Water world, life as a live aboard. [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Huntersun2
05-01-2012, 11:03
While this subject has probably been discussed I thought I'd bring it back up.

My wife and I have been living/cruising aboard our vessel for the last 3 years, mainly the east coast of the US and the Bahamas, over 9,000 miles on this boat to date. Not surprisingly cruisers share similar beliefs with survivalists, self sufficiency/reliance being goal #1. Freedom from excessive govt intrusion also at the top of the list. This past year we have seen a surge of cruisers who will admit there boat is their BOV as well as their home and as a boat broker I have sold several vessels specifically for this porpoise.

Here is a brief description of our set up.
50'x23' custom power cat, twin Volvo penta common rail diesels, 160 hp per side. Max range (+/- conditions, speed etc) 1800 miles with a 20% reserve.

(4) charging alternators 120+160 amp
(6) Siemens solar panels feeding (5) 200amp house batteries with a trace 2500 watt inverter. All lights are LED.

12volt cold plate ref/freezer (spent 6 mo's in the Bahamas and came home with meat in the freezer).

5.5 kw diesel gen-set (1/4 gal per hour). Spare 2kw Honda gas. Air compressor for the Hookah dive rig.

18 gph 12 volt water maker, water collection available via a guttered hard top.

(2) hot water heaters, electric and engine manifold.

Propane grill, stove and oven with 40lbs propane, 1+ years worth of fuel using the grill daily.

327 gal diesel+(2) 100 Gal bladders, 150 gal water storage with a SeaGull filtration system for drinking and cooking. 75 gal waste holding.

(2) queen berths with separate heads. A third berth was converted to additional storage.

Small shop with washer/dryer combo, parts/spares storage and tools.

(3) GPS plotters, (1) Radar, (3) VHF's (1) SSB with pactor modem, (2) depth/temp units.

10' AB inflatable w/ 15hp out board (gas)
(2) bikes and a kyack.
Lodes of fishing, hunting and diving gear.

Stores for 6+months for 2 adults.

(3) sets of ground tackle and enough rope/rode to spider tie if needed during a hurricane (been through 2).

Lot's more stuff but you get the idea. When she was built the owners intended porpoise was long term/range live aboard with speed, comfort, safety and efficiency being the goal.

What we have found during our travels are a large number of like minded folks traveling the oceans and water ways.

Is a boat a good BOV, I'd say yes and before someone jumps me, all our eggs are not in one basket....:cool:

Any questions/ideas please post them up.

Bilbo Bagins
05-01-2012, 12:13
If you got the money and skills I think its a great option. I rather have a sailboat with a motor backup, instead of a powerboat just in case if fuel is unavailable, becomes extremely expensive or you need to travel long distance, like across the Atlantic or Pacific.

Especially for those how already live full time on their boat, nothing better then taking your house and leaving when the SHTF.

JK-linux
05-01-2012, 12:35
.....

itstime
05-01-2012, 12:45
WOW. Pics please. I'm sitting here imagining this.

kirgi08
05-01-2012, 13:36
I'd like ta see. :needspics:

DoctaGlockta
05-01-2012, 13:37
How about COMS? (Edit: my bad just saw them)

And judging from your title you must have a good store of alcohol as well ;)

kirgi08
05-01-2012, 14:14
:headscratch:

Huntersun2
05-01-2012, 16:03
A few pic's.....

Huntersun2
05-01-2012, 16:14
A few more......

Huntersun2
05-01-2012, 17:03
If you got the money and skills I think its a great option. I rather have a sailboat with a motor backup, instead of a powerboat just in case if fuel is unavailable, becomes extremely expensive or you need to travel long distance, like across the Atlantic or Pacific.

Especially for those how already live full time on their boat, nothing better then taking your house and leaving when the SHTF.

While most long term cruisers are on some form of sailing vessel you'd be surprised to find they sail less the 10% of the time. With speed restrictions, mast hight and draft issues we felt a power vessel would serve us better, also my fuel numbers are very near a sail boat that spends most of it's time "motor sailing.

We are looking into the possibility of adding a kite rig for down wind running.

Huntersun2
05-01-2012, 17:10
Sounds great and not cheap. I'm imagining the setup you describe would be at least a 6 figure investment. Congrats!

