Bugout bags... What's in yours? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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nyycanseco33
05-05-2012, 00:47
What do you use for bugout bags and what do you carry in them for supplies, also what quantities too... Looking for more ideas to add or how to change mine to make it better, others can benefit from this also


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SolidGun
05-05-2012, 01:18
You need to state whereabouts you live and if you have family members to get the best input from the right people.

My entire bag setup changed when I had twins and we moved to a colder region.

nyycanseco33
05-05-2012, 01:35
You need to state whereabouts you live and if you have family members to get the best input from the right people.

My entire bag setup changed when I had twins and we moved to a colder region.

I live in upstate NY right on the south east corner of lake Ontario, I am single so no family members that will be tagging along right now but if that ever changes I can add to my kit

Just curious what others have added that I may have missed or just never even thought about


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Protus
05-05-2012, 11:01
What do you use for bugout bags and what do you carry in them for supplies, also what quantities too... Looking for more ideas to add or how to change mine to make it better, others can benefit from this also


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i use a Kelty Falcon 4000ci military ruck.
Mostly run it with the lid off and the low pro lid on. so its around the 3k ci mark.
I hike with it so contents change per season.

Water-
3L c-bak full
1L- nalgene on the belt
3x 2l platypus hosers with caps vs hoses.
katadyn mini.
sweet water drops
survival straw.

Shelter-
8x8 sil tarp
8x5 ground sheet
bug netting
sleeping bag- winter kelty 20f down bag or marmot trestles 32f, bivy bag . Summer- small snug pack style jungle bag.
therma rest-usgi issue
( clothing) columbia shirts,pants, UA hot or cold gear , and cabot and sons/smartwool socks, mesh boxer briefs. Base layers for winter and poly pros. Watch cap and gloves

Food-
assorted freeze dreid,mre and cliff bars
drink mixes( emergen-C mix)
trail mix/dried fruits

cooking- stainless steel cup, alum spork

fire- fire steel, matches, bic lighters

comms- strobe,led light sticks, 2m HT. cell phone, signal mirror

FAK- baisc small kit and IFAK

odd's /ends
sun glasses
bandana
sewing kit
mora knife
surefire G2
led head lamp ( energizer )
550 cord
small camo bungees( 6 inch size)
3-4 non climbing carbiners
flip flops
light stick( 1-3)
small pad,pen and pencil.
Maps( 3-4 Ao maps)
Compass
wrist compass
thermometer with small compass on it
spare multitool
sapre batts for lights
weapons support-
varies. when i hike i run 2 extra mags for my g17. Vs the 6 i'd carry bugging out ,same with rifle ( 100 round or 4 mags whatever i load )


about all of it i think from teh top of my head without dumping it all LOL.

weight is under 40 lbs

Deputydave
05-05-2012, 12:26
Simple A.L.I.C.E. pack w/frame that I bought off Ebay. Rugged, durable and has plenty of compartments and ways to attach things.

Inside, let's see, the pack doubles as my primitive camping and BOB...

Tuna fish can stove and smaller cat food can stove. These are great since I'm too chea...er, frugal to spend the $5 on an esbit stove ;)

Seriously, I like to be redundant in several areas such as making fire, knives, signalling, cordage and ways to cook/boil or sanitize water, lighting sources etc. So these are easily made and light.

First aid kit
Folding shovel
Several knives of various lenghts (I normally use Kabar, Mora and a attached a Gerber to the shoulder strap plus my normal Swiss Army and Spyderco folders)
Rain ponchos
Firesteel (several of these in various spots in pack, on my person, in knife sheath)
Magnesium block w/striker
Waterproof matches
Various tinder (cotton ball w/p-jelly, dryer lint from towels etc)
Various flashlights (LED as well as mini-mags and head lamp)
Sawyer filtration bottle (as well as some light weight aluminum and plastic types for additonal water storage) (also have 2% iodine as back up)
Whistle
Signal mirror
Various cordage (including 550 and some glow-in-the-dark for general camping use and some bungee cords)
Duct tape
Clothing differs depending on what the situation is going to be
Normal toiletry items
Cooking utensils and items
Tarp
Tent
Sleeping bag
Emergency blankets
Multi tool
Spare batteries
Food appropriate to the situation
Compass on my watch
My off-duty sidearm of course

Some other stuff but I'm drawing a blank at the moment.

That is just the BOB. I also have similar stuff in the vehicles for my GHB except stuff like tent and cooking stuff. Also, if I'm just doing a simple hike or bike ride I've got a small kit around the Mora (Cody) knife I wear with small first aid, flashlight, whistle, firesteel, cordage, tinder etc. All in a reflective, waterproof bag.

Aceman
05-05-2012, 21:45
Reserved space for more time.

Also - how long is your pack intended to last you, and is it by foot or vehicle?

FireForged
05-06-2012, 17:29
honestly, there are tons of bug out bag threads in this forum, I have contributed to 99% of them but I dont have the energy at the moment.

nyycanseco33
05-06-2012, 17:37
honestly, there are tons of bug out bag threads in this forum, I have contributed to 99% of them but I dont have the energy at the moment.

I asked a simple question and if you don't want to answer then fine just carry on and move along to the next thread instead of wasting our time here with your sarcastic and uninformative post


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nyycanseco33
05-06-2012, 17:46
Reserved space for more time.

Also - how long is your pack intended to last you, and is it by foot or vehicle?

I have to consider both options, if I can use a vehicle then great but in the odd case that I am unable to I may have to go by foot so I have to tailor it to be used for both I guess... My pack is intended to last as long as possible but mainly for 72 hours without refilling or running low on supply


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RatDrall
05-07-2012, 05:13
What do you use for bugout bags and what do you carry in them for supplies, also what quantities too... Looking for more ideas to add or how to change mine to make it better, others can benefit from this also

The bag is a Maxpedition Condor II. Inside is everything I'd need to spend a few nights at a hotel, on a friend's couch, in my car, in the woods, or in an alley.

First Aid
Shelter
Warmth
Water
Defense
Food

...Pretty much in that order.

