Tough Mudder Maysville KY [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Two_Clicks
05-09-2012, 17:49
Anyone else participating in the Tough mudder October 20, 21 in Kentucky? We've got a team together of 10 members so far and a few still pending.

Anyone ever participate in a tough mudder before?

grecco
05-10-2012, 06:21
I have,
Tough Mudder Pa 2011 last April.
You are going to have a lot of fun!
My advise , ware under armor clothing, or any equivalent wicker type, it will keep you dry,
pick up some shock blocks or energy gel packs.
also have the mind set of having fun, not a race.
Tough Mudder PA 2011 Official Video - YouTube

sappy13
05-10-2012, 10:51
Toughmudder is so much fun. I ran it in February for the GA one. I dont think you will need gel packs or anything like that. They have bannanas and stuff like that throughout the course. Water also. Moisture wicking clothes can be nice. Just anything that dries off somewhat fast. This time of year it shouldnt be too cold. I ran it shirtless in February and found that I tended to be warmer than my buddy that ran with me, since his clothes stayed wet. The obstacles make the 12 mile run easier than it would normally be, since your body has a chance to rest multiple times throughout the event. Make sure you wear shoes you really dont care about, if you have some, because they will never look the same again. lol. I wore some old ones and just tossed em after. There was no way I was going to destroy my current running shoes.

Its an extremely fun event and i loved it. Im currently planning to run the Worlds Toughest Mudder event in December, depending on where its located. Have fun and let us know how it goes.

itstime
05-10-2012, 11:01
I've never heard of it and now want to do one. Thanks. I'm looking now.

Goldendog Redux
05-10-2012, 11:57
I have done a TM at Bear Valley, CA and at Squaw Valley, CA. The one at Squaw was actually pretty grueling. It came out to a bit over thirteen miles. I did it alone because I wanted to see how fast I could go.

I am signed up for the next TM Nor Cal at Northstar at Tahoe. I like the TM at ski areas because the terrain/elevation is an obstacle by itself. A flat Tough Mudder would just be a long mud run. The obstacles are not really a big deal.

Have fun.

MF

Two_Clicks
05-11-2012, 15:09
Thanks for the tips I can't wait!

Did you guys do anything special to prepare for it? we will be running a few 5Ks and the warrior dash (about 3 miles with some obstacles) through the summer. I've started hitting the treadmill a few days of week and might mix some insanity work outs in between. Another plus I'm gonna be in awesome shape for deer season!

sappy13
05-13-2012, 10:24
Just run a lot would be my first suggestion. Try to get to 8 or more straight if possible, preferably 12 or more but that takes a lot of time/prep. The longer the distance you can run straight, the easier it will be for u on race day when u combination obstacles. The good thing about the obstacles is that it gives your body a small break between miles. It will make a huge difference for u.

Make sure u do some upperbody bodyweight exercises like pullups and pushups. They will help you a ton, since a lot of the obstacles are very upper body oriented.

Prepare as best you can and you will be fine. I saw people out there that I would have never thought could do 12 miles and those obstacles. Its amazing what the human body can do with someone that is determined to finish something.

Sent from my LG-P925 using Tapatalk

jpa
05-13-2012, 11:40
if you like their facebook page they've got a lot of tips and hints for preparing posted. A bunch of friends just did the Devil Dash yesterday and said it was great time. Of course that was only a 5k but it's the same idea. Same with the Spartan race, but I think that one's a little crazy. I don't think I like the idea of being shocked by live wires....

pugman
09-09-2012, 17:15
Just finished (as in yesterday) Wisconsin 2012!

My thoughts/Recommendations

Run outside!: Treadmill work is fine for overall endurance; but running on a belt which forces you to move is not the same thing. The furthest I ever rain training was 8 miles; between some obstacle bottlenecks and rest stops - if you can cover even as little as 5 miles at a time you will be fine.

Gloves: I wore a set of MadGrips (excellent for protection...since they muddy not worth a damn for grip on anything metal). I had no problem taking mine on and off – with a mesh back my hands didn’t sweat when I trained with them outside. I did not cut off the fingers and didn’t have any problem pulling the palm back a bit to let them drain.

Rest stops: take advantage of them. Wisconsin provided water, bananas and sometimes energy bars. Even if you are timing it, a 30 second stop is worth it. Average mudder time is three hours: one guy on my team who is a hard core triathlete timed us and set (thankfully) a reasonable pace. We finished in 2:32 by his watch which I thought was reasonable considering two of the three of us never did anything like this before

Timing: We were what I would call net passers; especially in the begining we had to sprint a bit to get ahead of our heat to set a good pace. This is not a race but since I trained for a year it was hard not to run at my pace.

Bring your bag/Don’t leave it in the car: I assume its standard, but there is a free bag check. Wisconsin’s weather for September was surprisingly Fall like and I was surprised I was one of the few people who thought of bringing sweat pants and a fleece jacket for after the race. While ’s of the racers were shivering after their post race mildly cold shower...I was warm and dry. Remember a towel!

