch it from home or from the back of your bug out truck, the same problems exist.

I do kind of like the idea of using for short trips or as a scouting vehicle, tho.

mixflip
04-25-2012, 16:14
The idea of a bike for my 5 mile bubble to get supplies or check on friends and neighbors etc etc really does make sense. Fast, in and out and never blocked in.

The bike as a scout vehicle also makes sense. Once you make it to your bug out location a bike would make for a good scout vehicle in deed.

I am not a fan of bugging out in general. It would have to be the last ditch option for me to bug out and leave all my major assets behind.

mac66
04-25-2012, 16:24
I rode my 1969 Honda Trail 90 from my home north of Detroit, over to Canada, around Lake Huron and back a couple of summers ago. I carried every thing I need to camp for 10 days and with side trips did about 600 miles by my self. Had a couple of flat tires and fouled a plug, otherwise no problems though I only averaged about 35 MPH and of course it was butt numbing and back breaking.

I have a 75 Honda XL175 I bought 10 years ago for $300. I and have ridden it from my home to northern Michigan a couple times on back roads. With a rack on the back, saddle bags and extra fuel cans I can make it the 180 miles without stopping.

I also did a lot of dual sport motorcycling back in the day on a Suzuki DRZ400s.

So yeah, bugging out on small motorcycles and even scooters can be done. The old jap bikes are pretty much bullet proof, are cheap and fun to rebuild.

My suggestion is go to to adventurerider.com and look in the various forums for tips on how to pack and what to take. There is a forum called minimalist touring in which people go all over the world on 250cc and smaller bikes. That's where I got my inspiration for my around the lake ride.

LongGun1
04-25-2012, 16:45
Actually my Suzuki V-Strom (aka DL-1000....Dual Sport 1000cc V-Twin) is a good choice for a 'Bug-out Bike' for a big guy with lots-of-gear!

Can carry hundreds of pounds & still be maneuverable..

..has lots of torque, a high ground clearance, fairly quiet & is a reliable platform.

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y235/LG1/2010-07-14ArkMotorcycleTrip014.jpg

Also the KLR-650, BMW GS series, Suzuki DL-650 (aka Wee-Strom) or similar are good choices also..

All can go many places larger 4WD vehicles simply cannot..

..such as narrow trails..

.. or especially concerning a bug-out....serious traffic jams..

..think "Deep Impact Traffic Jam Scene"!

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/.a/6a00d8341c630a53ef014e89d8d10d970d-600wi



Last week....there was a very serious traffic jam due to an 18 wheeler accident on I-40...

..vehicles backed for miles & miles...

..but was able to negotiate the jam fairly easily on the bike.




Not the 1st time I have done similar..

..that "plus" could be life saving in an actual bug-out for those of you in urban areas! :supergrin:


Someone riding shotgun (& especially if riding in groups) could dissuade the lowlifes from blocking your egress..

..a bug-out would be a good time to wear body armor under your motorcycle jackets..

..and learn to effectively target your firearms while maneuvering at speed...now!


(BTW...have a full set of tools & EMP shielded electronic spares for the bike as well)

YMMV

mixflip
04-25-2012, 18:14
That scene where Elijia Wood took his motorcycle and got out of the death trap freeway and ran for high ground on it always sticks in my mind when I think of motorcycle bug outs.

Thanks for the links. I'll check them out. I'd love to get a dual sport and take a ride out to the grand canyon, route 66, 4 corners, arches ntl park, Zion and back to Vegas.

Chindo18Z
04-25-2012, 18:45
Anyone have comments or experience with the Can-Am trikes I see advertised on TV.

Mileage? Load capacity (in an emergency)? Off road capability (if any)? Any advantages for inexperienced riders? Downsides? Are there any ATV-like cargo racks for them?

I know diddly squat about bikes...just curious.

LongGun1
04-25-2012, 19:10
That scene where Elijia Wood took his motorcycle and got out of the death trap freeway and ran for high ground on it always sticks in my mind when I think of motorcycle bug outs.

Thanks for the links. I'll check them out. I'd love to get a dual sport and take a ride out to the grand canyon, route 66, 4 corners, arches ntl park, Zion and back to Vegas.


Something to consider for everyday protection...