I keep the bag small and mobile. The biggest I'd go is a Maxpedition Condor II. It has straps on the bottom to attach and additional smaller bag, which I keep packed with a change of sturdy clothes (paid off after apartment fire forced me out. I got dressed in the parking lot, armed myself, and carried on while my neighbors stood around wearing their pajamas wondering when they were going to be let back in) so that I don't waste weight and space in the bag with bulky clothing that I don't absolutely need. It's nice to be able to drop 10 lbs of pack and carry on if you have to. The backpack has the essentials, only what I'd need, and is supplemented by duffel bags with food, water, more clothes, winter clothes, a nice tent, etc. that would be very nice to have if camping out of the truck, but could do without if I had to leave it behind.

Dexters
05-07-2012, 07:04
I live in upstate NY right on the south east corner of lake Ontario, I am single so no family members that will be tagging along right now but if that ever changes I can add to my kit

Just curious what others have added that I may have missed or just never even thought about


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We need more information.

What time of year will you be bugging out? Summer, Fall etc

Where will you be going?

What supplies are at your final destination.

How long will it take you to get there?

What do you currently have in your bag?

A Bug list for FL in Summer might not work for you.

quake
05-07-2012, 12:50
Personally, I use a camelback molle hydration vest, with an Ares combat-12 (iirc) pack that can attach/detach fairly quickly, allowing use of just the vest & bladder if desired.

Not to be vague, but the questions others asked above are important to address, even if not publicly. Your personal situation (location, likely distance from home, area type, family needs, etc) will dictate or influence a lot of things.

My comments from:
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1378834
Me personally, I carry a GHB (get home bag) in the vehicle, which is sort of the opposite, yet sort of the same, as a bug-out bag. Opposite in that its job is to help me get to my home rather than away from it, but the same in that the requirements for either are very similar. I'd need clothing, tools, and other items for either. Simply all kept in a rubbermaid tote in my truck, along with another, similar tote with vehicle emergency gear (jumper cables, two strap, 120ac inverter, etc).

In the "ghb" tote (in addition to the backpack for actually carrying things if on foot), I carry good boots, extra boot socks (no telling what I'd be wearing at the time), change of rough clothes, insulated coveralls in the winter (just put them back in a couple weeks ago), hat, gloves, basic food centered on calories, ease of preparation (or lack of preparation) and some comfort (instant coffee mix etc), a battery powered am/fm/noaa radio with earphone, a middle-of-the-road gen-2 D-300 nightvision monocular, infrared flashlight, a PUR voyager water purifier, and a small, low-end garmin etrex gps. In addition to batteries being stored with (but not "in") those devices, due to my work I always have literally dozens more batteries that fit those devices (aaa, aa, cr-123 mostly) in my truck's toolbox as well. Also in the tote are lighters & other firestarters (including fresnel lens and magnesium/flint starter), old gerber multitool, couple emergency blankets, a ziploc bag with a half-dozen N95 masks, nylon twine, duct tape, all kinds of little things like that.

Aside from stuff in the tote, in the truck are also a regular good flashlight and leatherman supertool (in the glove box), a .45LC snubnose with ammo & speedloaders, spare ammo for my daily carry pistols, and an old M1 carbine with mags & ammo. I'm in the truck (an expedition actually) so much that I carry a case of bottled water in the back seat so I can just grab one when driving. So in addition to the water purifier in the ghb, I pretty much always have anywhere from a half-dozen to a couple dozen bottles right there in the truck. Basically, there's pretty much anything I'd need to "get me home" from wherever I happened to be, and whatever circumstance (ice storm, flood, terrorist incident, whatever) that I might find myself in, and that's the idea for me - get me home, or to my workplace (in another county), or our secondary location near family members - whichever is closer at the time.


This one's pretty good as well:
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1417466

This thread has a lot of info, as well as a "contents calculator" spreadsheet link in it, to help point out weak areas. Not everything will apply to everybody and every situation, but worth looking at.
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=812551

Aceman
05-09-2012, 19:04
Here is a fairly recent version of mine and the whole thread of suggestions that go with it:

http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1370010&highlight=survival+pouch

actionshooter10
05-09-2012, 19:41
I asked a simple question and if you don't want to answer then fine just carry on and move along to the next thread instead of wasting our time here with your sarcastic and uninformative post


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You asked a question that has been asked hundreds of times.

Look at fireforged's join date and post count and compare it to yours.

Maybe he's got knowledge about this site you don't.

You may find his suggestion of doing a site search to be of value.

nyycanseco33
05-09-2012, 19:58
You asked a question that has been asked hundreds of times.

Look at fireforged's join date and post count and compare it to yours.

Maybe he's got knowledge about this site you don't.

You may find his suggestion of doing a site search to be of value.

If he was presented as a respectful manner and treated me with respect then I would but he disrespected me and others who are just curious about our bags, if you don't have anything to contribute then carry on and don't post here... Thanks for the no help

Your comment is the reason why a lot of people avoid asking questions because of the smart remarks and sarcasm instead of a polite comment directing someone to the source of info to help them, very disrespectful and unacceptable

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Angry Fist
05-09-2012, 20:10
Cash. And ammo.

Stevekozak
05-09-2012, 20:10
If he was presented as a respectful manner and treated me with respect then I would but he disrespected me and others who are just curious about our bags, if you don't have anything to contribute then carry on and don't post here... Thanks for the no help


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Wow! I suggest you pack a few pairs of panties in your BOB, as the pair you got on seems wadded up pretty tight!! :whistling:

techiej
05-09-2012, 20:11
Silver bullets & wooden stakes.

http://rvschooner.com

nyycanseco33
05-09-2012, 20:13
Wow! I suggest you pack a few pairs of panties in your BOB, as the pair you got on seems wadded up pretty tight!! :whistling:

I suggest you carry on, your remarks are not wanted here, please stop with the poor remarks


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Bolster
05-09-2012, 20:22
Want to make sure you checked out this stickied thread:

http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=812551

Don't yell at me if you don't like the above link or have already seen it. I'm trying to be helpful. You seem like you are looking for a fight.

nyycanseco33
05-09-2012, 20:28
Want to make sure you checked out this stickied thread:

http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=812551

Don't yell at me if you don't like the above link or have already seen it. I'm trying to be helpful. You seem like you are looking for a fight.

