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RWBlue
06-10-2012, 16:52
So today it is 90+ degrees out and I went for a bicycle ride.

Riding went well at first, but then I stopped sweating. Got light headed and heard a weird tone in my ear. I have a feeling I was very close to passing out. Lucky for me I brought enough water and my half way point was a Subway. Where I could sit in the AC and eat a BMT and drink lots of water.

I guess my point is hydrate guys.
And
Anyone know how much liquids the body can go through in a day?


BTW, Looking back I can see I was not hydrated when I left the house, but it didn't feel that way. I am tempted to force an extra liter of water down before I leave the house. Worst case scenario is I have to pee myself somewhere along the way.

Breadman03
06-10-2012, 19:36
I was watching a show about Spec. Ops. on History Channel (or one of the similar stations). They had one guy sweat out something like 2 gallons in an hour or two.

samuse
06-10-2012, 19:53
I don't do much at work but I DO make sure that I'm acclimated to hot weather: I deprive myself of a/c during workdays and only on Sunday afternoon in the truck. I do have an a/c on when I sleep at night.

On a good 100+ degree day, I'll easily go through two gallons of water. I usually drink a gallon on any given day.

Sugar/HFCS and caffeine will help to dehydrate you too. I only drink water after my morning coffee and evening whisky.

JuneyBooney
06-11-2012, 01:11
So today it is 90+ degrees out and I went for a bicycle ride.

Riding went well at first, but then I stopped sweating. Got light headed and heard a weird tone in my ear. I have a feeling I was very close to passing out. Lucky for me I brought enough water and my half way point was a Subway. Where I could sit in the AC and eat a BMT and drink lots of water.

I guess my point is hydrate guys.
And
Anyone know how much liquids the body can go through in a day?


BTW, Looking back I can see I was not hydrated when I left the house, but it didn't feel that way. I am tempted to force an extra liter of water down before I leave the house. Worst case scenario is I have to pee myself somewhere along the way.

You have to maintain your salt level and hydrate too. The body can intake 8 ounces of fluid every 20 minutes. Gatorade is better than water because it has salt in it from what I have heard. I am glad you are ok but you did describe heat exhaustion. I have been close too and it is not fun.

Stevekozak
06-11-2012, 06:19
I don't do much at work but I DO make sure that I'm acclimated to hot weather: I deprive myself of a/c during workdays and only on Sunday afternoon in the truck. I do have an a/c on when I sleep at night.

On a good 100+ degree day, I'll easily go through two gallons of water. I usually drink a gallon on any given day.

Sugar/HFCS and caffeine will help to dehydrate you too. I only drink water after my morning coffee and evening whisky.
I think air conditioning has screwed us all up to some point. Lets face it, the sun has always been there and most ppl thoughout history have managed not to fall over dead from it. Ppl seem like they just can't take even fairly mild summer heat these days. I think it is the air conditoning.

I too only drink water throughout the day, excluding my two cups of coffee in morning and my evening glass of Irish Whiskey. Seems to work out well for me.

SFCSMITH(RET)
06-11-2012, 08:20
The wife and I have gone through as much as 30 water bottles of H2O and sport drink in a days ride.

On RAIN (http://bloomingtonbicycleclub.org/events.php) '07, it was a million 2 degrees out, we carried four 32oz water bolltles on the bike, plus we both had 100oz camel backs. it's 156 miles, all in one day, in July. There are 3 offical sag stops, and a couple unofficial.. we used 5 that year, and were near out of fluids at EVERY stop. Close to 7 gallons EACH that day.

Some years the weather isn't to bad, some years... Out of 7 attempts we have 4 official finishes. One non-official, over time limit, but made the whole ride.

EDIT to add, many if not most, RAAM riders and such actually use a cycloputer with a timer function to remind them to drink every 10-15 minutes.

kirgi08
06-11-2012, 09:04
Hydration salts are nice.'08.

BR549
06-11-2012, 09:56
The wife and I have gone through as much as 30 water bottles of H2O and sport drink in a days ride.

On RAIN (http://bloomingtonbicycleclub.org/events.php) '07, it was a million 2 degrees out, we carried four 32oz water bolltles on the bike, plus we both had 100oz camel backs. it's 156 miles, all in one day, in July. There are 3 offical sag stops, and a couple unofficial.. we used 5 that year, and were near out of fluids at EVERY stop. Close to 7 gallons EACH that day.

Some years the weather isn't to bad, some years... Out of 7 attempts we have 4 official finishes. One non-official, over time limit, but made the whole ride.