Cheap and boats are never used in the same sentence:supergrin:
BUT you can find great deals in a wide verity of serviceable vessels, just depends on your intended purpose and abilities.

Thanks for the congrats.

Huntersun2
05-01-2012, 17:19
How about COMS? (Edit: my bad just saw them)

And judging from your title you must have a good store of alcohol as well ;)

Add to the radio coms we can tether our smart phones for internet access where ever we are (with service). SAT phones are available and have gotten better but we have not felt the need at this time. The Pactor modem allows email access through the SSB. While in the Bahamas we buy a cheap BA-TEL phone and prepaid minutes.

Not sure how you were able to determine my alcohol stores from my title but yes we are well stocked....

RWBlue
05-01-2012, 17:36
Cheap and boats are never used in the same sentence:supergrin:
BUT you can find great deals in a wide verity of serviceable vessels, just depends on your intended purpose and abilities.

Thanks for the congrats.

Well there is one sentence that uses Cheap and Boat.


"You are too cheap to buy a nice boat."

This fits most people.

pugman
05-01-2012, 17:48
First thing which came to mind...

How do you plan on dealing with real world pirates? If this is being used as a BOV it wont' take long for others to figure this out.

And lets face it...those don't look cheap

Huntersun2
05-01-2012, 18:25
Well there is one sentence that uses Cheap and Boat.


"You are too cheap to buy a nice boat."

This fits most people.

True, I stand corrected.

Huntersun2
05-01-2012, 18:40
First thing which came to mind...

How do you plan on dealing with real world pirates? If this is being used as a BOV it wont' take long for others to figure this out.

And lets face it...those don't look cheap

You are correct but let's think about it for a minute....
Land based pirates vs true boat pirates, when the shtf and I'm off shore dealing with a few if any properly equipped bad guys vs all the land dwellers that "could" be potential problems. The numbers are far fewer on the water.

But to your question, we most likely will be traveling in pack's, and the bad guys as usual will pick on the weak/stragglers and Canadian flagged sailing vessels:tongueout: because they know all US flagged power vessels are heavily armed.

308endurdebate
05-01-2012, 19:28
maybe a Solar Oven, Solar Still..



Normal survival gear on a larger ocean going vessel?

Normal USCG required stuff, plus survival rafts (with supply pack)

epirbs (at least one per vessel - 3, your main boat, your dingy, and the raft).

extra medical insurance (includes remote evacuation costs back to US if your in the carribean or elsewhere)

Training - USCG/Boating courses/license, Medical Training?

Huntersun2
05-01-2012, 19:51
maybe a Solar Oven, Solar Still..



Normal survival gear on a larger ocean going vessel?

Normal USCG required stuff, plus survival rafts (with supply pack)

epirbs (at least one per vessel - 3, your main boat, your dingy, and the raft).

extra medical insurance (includes remote evacuation costs back to US if your in the carribean or elsewhere)

Training - USCG/Boating courses/license, Medical Training?

Good questions.

We started out with a near coastal raft since I had it from a previous vessel, gave it away while in the Bahamas, our vessel is 125% boyant and will work as a raft if disabled.

(2) EPIRBS, one fixed mounted and one in the ditch bag, since we have no plans on leaving the boat 2 EPIRBS are again redundant.

Diver Dan's provides great evacuate ins for cruisers/boaters that have issues while on board at a very cheap price ($70/yr).

USCG offers a safety inspection but there is no license needed and the wife has been in the Med Field for 30+ years.

308endurdebate
05-01-2012, 20:14
Good questions.

We started out with a near coastal raft since I had it from a previous vessel, gave it away while in the Bahamas, our vessel is 125% boyant and will work as a raft if disabled.

(2) EPIRBS, one fixed mounted and one in the ditch bag, since we have no plans on leaving the boat 2 EPIRBS are again redundant.

Diver Dan's provides great evacuate ins for cruisers/boaters that have issues while on board at a very cheap price ($70/yr).

USCG offers a safety inspection but there is no license needed and the wife has been in the Med Field for 30+ years.

Nice. Sounds like you're set.

I don't own a cruiser, but have been rec fishing/boating for years.