Thank you I appreciate you posting that link, I'm not looking for a fight but I just don't appreciate the sarcastic disrespectful responses that don't provide any direction or assistance at all... Their replies were directed to cut down my post instead of assisting it... I like your link and will def check it out, again thank you very much for your assistance :)


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Bolster
05-09-2012, 20:37
Thank you I appreciate you posting that link, I'm not looking for a fight but I just don't appreciate the sarcastic disrespectful responses that don't provide any direction or assistance at all... Their replies were directed to cut down my post instead of assisting it... I like your link and will def check it out, again thank you very much for your assistance :)

My pleasure. The responses you're getting are how people normally converse in this subforum, so you're just being treated like one of the guys. We all take lots of crap to post here (with the possible exception of LongGun, nobody gives him crap...wait, maybe I just did...), so welcome to the brotherhood. The guys poking you are loaded with good info and are friendly and helpful underneath their slightly crustiferous exteriors. There have been loads of BOB threads in this forum so you'll have plenty of info coming your way.

:wavey:

Anyway that BOB rating system is the shizzle, it has been very helpful to me.

Bolster
05-09-2012, 20:47
It is not "might OF", it is "might HAVE".
Site ≠ Sight ≠ Cite. You cite the author in an endnote; you visit a Web site or the site of the crime, and you sight in your firearm.

HEY SolidGun: You might of needed to sight where your getting you're grammer information from. I think you might of made a mistakes. Check a grammer webcite and you will sea I'm wright.

(PS: Punctuation goes inside quotes.)

Dexters
05-10-2012, 06:45
Thank you I appreciate you posting that link, I'm not looking for a fight but I just don't appreciate the sarcastic disrespectful responses that don't provide any direction or assistance at all... Their replies were directed to cut down my post instead of assisting it... I like your link and will def check it out, again thank you very much for your assistance :)


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I thought my post was respectful. Yet, you ignored it.

Is that respectful?

nyycanseco33
05-10-2012, 07:16
I thought my post was respectful. Yet, you ignored it.

Is that respectful?

Sorry was preoccupied with other people and their non assisting remarks, def will answer your post and I do appreciate you posting on this thread


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JAS104
05-10-2012, 07:20
Snickers, some fishing lures, some dip. about it.
Unfortunately, if there's a need for a 'bugout,' I'll probably be running towards the cause.

nyycanseco33
05-10-2012, 07:34
What time of year will you be bugging out? Summer, Fall etc

A: could be anytime, looking for a bag for the just in case moment cause you never know when that might be, I'd have to be prepared for all 4 seasons and the hardships it may bring

Where will you be going?

A: away from the threat or situation until it is deemed safe to return, no set location really but I do have a few options at secluded camps

What supplies are at your final destination.

A: the basic, cooking appliances and grooming items but I will have a small setup of my own in case I'm unable to make it to that particular destination

How long will it take you to get there?

A: Not sure, will want to get as far away from the threat or situation as fast as possible and in as little time as possible

What do you currently have in your bag?

A: I currently have - a hydration bladder, 2 mre's, folding saw/shovel, cooking utensils, small fishing kit, paracord, travel toiletries, knife, multitool, fire starting supplies, maps, compass, small binoculars, water purification tablets, ammo, hunting items, hatchet, thermal blankets, medical supplies/trauma kit, miscellaneous small items and I'm sure there's other things I can't remember off the top of my head




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nyycanseco33
05-10-2012, 07:39
Snickers, some fishing lures, some dip. about it.
Unfortunately, if there's a need for a 'bugout,' I'll probably be running towards the cause.

Chances are I will too but I still want to have a bag just in case... I have 3 nuclear plants near my home and as a firefighter/emt and as a 911 dispatcher I may be required to stay if something were to happen but I still like to be prepared for the what if, even in the ever there's a storm/tornado situation or whatever else mother nature or life throws at someone


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Dexters
05-10-2012, 08:19
What time of year will you be bugging out? Summer, Fall etc

A: could be anytime, looking for a bag for the just in case moment cause you never know when that might be, I'd have to be prepared for all 4 seasons and the hardships it may bring

Where will you be going?

A: away from the threat or situation until it is deemed safe to return, no set location really but I do have a few options at secluded camps

What supplies are at your final destination.

A: the basic, cooking appliances and grooming items but I will have a small setup of my own in case I'm unable to make it to that particular destination

How long will it take you to get there?

A: Not sure, will want to get as far away from the threat or situation as fast as possible and in as little time as possible

What do you currently have in your bag?

A: I currently have - a hydration bladder, 2 mre's, folding saw/shovel, cooking utensils, small fishing kit, paracord, travel toiletries, knife, multitool, fire starting supplies, maps, compass, small binoculars, water purification tablets, ammo, hunting items, hatchet, thermal blankets, medical supplies/trauma kit, miscellaneous small items and I'm sure there's other things I can't remember off the top of my head




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Let's take the worst case - winter in an area like Oswego, New York. It gets an average of 140"/year. Relying solely on you BOB is not going to work and the bags most here have are not designed for that. (Your list does not include snow shoes or a winter bivy.)

You will need some sort of transportation - snowmobile?

For example, your BOB gets you to your snowmobile which gets you to your BOL or gets you out of the area ASAP.

Another idea is that you BOB is a GHB which you have fortified and stocked with what you will need.

What do you think?

nyycanseco33
05-10-2012, 08:39
Let's take the worst case for your area - winter in an area like Oswego, New York. It gets an average of 140"/year. Relying solely on you BOB is not going to work and the bags most here have are not designed for that. (Your list does not include snow shoes or a winter bivy.)

You will need some sort of transportation - snowmobile?

For example, your BOB gets you to your snowmobile which gets you to your BOL or gets you out of the area ASAP.

Another idea is that you BOB is a GHB which you have fortified and stocked with what you will need.

What do you think?

Yeah I think I get what you're saying, I do have a truck, snowmobile and ATV so transportation isn't a real issue, I think you're right about the GHB instead as that's what my real goal is in the end to be home safe. I think I'll pick one of my camp options and use that as a primary place to go if needed and I'll add the bulk of my items there as its much more effective to carry less but have the supplies there at my destination.