..as well as extra insurance from thrown or swung projectiles if ever a bug-out.


Researched impact resistant windscreens & came up with this..

National Cycle’s N20212 VStream® windshield

I know of an incident where a ball-peen hammer fell off of a vehicle & was deflected by this type of material...it supposedly hit the dead center windscreen at approx 75 mph....no damage!!! :shocked:

http://www.nationalcycle.com/testimonials/Testimonials_NC.html "I own a Honda Valkyrie with one of your Heavy Duty™ Windshields. I was traveling across the Howard Franklin Bridge in Tampa, Florida when a vehicle directly in front of me had a ball peen hammer fall from it and hit the pavement ahead of me. I had absolutely no time to execute any sort of evasive action. The hammer bounced up and hit my windshield dead center just above the crossbar at around 75MPH. Thanks to the durability of that shield, myself and my passenger were unhurt! The shield absorbed the impact and deflected the hammer away.

"A further testament to the durability of your product is that, upon later inspection, the windshield had sustained no damage, not even a scratch! This was a $200 product that in all likelihood saved my life and the life of my passenger.

"I assure you that in any future windshield purchases, I will accept nothing but a National Cycle windshield. A tremendous thanks to your company and to your design and manufacturing people... I owe them my life!"

Polycarbonate construction with FMR hardcoating also means that the N20212 VStream windshield is the toughest, most scratch resistant windshield available anywhere for the DL1000 and DL650 V-Stroms.

Advantages:
• Replaces the stock windshield – no other components are needed. Just remove your stock windshield and install the VStream® in its place
• 4.5mm thick polycarbonate construction means over 20X greater impact resistance than acrylic/Lucite® plastic
• FMR Hardcoating increases scratch resistance 3X over acrylic/Lucite® plastic
• Compatible with stock hand guards on DL1000 and Suzuki OE accessory hand guards on DL650
• Fits 2004-07 DL1000 V-Strom and 2004-08 DL650 V-Strom

Suggested retail price for the N20212 is $159.95

The N20212 VStream windshield is in stock and available now from National Cycle. There are three ways to order:

1) Order from your local National Cycle dealer.

2) Call National Cycle at 877-WSCREEN to order.

3) Order online at the link(s) below.

bdcochran
04-25-2012, 20:48
By coincidence, I was looking into a motorcycle today.

Are you an experienced rider. If not, you get something like a 125 cruiser if you can find one. You pass on the offroad type. You need experience before purchasing something more powerful.

I don't know where you live, how old you are, whether you have family or how far you have to go to safety.

About 10 years ago, I was out with a big game guide (one of the best in the country) and we were practicing optics where he lived (a long valley). He said that he wanted a motorcycle. I pondered. He wouldn't be able to use the motorcycle very long because of the problem of storing gasoline for the same. He couldn't use it to move his wife or 4 year old daughter either. It was only good for scouting. At that, people would hear it coming from some distance.

This is why I went the bicycle route years ago. Other than a quick bugout, a bicycle would be more utilitarian after shtf.

UneasyRider
04-25-2012, 21:17
Yamaha on/off 250 kick start would be my choice. I owned one once and it was enough for the road or the trails. Be careful though, if you ride off road it's a lot more dangerous than on road. Get you out of the city quick, maybe take you down a utility corridor under the wires and I'll bet you won't find a car that can catch a good rider on a dirt bike in the country with woods and such to zip into.

On another note my wife and I would take off on a Goldwing packed the same for 2 days as for 2 months and we had no problem at all. Managed to ride to almost all of the states and a few Canadian provinces from here in Florida. Although we carried no food and if we had to do that it would not be possible.

lawman800
04-25-2012, 22:29
250 4 stroke enduro dual sport type with factory muffler to keep it all quiet as much as you can while on the move.

Bolster
04-26-2012, 00:08
A bicycle? Seriously? As a Bug Out option?

How much can you carry on a bicycle? Even your BOB would be heavy on a bicycle.

How far could you get? I doubt I could get 50 miles a day on the fat tires of my mountain bike. Beats walking, but...

lawman800
04-26-2012, 00:12
A bicycle? Seriously? As a Bug Out option?

How much can you carry on a bicycle? Even your BOB would be heavy on a bicycle.

