Long gun for a long walk in the woods. [Archive] - Glock Talk

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auto-5
05-21-2012, 20:56
If you were going to walk into the woods for an extended amount of time with just one rifle which one and what caliber would you choose? For the sake of conversation letís say you are in Appalachian Mountains. Do you end up choosing a small game rifle like a 10/22 that would be great for hunting but lack luster for SD or are you picking an assault rifle like an AR/AK that is ideal for SD but for most hunting aspect are either over or under kill? Maybe you go a different direction with a bolt action rifle or shotgun?

wjv
05-21-2012, 21:31
Winchester 9422M .22 Magnum
11+1 rounds

http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i303/bcvojak/RVNet/P1030249.jpg

ChuteTheMall
05-21-2012, 21:48
AK 47, similar ballistics to 30-30, so deer should be on the menu. Good hunting cartridge for most size game.

30 round mags, so I probably won't get interrupted.
Good self defense cartridge for most zombie hordes.

M1A Shooter
05-21-2012, 22:27
my favorite long gun for the woods is a shotgun. will cover any base with the right ammo. only downside is bulky ammo. but sparrows to bear and anything in between.

if it were a more specific scenario, answer might be different but i believe the shotgun to be the best all around gun.

Ewalk
05-21-2012, 22:41
my favorite long gun for the woods is a shotgun. will cover any base with the right ammo. only downside is bulky ammo. but sparrows to bear and anything in between.

if it were a more specific scenario, answer might be different but i believe the shotgun to be the best all around gun.

:agree:

One of my Firearms instructors was with the secret service and part of his job was to protect foreign dignitaries. He said that they sent him with one to Alaska cause the guy wanted to go hunting. He said him and the other 3 agents had M16s and two sidearms each. He said the local guys just had shotguns with slugs and buck shot and they said that they had taken down angry bears. Plus u could get dinner with it!

Unistat
05-21-2012, 23:12
For long guns, when I'm camping it's usually my M6 Scout (.22 LR over .410.)

I keep the S&W 13 (.357 Mag) on hand for mean critters and mean people, but that's a handgun and not what you're asking about.

Snaps
05-22-2012, 00:38
For long guns, when I'm camping it's usually my M6 Scout (.22 LR over .410.)

really wish they still made that.

I'm really thinking about one of those ruger 10/22 take down guns. They seem like a nice idea for a fair price

RatDrall
05-22-2012, 04:22
How is a semi-auto rifle overkill? A 7.62x39 or 5.56 can kill a deer just as much as any .30-30, I would argue that the deer hunter's .300 win. mag. is overkill if anything is.

The rule is that if you carry a .22 rifle for squirrel hunting or whatever, have a decent sidearm 9mm or .38 special or bigger in the woods.

I would recommend an AK or Mini-30 for hiking in Appalachia, never know when you're going to stumble on somebody's 'marrijuaner' patch, or come across a crabby black bear...

TangoFoxtrot
05-22-2012, 04:50
If you were going to walk into the woods for an extended amount of time with just one rifle which one and what caliber would you choose? For the sake of conversation letís say you are in Appalachian Mountains. Do you end up choosing a small game rifle like a 10/22 that would be great for hunting but lack luster for SD or are you picking an assault rifle like an AR/AK that is ideal for SD but for most hunting aspect are either over or under kill? Maybe you go a different direction with a bolt action rifle or shotgun?

Shotgun or AR.

vafish
05-22-2012, 05:12
How is a semi-auto rifle overkill? A 7.62x39 or 5.56 can kill a deer just as much as any .30-30, I would argue that the deer hunter's .300 win. mag. is overkill if anything is.

The rule is that if you carry a .22 rifle for squirrel hunting or whatever, have a decent sidearm 9mm or .38 special or bigger in the woods.

I would recommend an AK or Mini-30 for hiking in Appalachia, never know when you're going to stumble on somebody's 'marrijuaner' patch, or come across a crabby black bear...

A 7.62x39 or 5.56 is over kill for small game such as a squirrel or rabbit.

On an extended walk you aren't going to want to kill a large animal like a deer, that's just wasteful because you can't consume it before it rots.