These are great things for me to think about that I normally wouldn't have, kinda get tunnel vision sometimes but it's good to have different perspectives from others who are familiar with a BOB/GHB. I appreciate your assistance and am open to more suggestions, tips, and/or ideas... Thank you :)


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MisterMark
05-10-2012, 13:52
My current list
Seven day bug out bag:
2 pair socks
2 pair underwear
Iodine tablets and neutralizer
8000 calories of food
Multi tool
First aid essentials
1. Gauze
2. Medical tape
3. Topical antibiotic
4. Hand sanitizer
5. 2 pair non latex gloves
6. Ace bandage
7. Instant cold pack
8. Asprin and acetaminophen
Duct tape
Zip ties
Multivitamins
Lighter, magnifying glass
Ammunition
Paracord
Blanket

THIS LIST TAPED TO THE OUTSIDE
Camel Back
Coat
Gloves
Extra clothes
Tools (hatchet/machete etc.)
Topographical maps
Watch
Cell phone
Cell charger

auto-5
05-10-2012, 14:45
Trail bag (spring, summer, and fall)

-backpack style bag realtree camo (Wal-Mart special but it does the trick.)
-3L water
-6 cliff bars
-1 can tuna
-long sleeve underarmor shirt
-poncho
-small first aid kit
-supplemental first aid kit (meds, pain killers, prewrap and tape, spare inhaler)
-fire starter kit
-spare socks and shirt
-2 small rolls duct tape
-pen, note pad, sharpie
-deck poker cards
-underwater flashlight w/replacement batteries
-underwater compos
-3 dirt cheap pocket knifes
-2 glow sticks
-100% Deet bug spray
-50 SPF sun tan lotion

Supplemental bag (stays in the car when I hike)
-1 blue tarp
-3L water
-3 cans tuna
-1 small skillet
-1 large can bug spray
-50’ cord
-socket kit
-spare Red Sox hat
-1 Rugger 10/22 .22 LR
-3 25rd mags (loaded)
-1 10rd mag (loaded)
-115rd loose

rotjovi
05-11-2012, 06:06
FedEx just dropped off my GHB, a 5.11 RUSH 12. RUSH 72 is my BOB. Also gave a 5.11 MOAB 10 for a GHB in the truck. The 5.11 Tier System joins the 2 together. I love 5.11 gear!!

Bilbo Bagins
05-11-2012, 09:36
OK I'll play. I'm planning a 4 day, 60 mile hike on Memorial day weekend along the AT. I don't have a dedicated BOB, but I have a few bags packed and ready to go around the house for either a multiday hike, or the Zombie apocalypse.

Bag - Kelty Redwing 3100

Shelter
-Modified Eno Hammock with whoopie slings, bugnet, and Eno profly tarp, and a cargo underbelly all in OD green. The whole thing with stakes and stuff bag come in a 3lb 12oz, and the stuff bag is about 12" by 6". Its a few ounces heavier then my ultra light Big Agnes seedhouse tent, but I'm digging hammock camping. The are fast to set up, an its comfy as heck.

Bag
My 30 degree Eureka bag, but I might go with my lighter bag if the weather is warmer to save some ounces. I'll also have a cheap foam pad for insulation if I need it and if for some reason I need to sleep on the ground.

Clothing
-Lightweight rain jacket and pants.
-Two pair of nylon hiking pants that convert to shorts
-A light fleece jacket
-Lightweight base layer top and bottom (to sleep in or use if it gets cold)
-Two Cheap underarmor knockoff T-shirts
-Underwear - two underarmor poly boxer briefs type, and one underarmor boxers. Hiking long distance you rather have compression boxer briefs type underwear, but when you camp for the night you want everything to air out and be free so I sleep and walk around camp in boxers or a commando in a pair of basketball type shorts.
-One pair of Midweight smartwool hiking socks to sleep in, 3 pair of lightweight smartwool for hiking.
-I may or may not bring a pair of coolmax liners.
-I also carry a buff to use as a makeshift beenie or bandana, a neck warmer or to wipe my sweaty brow.
-A pair of mechanics gloves. If it gets cold or I'm
-I'll probably will have a baseball cap as a hat

Water prep and carry
-I'm keeping the MSR Miniworks at home, and trying my new Sawyer squeeze system filter. Crazy small and only 3 ounces, it worked great at home, and this is the first field test. If it works this may be my go to water filter for all hiking and emergency needs.
http://sectionhiker.com/sawyer-squeeze-water-filter-system/
-I also have a 3L Platypus bladder and a empty 32oz gatorade bottle


Cookset
-Vargo Ti alcohol/ebsit stove - only 4oz. I have a bottle of HEET and some Ebsit cubes for backup
-Snowpeak 700 Ti mug/pot and a small plastic bowl/cup I stole from my -GSI minimalist cookset. I'll also have a light my fire spork.
I'll also have a lighter and a Swedish fire steel as a backup.

Weapons and Other stuff
-A Bacho Laplander so far the best camp saw out there, best $30 I ever spent. I'm not going to go all nutnfancy stupid with wood processing. Its just its nice to have a saw for some quick trail maintenance and for firewood. If the SHTF it would definitively be coming with me.
-A Compass and maps
-A petzel Headlamp and a 4sevens Preon 2 flashlight, and extra AAA batteries.
-I might bail on my Kershaw hatchet, and bring just a glock knife or even a Cold Steel Recon1 to save a few ounces. If the SHTF I would bring both a hatchet and knife.
-I'm bringing some almost expired police grade pepper spray. I have a bear spray but the canister is bulky and again I'm cutting weight down. SHTF bear spray would be very effective against anything from bears to a mob of looters wanting your stuff.
-The gun I'm bringing is still up in the air. I usually bring a Kel Tec Pf9 for hiking, but I have had issues with it. I might suck it up an take my Glock 27 since its the best woods gun I own, but this thicker and heavier then the PF9. I'm still in the market for a lightweight woods/bear gun. If the SHTF the plan is to take my G19, and my Advantage Arms .22 conversion kit for it. and extra mags and ammo.