I recommend a book I've got - Boatowner's Mechanical and Electrical Manual. I've got the 3rd edition (2005)... there may be a newer version, but it is great. Covers how things work on a bigger boat (mechanical, electrical, plumbing, etc). Has troubleshooting, Well worth the $50 retail list. Helps if you're handy, but still well worth the read. Keep double ziplocked onboard.

Fair Winds and Following Seas.

Huntersun2
05-01-2012, 20:27
Nice. Sounds like you're set.

I don't own a cruiser, but have been rec fishing/boating for years.

I recommend a book I've got - Boatowner's Mechanical and Electrical Manual. I've got the 3rd edition (2005)... there may be a newer version, but it is great. Covers how things work on a bigger boat (mechanical, electrical, plumbing, etc). Has troubleshooting, Well worth the $50 retail list. Helps if you're handy, but still well worth the read. Keep double ziplocked onboard.

Fair Winds and Following Seas.

I agree, Nigel Calder's books are top rate and yes I have them on board.
No need for the zip lock thing, if I need to worry about them getting wet I'm in big touble..

ChuteTheMall
05-01-2012, 20:51
:tongueout: because they know all US flagged power vessels are heavily armed.

Any legal problems carrying guns to Bahamas, or elsewhere?


:drowning::arg::pirates::50cal:

Huntersun2
05-01-2012, 21:17
Any legal problems carrying guns to Bahamas, or elsewhere?


:drowning::arg::pirates::50cal:

Bahamas are not a big deal, declare with ammo count and your good to go. The BVI's are another story.

Bolster
05-01-2012, 23:34
Told post OT so deleted.

TangoFoxtrot
05-02-2012, 04:27
:wow:A few more......

If you can live this life you choose then go for it.

series1811
05-02-2012, 05:00
We have a sailboat and we got back last year from a six month cruise to the Bahamas. My wife and I often joked that the boat is our SHTF bug out vehicle.

We are set up to fairly self-sufficient as well. The only item I won't go back to the Bahamas without is a water maker.

The only flaw I see in your plan is that I can remember pulling into lots of islands in the Bahamas that had been waiting on diesel for weeks. I can't imagine that situation getting better in any kind of crisis.

A sailboat will outrun the fasted powerboat ever made when the fuel is all gone. :supergrin:

But, cruisers are a self-sufficient lot and I was amazed at how minimalist some of the ones we ran into were. You can get by on a lot less than you are used to.


- There is no cold beer. There's no cold food at all.


No cold beer? He's just not set up right. I have a 12 volt cooler on my boat that runs off the battery bank, and is fully recharged almost every day by the solar panels. :supergrin:

And, as far as anything affecting the people who live on these small islands. Unless you told them the world had ended, they would probably just be wondering why the supply boats were later than usual. They don't care, or they wouldn't live there. :)

Chindo18Z
05-02-2012, 06:18
Prefaced to note that I've never sailed anything bigger than a plastic toy in my tub, nor driven anything bigger than an inboard ski boat...

But in my idle musings on how to spend imaginary lottery proceeds, I've settled on a slow, passage maker Nordhavn trawler like this one (N62 footer):

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/images/thumbnail.aspx?q=4747137702560788&id=3116d4c80e4cd0813f89699816dac648&url=http%3a%2f%2fnordhavn.com%2fmodels%2f62%2fimages%2fopen.jpg

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/images/thumbnail.aspx?q=4587665573938044&id=70cea394e53a1be75d2e538d33615152&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.nordhavn.com%2fmodels%2f62%2fgallery%2fexterior%2f2.jpg

http://ts3.mm.bing.net/images/thumbnail.aspx?q=4993020285485178&id=e56ff305b541c5b910bf262a76d223de&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.nordhavn.com%2fmodels%2f62%2fgallery%2finterior%2f3.jpg

http://www.nordhavn.com/models/62/

3000 NM range at ~9knots. The theoretical ability to literally go anywhere (that can accommodate 6.5 feet of draft). Bunk space for 6-7 in comfort; 3 more in a pinch. Diesel. On board water maker. Full Kitchen. Salon. Bar & Dining area. 3 staterooms and pilot house bunk. BBQ grill. Storage. Radar. FLIR. Comms systems. Killer audiovisual systems throughout. Satellite antennas. GPS computerized navigation and autopilot. Crane & runabout Zodiac outboard rubber boat. Freezers, fridge, washer/dryer, AC, showers, etc.