How far could you get? I doubt I could get 50 miles a day on the fat tires of my mountain bike. Beats walking, but...

You don't ride the bike anymore, you use it as a beast of burden. Load it up and roll it. Worked for the Viet Cong down the Ho Chi Minh trail.

Javelin
04-26-2012, 00:15
If you are going on a bike you are going ultra-light. That means backpack and pistol as water will be taking up most of your weight.

Not fun and probably the last resort.

SFCSMITH(RET)
04-26-2012, 06:40
There are a lot of problems to useing a bicycle.. but of course there are lots of problems to deal with if any of the crap we talk about in here comes about.. no perfect one size fits all answer..

If I was going to use a bicycle, which is a possibility, since I have $15k worth of them in the garage, and I DO have experience doing LONG rides on them, on and off road, I would use one of these: IBEX (http://www.bobgear.com/ibex).. course you need to have it before the shtf.. You would think with "BOB" in the name, S&P would be all over it.. lol I have pulled one with 60 pounds in it, 40-100+ miles a day, for weeks at a time.

As far as a motorcycle, in the on/off world, the KLR650 is king. period.

Dexters
04-26-2012, 06:42
A bicycle? Seriously? As a Bug Out option?

How much can you carry on a bicycle? Even your BOB would be heavy on a bicycle.

How far could you get? I doubt I could get 50 miles a day on the fat tires of my mountain bike. Beats walking, but...

Search the forum for a discussion about that.

Also, search how bikes were used by the Vietcong during the Vietnam war.

Research long distance biking for how to load a bike.

Dexters
04-26-2012, 06:45
If you are going on a bike you are going ultra-light. That means backpack and pistol as water will be taking up most of your weight.

Not fun and probably the last resort.

No.

What it means is that you learned the concepts and the equipment they use and then adapted the same for your situation.

mixflip
04-26-2012, 09:13
What about a bike and a trailer AND one of those bike motors you can ad on? I have seen gas powered motors and internal electric hub motors.

Regardless...my bug out car will have some bicycles strapped to it for sure. Beats walking if we have to ditch the car.

Bilbo Bagins
04-26-2012, 12:42
http://downtheroad.org/Alaska-Canada-USA/imagesBBB/Winky/DSC06272_small.JPGA bicycle? Seriously? As a Bug Out option?

How much can you carry on a bicycle? Even your BOB would be heavy on a bicycle.

How far could you get? I doubt I could get 50 miles a day on the fat tires of my mountain bike. Beats walking, but...

People do cross country bicycle trips all the time. All you need is a good bike, panniers and strong legs. Just like in the BOB thread, everything you can carry on your back, you can put on a bike, including a lightweight tent, sleeping bag, clothing and provisions.

East Coast to West Coast or visa versa can be done in a month or two, give or take.

http://downtheroad.org/Alaska-Canada-USA/imagesBBB/Winky/DSC06264_small.JPG

LongGun1
04-26-2012, 12:55
What about a bike and a trailer AND one of those bike motors you can ad on? I have seen gas powered motors and internal electric hub motors.

Regardless...my bug out car will have some bicycles strapped to it for sure. Beats walking if we have to ditch the car.


Yes, bikes beat walking!

And I have done alot of deep backwoods exploring on mountain bikes!

With heavy packs including multiple firearms.


Choice of which really depends on your AO & the severity of the "bug-out"..

..on whether you need the extra power of a motorcycle to put distance quickly between you & predators..

..or you & the incident driving you to bug out in the 1st place!


Really no reason you cannot initially bug out with both strapped to your vehicle or trailered!


IMO...For self protection reasons....the motorcycle strongly trumps the bicycle..

..from the ability to effectively use firearms as the rider (or especially if carrying a passenger..)

..to rapidly putting distance between you & threats..

..& in a real tight situation...quickly powering thru threats! :whistling:


On that note..

As I stated previously..

..a good windshield can shield against more than just wind! :supergrin:

And crash padded motorcycle protective pants & jackets designed to absorb serious impacts can do double duty against those trying to dismount you using improvised weapons!


All may sound far fetched now..

..but better safe than sorry! :cool:

Happypuppy
04-26-2012, 13:14
KLR 650, Easy. That said my Vstrom is setup as an urban assault vehicle.