That is it, Fully loaded with food and water my pack weight is usually between 32 to 35 pounds. I'm shooting for sub 30lb for this hike

Dexters
05-11-2012, 11:23
OK I'll play.

What state or area of the trail?

No trekking poles?

Bug spray - highly recommended, especially for ticks.

Amazon.com: Sawyer Premium Permethrin Clothing Insect Repellent Trigger Spray, 24-Ounce: Sports & Outdoors@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41MmGw%2B8igL.@@AMEPARAM@@41MmGw%2B8igL

Bilbo Bagins
05-11-2012, 12:09
What state or area of the trail?

No trekking poles?

Bug spray - highly recommended, especially for ticks.

Amazon.com: Sawyer Premium Permethrin Clothing Insect Repellent Trigger Spray, 24-Ounce: Sports & Outdoors (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001ANQVYU/ref=asc_df_B001ANQVYU2012397?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&tag=dealt529226-20&linkCode=asn&creative=395093&creativeASIN=B001ANQVYU)

My bad , I usually carry a pair trekking poles. Trekking poles are kind of not cool if you are talking prepping and Zombies. I'm in my 40's and its just too hard on my knees and legs to hike big miles with a backpack without poles.

And my list is also missing my first aid kit, a small travel toothbrush a toothpaste, my poop kit, a small bar of ivory soap, a tick remover key and BUG SPRAY. I have been OK with Deepwoods Off so far, and I usually have those little pen sized spray bottles in all my pack as a backup in case I forget. I have actually never had a tick on my while camping, but I have had gotten twice in my own back yard. :dunno: Knock on wood, no lyme yet.

Its basically a four guy hike, so if I miss something non essential, someone else will probably have some to borrow. This year we are doing PA, a section of the AT just outside of Hamburg PA (there is a big Cabelas not far from there) and the Delaware Water Gap a few miles before you hit the PA/NJ line. If you every been thru the Lehigh Tunnel on the PA turnpike, we hike across the ridge of that mountain.

Protus
05-12-2012, 05:43
OK I'll play. I'm planning a 4 day, 60 mile hike on Memorial day weekend along the AT. I don't have a dedicated BOB, but I have a few bags packed and ready to go around the house for either a multiday hike, or the Zombie apocalypse.

Bag - Kelty Redwing 3100

Shelter
-Modified Eno Hammock with whoopie slings, bugnet, and Eno profly tarp, and a cargo underbelly all in OD green. The whole thing with stakes and stuff bag come in a 3lb 12oz, and the stuff bag is about 12" by 6". Its a few ounces heavier then my ultra light Big Agnes seedhouse tent, but I'm digging hammock camping. The are fast to set up, an its comfy as heck.

Bag
My 30 degree Eureka bagwhat is the weight of this bag, but I might go with my lighter bag if the weather is warmer to save some ounces. I'll also have a cheap foam pad for insulation if I need it and if for some reason I need to sleep on the ground.

Clothing
-Lightweight rain jacket and pants.
-Two pair of nylon hiking pants that convert to shorts(stick with the pair your wearing and a pair of trekking shorts for in camp
-A light fleece jacket
-Lightweight base layer top and bottom (to sleep in or use if it gets cold)
-Two Cheap underarmor knockoff T-shirts( dump one wear one during the day and a dry one for in camp
-Underwear - two underarmor poly boxer briefs type, and one underarmor boxers. Hiking long distance you rather have compression boxer briefs type underwear, but when you camp for the night you want everything to air out and be free so I sleep and walk around camp in boxers or a commando in a pair of basketball type shortssee my trekking short commenta bove ;) ).
-One pair of Midweight smartwool hiking socks to sleep in, 3 pair of lightweight smartwool for hiking.(dump 2 pairs of those lighter socks. wear one, keep one spare especially if your bringing the coolmax liners,honestlyi sleep with out socks when i hike so my feet dry out 100% in the night
-I may or may not bring a pair of coolmax liners.
-I also carry a buff to use as a makeshift beenie or bandana, a neck warmer or to wipe my sweaty brow.a large bandana , its what i use and is double duty
-A pair of mechanics gloves. If it gets cold or I'm
-I'll probably will have a baseball cap as a hat ( this can work, when i hike i hear a mesh sided columbia boonie,keeps the sun offmy ears/neck and still is cool enough for summer hikes)

Water prep and carry
-I'm keeping the MSR Miniworks at home, and trying my new Sawyer squeeze system filter. Crazy small and only 3 ounces, it worked great at home, and this is the first field test. If it works this may be my go to water filter for all hiking and emergency needs.( i would bring trusted equipment on a longer hike like this,save the T and E for shorter day hikes
http://sectionhiker.com/sawyer-squeeze-water-filter-system/
-I also have a 3L Platypus bladder and a empty 32oz gatorade bottle


Cookset
-Vargo Ti alcohol/ebsit stove - only 4oz. I have a bottle of HEET and some Ebsit cubes for backup
-Snowpeak 700 Ti mug/pot and a small plastic bowl/cup I stole from my -GSI minimalist cookset. I'll also have a light my fire spork.
I'll also have a lighter and a Swedish fire steel as a backup.

Weapons and Other stuff
-A Bacho Laplander so far the best camp saw out there, best $30 I ever spent. I'm not going to go all nutnfancy stupid with wood processing. Its just its nice to have a saw for some quick trail maintenance and for firewood. If the SHTF it would definitively be coming with me.
-A Compass and maps
-A petzel Headlamp and a 4sevens Preon 2 flashlight, and extra AAA batteries.
-I might bail on my Kershaw hatchet, and bring just a glock knife or even a Cold Steel Recon1 to save a few ounces. If the SHTF I would bring both a hatchet and knife. ( carry a knife on you or a mora for a light fixed blade, you have the saw no need for the axe/hatchet,
-I'm bringing some almost expired police grade pepper spray. I have a bear spray but the canister is bulky and again I'm cutting weight down. SHTF bear spray would be very effective against anything from bears to a mob of looters wanting your stuff.
-The gun I'm bringing is still up in the air. I usually bring a Kel Tec Pf9 for hiking, but I have had issues with it. I might suck it up an take my Glock 27 since its the best woods gun I own, but this thicker and heavier then the PF9. I'm still in the market for a lightweight woods/bear gun. If the SHTF the plan is to take my G19, and my Advantage Arms .22 conversion kit for it. and extra mags and ammo.