Is suggest a handgun capable of defense against the big critters, such as a stainless 4" .44 mag, that is carried on your person all the time and a light weight .22lr rifle for harvesting small game. I have a single shot cricket for my daughter, it only weighs a couple pounds and is very accurate.

Total weight between the 2 guns would be less the one centrefire rifle or shotgun.

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cowboywannabe
05-22-2012, 05:14
Savage over under rifle shotgun combo.

.22lr and 20ga. are pretty good choices.

PhotoFeller
05-22-2012, 05:56
Because I'm an old peckerwood with bad knees, I always think about the possibility of getting hurt on the trail...stepping into a hole or some type of accident. If you're hurt and alone, a shotgun would be mighty comforting til help arrives. A short barrel pump in any gauge with a sling would provide meat and defend against anything/anybody with the intentIon of doing bad things. A .22 is fine with full faculties, but a shotgun is more forgiving with a busted arm or if weakened by a snake bite.

The answer to the OP really is a personal decision based on one's thoughts about how the firearm might be needed on the trail. In my case, it's primarily a survival and defense tool.

sebecman
05-22-2012, 06:12
How is a semi-auto rifle overkill? A 7.62x39 or 5.56 can kill a deer just as much as any .30-30, I would argue that the deer hunter's .300 win. mag. is overkill if anything is.

The rule is that if you carry a .22 rifle for squirrel hunting or whatever, have a decent sidearm 9mm or .38 special or bigger in the woods.

I would recommend an AK or Mini-30 for hiking in Appalachia, never know when you're going to stumble on somebody's 'marrijuaner' patch, or come across a crabby black bear...

Actually atleast in my area, a 5.56 or 223 is a poor choice for deer. The small diameter and high velocity mean the round often will pass clean thru the animal with no expansion, creating a very small wound channel that is easily plugged by a bit of muscle/bone or gut. This means that the animal runs well beyond your range/ability to recover it before it dies.

Given the terrain here, EVERYONE uses 30 caliber or larger, the idea being to drop that animal where it stands so as to limit your need for trekking thru swamp, over mountain and thru dark growth forest that willl make a grown man cry trying to recover your animal...300 win mag is a prime choice, I prefer 30-06.

UneasyRider
05-22-2012, 06:43
1 A long walk in the woods "for an extended time" means packing in my rifle and ammunitition both. So if I can't carry it I don't have it.

2 Appalachian mountains are full of small game and passive deer with virtually no predators except for a starving black bear, in your dreams, and 1 poisonous snake (the timber rattler).

I choose the Ruger 10/22 with a reasonably priced Pentax Gameseeker 3 watertight scope that will put a round in a baseball at 100 yards and 3 magazines, the new BX25, that are not going to fail and offer 25 rounds each. I would also bring a couple of 555 round boxes of .22LR as my pack could handle it and if I were taking to the woods I would probably need all that I could carry.

This package will put away any game or deviant within 100 yards and in the trees of the Appalachians that should be just fine.

eracer
05-22-2012, 06:52
My .300 BLK with suppressor attached. Mags holding various flavors of subsonic and supersonic ammo.

Donn57
05-22-2012, 08:45
Well, first you'd have to define "extended amount of time". To me, it would mean several hours since anything longer than that and you're not walking, you're camping. Since it is unlikely that I'll run out of food in a matter of hours, hunting is not a consideration, only self defense. I probably wouldn't bother with a rifle at all, but if I did carry a rifle, it would be the smallest, lightest carbine available that chambered a serious self-defense round.

quake
05-22-2012, 10:09
I quit carrying a rifle in the woods a few years ago, and just carry a large revolver instead now. My "which rifle" answer would depend on whether I still had that revolver or not.

If so, then a .22 rifle for small stuff & light weight of ammo, since the revolver can handle defense & bear & such. Most likely the marlin 795 or 7000.

If I couldn't have the revolver and was stuck with rifle-only, then my choice would be a levergun in either .357 magnum or .454 casull; either one. Of the two, the .357 would likely be my first choice for anything short of a full-on "Postman" type situation. It has the advantage of being lighter, both in gun weight & ammo weight; and with magnum loads is as powerful as a .44 magnum revolver, plenty for deer or defense imo. The .454 levergun has the advantage of being stainless steel along with a probably-unnecessary power advantage, but is more weight both gun-wise and ammo-wise.

