Why are Glocks always called DAO guns? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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GasTurbine
06-14-2012, 05:46
I know they categorize it that way because of it longer pull, but the fact is, (besides going thru all the safeties) it preforms just one action...releasing the striker, thus, technically making it an SA gun.

I know that Armslist has "Striker fired" added to their "Action types"...I hope this catches on.

DannyR
06-14-2012, 05:57
The designation has nothing to do with the length of the trigger pull. Since there is no hammer to cock or decock, it is designated DAO.

I just love the sound effects on some TV shows when you hear someone cocking a Glock.:wavey:

Think in terms of revolvers:

Single Action
SA/DA
DAO

emtjr928
06-14-2012, 05:58
Because they are! Drawing the trigger to the rear completes the setting of the striker spring before it releases the striker.

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leedesert
06-14-2012, 06:02
The striker is only preloaded in normal conditions. The trigger pull brings it back the rest of the way and the trigger spring assists with that pull. If there were no trigger spring it would feel more like a revolver.

Do I have that right guys?

Bruce M
06-14-2012, 06:07
To me one of the reasons may be because every time the trigger is pulled and the gun fires the trigger pull is the same as opposed to a revolver fired double and then single action or the first and subsequent shots on a traditional double action.

GasTurbine
06-14-2012, 06:07
I feel you guys, but typically (in "normal" terms) when we say "Double Action" its referring to the (first action) setting of the hammer spring. The second action is releasing of said spring. Since striker fired pistol already have the sticker pin loaded in normal conditions, that should make it a single action...at lease in my eyes. Oh well. :crying:

Raleigh Glocker
06-14-2012, 06:12
I feel you guys, but typically (in "normal" terms) when we say "Double Action" its referring to the (first action) setting of the hammer spring. The second action is releasing of said spring. Since striker fired pistol already have the sticker pin loaded in normal conditions, that should make it a single action...at lease in my eyes. Oh well. :crying:

Yeah, I just call them "striker fired." That's all you really need to know about the action and how it compares to other pistols.

Clay1
06-14-2012, 06:19
The "Safe" action is different than a normal double action trigger or a normal single action trigger.
The reason that IDPA classifies it in the same category as a Beretta 92 which is a true double action first shot gun is that the striker isn't fully to the rear like others have mentioned. I find this animation really lets you see why IDPA classifies it that way: Glock Function Animation - YouTube

Pay particular attention to the striker during the trigger pull and you will see the "Why" to your question.

leedesert
06-14-2012, 06:22
I feel you guys, but typically (in "normal" terms) when we say "Double Action" its referring to the (first action) setting of the hammer spring. The second action is releasing of said spring. Since striker fired pistol already have the sticker pin loaded in normal conditions, that should make it a single action...at lease in my eyes. Oh well. :crying:

A single action requires no further setting of the hammer. The trigger strictly releases it. The striker in a Glock still has to be pulled back the rest of the way and then released. If a Glock was SA we would have a much sweeter trigger pull but would then need an external safety.
That would make it "not" a Glock.

Sent via mental telepathy.

ron59
06-14-2012, 09:45
Glock doesn't call their action DAO, but rather "Safe Action". IDPA uses the same terminology. There's a difference.

M&P15T
06-14-2012, 09:48
I feel you guys, but typically (in "normal" terms) when we say "Double Action" its referring to the (first action) setting of the hammer spring. The second action is releasing of said spring. Since striker fired pistol already have the sticker pin loaded in normal conditions, that should make it a single action...at lease in my eyes. Oh well. :crying:

Watch the video above....you'll see why you're wrong.

There are TWO actions happening from the pulling of a GLOCK trigger, not one.

Still, they're striker fired, not DOA.

emtjr928
06-14-2012, 09:58
FWIW, In Glock's own Armorer Manual Technical Specifications and in their Armorer Course, each pistol is described as Action: Safe Action (constant double action mode).

Z71bill
06-14-2012, 10:01
I always think of a true double action having second strike capability. Anything less is not true double action because it takes an additional separate action to get the gun to fire.

Maybe Glock is "two" action :upeyes:- or 1 1/2 action :cool:- but it is not double action.

samurairabbi
06-14-2012, 10:35
Single Action and Double Action are REVOLVER terms that, unfortunately, were carried over into autoloader applications because (in my opinion) too many people had too much time on their hands and could not find any better philosophical question to expend all the excess on!