That is it, Fully loaded with food and water my pack weight is usually between 32 to 35 pounds. I'm shooting for sub 30lb for this hike

I only did the red to help save ya some pounds etc.
Over 60 miles your food is gonna be very important to your energy level and to your pack weight level.water will be second.( i dunno the AO your hiking but i would make sure you have the means to hump extra water if your in a dry area- reasoni carry 3 extra 2-3 liter platypus bags).

an example of the clothing i wear when backpacking.
columbia pants - these arent convertibles.I think they are the ulitmate ROC pant, BUt cant recall. They are light weight like their convertibles, with a small cargo pocket. I mod'd them with draw strings on the legs. These pants dry fast and arent bad to wear in the heat.
shirt(s)- i layer. I wear a UA heat gear almost mesh shirt, with a long sleeve columbia fishing shirt.If its to hot the shirt gets shoved in the ruck and worn in camp later. The Longsleeves mean i have sun and bug protection.
I wear mesh boxer briefs, and pack only one spare. Socks. i wear light weight smartwools and keep a pair of lighter wool blend for in camp/spare. I also hump in flip flops/croc for in camp so my main footware can dry out(as well as my feet).
clothing can take up a ton of space, and the weight add's up. Plus, i dont mid wearing 3 day old pants , as long as when i get into camp i have cleaner dry kit to put on( trekking shorts or base layers) , im not out there to win a fashion show ,so if my hiking buddies have to see me in a base layer walking around camp vs pants so be it..less weight i gotta hump LOL :P

sides that what the pants look like ( i had to buy a second pair as i lost 20+ lbs since that pic was taken) but will give you an idea of what my hooch looks like as well)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v54/protus/octhike2010025.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v54/protus/octhike2010023.jpg

Dexters
05-12-2012, 07:42
http://www.backpacker.com/gear_checklists_and_shopping_guides/gear/12091

Backpacker.com has some good lists.

As far as lightening up Applichaian Trail through hikers have good suggestions.

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/index.html

Above can have some good ideas but, you have to pay for some of the content and there a lot of comugions on the forums.

One tip - get rid of as much cotton as you can and go to synthetics.

Most of my hiking is solo, cold weather, Alpine/mt hiking so weight, isn't high on my list when I'm carrying snow shoes, axe, and crampons etc.

wrenrj1
05-12-2012, 09:31
I've put two of these EDC kits together. They're small and can easily fit in a BOB.
http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb87/wrenrj1/IMG_1519.jpg

actionshooter10
05-13-2012, 00:12
If he was presented as a respectful manner and treated me with respect then I would but he disrespected me and others who are just curious about our bags, if you don't have anything to contribute then carry on and don't post here... Thanks for the no help

Your comment is the reason why a lot of people avoid asking questions because of the smart remarks and sarcasm instead of a polite comment directing someone to the source of info to help them, very disrespectful and unacceptable

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My, we are thin skinned.

My point, regardless of whether you felt it was disrespectful, was that there is a host of information on this forum that you can search for and read.

I have no problem with people asking questions. I do have a problem with laziness and intentional ignorance. Check my hx, I'm normally quite helpful but your attitude rubs me the wrong way.

I don't know where you work, but I can say you wouldn't last at any agency in my area with your attitude and inability to accept constructive criticism.

Have a nice day.

nyycanseco33
05-13-2012, 03:06
My, we are thin skinned.

My point, regardless of whether you felt it was disrespectful, was that there is a host of information on this forum that you can search for and read.

I have no problem with people asking questions. I do have a problem with laziness and intentional ignorance. Check my hx, I'm normally quite helpful but your attitude rubs me the wrong way.

I don't know where you work, but I can say you wouldn't last at any agency in my area with your attitude and inability to accept constructive criticism.

Have a nice day.

Your response had nothing constructive to provide and it's not laziness, I just wanted to see if there were even other suggestions to add that have not been previously mentioned. As for the agency comment I believe you are quite out of line due to the fact that you don't know me or where I'm from so please keep your negative comments to yourself. If you are normally quite helpful then you could have been a standup guy and helped me here but instead insisted on being rude and providing smart comments for your own pleasure. It's apparent that you are not going to provide any valuable substance to this thread so please stop commenting and carry on elsewhere.


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Ethereal Killer
05-13-2012, 08:37
well I'm seeing a "trend" here... :D

Apparently you should pack some "respect" in your bugout bag so you can hand it out to everyone you come in contact with so they can give it back to you. I'm thinking that SINGLE item will get you further than all the other suggestions combined.

Ooooh... maybe you could become "johnny bag-o-respect" and go around new england planting respect in the hopes of growing respect trees so everyone would have respect.

Alternatively you could also save up all the respect you get (prolly slim pickins these days tho huh?), and then help yourself to some whenever you feel the need. then your self respect would remain high enough you wouldnt need to get it from other people.

yep. a bag-o-respect. thats all you need. :eric:

---------------

bugout/survival bag 101:
-fire
-water
-shelter
-communications
-maps/compass useful for mode of transportation intended
-ability to buy things
-protection
-knife
-skills to do all the above with a minimum of gear.

if you want to learn what to put in your bag, then make the "bugout" journey once or twice and get your stuff dialed in for sure. No-one here can tell YOU what to put in your bag... (except maybe some extra respect :tongueout:)

wrenrj1
05-13-2012, 08:56
catfight...rarrrr.:popcorn:

Protus
05-13-2012, 09:17
catfight...rarrrr.:popcorn:

aint the internet grand....LOL.