Some of the signature obstacles

Everest: I’m short at 5’7 and even I made it up...step back 40-50 ft and sprint and run as hard/fast as you can; if you watch the videos the key to making it without help is not sticking it 2-3 times and jumping and trying to get ahold of the top - the key is to sprint and time your jump so you have the momentum to be able to boost yourself up at the same time. Its the same movement you would use to say go up and over a 6’ wall.

ElectroShock Therapy: Sucked. Its not the pain of the 10,000 volts...I got hit three times. It was the disorientation of running...getting nailed...momentarily blacking out and next realizing you are on the ground. The two guys on my team ran clear through and got nailed in the last row of wires and both fell like a stone.

The Artic Blast (or whatever they are calling the ice bath): Make sure the bath is clear if possible, jump in do not come up for a breath and clear the wall then come up. Sitting in front of a wall freezing only makes you think. Second, once you get out don’t sit there shivering...start running! The only way to quickly warm up is to get moving.

End Race: I thought TM did an excellent job after clearing the Shock Therapy with food, Cliff Builder’s energy bars, drinks etc. Yes, I grabbed my well deserved beer but there were plenty of after (and before!) free promo energy drinks and bars

Overall, you will have a blast. TM did a great job setting an awesome atmosphere. If you have any choice get an early start time. Even though it didn’t rain Saturday, our course by 1:00 was trashed; a good example was this small hill after the mud mile – what we ran up with no problem had become so slick by 1:00 people needed a rope to get up it. Also an earlier start time meant less bottle necks at obstacles.

You WILL have a good time

Get some!

jason10mm
09-10-2012, 08:10
I'm going the Spartan Beast in SC next month. I'm psyched for it but I HATE having to train to run these 12 mile events! Definitely gonna focus on the 5K runs after this :)

pugman
09-10-2012, 11:42
I'm going the Spartan Beast in SC next month. I'm psyched for it but I HATE having to train to run these 12 mile events! Definitely gonna focus on the 5K runs after this :)

If you can run 5K - you can make 12 miles.

There were 5 aid stations with water, bathrooms and food. Our event didn't have the stacks of people with full cups of water - they had people handing out cups and you had to fill your own from huge 2-300 gallon tanks...i.e. unless you won't want water you will have no choice but to stop for a minute or so

Some of the obstacles will bottle neck.

At least on our course, there were times walking was the only safe and possible thing to do - a few spots you had to keep your head down to avoid holes, roots, low hanging branches, rocks or potential slick spots.

At least I found as long as I could run my pace (which at 43 was about a 10 minute mile) I could have run a while longer

As far as I could see, everyone who carried a Camelbak was complaining - they got caught in the barbed wire, they were a pain to have when crawling through tunnels and who wants to run with an extra 8-16# on their back

jason10mm
09-10-2012, 12:36
Yeah, I have heard that it is not like running 12 miles straight. I just want to finish, my time is irrelevant. If I can keep doing them while only running 4-6 miles in training that would be great. 8+ mile runs just eat me up.

sappy13
09-11-2012, 09:05
It's nothing like running 12 miles. The breaks you get for obstacles makes it really easy. Plus there was 2 spots at the GA one where you had to just keep a fast walk due to going through a creek and alongside the lake in the mud.

I'd say as long as u can run 6 miles and have some upperbody strength u will excel at it. Just push yourself when tired.

Sent from my LG-P925 using Tapatalk 2

Hawkeye16
09-11-2012, 09:16
Did the MN one this year and it was definitely fun. Much easier with a teammate. We had some pretty out of shape people that got through with some help from the more in shape people.

I would recommend it for just about anyone!


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pugman
09-12-2012, 16:11
Yeah, I have heard that it is not like running 12 miles straight. I just want to finish, my time is irrelevant. If I can keep doing them while only running 4-6 miles in training that would be great. 8+ mile runs just eat me up.

Ironically I found the obstacles are what burned me up.

Before doing roadwork, I was running 8-8.5 miles without stopping - no I wasn't going to qualify for the Boston Marathon but one of my goals for the course was to not stop...even if it meant walking.

If you can do 6...you can do 12. Funny how when the mile markers moved into double digits you can/will pick up the pace.

As for the Electro Shock therapy - honestly, the shock doesn't hurt at all; its the disorientation and being on the ground and not quite remembering how you got there 2 seconds ago.

Two_Clicks
10-17-2012, 18:18
Anyone gonna be there this weekend? We did have a total of 15 signed up but it looks like only 12 are going to run due to some obligations and complications lol

I'm fired up....thank you all for the advice!

Altaris
10-17-2012, 19:03
As for the Electro Shock therapy - honestly, the shock doesn't hurt at all; its the disorientation and being on the ground and not quite remembering how you got there 2 seconds ago.

The guy next to me at work just did the Austin one last weekend. He said him and the 3 people he was with started having leg cramps after the electro stuff. He thinks it messed with them somehow.


I plan do do the one here when it comes back in April, though my problem is I can't run for crap. The upper body strength is no problem, and I am a monkey by nature, so the obstacles should be easy for me. I only have 80% lung capacity of most people though, so I can only run about a 1/2 a mile at most before I have to stop to catch my breath. I really want to do this, but I am just concerned that I am going to end up walking most of it and having it take forever.

Two_Clicks
10-17-2012, 19:06
It's not a race it's just about finishing...best of luck if you go for it.

Goldendog Redux
10-17-2012, 23:14
The guy next to me at work just did the Austin one last weekend. He said him and the 3 people he was with started having leg cramps after the electro stuff. He thinks it messed with them somehow.

It didn't. Tons of people cramp up at events like that. Two years ago I cramped pretty bad for a minute or two. This year I got a zinger in my calf that went away as fast as it came.

The electricity is nothing. Seriously. Expect to get thumped pretty good but only women and sissies scream and fall down.

Dlo250
10-22-2012, 18:29
What time did you guys start? We started about 905am and finished up about 1210. I thought most of the course was worse than the actual obstacles. Those hills were steep!228534

JasonC8301
10-22-2012, 21:38
Very good training tool and fun with the right mind set. Its gonna suck but run it with friends and enjoy it.

My tough mudders and spartan races were called other things such as E course, O course, combat survival, movement to contact, and so forth. In the wonderful locations of Quantico, Parris Island, and Okinawa.

jason10mm
10-23-2012, 08:48
I did the spartan beast last weekend. VERY fun (the fun part came in retrospect, relaxing days later after the cramping, soreness, and bruises fade :P

There is a tough mudder in Nashville in May, gonna shoot for that, as well as a spartan trifecta for 2013.

I do think that you don't need to be able to run 10+ miles straight, I never went anywhere near my running endurance, I got hobbled by cramps. So I need to spend more time running hills and carrying electrolytes and water. Carrying heavy weights, being able to pull yourself up (rope, wall, bars), and maneuvering up STEEP dirt hills, those are the key characteristics.

Still not enthused about the mudder electrical obstacles, but I'll just have to hope they have them hooked to a couple AA batteries instead of something that can surge and that I won't catch one in the eye.

Dlo250
10-23-2012, 09:34
The obstacles aren't that bad. It's more mind over matter for most if the course. When I do one of these things again, I'm planning on bringing goggles for the electrical obstacles. I ran 10 miles one time 2 weeks before the race, I don't think that helped much. You can't really prepare for one of these things psychologically though.

bamacisa
10-23-2012, 11:20
My daughter in law entered the event. She completed the whole course. That is something that I could not do....would not even try to do. She is an physical trainer at a gym in the Louisville area. She runs eight to twelve miles every day and is in great physical shape. I am seventy three years old and would not even consider entering the contest. ( Just for the record, I would not have considerd it when I was in my twenties or thirties either)

pugman
10-23-2012, 17:54
What time did you guys start? We started about 905am and finished up about 1210. I thought most of the course was worse than the actual obstacles. Those hills were steep!228534

We started at 8:20..finished in 2:32 which I was happy with.

Better than average - my problem was I kept saying you need to save yourself. I will shave 10-20 minutes off my next time.

But if anyone ever did one of these courses I would always suggest get the earliest time possible. Our course, even on a dry day, had parts which got so ripped up and slick by noon TM had to install ropes and lay hay for people to get up even small hills.

The obstacles aren't that bad. It's more mind over matter for most if the course. When I do one of these things again, I'm planning on bringing goggles for the electrical obstacles. I ran 10 miles one time 2 weeks before the race, I don't think that helped much. You can't really prepare for one of these things psychologically though.

Personal suggestion, I would keep the goggles at home. I saw a lot of them tossed.

As for the electrical...the Electric eel (crawling in 6" of water around live wires) wasn't that bad....kind of like taking 110 or 220 from your house. It doesn't hurt...its the shock of being shocked. The wires are obviously not constantly running...so once you discharge it its off for several seconds.

ElectroShock Therapy: Again, in my opinion the 10,000 volts didn't hurt...but if you take one I know I blacked out for a second and realized I was on the ground. I know how I got there - I just don't remember it happening. To me, the worse part was being dazed and confused. Again, not all the lines are the full charge...and they aren't constantly on. Piece of advice: go through with a group and hopefully someone ahead of you takes out the hot lines. I got nailed three times...my two team mates each got hit once (although my BIL took 5 including one to the head in the Eel). However, if you take a full jolt...don't be surprised if you are on the ground

Two_Clicks
10-23-2012, 18:21
[QUOTE=pugman;19549116]We started at 8:20..finished in 2:32 which I was happy with.

Better than average - my problem was I kept saying you need to save yourself. I will shave 10-20 minutes off my next time.

But if anyone ever did one of these courses I would always suggest get the earliest time possible. Our course, even on a dry day, had parts which got so ripped up and slick by noon TM had to install ropes and lay hay for people to get up even small hills.



The course got destroyed saturday they ended up rerouting the course twice since it was taking too long to get up some of the hills. The worst obstacle was the cold I don't think it got over 50 degrees with a good wind. The last mile looked like the trail of tears except instead of buffalo hides it was foil emergency blankets. Im not sure on exact time but we were a little over 4 hours to completion. There was very few stretches you could actually run because of the rain and traffic making everything slippery. I will sign up again but it will be a warmer month or I will plan my gear a little different.