Kevin108
04-26-2012, 13:30
That scene where Elijia Wood took his motorcycle and got out of the death trap freeway and ran for high ground on it always sticks in my mind when I think of motorcycle bug outs.
Sadly there are no mountains in Virginia Beach so while it was dramatic and carried the story, from an accuracy/likelihood standpoint if things like that are part of your survival plans, you better be ready to Jones out in a lead-lined refrigerator as well.

Happypuppy
04-26-2012, 14:14
IMO why a bike can be broken down to a few criteria important to myself
1. It is just myself
2 the roads are so clogged traffic can't move. I have been through 3 major earthquakes starting with Northridge and it was standstill. Bikes split traffic
3. Back roads. I know paths and roads that avoid most any highway and/ or freeway
4. 70 mpg. Can't be discounted. The file is to get me from a to b ASAP and bikes can move or go in goat trails if needed
5, repairs on roadside are pretty simple
Drawbacks of course. But again point a to b ASAP is the highest priority

LongGun1
04-26-2012, 14:28
Sadly there are no mountains in Virginia Beach so while it was dramatic and carried the story, from an accuracy/likelihood standpoint if things like that are part of your survival plans, you better be ready to Jones out in a lead-lined refrigerator as well.

In the story, they were a long way from the stranded motorists still at Va Beach when Biederman? impacted..

..thus the reason for a motorized bike that can cover lots of distance in a hurry.

LongGun1
04-26-2012, 14:30
KLR 650, Easy. That said my Vstrom is setup as an urban assault vehicle.


Cool....another V-Strom owner! :thumbsup:

mac66
04-26-2012, 17:41
One caveat on using motorcycles for bugging out. If you do down on a bike, you are more than likely going to be hurt, badly.

mixflip
04-26-2012, 17:57
IMO why a bike can be broken down to a few criteria important to myself
1. It is just myself
2 the roads are so clogged traffic can't move. I have been through 3 major earthquakes starting with Northridge and it was standstill. Bikes split traffic
3. Back roads. I know paths and roads that avoid most any highway and/ or freeway
4. 70 mpg. Can't be discounted. The file is to get me from a to b ASAP and bikes can move or go in goat trails if needed
5, repairs on roadside are pretty simple
Drawbacks of course. But again point a to b ASAP is the highest priority

Im on board with this mindset. Speed and mobility is a huge upside. Attack vulnerability and lack of supplies and carrying the family is a huge downside.

Ride Now powersports has a big BBQ this weekend so Im going to go check out some bikes for fun. Im going to look for some hardtail non suspended mountain bikes at the flea market and Goodwill stores too.

Myke_Hart
04-26-2012, 18:45
A offroad motorcycle is a great escape vehicle. Better would be a 4x4 pickup with your dirt bike or bikes mounted in the bed. You get stuck in traffic you dump the truck and take off on the bikes.

Here are my BOB bikes.
They don't have batteries and very, very little electronics, Just a coil, magneto, and plugs to run. You can mount Baja battery powered headlights if your need them, but I found that helmet mounted lights to be better because the light follows your head and not the bike. Also they are very good on gas.

The only drawback is that you need to haul butt, because they will hear you comming.

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll264/myke_hart/Motorcycles/IMG_2549.jpg

As soft as they get!:embarassed:
Motorcycles :: 513 2007 rm250 video by myke_hart - Photobucket@@AMEPARAM@@file=http%3A%2F%2Fvid290.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fll264%2Fmyke_hart%2FMotor cycles%2FMVI_1785.mp4@@AMEPARAM@@file=http%3A%2F%2Fvid290.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fll264%2Fmyke_ha rt%2FMotorcycles%2FMVI_1785.mp4

Motorcycles :: 514 buddy bike 2002 rm250 video by myke_hart - Photobucket@@AMEPARAM@@file=http%3A%2F%2Fvid290.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fll264%2Fmyke_hart%2FMotor cycles%2FMVI_1784.mp4@@AMEPARAM@@file=http%3A%2F%2Fvid290.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fll264%2Fmyke_ha rt%2FMotorcycles%2FMVI_1784.mp4

Edit: Yes, they are supposed to smoke (2 stroke). The one missing the shrouds was just COMPLETELY rebuilt and I was running a very oil heavy mix to ease the rings and crank during break in. So that's why it is smoking like a freight train.