:upeyes:

Calhoun123
05-13-2012, 09:36
I used to have a BOB, but I'm older now and looking at things through a different prism. I'm not planning to bug out. If I ever had a need to bug out, it could only be done with a vehicle because I am not an army of one, I am the head of a family. If things are so bad that a vehicle is not an option, we have ways to deal with that (like bicycles), but its so unrealistic that there is no point in me wasting time and money worrying about it. So, I'm offering this to you as something to consider as you think about it.

nyycanseco33
05-13-2012, 11:07
well I'm seeing a "trend" here... :D

Apparently you should pack some "respect" in your bugout bag so you can hand it out to everyone you come in contact with so they can give it back to you. I'm thinking that SINGLE item will get you further than all the other suggestions combined.

Ooooh... maybe you could become "johnny bag-o-respect" and go around new england planting respect in the hopes of growing respect trees so everyone would have respect.

Alternatively you could also save up all the respect you get (prolly slim pickins these days tho huh?), and then help yourself to some whenever you feel the need. then your self respect would remain high enough you wouldnt need to get it from other people.

yep. a bag-o-respect. thats all you need. :eric:

---------------

bugout/survival bag 101:
-fire
-water
-shelter
-communications
-maps/compass useful for mode of transportation intended
-ability to buy things
-protection
-knife
-skills to do all the above with a minimum of gear.

if you want to learn what to put in your bag, then make the "bugout" journey once or twice and get your stuff dialed in for sure. No-one here can tell YOU what to put in your bag... (except maybe some extra respect :tongueout:)

I have respect for everybody but it quickly goes away when they treat me like the way some have in here, I don't appreciate their smart remarks and non productive replies... I do appreciate your list and suggestions for a bag though and I'm writing everything down to consider when I redo mine, thank you :)


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Ethereal Killer
05-13-2012, 16:20
c'mon now guys... Johnny bag-o-respect was KINDA funny wasnt it? Anyone? :whistling:

Aceman
05-13-2012, 19:24
Well, since post count was brought up, mine is higher than Nyy, dexters, and actionshooter's put together.

That said, keeping it objective, the only party I find offensive in the least is Nyy.

Nyy - no one was was "disrespecting" you. That said, your somewhat over the top pursuit of the matter, was over-the-top for the comment made. It's the internet, lighten up.

By the way, in the matter of disrespect, I'll offer this advice: Having lived in PA, and spent enough time in New York, you may want to seriously check YOUR respect for mother nature.

She will smack a beyotch down with absolutely no concern or respect whatsoever. The questions you are asking and the bag you have suggest you have quite a bit to consider. Ask more questions about weather, food, shelter, travel. Worry less about social graces and more about staying alive.

That Oswego in middle of a blizzard comment was serious good advice to consider.

rotjovi
05-14-2012, 19:02
c'mon now guys... Johnny bag-o-respect was KINDA funny wasnt it? Anyone? :whistling:

Not at all. Damn Troll!!!

wrenrj1
05-14-2012, 19:07
I have respect for everybody but it quickly goes away when they treat me like the way some have in here, I don't appreciate their smart remarks and non productive replies... I do appreciate your list and suggestions for a bag though and I'm writing everything down to consider when I redo mine, thank you :)


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Now lets move on, end the hurt puppy stuff respectfully, and yes, bag-o-respect was funny.

Just a suggestion, if people call you on stuff, argue their points objectively as it relates to their post. If they're antagonistic, just don't respond.

You have a good thread, why make a right turn on another subject?

Respectfully,

Wren

Aceman
05-14-2012, 21:27
I've put two of these EDC kits together. They're small and can easily fit in a BOB.
http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb87/wrenrj1/IMG_1519.jpg

I have a Maxpedition pocket organizer done in a similar way - maybe a little smaller...

Cwlongshot
05-15-2012, 05:31
I've put two of these EDC kits together. They're small and can easily fit in a BOB.
http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb87/wrenrj1/IMG_1519.jpg


Wren,
Quick question. What is and who makes this "bag"?

Thanks ,
CW

Bushflyr
05-15-2012, 11:31
Not Wren, but it looks similar to the Maxpedition EDC pocket organizer. The webbing and zipper section on the right looks different than mine though.

BLau
05-15-2012, 12:02
Lot's of bug out gear and info:

http://www.zombiehunters.org/forum/viewforum.php?f=14&sid=efa5f716de645b9ff1b4c8afa2ba9cc5

wrenrj1
05-15-2012, 18:55
Wren,
Quick question. What is and who makes this "bag"?

Thanks ,
CW

http://www.maxpedition.com/store/pc/Fatty-Pocket-Organizer-14p1654.htm

wrenrj1
05-15-2012, 18:57
I have a Maxpedition pocket organizer done in a similar way - maybe a little smaller...

Winner winner chicken dinner. This is the Maxpedition Fatty.

Wren

BR549
05-16-2012, 11:30
These are the categories I consider for any activity.


1. Pack / Packing Materials

2. Shelter / Clothing / Sleeping / Hygiene / Fire

3. Water / Food / Nutrition / Purification / Preparation / Fire

4. First Aid / Medical / Water / Purification / Fire

5. Navigation / Communication / Light / Fire

6. Utility / Tools / Specialty / Fire



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MisterMark
05-16-2012, 11:37
After reading through this thread and thinking more deeply I am moving away from a bugout bag mindset and going to an evacuation mindset.

Lots of people are preparing to head to the woods. Good thing to prep for but a fairly low probability for most people.

Thinking through the various 'grab a bag and run' scenarios this is the new plan:

Large suitcase that holds spare under clothes, jacket, blanket and the more civilized travel elements of my evacuation kit. Spare cash, travel kit, the kind of stuff that the family would take for a regular overnighter. Stuffed in the corner of this bag (it is huge, from before all airline baggage restrictions) is a camping/apocalypse style bugout bag. The kind of thing that lets you survive for seven days with no infrastructure available and some tools for obtaining additional supplies.

Disaster comes we can grab the big bag, throw it in a vehicle and head out. If things get too serious we break out the smaller bags and head out on foot or bicycle.

Bilbo Bagins
05-16-2012, 11:45
After reading through this thread and thinking more deeply I am moving away from a bugout bag mindset and going to an evacuation mindset.

Lots of people are preparing to head to the woods. Good thing to prep for but a fairly low probability for most people.