Akita
05-22-2012, 10:46
AR with a 22 kit (any brand except Ceiner, the jailbird Ceiner that is).

Personally, its a Glock 29 for me unless there is reason to carry otherwise.

Quigley
05-22-2012, 11:01
I agree with previous comments on this. If I had a hangin for defense I would want a .22 like the 10/22 but if all I had was a rifle it would have to be a .357 lever gun. With .38 wad cutters it is perfect for small game, or at least close to it and with .357s it can handle any two or 4 legged predator that the woods has to offer.


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SEARTraining
05-22-2012, 15:05
Ruger Mini 14 .223 or Remminton 870 with 00Buck and Slugs. After watching the Magpul Art of the Dynamic Shotgun DVD's I went out of the market for a rifle and pretty much only carry a shotgun now.

Art of the Dynamic Shotgun Trailer - Magpul Dynamics - YouTube

Cwlongshot
05-22-2012, 15:31
Winchester 9422M .22 Magnum
11+1 rounds

http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i303/bcvojak/RVNet/P1030249.jpg


I agree, the more I think on this SHTF topic the more I keep coming back to the 22magnum...

Even tho I know you said ONLY a long gun... But I know in my heart I would also have a handgun. ;) That makes the choice of the 22M rifle easier, cause its not NOT a primairy defensive caliber. the (my) handgun would be. ;)

CW

bdcochran
05-22-2012, 16:58
First posting had it. .22 win mag. Preferably with a scope. Terminal ballistics of a .223 at 100 yards. Takes birds without destroying and up to deer.

You said woods and not plains. Are you really going to get a good game shot at more than 100 yards in the WOODS?

Most people do not live in Alaska or where there is more than one bear per 10 square miles. The chances of encountering a bear are quite remote then.

If you shoot a rabbit, a squirrel, a dove with an ak47, what are you going to eat for dinner.

Meanwhile after shtf and all the deer are hunted out in the woods, what game animals are left?

Stevekozak
05-22-2012, 17:26
If I couldn't have the revolver and was stuck with rifle-only, then my choice would be a levergun in either .357 magnum or .454 casull; either one. Of the two, the .357 would likely be my first choice for anything short of a full-on "Postman" type situation. It has the advantage of being lighter, both in gun weight & ammo weight; and with magnum loads is as powerful as a .44 magnum revolver, plenty for deer or defense imo. .


This would mostly be my idea as well. A good .357 levergun will be pretty light comparatively. I feel like the OP is talking about an actual extended long walk in which you are walking everyday in some directon or other. Weight becomes a big issue in that case. Although my thoughts normally run toward the shotgun, my 870 would get really heavy after awhile. With the .357 carbine you can take small game with suitable .38 ammo, and with suitable .357 ammo put up a pretty good defense against most any 2 or 4 legged predator that you would be likely to encounter in the Appalachians. Barring that, I would probably choose a good under/over combo gun in .22/20 or 12 gauge.

quake
05-22-2012, 17:34
I agree, the more I think on this SHTF topic the more I keep coming back to the 22magnum...
Agree; the .22wmr is a stunningly versatile caliber. With our area's small deer and short distances, I'd even use it for deer in a pinch. (And 'shtf' qualifies as 'a pinch' imo :supergrin: )

Thing is, I had one & sold it more than 15 years ago strictly due to legal restrictions & economic realities. Here in arkansas, there's nothing legal to hunt with a .22mag that can't be taken with a .22lr, which kind of reeks. My gun was a winchester 9422m just as in wjv's pic but with a 4x32 scope on it, and it was crazy accurate. I mean pick a twig off a branch kind of accurate. But the fact that I couldn't actually use it for any game that I couldn't use a .22lr for, combined with the fact that .22mag ammo cost more than twice what my centerfire handloads cost, meant there was no hunting reason and no recreational reason to hang onto it. So I sold it and got another levergun, in .357 magnum.