Myke_Hart
04-26-2012, 19:06
As for carrying a lot of stuff on a bike...

I think if you can't walk 50 miles with your BOB on your back or shoulder, you are carrying way too much stuff.

I see a ton of people with 100lbs of BO gear in thier car.

Well your car can't usually go to far off road. Dump what you dont need, Strap your BOB on your back and get riding.:wavey:

RMTactical
04-26-2012, 20:23
Ttr125

cowboy1964
04-26-2012, 21:02
http://downtheroad.org/Alaska-Canada-USA/imagesBBB/Winky/DSC06272_small.JPG

People do cross country bicycle trips all the time. All you need is a good bike, panniers and strong legs. Just like in the BOB thread, everything you can carry on your back, you can put on a bike, including a lightweight tent, sleeping bag, clothing and provisions.

East Coast to West Coast or visa versa can be done in a month or two, give or take.


All of that is assuming a functional, peaceful, society where you can stop and buy anything you need along the way. You ain't carrying a month's provisions on your back.

M1a65
04-27-2012, 03:47
A Ural Gear Up model would work out nicely. 2 wheel drive with a side car. Carries your gear in the trunk of the side car while your passenger lays down suppressing fire on the way to work. Close as a motorcycle can come to a 4 wheeler and will go thru about any kind of terrain. More fun then a KLR thou 3x as expensive.

Myke_Hart
04-27-2012, 04:44
All of that is assuming a functional, peaceful, society where you can stop and buy anything you need along the way. You ain't carrying a month's provisions on your back.

You need to leave that stuff hidden in a safe place. You don't want it on your person when you get stopped by a looting mob!:whistling:

syntaxerrorsix
04-27-2012, 04:58
All of that is assuming a functional, peaceful, society where you can stop and buy anything you need along the way. You ain't carrying a month's provisions on your back.

You also won't likely be buggin' out across the country. That wasn't really the point however :wavey:

SFCSMITH(RET)
04-27-2012, 06:21
All of that is assuming a functional, peaceful, society where you can stop and buy anything you need along the way. You ain't carrying a month's provisions on your back.

You ain't carrying a month's provisions in a suburban. Not if you are assuming you have to carry EVERYTHING with you the whole time. no form of resupply.. The way I see it, the bug out transportation is to get you to a bug out location, pre prepped with gear and supplies.

Again, like nearly everything that has to do with S&P, there is NO one size fits all right answer.

Other than.. Prepare.

FireForged
04-27-2012, 07:48
I am not a bike dude but I dont understand all the "motorcycle" cant do this or cant haul that... isnt good in rain. Sometimes, bugging out can be about getting the heck out of where you are and onto a safer place 100 miles down the road. Its not always about end of the world or living on the back of your bike for 6 months. Bugging out can be a 4hrs bee line escape to a place that is safer. ..its better than walking and can go places a RV cant. I see no issue witih a bike being part of a survival system. Heck, give me a moped and a full gas can, Ill bug out with a smile.

Bilbo Bagins
04-27-2012, 07:51
All of that is assuming a functional, peaceful, society where you can stop and buy anything you need along the way. You ain't carrying a month's provisions on your back.

Who says you can't? The Viet Cong did in war torn Vietnam along the 1,000 mile Ho Chi Minh trail. :dunno:


http://i299.photobucket.com/albums/mm303/casydegc/BicycleSuppliesTrail.jpg

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/images/thumbnail.aspx?q=4671219854344380&id=6d7b1dfc22b21fd5e6eff5544141faf9&url=http%3a%2f%2fimage50.webshots.com%2f50%2f4%2f43%2f29%2f420944329xqKSxP_ph.jpg


You can also tow a trailer with a bicycle. Granted uphill sucks and downhill would be spooky. You will be suprised what you can do.

http://media.treehugger.com/assets/images/2011/10/Bike-Trailer-Moves-House.jpg

http://velo-city.org/touring-trailers/chuckwagon-w44.de-Gunter-Lorenz.jpg

http://velo-city.org/touring-trailers/index.html

mknpwr
04-27-2012, 08:03
A Ural Gear Up model would work out nicely. 2 wheel drive with a side car. Carries your gear in the trunk of the side car while your passenger lays down suppressing fire on the way to work. Close as a motorcycle can come to a 4 wheeler and will go thru about any kind of terrain. More fun then a KLR thou 3x as expensive.

This...

Sent from my rotary dial phone

mingaa
04-27-2012, 08:17
I recommend not bugging out on a motorcycle. They don't haul supplies very well or offer any protection from bad weather, bullets, etc. A 4WD SUV would be a much better choice.
YEP - put run flat tires on it as well. Prices have come way down on certain models. If you think a bike is the way to go buy a dual purpose on/off road capable ride. A motorcycle CAN go where no 4 wheeler can drive = degree of safety.

http://www.suzukicycles.org/photos/RM-RMX-series/RMX250/1991_RMX250_yellowblue_450.jpg 1991 will be affordable

http://www.bmbikes.co.uk/photos/photophotos/R80GS%20ParisDakar%20(1).jpg BMW Paris Dakkar - more rare but a gem if you find it. Plenty of cargo capability.

Ethereal Killer
04-27-2012, 08:49
Add me to the chorus of pro motorcycle voices. there are a TON of options but for bugout, I think an on/off road capable cycle is the way to go. personally I think the BMW's are really nice but they are not really that good off road I hear.

there are some cool options like that Yamaha TW-200 or that two wheel drive Rokon which give up speed for capability. That Rokon is basically the equivalent of a horse without the constant feed bill or personality conflicts or training. they aint fast but it sure is hard to stop them!

the correct mindset for a motorcycle is that you can carry the same or slightly more than you would in a backpack but now you can go faster and farther. Panniers carry a surprising amount of stuff in them and you can add a trailer behind a motorcycle too.

also, I think a regular 4-wheel ATV answers some of the concerns for cargo hauling. they can fit in places where a car cannot and can go almost anywhere too. they are not as agile as a motorcycle but they do have some advantages. A team with a couple ATV's and a couple dual purpose bikes would rock. add a trailer to the 4-wheelers and you'd be GTG.

NOTE: I think a lot of folks get too fixated on grabbing all their **** and bugging out. what SHOULD be happening is that a light survival pack with minimal weaponry and ammo is carried to where your supplies are already stashed or at least SOME assets are pre-positioned.

mixflip
04-27-2012, 09:03
Sometimes, bugging out can be about getting the heck out of where you are and onto a safer place 100 miles down the road. Its not always about end of the world.

Well said. That Japanese tsunami forced thousands of people to bug out quick! It wasnt TEOTWAWKI... it was simply... a need to get the hell up to high ground NOW! I can see a pretty much any motorcycle filling this need along with a 3 day pack.

Devans0
04-28-2012, 12:09
I am not a fan of bikes for evacs. Mother Nature's debris in her SHTFs makes them a likely source for injuries at the worst possible time. For hauling Ho Chi Minh style as a human powered utility vehicle is best use.

Victor Papanek had a "Design For the Real World" bike that was a 1 speed iron-pipe Schwinn with a pannier that could be unbolted to swing below the wheel as a stand. The axle and extra chain could be used to power a rotating shaft for human 'motor' power to grind/mill/sand/saw/pump/ whatever. When fuel is expensive and hard to get, simple works.

emt1581
04-28-2012, 22:00
I'd probably reccommend an Enduro/Motocross of some sort. Personally I dislike them because they aren't comfortable for me to ride. But that would probably be my choice as it lets you go zipping around on streets as well as off road without a problem.

As for a bike not letting you carry much gear, that has not been my experience. I have large saddle bags and a Maxpedition Merlin locked to my luggage rack. I can cary LOTS of gear! Am I going to haul tons of rifles and a few barrels of water, no. Can I carry my BOB/GHB and plenty of other supplies? Yup.

Just as a car can't carry as much as a van and a van can't carry as much as a bus, a bike can't carry as much as most cars....so what? A bike has benefits that no other vehicle on the road does, except maybe those cars that are planes as well..

Because I have a family a motorcycle would NOT be my choice for bugging out. I'd definitely want a motorcycle in tow though.

-Emt1581

Stevekozak
04-29-2012, 06:14
I am not a bike dude but I dont understand all the "motorcycle" cant do this or cant haul that... isnt good in rain. Sometimes, bugging out can be about getting the heck out of where you are and onto a safer place 100 miles down the road. Its not always about end of the world or living on the back of your bike for 6 months. Bugging out can be a 4hrs bee line escape to a place that is safer. ..its better than walking and can go places a RV cant. I see no issue witih a bike being part of a survival system. Heck, give me a moped and a full gas can, Ill bug out with a smile.
i agree with these sentitments. :wavey:

mac66
04-30-2012, 08:03
A guy rode this 50cc Honda Ruckus around the country for 4 months and lived off of it. There is maintainance that has to be done on any bike that you ride for distance. Usually, tires and chains need close attention.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v489/mac66/Picture014-6.jpg

This is my $300 1975 Honda XL175.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v489/mac66/100_0770.jpg

In Australia they use old Postal service bikes called Posties for everything. They even have a cross continent race called The Postie Challenge. They are Honda CT110s which replaced the CT90 (Trail 90s) My Trail 90 was set up similar to this when I rode it around Lake Huron. Note the added gas tank

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v489/mac66/IMG_0266edited.jpg

kirgi08
04-30-2012, 08:38
:cool:

dhv
05-01-2012, 05:21
KLR 650, Easy. That said my Vstrom is setup as an urban assault vehicle.

I own a KLR 650. It's probably one of the better choices, but...

Only 350 klm max on a full tank.

You cant ride through obsticals and scan the environment at the same time.

If you fall off and hurt yourself, there is no help. What then?

Very specialised use in my opinion.

Bren
05-01-2012, 06:15
A guy rode this 50cc Honda Ruckus around the country for 4 months and lived off of it. There is maintainance that has to be done on any bike that you ride for distance. Usually, tires and chains need close attention.

Problem is, he wasn't "bugging out" - he had gas stations, restaurants, stores, law and order, etc. If I have all of those things, I don't need to "bug out." If I do need to bug out, I need to carry what it takes to survive against nature, starvation and people not constrained by laws.

lawman800
05-01-2012, 08:08
I own a KLR 650. It's probably one of the better choices, but...

Only 350 klm max on a full tank.

You cant ride through obsticals and scan the environment at the same time.

If you fall off and hurt yourself, there is no help. What then?

Very specialised use in my opinion.

Get the diesel KLR650 like the Army, and put a few fuel tanks on it like the Army.

Granted, you won't be scanning too well while climbing boulders or navigating treacherous streams, but a good motorcyclist is always scanning for hazards while on the move, more so than any car driver, I can assure you, it's a matter of survival.

If you fall off, well, if you don't have good armor and helmet, you better hope you get lucky, but surprisingly, as long as you don't fly into a cement light pole or solid wall, a lot of people survive crashes with little than bruises and scrapes, if that.

I crashed bad once when a pedestrian decided to walk in front of me while I was making a turn, got flung off the bike, my chin landed about 6" from the curb, would have been bad, but all I got was a scraped up right palm from the landing when I stuck my hand out to brace myself. No other injury... and I was wearing tank top and shorts and no helmet... (this was back in the reckless 80's) I was on the ground looking at the stupid girl that caused the accident, she stared at me for a second and ran off like a bat outta hell... curse her!

FireForged
05-01-2012, 08:30
50cc honda ruckus..hahahah! I gotta have one. google'n it now!

lawman800
05-01-2012, 20:24
There is a local store here that specializes in the Ruckus and there is a whole gang of riders who cruise all the local spots on their super customized Ruckuses. Some of them spent over five figures fixing the ride up... which is retarded... and the most common mod I hear is the 80cc or 100cc "BIG BORE" upgrade to bump up the power of the 50cc engine... whoopie!

actionshooter10
05-01-2012, 21:18
Seems like a lot of people have a different definition of "bug out" than I do.

My definition of bug out is to get from where I am to my retreat location with a relatively small amount of gear. That doesn't mean riding around aimlessly or for a long period of time.

That said, I echo LG1's opinion.

I believe, enough to own one, that the BMW GS 1200 is the perfect bug out vehicle.

110 hp and 89 ft/lbs of torque.
8.9 gallon fuel tank at 51 mpg giving you a 400+ mile range.
8+ inches of suspension travel making it VERY offroad capable.
480 lb payload meaning I can carry everything I need and then some.

Basically this is a go anywhere do anything bike that doesn't break. These bikes routinely go 100k miles and maintainence is easily done yourself.

The only thing that would screw me is an EMP and, lets face it, that would screw a lot more than my bike...lol.

If you're just looking for a bug out bike, this is not for you. If you love to ride and enjoy getting off the pavement, buy it!

This is the finest all-around bike on the market...IMHO.

mac66
05-02-2012, 15:13
Problem is, he wasn't "bugging out" - he had gas stations, restaurants, stores, law and order, etc. If I have all of those things, I don't need to "bug out." If I do need to bug out, I need to carry what it takes to survive against nature, starvation and people not constrained by laws.

In a sense he was bugging out every couple of days. He did stealth camp and cook his own food much of the time. Besides, bugging out implies a destination in mind. With planning one can forgo any support between where you have to bug out from to where your BOL is.

Unless there is a complete shutdown of society all a once throughout the country (highly unlikely) I don't think one would have a problem doing a bug out.

gotplastic
05-02-2012, 19:31
Harley Davidson FatBoy. if i'm going to leave my kids and wife behind and hop on a bike, might as well go in style.

wrenrj1
05-02-2012, 19:35
http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb87/wrenrj1/IMG_1527.jpg

Sold the 1981 KZ 550 for this.

Wren

bdcochran
05-02-2012, 19:50
1. the concept of bugging out, at a minimum, means removing ones self from the immediate danger. By this limited application, the distance may be just a few miles and at a speed faster than a person can run in a 200 yard sprint.
If you add to the concept hauling a few hundred pounds of equipment, going 40 miles an hour, or driving off road on hills, then you have to better define "bugging out" more precisely.

2. it is pointed out that bugging out must have a goal, that riding a motorcycle is not as simple as getting on a bike for the first time and confidently riding either down the street or off road up a hillside. Learning to ride a bike is more than just going to a sponsored motorcycle riding introduction class.

3. I doubt that anyone really wants to invest a few thousand dollars in a motorcycle and have it sit in the garage, unused except in an emergency. I also doubt that someone would just buy trailbike that could be kept unlicensed and park that in a garage.

4. Your motorcycle has to have some minimum power. I remember borrowing a kid's motor bike in college and having to walk it up Sunset Blvd in West LA because it just didn't have the power to go up a slightly hilly city street.

5. The real value in a motorcycle is mobility - and it isn't limited to "bugging out". The Plains Indians and even John Mosby in the War Between the States demonstrated that mobility on horseback was critical for both defensive and offensive operations. A decent, appropriate motorcycle (and not a cheapie) replaces the horse. And, just like the horse, you have to be concerned with maintenance, providing feed (fuel), doing major repairs.

IV Troop
05-05-2012, 14:06
http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b109/IV_Troop/055.jpg

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b109/IV_Troop/004-2.jpg

I have been lots of places " you can't take a KLR 650". :)

IV Troop
05-05-2012, 14:14
http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b109/IV_Troop/Mackayjun10014.jpg

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b109/IV_Troop/Mackayjun10048.jpg

wrenrj1
05-05-2012, 18:29
http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b109/IV_Troop/Mackayjun10014.jpg

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b109/IV_Troop/Mackayjun10048.jpg

Great pics IV Troop! Just picked up my 2012 KLR in March. First two things I did was install a Corbin seat and a Milk crate, followed by the same action packer you have.

Are you on the KLR650 forum?

Wren

IV Troop
05-05-2012, 22:16
Wren,

I am a member, though it has been a while since I have been on there. Congrats on joining the ranks. I have owned many bikes over the years, starting in the 80s. None have been as enjoyable and practical to own and ride as the KLR. I have no real desire to own another street bike.

wrenrj1
05-06-2012, 18:22
Wren,

I am a member, though it has been a while since I have been on there. Congrats on joining the ranks. I have owned many bikes over the years, starting in the 80s. None have been as enjoyable and practical to own and ride as the KLR. I have no real desire to own another street bike.

Giddyup! Happy Trails!

Wren