Thinking through the various 'grab a bag and run' scenarios this is the new plan:

Large suitcase that holds spare under clothes, jacket, blanket and the more civilized travel elements of my evacuation kit. Spare cash, travel kit, the kind of stuff that the family would take for a regular overnighter. Stuffed in the corner of this bag (it is huge, from before all airline baggage restrictions) is a camping/apocalypse style bugout bag. The kind of thing that lets you survive for seven days with no infrastructure available and some tools for obtaining additional supplies.

Disaster comes we can grab the big bag, throw it in a vehicle and head out. If things get too serious we break out the smaller bags and head out on foot or bicycle.

Stop ruining everyone's Mad Max fantasy with your common sense :whistling:

fastbolt
05-16-2012, 12:50
I realized long ago that a single "BOB" wasn't really feasible for my own needs. Not for all-around, all-weather, all-circumstances, etc.

Having been caught away from home during the '89 earthquake here (CA), held over on-duty, I decided I also needed to expand my work gear bag to include emergency food/snacks and some other things that needed to be in the trunk of my work car (not my locker). That naturally carried over to what I felt was minimally necessary in my POV's.

Then, my wife and I were stuck in a remote rural house during that really bad storm in the Pacific Northwest several years ago. Roads being closed for more than a week due to heavy snow, ice, hundreds of trees down across rural roads. Worse in areas where rocks, snow, etc came down and closed major routes. People were stuck and died.

In our area there was no power, no emergency response capabilities, freezing temps, deep snow, local generators were over-loaded and totally inadequate in number & availability, and then the local water supply lost its power (for filtration). No propane (because local power was run out there, it being a popular recreational destination during the good months ). Fortunately, I'd learned to plan for emergencies while traveling with a family many years ago, so we had some extra gear & supplies to supplement what was in the rural house.

I decided to put together a range of "modular" bags that could be broken down or combined, depending on my needs.

Nothing involving firearms or ammunition (except for the "work" bag). Limited expensive gear, knives, etc. That stuff remained with me, on my person and in my personal bags/luggage (while using my veh's for travel).

My supplemental bags vary a bit depending upon where & when (seasonally) I'm traveling, and also for how long I expect to be gone. (Safety margins factored.)

Some stay in the car, at times, but those don't have the same amount of expensive stuff I used to carry (not since I lost about $900 worth of gear out of my trunk many years ago). That gets safely & securely stowed at destinations, but remains within easy access when I'm away from the veh.

Clothing, emergency supplies (clothing/warmth, lighting/signaling, medical, reference info, shelter, repair, etc).

I look more toward geographical/seasonal influences when combining gear bags. I worry about being able to remain warm and staying energized & alert (food), regardless of whether the circumstances compel either sheltering-in-place or keeping mobile. Having safe/clean water is important, too.

I learned the importance of good ankle support and balance assistance (climbing boots and a solid staff) when foolishly doing some casual cave exploring one time. Both saved me from breaking an ankle and becoming stuck somewhere. I was otherwise ill-equipped, though. Also, nobody knew where I'd gone that day, and I wasn't prepared for some nasty insects that left a huge bite/welt which caused one forearm to swell (but which subsequent emergency treatment at a hospital determined wasn't really a problem). I was young and sometimes acted without forethought back then. :whistling:

Perhaps less focus on "hard" gear and more prep work with knowledge, training and the less glamorous equipment is helpful. ;)

FWIW, I think the firearms/protective weapons subject is a narrow subset of this general topic, but let's just say that I realize how easily equipment might be lost, stolen, damaged or otherwise rendered inoperable. Training for use with something other than a "prized, personally-owned" firearm is preferred (for me) to building a skillset and dependence on a single firearm, especially a single type/design of handgun.

MisterMark
05-17-2012, 09:39
FastBolt had some good points, the car must be factored in.

A further refinement to emergency evacuation or loss of services prep leaves this update:

So if we keep in mind that the one thing you are most likely to be near when everything goes down is your car, the smart choice would seem to be letting your bulky evacuation kit at home and keeping a low cost bugout kit locked in your trunk or a lockbox.

Which means your main evacuation kit is large and bulky and locked up at home, but can supply everyone in your family for a week at least, with whatever specalized gear you like and an essentials backpack that should give you what you need to either make it back to the house or keep you alive for 48 hours.

wrenrj1
05-17-2012, 18:44
Good points Fastbolt and Mrmark. I plan to shelter in place unless my home has become uninhabitable, and that will be by my decision. I've done a mental risk assessment of those hazards that would impact me and they are limited to severe storm damage or fire (living in the Midwest).

If I need to bug out with supplies, everything is on the shelf and can be thrown into boxes ready to go. Granted some things will need to be left behind but it's about getting away from the threat.

Wren

dissthis
06-01-2012, 18:32
Mine is more of a GHB....I recently unpacked everything from the one pack as the Cheaper Than Dirt pack was breaking zippers fast!:upeyes:

Old pack on left new on right before swap over:

http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q270/curtdiss/61f2ca65.jpg

contents:

http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q270/curtdiss/43f45b40.jpg

http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q270/curtdiss/8258d016.jpg

http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q270/curtdiss/c62c3968.jpg

http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q270/curtdiss/884189a4.jpg
.

dissthis
06-01-2012, 18:33
http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q270/curtdiss/9fb7744b.jpg

http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q270/curtdiss/fe292270.jpg

everything in new bag with room to spare:
http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q270/curtdiss/97662090.jpg

The above pack stays in the car 24/7
I also have a MaxPedtion Versa Pack that goes with me...some redundancy. If I ever had to hump it home I would probably marry the two bags and start hoofing it..

*edited to add: bottles of water and Nalogene bottles in the trunk.

quake
06-02-2012, 07:02
dissthis - curious, what are the wire strippers in the 2nd pic for?

dissthis
06-02-2012, 07:15
dissthis - curious, what are the wire strippers in the 2nd pic for?

I don't know yet :supergrin:

But since I've ended up with 4 or 5 pairs of strippers over the years I threw a pair in there...as I am sure you know stripping wires (especially thin/delicate ones) is hard to do with a pocket knife or your teeth
Come to think of it I am going to throw a roll of electrical tape in my bag...