4-wheel drive off-road performance with limousine comfort and features. Ocean going yacht designed for people wanting to cruise the Pacific, tour Alaskan waters, navigate the Great Lakes, or cross the Atlantic. Can be crewed by a couple. Slow, steady, and fuel efficient.

If I had the money to commission a new one, I'd have it constructed with a contingency weapon station (reinforced universal pintle mount) to handle a .30 cal belt fed NFA. And some partial Kevlar armoring of the pilot house and engine room. Perhaps self-sealing fuel tanks. (I think the additional weight could be managed using hidden structural panels).

I just need an extra $2,000,000+ for the boat and accessories. Prolly another million to operate, maintain, house, and feed it. Any day now... :whistling:

Their $400K 40 footer has been used to circumnavigate the globe. They also make a pretty competent oceangoing 56 foot motor sailboat that acknowledges the reality of using motor more than sail (when you are on a schedule). 'Bout $1.5 million.

http://www.nordhavn.com/models/56/

Spendy. But it's my dream for a long distance BOV that doesn't also require a paid crew. I could use the range to put a lot of distance between myself and regional trouble.

Bilbo Bagins
05-02-2012, 07:25
Cheap and boats are never used in the same sentence:supergrin:
BUT you can find great deals in a wide verity of serviceable vessels, just depends on your intended purpose and abilities.

Thanks for the congrats.


+1

You have a nice setup, but like you said its not out of the realm of possibilities.

I read an article a while back about a guy who did the Great loop (which is cruising the Atlantic Intercoastal waterway, maybe a jaunt to the Carribean, then up the Mississippi to the Great Lakes, the back out to the Atlantic) in a tiny tolman skiff that cost him less than $10,000. Granted its not luxurous, since he basically slept in a sleeping bag on the deck of his boat, but its very doable on a budget.

Huntersun2
05-02-2012, 07:38
My college roommate (of many years ago) is single-handing a ketch across and around the Pacific for 2 years. It's quite the adventure. I've been in close contact with him via Sail Mail for these past months and have gotten an intimate view of what it's like to sail vast expanses alone. (Not the OP's situation, obviously.)

It sounds romantic, but it is hard survival work. It's a hard life, period. Physically and psychologically demanding. Off the top of my head, here are a few observations I can make from our past two years of correspondence:

- You really can't count on catching enough fish to keep you from starving. Sometimes bounty, sometimes nothing. This came as a shock to me.
- Yes, sharks do take up positions near your boat, and will stay there for hundreds or thousands of miles. So if you happen to fall overboard (a moment's inattention and the boom catches you), somebody's waiting!
- If you didn't bring it, there's no going to buy or barter it in the middle of the ocean.
- There's a constant concern of not enough provisions and materiel. And this is generally countered by overprovisioning, which provides its own set of problems, mainly excess weight.
- No aerobic exercise most of the time. (Rowing, when near shore.)
- Mid pacific, there are no physicians. If you get deadly ill, well, you die, and your boat sails on.
- My friend exists primarily on lentils and rice.
- Singlehanded sailing is like one giant sleep deprivation experiment. Even if the waves let you sleep, you must get up several times a night to check the horizon for running lights. Being rammed by a large vessel is a constant concern.
- There is no cold beer. There's no cold food at all.
- The barnacles are constantly working to slow you down to a crawl.
- Small injuries are a big deal.
- There's no such thing as taking a walk to get away for a few moments. Imagine being holed up in your room for weeks at a time.
- After several weeks of no human contact, hallucinations are a part of life, and you just live with them.
- When you arrive at land, no guarantee anybody will be friendly. Chances are you'll be shoo'd off, or drained of your cash reserves for substandard victuals, then shoo'd off. You're viewed as a sucker with few options by pacific islanders.
- Several startlements have occurred with boats approaching rapidly. None have been pirates, but it's one more thing for the nerves.
- Given the weight and momentum of the boat, the hulls are as fragile as eggshells if they contact anything stationary, such as uncharted coral, or even submerged floating junk. And when a breech occurs, it's minutes before the boat goes down.
- Weather is a constant concern. Where is the next storm coming from? Can I attain safe harbor before then?
- And, you're not earning any money while you're sailing.