Enormous mental, print, and electronic resources have been expended because of this kludgy attempt to adapt this terminology. I weep for this tragedy! (OK, I've sounded off; now I'll crawl back in my hole and resume contemplation of the karmic harmony of the universe.)

PAGunner
06-14-2012, 10:45
The designation has nothing to do with the length of the trigger pull. Since there is no hammer to cock or decock, it is designated DAO.

I just love the sound effects on some TV shows when you hear someone cocking a Glock.:wavey:

Think in terms of revolvers:

Single Action
SA/DA
DAO

Even better is when a movie cop rack's his/her slide, to let you know they mean business.

SouthernBoyVA
06-14-2012, 11:13
I know they categorize it that way because of it longer pull, but the fact is, (besides going thru all the safeties) it preforms just one action...releasing the striker, thus, technically making it an SA gun.

I know that Armslist has "Striker fired" added to their "Action types"...I hope this catches on.

This is not true. The trigger performs two tasks. 1) It completes the cocking of the striker and, 2) It releases the striker to fire a cartridge. This is two distinct actions by the trigger, ergo the definition of DAO.

About two years ago, I got into a spirited discussion about this very topic on another website so I took it upon myself to contact Glock and to speak with a tech/designer. He assured me that the Glock design was a DAO design and that this was also the designation that the BAFTE assigned to the pistol (not that that would make a world of difference).

SouthernBoyVA
06-14-2012, 11:16
A single action requires no further setting of the hammer. The trigger strictly releases it. The striker in a Glock still has to be pulled back the rest of the way and then released. If a Glock was SA we would have a much sweeter trigger pull but would then need an external safety.
That would make it "not" a Glock.

Sent via mental telepathy.

Nope. Example is the M&P Smith and Wesson. S&W defines the M&P as a DAO pistol but in reality, the striker is held in a fully cocking position prior to release. The trigger only does one thing; it releases the striker via the sear. It does not cock the striker any more than it is already. I believe the XD series operates this same way.

TheJ
06-14-2012, 11:21
This is not true. The trigger performs two tasks. 1) It completes the cocking of the striker and, 2) It releases the striker to fire a cartridge. This is two distinct actions by the trigger, ergo the definition of DAO.
...

^^This.




Of course it is really quite different from the traditional DOA hammer fired guns.. but since the trigger pull does two things and can not be fired any other way, it seems that it is literally DAO.

Z71bill
06-14-2012, 11:30
Even better is when a movie cop rack's his/her slide, to let you know they mean business.

I can't recall which TV show - maybe Criminal Minds - JJ (A.J. Cook) :hearts:

Police guys get ready to break down a door - guy racks the slide - then they kick in the door & rush in - same guy racks the slide again to let the BG inside know he means business.

leedesert
06-14-2012, 11:33
I can't recall which TV show - maybe Criminal Minds - JJ (A.J. Cook) :hearts:

Police guys get ready to break down a door - guy racks the slide - then they kick in the door & rush in - same guy racks the slide again to let the BG inside know he means business.


I think a good indicator that you mean business is pulling the trigger. :confused:



Sent via mental telepathy.

oldman11
06-14-2012, 12:24
Because they are! Drawing the trigger to the rear completes the setting of the striker spring before it releases the striker.

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You're absolutely right! Finally someone besides me has seen a skeleton model in action. I also saw a video on it this year.

mrsurfboard
06-14-2012, 12:57
Because they are! Drawing the trigger to the rear completes the setting of the striker spring before it releases the striker.

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Unlike the SAO M&P, where the striker is 100% cocked and ready to fire.

R.T.
06-14-2012, 12:57
The BATF classifies the GLOCK as DAO because it completes the cocking of the firing pin (loading of the striker) and then releases it (double action). The gun is incapable of single action fire, therefore, the Glock is double action only (DAO).

So if the question remains, why do people call a Glock double action, your answer is above.

If you want to believe it's not double action because it doesn't cock without racking the slide, or the pressing of the trigger doesn't do all of the cocking, or because it doesn't have second strike capability that's your choice.

However, the one thing Glock is certainly not is single action. Single Action by definition does only one single task; releases the hammer/striker. If ANY cocking occurs with the trigger press it is NOT single Action.

Patchman
06-14-2012, 12:58
I thought this was more of an ATF thing. When Glocks were first introduced, ATF had only two designations: Single Action (cowboy guns, 1911s) or Double Action (first pull of the trigger cocks and fires gun, then movement of slide cocks hammer/striker and trigger releases it). Then came Glocks and it was classified as DA Only.

kashdaddy
06-14-2012, 14:05
SA is something totally different.

dpadams6
06-14-2012, 15:36
I know they categorize it that way because of it longer pull, but the fact is, (besides going thru all the safeties) it preforms just one action...releasing the striker, thus, technically making it an SA gun.