EDIT to add, many if not most, RAAM riders and such actually use a cycloputer with a timer function to remind them to drink every 10-15 minutes.

BTTB :thumbsup:

Breadman03
06-11-2012, 10:52
I know, the link takes you to a pink site, but 2-3 liters/hour is their published answer.

http://www.shape.com/fitness/cardio/does-more-sweat-mean-you-burn-more-calories-surprising-sweat-myths?page=3

Deputydave
06-11-2012, 11:05
Getting dehydrated can really suck. It can go the range of just feeling lousy (like the OP described) to vomitting to passing out to death.

It is important to hydrate prior to, as well as during, as well as after physical exercise. And a great point was made above about replacing sodium. Taking this a step further, there is a product called 'Ionic Fizz' that you can get at a heath food or sports nutrition store (or Amazon or other net sites). It has calcium, magnesium and potassium in additon to some other nutrients. During the day, and particularly prior to and during a workout I will mix a scoop of Ionic Fizz and a scoop of the Gatorade power together with water (the powder Gatorade is cheaper in the long run). This replaces my H20, my sodium, electrolytes and the other nutrients the brain/body needs to maintain level. Particularly the calcium/magniseum/potassium as this will help prevent cramping.

The Ionic Fizz comes in different 'berry' flavors and is tasty. Since it is a powder, and since Gatorade can be in a powder it is easy to put some in a zip lock back and put in the BOB or camping back for camping/hikes/emergency situations. It is light and doesn't take up much room. Put a little plastic measuring spoon in the bag and you're all set.

Goes a LONG way towards keeping you hydrated properly.

jtull7
06-11-2012, 11:08
In my 15 years of search and rescue in the Sangre de Christo Mountains of Northern New Mexico, in the summer and usually above 11,000 feet, our rule was if your urine is clear your are OK but if it starts getting a dark color, you are in trouble.

Most of us would drink 2 quarts of water and then 1 quart of Gatorade (and repeat) to replenish the chemicals, especially salt.

There is a possibly fatal condition called hyponatremia, where the hiker is fully hydrated but is exhibiting the symptoms of volume shock (which most of you call heat exhaustion). The problem is that the hiker has washed out all the sodium in his/her body and has not replenished the salt.

The mortality rate of volume shock and hyponatremia is 80%, irrespective of treatment. So, be careful out there.

kirgi08
06-11-2012, 11:11
Were cool,thank you my friend.'08. :wavey:

Aceman
06-11-2012, 16:43
Biking can be deceptively dangerous. The sweat wicks and the breeze makes it feel cooler than it is. But the core temp can definitely rise to dangerous levels, especially if you are not fit.

RWBlue
06-11-2012, 18:06
One more question...

If I couldn't get to someplace with AC, what would have been the best course of action.

I had water, could I have soaked the sweat band in water.
I could have pored some water on my head.
There was a creek a few miles away. Assuming I could have gotten there, I could have laid down in the creek.

UneasyRider
06-11-2012, 18:49
You have to maintain your salt level and hydrate too. The body can intake 8 ounces of fluid every 20 minutes. Gatorade is better than water because it has salt in it from what I have heard. I am glad you are ok but you did describe heat exhaustion. I have been close too and it is not fun.

My doctor told me that my chest pains after working in the heat all day a couple of months ago were from an elecrolite imbalance and got on me about drinking a gatoraide when I did something like that again. Good and timely post.

UneasyRider
06-11-2012, 18:50
One more question...

If I couldn't get to someplace with AC, what would have been the best course of action.

I had water, could I have soaked the sweat band in water.
I could have pored some water on my head.
There was a creek a few miles away. Assuming I could have gotten there, I could have laid down in the creek.

Wet towel on the back of the neck will do it.

Bacchus99
06-11-2012, 20:20
One more question...

If I couldn't get to someplace with AC, what would have been the best course of action.

I had water, could I have soaked the sweat band in water.
I could have pored some water on my head.
There was a creek a few miles away. Assuming I could have gotten there, I could have laid down in the creek.

My Grandfather always said NEVER to pour ice water over your head. I know you said water but it reminded me about the ice water. He was like a 3rd generation farmer so he knew a thing or 2 about the heat. Always said it could cause death.

RWBlue
06-11-2012, 20:38
My Grandfather always said NEVER to pour ice water over your head. I know you said water but it reminded me about the ice water. He was like a 3rd generation farmer so he knew a thing or 2 about the heat. Always said it could cause death.

I am guessing I would have gone into shock if I had done that.

RedHaze
06-11-2012, 21:28
One more question...