All in all, the lifestyle is exhilarating, the definition of freedom, and adventuresome. This is balanced by there being constant worries, concerns, and insecurities. It's a mixed bag, so romantic notions should be jettisoned immediately.

Now the OP has a larger ship, and a wife, both of which are certain to be huge advantages that my friend doesn't have. But extended sailing is a heckuva lot of work, worry, and expense, despite its marvelous boons.

Interesting post but we are talking about near coastal cruising not circum nav or ocean crossing.

Point by point.
You can if you know what your doing catch enough fish to add to your stores, wahoo, tuna and mahi are easy catches. Trigger, snapper and grouper are easy near shore targets.

Sharks, yes you have to keep a eye on them but they taste good if prepared properly.

Agreed, bartering in the model of an ocean could be problematic:supergrin:

Needing a emergency room at sea, a SSB call to Dan's will get you air lifted.

If you provision properly this is not an issue. Now if your vessel is to small or no refrigeration then this could be a issue.

The exercise issue is news to us, we are in better shape after cruising 3 years then we were on land.

We dive/hookah our bottom at least once per month, a good bottom/paint job lasts 2+ years.

Lentils and rice? No cold goods?? Your bud sounds like a minimalist or cheap:tongueout: We added a ice maker for sundowners at 5pm....

You can get fleeced anywhere, on land and on the water.

Rapidly approaching vessels could be friend or foe, whole new topic to be addressed.

While I could argue the egg shell comment I will agree that a breached hull is tragic but not all vessels are egg shells.
Note I'm a retired Marine Surveyor.

You learn to read the weather quickly and head her warnings, never underestimate mother nature.

While we were not working we are still making money while we were cruising.

Again your observations of your bud doing the so. pacific are realistic but a bit off compare to the BOV idea.

Huntersun2
05-02-2012, 07:54
Chindo,
The Nord 62 is a beast, we looked at them back in 1996 when they first arrived in the states (made in Tiwan) there draft and weight were a bit much for our intended use but if your looking for a true blue water vessel the Nordhavens are a must see.

Bolster
05-02-2012, 08:19
Interesting post but we are talking about near coastal cruising not circum nav or ocean crossing.

Oh, I'm sorry. I thought this was an "information about S/P at sea" thread. I didn't realize it was your personal brag thread, and that we were performing ego maintenance for you by allowing you to demonstrate your superior knowledge. So unquote me. I deleted my "off topic" posting. It's "your" thread and you can have it.

Kieller
05-02-2012, 10:59
Hunter,

Sounds like you have a sweet setup. I can't really add anything since it appears that you have the major bases covered. I would definitely ensure that some spare parts are present for the water maker and possibly an alternative source of fresh water. A solar still comes to mind.

The only major change I would have is making it a Catamaran rather than a PowerCat. Then again, I'm a sailor so I'm biased :supergrin:

My grandparents did a live aboard for +10 years and primarily stayed in FL, Bahamas and some of VIs. They did it on a 27' Catalina sailboat, talk about minimalist! I learned alot from them and it will hopefully be put to use at some point in the future when I can do the same :supergrin:

May your seas be calm!

dissthis
05-02-2012, 11:28
Silly question: where does your dog go to the bathroom on board?

series1811
05-02-2012, 12:07
It's amazing the different vessels you see people cruising in. We saw everything from a 16 riverboat, to a 160 foot yacht.
The guy in the 16' riverboat had trailered it from Oklahoma to the Mississipi River, and had motored the rest of the way to the Exumas Land and Sea Park where we talked to him. He had a 10 hp outboard on a bracket as his backup motor and a mostly canvas enclosure on the boat.

The biggest "Aha" moment was seeing the 160 foot yacht towing it's dinghy---a 42 foot sport fish. :supergrin:

And, we tied up next to a Azimut 86 for a week that belonged to a well known New Yorker. It was his "small boat" as his big boat drew too much water to use in the Bahamas.

Lots of different ways to get on the water if that's what you want to do. :supergrin:

Adjuster
05-02-2012, 12:20
Great boat!
Great dog!
Great lobsters!
Great chick in dive suit!

Not necessarily in that order.

Gotta say I am pretty envious!




(very nice boat and pics, thanks)
/

alexanderg23
05-02-2012, 12:23
I'm jealous!!!! I love off shore fishing

Glock!9
05-02-2012, 12:37
How far out can your boat go? I do not know a lot about boats but man I am jealous!