I know that Armslist has "Striker fired" added to their "Action types"...I hope this catches on.

I would think because it pulls the striker back first, then releases it.

dpadams6
06-14-2012, 15:39
M&p would be single action because its fully cocked and pulling the triggers rotates the sear, releasing the srtiker. Terrible design, IMHO

jb1911
06-14-2012, 17:39
The trigger on my G26 feels like a single action trigger once the slack is taken up. It's not like a DAO at all as far as I'm concerned. I know that technically it's not an SAO, just saying it feels like one.

SouthernBoyVA
06-15-2012, 07:04
Gentlemen, the thing that defines the action designation of a handgun is what the trigger's tasks are... what the trigger does to fire the gun. Nothing else. Whether or not the gun uses a striker or a hammer or a combination thereof, makes no difference. It is what the trigger does that defines the action type description. If you keep that in mind, you won't have any problem understanding and referring to the action of a given design.

SouthernBoyVA
06-15-2012, 07:10
Unlike the SAO M&P, where the striker is 100% cocked and ready to fire.

Yes, this is technically true. In reality the M&P design, and that of the Springfield XD series, is a SAO, but S&W classes their M&P line as DAO pistols. Perhaps because there is no such designation of SAO (this is a guess on my part).

SouthernBoyVA
06-15-2012, 07:15
M&p would be single action because its fully cocked and pulling the triggers rotates the sear, releasing the srtiker. Terrible design, IMHO

I think it is a good design because it can result in a lighter trigger (think competition and improved accuracy) and a more crisp letoff. The Apex Tactical hard sear returns an almost 1911-like break. Of course, you still have pre-travel but that is necessary in order for the trigger bar cam to disengage the striker block safety... which can also be improved with Apex parts.

dpadams6
06-15-2012, 08:18
I think if is a good design because if can result in a lighter trigger (think competition and improved accuracy) and a more crisp letoff. The Apex Tactical hard sear returns an almost 1911-like break. Of course, you still have pre-travel but that is necessary in order for the trigger bar cam to disengage the striker block safety... which can also be improved with Apex parts.

I have heard good things about the apex. I never really liked the stock sear in not knowing or feeling the reset like a glock. Does the the apex allow knowing/feeling the reset better? I just dont like how the sear kinda "teeters" back/forth on a pin...

ChicagoZman
06-15-2012, 08:41
Action Type refers to what occurs when you pull the trigger.

With a single action firearm (revolver or pistol), the trigger simply releases the hammer or striker. With a double action firearm, the trigger cocks AND releases the hammer or striker. DAO simply refers to a subset of double action in which manual cocking of the hammer is not possible so each trigger pull results in cocking and releasing.

With a Glock and a S&W M&P, the striker is not fully cocked until the trigger is fully pressed, hence both these pistols are double action (only). With an XDm, the striker is fully cocked and trigger press simply releases the striker, making it single action.

.38 super
06-15-2012, 09:01
Nope. Example is the M&P Smith and Wesson. S&W defines the M&P as a DAO pistol but in reality, the striker is held in a fully cocking position prior to release. The trigger only does one thing; it releases the striker via the sear. It does not cock the striker any more than it is already. I believe the XD series operates this same way.I absolutely agree, I believe I did ask DannyR in his blog about it ( I cannot find the post right now...) but IMHO we should look at actions in two ways: mechanical properties and user interface... By user interface Glock is SA gun, just as 1911, as much as strange this would look in initially, but if you think, in both mechanics, if you have misfire for any reason, you should operate the slide in order to chamber fresh round...
For me, in regard of the explanations in the previous two posts above, DAO is a self loading gun that will operate the striker with every pull of the trigger lever, regardless of what is the slide doing, same as P250 or for example "double strike capability" of some Taurus models...
BTW, Glock does designates his guns as "DAO" in some of their manuals, especially where they have charts with the models.
In regard of the two other pistols mentioned - the M&P and XD, I read somewhere that the trigger was designed intentionally to mimic long DA pull, even the two guns have the strikers fully cocked by the cycling of the slide...
Mr. Metkalf had a article in one of the S&W magazines, when those models came up, some 3-4 years ago if I'm not mistaking, where he was explaining the way M&P partially cocks the striker, but in the same time, there was a video by the American Gunsmith Association I believe, where you can see that the sear only releases the striker, it is not cocking it additionally... I wrote Mr. Metkalf's an e-mail, asking him to explain why the difference between his article and the video, my only intent was to learn something possibly, unfortunately I never had answer...