If I couldn't get to someplace with AC, what would have been the best course of action.

I had water, could I have soaked the sweat band in water.
I could have pored some water on my head.
There was a creek a few miles away. Assuming I could have gotten there, I could have laid down in the creek.
Having been stationed in 29 Palms CA, training and deploying to Iraq twice. I've seen a few heat related casualties.

Find shade. Lay down. Cool as best you can head, chest, armpits, & groin area. NOT cold water, cool water, or any water. You're trying to lower your core temp, not send yourself into shock.

Chugging more water at this point helps nothing. You're better off dumping it on yourself and sitting in the shade for 20 minutes to cool down. Sip water. Or better yet, something with the 'electrolyte mix'.

Think your work is hard at 90+ degrees? Try it with 40-60 lbs of gear, all day long.
http://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt104/vor033/USMC-3/e24fdc7b.jpg

Semper Fi.

JuneyBooney
06-11-2012, 21:34
In my 15 years of search and rescue in the Sangre de Christo Mountains of Northern New Mexico, in the summer and usually above 11,000 feet, our rule was if your urine is clear your are OK but if it starts getting a dark color, you are in trouble.

Most of us would drink 2 quarts of water and then 1 quart of Gatorade (and repeat) to replenish the chemicals, especially salt.

There is a possibly fatal condition called hyponatremia, where the hiker is fully hydrated but is exhibiting the symptoms of volume shock (which most of you call heat exhaustion). The problem is that the hiker has washed out all the sodium in his/her body and has not replenished the salt.

The mortality rate of volume shock and hyponatremia is 80%, irrespective of treatment. So, be careful out there.

People also need to know that for their dogs if they run with them. I lost a dog years ago because they had plenty of water but not enough salt. I also got sick and you were right about the color of the urine. That taught me a lot about the dangers of not being hydrated properly with sodium too.

RWBlue
06-11-2012, 22:02
Think your work is hard at 90+ degrees? Try it with 40-60 lbs of gear, all day long.

Semper Fi.

My problem is I am out of shape.
It is hard to get back into shape.

RedHaze
06-11-2012, 22:17
I got out two years ago this July. I'm certainly "out of shape" now, compared the the shape I was in then.

M1A Shooter
06-11-2012, 23:06
i have had a few days like that and i usually take a cool shower. by cool i mean just a few degrees below body temperature, maybe room temp at coolest. any colder could put you in shock.

i also mix my gatorade about half and half with water to rehydrate as sometimes when i get really dehydrated, the gatorade almost seems sour and really gets the back of my throat, hard to put into words.

once youve been down that road a time or two, it gets easier to feel it coming on and hopefully, that will be the learning curve as well.

Bilbo Bagins
06-12-2012, 06:53
Wet towel on the back of the neck will do it.

As I get older, I notice I overheat easier when I'm out hiking in the heat. I do the towel thing, but I got one of these last year and its literally a lifesaver. Get it wet, and throw it over the back of your neck and head, and you feel like someone turned the AC on.

http://www.slyfoxmx.com/prod_images_blowup/Chilly-Pad1.gif

Its stiff as a board when its dry, and when its wet it feels and smells kind of rubbery, but man does it work. I carry it in my summer backpack, and I might buy some extra to stick in the cars.

RWBlue
06-12-2012, 08:01
As I get older, I notice I overheat easier when I'm out hiking in the heat. I do the towel thing, but I got one of these last year and its literally a lifesaver. Get it wet, and throw it over the back of your neck and head, and you feel like someone turned the AC on.

http://www.slyfoxmx.com/prod_images_blowup/Chilly-Pad1.gif

Its stiff as a board when its dry, and when its wet it feels and smells kind of rubbery, but man does it work. I carry it in my summer backpack, and I might buy some extra to stick in the cars.

Tell me more about this.

Bilbo Bagins
06-12-2012, 08:28
Tell me more about this.

They sell them in sporting good stores. You wet/soak the towel and it gets cooler then the current air temp. Not ice pack cool, just cooler by maybe 10 or 20 degrees cooler. Its about the size of a standard bandana.

They sell for about $15 dollars and they come in a plastic tube, that you want to hold on to. Since its stiff and sort of brittle when its dry, you can keep it in the tube. When you need, you can pull it out an wet it, or just fill the tube with water and let it soak.

The cool effect last as long as it stays wet. For me, when I'm hiking in the heat, I would take a 5 minute break, plop it on my head and neck and drink some gatorade. Then I fold it back up and stick it in the container. Its usually stays wet and cool all day, but if you left it out in direct sunlight it will probably dry out in about an hour or so.

http://chillypad.com/

http://www.sportsauthority.com/product/index.jsp?productId=11367433

auto-5
06-12-2012, 16:38
On a hot day i can go through a 12 pack maybe more!!!

Cavalry Doc
06-12-2012, 20:32
OK, if you ask 20 people what the right answer is, you're gonna get 30 good answers.

I've been to a few hot places too, as a battalion and Brigade medical officer. I've seen people drink 4 gallons of water and still go down with hypovolemia. I quit telling people how much to drink. I've asked every person that I have seen that was suffering a heat casualty, how much have you been drinking. Almost every one of them answered something close to: "Doc, I've been drinking tons of water all day long". But ask them how much they have been peeing...... That's what you should be paying attention too.

Urine output should be a full bladder every two hours. However much you have to drink to achieve that, that is the right amount.

BE CAREFUL

If you drink too much, you'll wash off your sodium and end up with hyponatremia, and it feels bad, many mistake that with dehydration, and drink even more water, which makes that worse.

Bottom line, if you are peeing light lemonade to clear every 2 hours, you are good to go. If you are peeing clear every 15 minutes, and feel bad, stop drinking water and get in the shade. If you are peeing dark urine every 4 hours or less, drink more, and get in the shade.

1/2 strength gatorade is better than just gatorade. Energy drinks are not good with heat, or cardiovascular exercise. If drinking caffeinated beverages, what you take in goes out, it is a net of zero, avoid caffeine in the heat.

UneasyRider
06-12-2012, 21:33
OK, if you ask 20 people what the right answer is, you're gonna get 30 good answers.

I've been to a few hot places too, as a battalion and Brigade medical officer. I've seen people drink 4 gallons of water and still go down with hypovolemia. I quit telling people how much to drink. I've asked every person that I have seen that was suffering a heat casualty, how much have you been drinking. Almost every one of them answered something close to: "Doc, I've been drinking tons of water all day long". But ask them how much they have been peeing...... That's what you should be paying attention too.

Urine output should be a full bladder every two hours. However much you have to drink to achieve that, that is the right amount.

BE CAREFUL

If you drink too much, you'll wash off your sodium and end up with hyponatremia, and it feels bad, many mistake that with dehydration, and drink even more water, which makes that worse.

Bottom line, if you are peeing light lemonade to clear every 2 hours, you are good to go. If you are peeing clear every 15 minutes, and feel bad, stop drinking water and get in the shade. If you are peeing dark urine every 4 hours or less, drink more, and get in the shade.

1/2 strength gatorade is better than just gatorade. Energy drinks are not good with heat, or cardiovascular exercise. If drinking caffeinated beverages, what you take in goes out, it is a net of zero, avoid caffeine in the heat.

Thank you for the really good advice!

It explains why after riding my motorcycle 370 miles to Key West in the heat I did not pee for two days even though I stopped to drink every hour on the way down, plus I was sweating outdoors for the two days that I was partying with the 60,000 other bikers. Scared me a bit that I kept drinking and never had to pee.

Aceman
06-13-2012, 03:44
My problem is I am out of shape.
It is hard to get back into shape.

Rule #1 ombieland: Cardio

'I don't need to be faster than the bear, just faster than you..."

Harsh but true stratement. Get in shape! #1 prep: Be fit with maybe 10lbs extra of fat stores on top of it.

Cavalry Doc
06-13-2012, 05:22
Thank you for the really good advice!

It explains why after riding my motorcycle 370 miles to Key West in the heat I did not pee for two days even though I stopped to drink every hour on the way down, plus I was sweating outdoors for the two days that I was partying with the 60,000 other bikers. Scared me a bit that I kept drinking and never had to pee.

Yikes. You were possibly in renal failure. Not peeing for a whole day is a REALLY bad sign.

RWBlue
06-13-2012, 10:34
Rule #1 ombieland: Cardio

'I don't need to be faster than the bear, just faster than you..."

Harsh but true stratement. Get in shape! #1 prep: Be fit with maybe 10lbs extra of fat stores on top of it.


How many minutes can you survive without air?
How many days can you survive without water?
How many days without food?
How many days without a pay check?
How many days without shelter?
Fitness is not #1, but it is at the top of the list for me at this point.

ashecht
06-13-2012, 13:08
when I play tennis in the hot summer months, like now, its not uncommon for me to go through as many as 5 quart bottles of powerade zero when I play for 2-2.5 hours. Even more after I am done playing.