PaulMason
05-02-2012, 16:16
The OP has a nice set up. There is one thing I've noticed about the world. There are those that like the water and those that like the mountains. Being near or on the water, lake or ocean, tires me and bores the hell out of me. The mountains give me energy. Even in a SHTF situation I don't think I would take to the water. Although, I could see if there were a pandemic it makes good sense to go off shore and wait for thing to sort themselves out.

Huntersun2
05-02-2012, 17:17
Silly question: where does your dog go to the bathroom on board?

Sampson belongs to a young couple that we meet in the Exumas, he was trained to use a peice of astro turf that could be thrown overboard for cleaning.

Huntersun2
05-02-2012, 22:05
The OP has a nice set up. There is one thing I've noticed about the world. There are those that like the water and those that like the mountains. Being near or on the water, lake or ocean, tires me and bores the hell out of me. The mountains give me energy. Even in a SHTF situation I don't think I would take to the water. Although, I could see if there were a pandemic it makes good sense to go off shore and wait for thing to sort themselves out.

Paul,
Great points, we had been going back and forth between the mtn's and the coast for years and still have mtn property. Salty air and salt water are very therapeutic.

You hit the nail on the head ie: pandemic or civil unrest, hence the reason for the thread. That said most any vessel can get you out of harms way weather it's a old shrimper or a sail boat that a friend owns. With a little forethought and planning a boat could save your bacon.

Huntersun2
05-02-2012, 22:13
Hunter,

Sounds like you have a sweet setup. I can't really add anything since it appears that you have the major bases covered. I would definitely ensure that some spare parts are present for the water maker and possibly an alternative source of fresh water. A solar still comes to mind.

The only major change I would have is making it a Catamaran rather than a PowerCat. Then again, I'm a sailor so I'm biased :supergrin:

My grandparents did a live aboard for +10 years and primarily stayed in FL, Bahamas and some of VIs. They did it on a 27' Catalina sailboat, talk about minimalist! I learned alot from them and it will hopefully be put to use at some point in the future when I can do the same :supergrin:

May your seas be calm!

You'd be interested to know she spent her first 6 1/2 years sailing around So. America. When the original owners got back to the east coast they demasted (65' carbon fiber stick) and powered with straight inboards. Plus I never got the hang of sailing......:supergrin:

The solar still idea is a good one, will look into that. We can run our heads on salt water when needed but when we get low and can not make water due to poor water quality we would wash with salt water and rinse with fresh. Good points thanks.

Huntersun2
05-02-2012, 22:18
How far out can your boat go? I do not know a lot about boats but man I am jealous!


Range is a dance between speed, current, load and fuel capacity then throw in weather conditions. Most cruising vessels will handle more weather then the owners. That said our range is between 1000- 1800 miles.

Huntersun2
05-02-2012, 23:05
We have a sailboat and we got back last year from a six month cruise to the Bahamas. My wife and I often joked that the boat is our SHTF bug out vehicle.

We are set up to fairly self-sufficient as well. The only item I won't go back to the Bahamas without is a water maker.

The only flaw I see in your plan is that I can remember pulling into lots of islands in the Bahamas that had been waiting on diesel for weeks. I can't imagine that situation getting better in any kind of crisis.

A sailboat will outrun the fasted powerboat ever made when the fuel is all gone. :supergrin:

But, cruisers are a self-sufficient lot and I was amazed at how minimalist some of the ones we ran into were. You can get by on a lot less than you are used to.



No cold beer? He's just not set up right. I have a 12 volt cooler on my boat that runs off the battery bank, and is fully recharged almost every day by the solar panels. :supergrin:

And, as far as anything affecting the people who live on these small islands. Unless you told them the world had ended, they would probably just be wondering why the supply boats were later than usual. They don't care, or they wouldn't live there. :)

Missed this post sorry. We might have passed some where along the east coast or islands. Our Vessel name is SeaVeyor, your's ?

series1811
05-03-2012, 05:57
Missed this post sorry. We might have passed some where along the east coast or islands. Our Vessel name is SeaVeyor, your's ?

Merrymichelle. 42 Catalina sloop.