SouthernBoyVA
06-15-2012, 13:18
I have heard good things about the apex. I never really liked the stock sear in not knowing or feeling the reset like a glock. Does the the apex allow knowing/feeling the reset better? I just dont like how the sear kinda "teeters" back/forth on a pin...

Yes, there are several kits or individual parts that Apex offers that can improve the reset. I never seem to have a problem with my M&P 9 Pro because I have fired it enough that it is just a natural thing for me where the reset occurs.

What accounts for the more audible and crisp feel of the Glock reset is the connector. The M&P has no such thing.

SouthernBoyVA
06-15-2012, 13:20
Action Type refers to what occurs when you pull the trigger.

With a single action firearm (revolver or pistol), the trigger simply releases the hammer or striker. With a double action firearm, the trigger cocks AND releases the hammer or striker. DAO simply refers to a subset of double action in which manual cocking of the hammer is not possible so each trigger pull results in cocking and releasing.

With a Glock and a S&W M&P, the striker is not fully cocked until the trigger is fully pressed, hence both these pistols are double action (only). With an XDm, the striker is fully cocked and trigger press simply releases the striker, making it single action.

True in regards to the Glock design, false for the M&P as was previously noted. With the M&P, the trigger bar does not complete the cocking of the striker because the striker is held in a fully cocked condition by the sear.

SouthernBoyVA
06-15-2012, 13:22
I absolutely agree, I believe I did ask DannyR in his blog about it ( I cannot find the post right now...) but IMHO we should look at actions in two ways: mechanical properties and user interface... By user interface Glock is SA gun, just as 1911, as much as strange this would look in initially, but if you think, in both mechanics, if you have misfire for any reason, you should operate the slide in order to chamber fresh round...
For me, in regard of the explanations in the previous two posts above, DAO is a self loading gun that will operate the striker with every pull of the trigger lever, regardless of what is the slide doing, same as P250 or for example "double strike capability" of some Taurus models...
BTW, Glock does designates his guns as "DAO" in some of their manuals, especially where they have charts with the models.
In regard of the two other pistols mentioned - the M&P and XD, I read somewhere that the trigger was designed intentionally to mimic long DA pull, even the two guns have the strikers fully cocked by the cycling of the slide...
Mr. Metkalf had a article in one of the S&W magazines, when those models came up, some 3-4 years ago if I'm not mistaking, where he was explaining the way M&P partially cocks the striker, but in the same time, there was a video by the American Gunsmith Association I believe, where you can see that the sear only releases the striker, it is not cocking it additionally... I wrote Mr. Metkalf's an e-mail, asking him to explain why the difference between his article and the video, my only intent was to learn something possibly, unfortunately I never had answer...

With DAO pistols, there are two flavors. Those which do not have a second strike capability and those which do. Most don't and the Glock is one example. The Kel-Tec P11 is a DAO design and does have second strike capability, as does the Ruger LCP.

ChicagoZman
06-15-2012, 18:33
True in regards to the Glock design, false for the M&P as was previously noted. With the M&P, the trigger bar does not complete the cocking of the striker because the striker is held in a fully cocked condition by the sear.
In the M&P, the striker is moved ever so slightly to the rear as the trigger in pressed and the sear rotates. Even if only a negligible amount (1%, 2%, 3%?) that movement makes it a double action as the trigger press completes the cocking process.

dpadams6
06-16-2012, 05:41
True in regards to the Glock design, false for the M&P as was previously noted. With the M&P, the trigger bar does not complete the cocking of the striker because the striker is held in a fully cocked condition by the sear.

True. I went to m&p armorer school. It is full cocked. Pulling trigger pivots the sear /bar, releasing the striker (that's already cocked). Its weird how a lot of people think different about this. Not sure why. Its pretty basic.

SouthernBoyVA
06-16-2012, 06:14
True. I went to m&p armorer school. It is full cocked. Pulling trigger pivots the sear /bar, releasing the striker (that's already cocked). Its weird how a lot of people think different about this. Not sure why. Its pretty basic.

Yes it is. A little while back I got into a "firm" discussion (not nasty) with a gentleman on a website who believed that the sear moved the striker rearward one or two millimeters before releasing it. So I grabbed my M&P 9 Pro and a high intensity flashlight to closely examine both the sear and the striker lug and the fellow was WAY off base. If there is any movement at all, it would be in the tens of thousandths of an inch; nowhere near one or two millimeters.

When one uses the term DAO, one has to know what that means and why the term was applied to a given design. In my opinion, the two best examples of a DAO pistol would be the Kahr design (striker fired with no second strike capability) and the Kel-Tec P11 (hammer fired with second strike capability).

TheJ
06-16-2012, 06:36
My understanding of the M&P has always been that practically speaking the gun is fully cocked without pulling the trigger but technically it is DAO because there is some modicum of cocking action (although Much less than Glocks) that takes place when the trigger is pulled.... As explained here:http://mp-pistol.com/boards/index.php?showtopic=517&st=0&p=3666&#entry3666
And here: http://mp-pistol.com/boards/index.php?/topic/32456-single-or-double-action/page__hl__dao#entry318203

Practically, the striker is fully cocked i.e., single action mode.

Technically, the gun is considered a double action gun because there is a small (like a few thousandths of an inch) rearward movement of the striker as the trigger is pulled all the way.

Explanation, it all lies in the shape of the sear. S&W has machined a little hump into the top of the sear right where it engages with the striker face. This little hump creates a slight caming effect causing the striker to move rearward very slightly when the sear is engaged enough to allow the striker to fall. However, this rearward movement is not necessary for the gun to fire. So why did S&W build this into the sear design? Two reasons:

1. If the striker is moved rearward even as slightly as it is in the M&P design, then the gun can be categorized as a DAO gun. Evidently this is necessary for a number of reasons, not the least of which is allowing the M&P to be more readily accepted by law enforcement agencies.

2. The hump in the sear allows the sear to move back to its full set position if for whatever reason the trigger is released after not being fully engaged. If the sear moved a little bit, but not enough to break the shot, and then the trigger is released, the sear will cam back to is full set position. This allows the trigger weight to not change from shot to shot regardless of how far the sear moved previously.

You can actually see this happen if you look through the back of your gun under the striker cap where the sear and striker engage. Make sure the gun is unloaded, and press the trigger slightly just enough to allow the sear to partially move, and rather than break the shot, release the trigger and you'll see the sear move back to its full seated position ready for a consistent pull the next time the trigger is pressed.

The exception to number 2 is that an extremely rough striker face can prevent the sear from moving back to it full set position if the trigger is released before the striker is dropped. However, this will correct itself over time as the parts smooth out with use.

God Bless,
David


If my understanding is incorrect (as explained above) and the M&P trigger technically only performs one action, then what exactly is the DAO designation based on?

Spiffums
06-16-2012, 06:39
When I hear Striker Fired I think of Raven, Davis, Jennings and the other cheap poorly made $125 guns.

Butch
06-16-2012, 06:40
I absolutely agree, I believe I did ask DannyR in his blog about it ( I cannot find the post right now...)
:)

Click-> http://glocktalk.com/forums/blog.php?b=7

Click-> http://glocktalk.com/forums/blog.php?b=426

Butch
06-16-2012, 06:43
When I hear Striker Fired I think of Raven, Davis, Jennings and the other cheap poorly made $125 guns.
When I hear 'striker fired' I cringe.....

Guns have firing pins.......'strikers' play soccer, ring bells, and refuse to go to work.

Some firing pins are powered by the impact of a spring loaded hammer, and others, like Glocks, are powered directly by a spring.

Butch
06-16-2012, 06:48
My observations tell me that the M&P is indeed fully cocked when the slide closes and is single action.

The Glock firing pin is partially cocked when the slide closes and is only fully cocked when the trigger is pulled.....double action.....as designated by the BATFE. The beauty of the Glock safe action is that it is up to the user to decide how he wants to use it.

ChicagoZman
06-16-2012, 07:02
I stand corrected.

.38 super
06-16-2012, 08:54
If my understanding is incorrect (as explained above) and the M&P trigger technically only performs one action, then what exactly is the DAO designation based on?

It's all in the lingo and marketing the gun, I believe this is the case with Glock too...

1. If the striker is moved rearward even as slightly as it is in the M&P design, then the gun can be categorized as a DAO gun. Evidently this is necessary for a number of reasons, not the least of which is allowing the M&P to be more readily accepted by law enforcement agencies.

.38 super
06-16-2012, 09:09
:)

Click-> http://glocktalk.com/forums/blog.php?b=7

Click-> http://glocktalk.com/forums/blog.php?b=426
Thank you! Your blog is excellent reference material and your posts are always very well structured and explained, I'm glad there are so many people like you here, great place to learn things, also to express opinion, I guess.
I understand the point with the DAO, in fact I have absolutely no problem to go with the manufacturer's designation of the action of the trigger or something else, I was just curious why companies go one time with one explanation ( technical ) than they go with another - subjective, user's interface... It's all for profit after all... Moving the sear thousand of an inch is not enough to designate it as DAO... sounds to me just as the rest of the basically useless stuff as "Positive Sear Engagement" in the 1911 firing group... I don't know, marketing tricks maybe...
Aside from the technical part IMHO we should look at the gun and the action/trigger system as a black box - the use should not care what is the mechanics in the gun, you care only for the trigger, the pull and so on, if it feels as SA - it is SA gun, if it operates as SA - it is SA gun... I don't know, someone to correct me, but Glock operates exactly as a SA gun, actually from what I read the designers were looking for such a hybrid feeling and mechanics...

SouthernBoyVA
06-16-2012, 09:09
My observations tell me that the M&P is indeed fully cocked when the slide closes and is single action.

The Glock firing pin is partially cocked when the slide closes and is only fully cocked when the trigger is pulled.....double action.....as designated by the BATFE. The beauty of the Glock safe action is that it is up to the user to decide how he wants to use it.

Double action only. It's a double action only, not a double action. These two different action types are distinct in their differences.

vmann
06-16-2012, 12:46
Gentlemen, the thing that defines the action designation of a handgun is what the trigger's tasks are... what the trigger does to fire the gun. Nothing else. Whether or not the gun uses a striker or a hammer or a combination thereof, makes no difference. It is what the trigger does that defines the action type description. If you keep that in mind, you won't have any problem understanding and referring to the action of a given design.
finally someone who knows what they are talking about....

there is alot horrible information being put on this post....

shooter1234
09-26-2012, 23:15
Glock doesn't call their action DAO, but rather "Safe Action". IDPA uses the same terminology. There's a difference.

Negative. The Glock is a locked breach, recoil operated double action only pistol. This is verbatim right from Glock via the armorer's course...

JuneyBooney
09-27-2012, 01:31
The designation has nothing to do with the length of the trigger pull. Since there is no hammer to cock or decock, it is designated DAO.

I just love the sound effects on some TV shows when you hear someone cocking a Glock.:wavey:

Think in terms of revolvers:

Single Action
SA/DA
DAO

Of course it is not DAO...you have an invisible hammer that you pull down...:rofl:

.38 super
10-04-2012, 06:39
Yes,this is technically true. In reality the M&P design, and that of theSpringfield XD series, is a SAO, but S&W classes their M&P line as DAOpistols. Perhaps because there is no such designation of SAO (this is a guesson my part).My x5 is designated by Sig as SAO and I also agree on your stand about the trigger of the M&P - it is way better than off the box Glock's, especially gens up to 3, gen4 is different, maybe I find it better because I only shot “-“ connectors.

I also agree on the defining the action from what the trigger is doing, but in the case of M&P and XD, manufacturer was intentionally looking for that trigger to “feel” as DA trigger, it was market targeting, so things are not so simple…

There is of course designation based on the mechanical properties of the system (trigger) but generally speaking, the gun should be “black box” a shooter does not have to know how the mechanics work, you feel this by the trigger, it’s a user interface, you designate the trigger by the way you feel it, that’s why (I could be wrong, and actually I’m not looking for discussion, it’s just an opinion…) in regard that Glock does not have a second strike capability as for instance Sig 250, I would say: mechanically it is DA pistol, by user interface, by the way you operate the gun it is SA.
Safe Action for me is just marketing gimmick, that little thing on the trigger is mechanically anything else but safety, there is no probable way of pressing on this trigger, by finger or any otherway, without pressing on the “safety” so IMHO this thing is far from “Safety Action”and there are plenty of cases to support such idea…

shyguy
10-05-2012, 06:07
I always think of a true double action having second strike capability. Anything less is not true double action because it takes an additional separate action to get the gun to fire.

Maybe Glock is "two" action :upeyes:- or 1 1/2 action :cool:- but it is not double action.

Agreed, the lack of a second strike precludes it from being a true DAO. If you have a misfire on a Glock, for whatever reason, the slide must be cycled to reset the trigger. I always thought striker fired is a more descriptive phrase.