If the ammo price was closer to .22lr or if there were more things I could use it on up here legally, I'd be tempted again; I really liked that winchester. But where I am, and with the ammo cost, I just can't get back on board with it. Much like abandoning the "middle" 16 gauge for either the 20 or 12, I abandoned the middle .22mag, and instead now just stick with the .22lr and centerfire.

Definitely a shame; it was a horrendously capable little gun. :frown:

quake
05-22-2012, 17:55
This would mostly be my idea as well. A good .357 levergun will be pretty light comparatively. I feel like the OP is talking about an actual extended long walk in which you are walking everyday in some directon or other. Weight becomes a big issue in that case. Although my thoughts normally run toward the shotgun, my 870 would get really heavy after awhile. With the .357 carbine you can take small game with suitable .38 ammo, and with suitable .357 ammo put up a pretty good defense against most any 2 or 4 legged predator that you would be likely to encounter in the Appalachians. Barring that, I would probably choose a good under/over combo gun in .22/20 or 12 gauge.

To avoid threadjacking for one of my favorite soapbox issues :embarassed: , I'll just say 'check out this thread' on pistol-caliber carbines.
The magnum ones especially will stun anyone not familiar with what the rifle-length barrel does for performance:
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1404820

jdavionic
05-22-2012, 18:00
I actually take those walks in that general area. What I take is dependent on why I'm out there. Shotgun for small game or turkey. I actually take one of 2 C&R rifles for deer -
M38 - good power and short...easy to walk through the woods.
or
Enfield .303 - longer than the M38, but very accurate for purpose that I use it and excellent power.

For just SD, I'd probably grab my side folding AK.

JimBianchi
05-22-2012, 18:39
When ever I went out for a walk in the woods in AK (up to three days) I took my M500 7+1, slugs, and a Ruger MII.

I never felt under-gunned.

Stevekozak
05-22-2012, 18:40
To avoid threadjacking for one of my favorite soapbox issues :embarassed: , I'll just say 'check out this thread' on pistol-caliber carbines.
The magnum ones especially will stun anyone not familiar with what the rifle-length barrel does for performance:
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1404820
Yep, I followed that thread closely at the time, as I had recently bought a Rossi 92 in .357. It is a fun little gun, and has many practical uses. :wavey:

RMTactical
05-22-2012, 20:21
A lever action seems like it would be a good choice.

Also, I know this isn't technically a long gun but I have always felt that an AK pistol would be a great bear/cougar/wolf defense gun.

G29Reload
05-22-2012, 21:14
East of the Mississippi, my Marlin 1894S .44mag levergun.

Biggest thing I can run into from NYS to GA in deep dark woots is a blackie.

Bear that is.

West of the MS, 1895G, short barreled Guide Gun. In 45-70, big enough to drop a griz. WY, MT, ID, etc.

With my handloaded hardcast, 405gr minimum, probably something I cast out of wheel weights.

DJ Niner
05-23-2012, 01:44
Short/light-barreled AR carbine with optical sight, and iron sights zeroed for a drop-in single-shot .22 conversion cartridge. Carry with the .22 converter cartridge chambered and ready-to-go in case you see smallish food critters; with a quick pull on the charging handle, you're back to .223/5.56mm for defense or larger game.

Sheepdog Scout
05-23-2012, 03:02
If all I'm worried about is a pissed of druggie or a wild dog, I'll carry what I normally do, a Beretta 92. If I'm worried about anything bigger, or I'm out camping/hiking for more than a day, a shotgun will go along.

RatDrall
05-23-2012, 05:03
Actually atleast in my area, a 5.56 or 223 is a poor choice for deer. The small diameter and high velocity mean the round often will pass clean thru the animal with no expansion, creating a very small wound channel that is easily plugged by a bit of muscle/bone or gut. This means that the animal runs well beyond your range/ability to recover it before it dies.



This is not true and has been proven so for a long time? 5.56mm is way less likely than most big "woods" cartridges to pass through, even with full metal jacket military ammo. Google "5.56mm fragmentation".

Any rifle round can zip through a critter, it's a dynamic situation that can result in all sorts of craziness happening. It is the combination of poor bullet construction and poor shot placement that causes this.

I've shot a coyote with a 12gauge slug and had it run off, the one next to it that my buddy tagged with his 5.56mm dropped right there. Both were shot in the shoulder, wierd things happen.

Besides, we aren't talking about deer hunting here. A 5.56mm as a woods companion is more for self defense than anything else.

HAMMERHEAD
05-23-2012, 14:59
Big fan of the .22 mag for general woods walking/survival. My favorite is the CZ 452 Lux. long, light, accurate and tangent sights for quick elevation adjustments. The sights are so good there's no need for a scope.
Photo credit to Chuckhawks.
http://www.chuckhawks.com/cz_452Lux.jpg

garyo
05-23-2012, 18:23
I would choose my Marlin .357Mag lever carbine. Good power, light, ammo is also light to carry and should be able to handle any 2 or 4 legged critter you might run up against.

pmwglock19
05-23-2012, 19:21
I say carry what you decided would work the best for the excursion into the woods. Without knowing how well you shoot a particular weapon it would be difficult to say what to use.

ZombieJoe
05-23-2012, 19:29
I would take my HiPoint 995 carbine. Same ammo as my CCW, accurate to moderate range, not to heavy. Its a great camping rifle.

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HAMMERHEAD
05-23-2012, 20:09
I would choose my Marlin .357Mag lever carbine. Good power, light, ammo is also light to carry and should be able to handle any 2 or 4 legged critter you might run up against.
That's another good one.
I would even feel comfortable with my single shot Handi rifle in .357 or .45 Colt. The .45 version carries easily and handles a very wide variety of ammo.
http://i376.photobucket.com/albums/oo205/FF1063/ff%201063/HR.jpg

farmer-dave
05-23-2012, 20:58
I'll 2nd akita's answer. Lightweight ar-15 with a .22 conversion in the backpack. I use the cmmg stainless version.

RWBlue
05-23-2012, 21:05
If you were going to walk into the woods for an extended amount of time with just one rifle which one and what caliber would you choose?

What's in season or is this SHTF no law?

If there is season, it depends on what is in season.

If there is no season, the combo rifle is when you don't have any idea what you will find, but you have to kill something to eat something.

I want a 12ga and preferably a 308-300wm.

UtahIrishman
05-23-2012, 21:19
I would take my BLR in .308 with four extra magazines and possibly another 30 rounds or so, depending on how far this 'walk' is and what I'd be expecting. It's fast and light and I'm far more experienced with it than any other rifle I own.

Since I reload, I'd most likely setup the magazines prior to the walk with different loads for different game. Or if it's for self-defense against four or two legged critters a 165 grain soft point should do the trick

Here in Utah there's lots of black bears but no Grizzlies and there are Mountain Lions here and there.

auto-5
05-24-2012, 07:59
After all this I am still pretty sold on either a 10/22 or a Mini-14. I wish someone was still producing a good semi auto 22 mag but I can’t find one so I am going with the two next best things. Thanks for all the input.

PhotoFeller
05-24-2012, 09:34
Auto-5,

Glad you reached a decision. Your choices are fine firearms that will serve well however they're used.

I wouldn't try to change your mind because the decision is a very personal one. However, this is a good topic that I want to offer one more thought.

On the trail, targets of choice (survival food) and necessity (rabid animals, wild hogs, snakes, big cats, etc.) may well be moving; some may be moving fast in brush or other cover; some may be smaller than a deer or human; some may be difficult to see because of limited light. Given these possible conditions, which could make scoring a hit very difficult with a rifle or handgun, a shotgun probably would be most effective.

I do respect every opinion offered here. Many folks are better marksmen than me, and my deficiencies are prominent in my choice of a shotgun for a non-hunting trail walk.

I've enjoyed reading the various points of view.

WolfNotSheep
05-24-2012, 11:09
For a prolonged walk in the woods, what long-gun would I take with me?

If I am limited to only what is in my vehicle at this very moment then I won't have a long-gun at all. I'll have a Draco pistol and a Glock 17. The back of the rear trunnion on the Draco has had a sling swivel installed so the pistol can be carried in patrol ready position with the sling looped over neck and shoulder and across the back. Slung this way, it lies very comfortably across my chest while leaving my hands free and not interfering with a chest rig. And forty round magazines give me more wood than this AK-47 has ever been dressed up in.

If I am plannig this foray into the wild green yonder, I would still carry my Glock 17 (duh) and would still have the chest rig but would swap the Draco out for Romy-G AK with the wire side-folding stock. Again, when in patrol ready carry this gun sits across my chest and leaves my hands free, and the stock can literally be unfolded while I am shouldering the rifle in one motion.

UneasyRider
05-24-2012, 14:09
After all this I am still pretty sold on either a 10/22 or a Mini-14. I wish someone was still producing a good semi auto 22 mag but I canít find one so I am going with the two next best things. Thanks for all the input.

I still like the 10/22 and Ruger makes an excellent .22 mag for it the BX-25 (25 rounds) that is very high quality magazine for the 10/22 that you will love.

02LimitedX
05-24-2012, 14:20
I still like the 10/22 and Ruger makes an excellent .22 mag for it the BX-25 (25 rounds) that is very high quality magazine for the 10/22 that you will love.

I think auto-5 was talking about an auto .22 magnum, not a .22 magazine. But I agree the BX-25 is the best hi-cap magazine out there for the 10/22.

UneasyRider
05-24-2012, 14:38
I think auto-5 was talking about an auto .22 magnum, not a .22 magazine. But I agree the BX-25 is the best hi-cap magazine out there for the 10/22.

Yes it is! I love that rifle with a few mags and a $200 weatherproof scope it is a spot on small game hunter and if need be I could defend myself with it in the woods because the accuracy of that rifle with a decent scope is great, ie shot placment equalizes bullet caliber.

auto-5
05-24-2012, 14:40
I think auto-5 was talking about an auto .22 magnum, not a .22 magazine. But I agree the BX-25 is the best hi-cap magazine out there for the 10/22.

This, Sorry about that .22 magnum.

SEARTraining
05-26-2012, 00:00
I am surprised their are no takers for the Winchester 94-30-30. Just shot mine yesterday with this thread in mind. Great short rage reliable rife.

barbedwiresmile
05-26-2012, 06:48
I never brought a rifle into the woods hiking or camping. But if I did I would want something light, cheap, and low maintenance with few moving parts. Also something that wouldn't at track too much attention and draw MWG calls to 911. Some kind of lever action. .30-.30 would work. Or .357.

I Shooter
05-26-2012, 18:54
If I was going into the woods for a long walk I would take my Thompson Encore, 1187 12g and my 629 S&W 4" with me. In bear country I would carry the Encore with the 358 Winchester barrel 250 gr home rolled rounds - 20. For a long shot on game or a bad guy I would change barrels to the 243 with 100 gr home rolled - 40. It will give me .5" group if I do my part at 100 yards. Walking in the woods or hunting small game I would carry the 1187 loaded with number 4 buck or number 6 shot depending what I was hunting. All this stuff and ammo fits in my Mountain Smith pack with all the other stuff I need for camping. Pack is about 40 lbs loaded. If I take the tent it adds 4lbs. Yes that is a lot to carry. No I can't make it any lighter. Yes you could get along with just the shotgun but then you would have to take game and bad guys at 50 yards or under. 100 yard shots with slugs and iron sights on an 1187 is hard and groups less than a foot are near imposable. Hitting small game with a 243 really destroys some good eating. So yes you need the shot gun for small game and camp defense. I will not give up the 629. I will give up the others before giving up the 44. In the woods it is with me all the time and I can hit out to 100 yards with it. It will stop any thing in the lower 48. It is a great companion. That is what I take for long walks in the woods. I have put up with the weight to have the tools I need. You all have a great day.

Quigley
05-26-2012, 19:22
I know everyone likes to fantasize that they are going to get attacked by a hoard of grizzly bears or mountain men with double barrels but lets be honest. If you've ever spent a great deal of time in the woods you don't want a lot of weight and you sure as heck don't want an AK to take game with. Sure it will work in a pinch, but there are much better options. AKs and any long arm made for modern combat are far to bulky for long walks. Not to mention they scream I'm crazy.



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