In mid August, 2010, we left along the gulf coast of Florida to Marathon, up to Miami, across to Gun Cay in early November 2010, then to Chub Cay and the Berry Islands, then to Nassau, then down the Exumas, stopping at George Town. We ahd planned on going farther, a lot farther, but had a family emergency that we had to return home for. We left the Bahamas in February of 2011, heading back the same way.

It was my fourth trip there. One of my favorite places. If I had the money, I would live on my boat, cruising full time, and just flying home to visit every few months. In a few years, maybe so, after the last ones are through college. :supergrin:

BamaTrooper
05-03-2012, 06:12
...I have sold several vessels specifically for this porpoise.

...

You would think porpoises would want less boats out there.:tongueout:

Seriously, I always wondered how many preppers had boats large enough to live aboard.

series1811
05-03-2012, 06:33
You would think porpoises would want less boats out there.:tongueout:

Seriously, I always wondered how many preppers had boats large enough to live aboard.

There is a woman, pretty well known in boating circles, named Tania Aebi, who at 17 years of age, sailed around the world in a 26 foot Contessa sailboat. It took her two and a half years.

Robin Graham, did it years before at roughly the same age, in a similar sized boat. His journey was covered by National Geographic (I remember it well because it is one of the things that got me into sailing).

If kids can do it ....... :supergrin:

When you visit and read about some of the small island countries, (especially in the South Pacific), they are already living like the apocalypse has come. I don't think it will really affect them. :supergrin:

phil evans
05-03-2012, 11:31
Huntersun2

(2) bikes and a kyack.
Lodes of fishing, hunting and diving gear.

how have you ajusted to foreign firearms regulations?

Huntersun2
05-03-2012, 19:02
Huntersun2

(2) bikes and a kayak.
Lodes of fishing, hunting and diving gear.

how have you ajusted to foreign firearms regulations?

Phil,
This question/topic is as highly discussed as any with cruisers leaving the US. While in the US and it's Territorial waters your vessel is your home with the USCG having legal authority to board.

This is my finding while traveling and not a legal authority.

The Bahamas are easy, declare your weapons with serial #'s and exact round count, as of this time you can still keep them on board in a lockable compartment.

Turks and Cacaos you will need to apply in advance for permission to enter with weapons.

The Carib, each Providence has there own rule but the general deal is you will have to surrender your goods when declaring in and return to the same port to claim as you leave, a major PITA.

Also remember once you declare in any given country they have a record of them and I'm sure this is traceable in the event you get into trouble in a neighboring country.

So the bottom line is do you declare and forfeit your ability to protect your loved ones or not and suffer the consequences if boarded and weapons are found. That said we have seen a growing # of cruisers armed then not and the declare vs not debate rages on.

SpectreRider
05-04-2012, 18:10
Huntersun2, Great boat, looks to be very self sufficient and allows you to seek out better areas to sustain you and yours if the S ever HTF.

How do you deal with current regulation on firearms aboard as you transit from state to state and country to country?

thejellster05
05-04-2012, 20:52
NICE SETUP!

I was born in Kansas and have been here my whole life so I've only been to the ocean twice, but that first pic of your boat in the really blue carribean water made me JEALOUS!

:wavey:

cowboy1964
05-04-2012, 20:53
Theoretically a boat has a certain appeal as a BOV. But in a lawless world I can't imagine how bad piracy would get.

Huntersun2
05-04-2012, 21:41
Please forgive the correction. In a post I would let it go. As a sig line I thought I should let you know.
____________________
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Life's too short for an ugly boat.


Fixed it......thanks.

Huntersun2
05-04-2012, 21:50
Theoretically a boat has a certain appeal as a BOV. But in a lawless world I can't imagine how bad piracy would get.

Agree but the further you can place yourself from the masses the better off you will be. Being mobile should increase your odds.

Kieller
05-07-2012, 10:48
You'd be interested to know she spent her first 6 1/2 years sailing around So. America. When the original owners got back to the east coast they demasted (65' carbon fiber stick) and powered with straight inboards. Plus I never got the hang of sailing......:supergrin:

The solar still idea is a good one, will look into that. We can run our heads on salt water when needed but when we get low and can not make water due to poor water quality we would wash with salt water and rinse with fresh. Good points thanks.

So she has a little sailor in her eh? Sounds like she started off on the right foot :supergrin: