Have you ever had a failure that you can really blame on a lube? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Wash-ar15
06-16-2012, 08:28
one of the most common questions is what kind of lube do people use. there are so many kinds out there so the answers vary. to me, the lubes are so good these day, it does not really matter. just pick a one.

So has anyone ever had a failure that they can really attribute to the lube they used?

arclight610
06-16-2012, 08:30
Not really. Lubrication is less important in some guns, more important than others. AR-15's require good lubrication. Since the bolt/bolt carrier act as the pistol and heat up, lubrication burn off is a concern.

Creatism
06-16-2012, 08:33
Not really due to a specific lube, but lack of lube, my 1911 if it got dry would start having ftf. Greasing the rails helped that a lot.


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M&P15T
06-16-2012, 08:51
Not in any firearms I've ever owned. But then I like to keep them clean and properly lubed.

flynlead
06-16-2012, 09:03
Yes, on a low end 1911 I use to have. It was all my fault (young and dumb) I ran it dry and had failure after failure. Took apart and lubed it and failures went away.

Other than that, no all my guns function with pretty much any kind of lube

RJ's Guns
06-16-2012, 11:57
At a shooting match in 20 degree below zero (ambient) weather, the lube that a competitor used on his weapon congealed and caused his auto-loader to repeatedly fail to feed and fail to extract.

WarEagle32
06-16-2012, 12:05
Not due to a specific Tyne of lube that I used. However, any 1911 in my experience if you don't keep it pretty lubed will not run as well as it can. A Glock doesn't need much at all!

A'boy
06-16-2012, 12:07
Only a lackthereof in my AR's....but no longer.

Bruce M
06-16-2012, 12:22
Lack of - yes a couple times. One specific brand versus another, nope.

michael e
06-16-2012, 12:27
I went 9k rounds with no lube or cleaning a gun before the first failure, this was with lead bullets that are a little dirty. Was a gun I never carried and wanted to see how long it would go.

K.Kiser
06-16-2012, 12:39
I'm gonna say no, but it's a trick question... If a firearm has special needs in the lube dept. then I'm gonna lay some of the blame on the design itself...

If a firearm is clean, and oiled just enough to be not dry then it should run if it's of proper design...

I have some firearms that are over 40 years old and have never seen anything other than wd-40 and the steel and blue still appear as new, in louisiana humidity but I understand that's not a functionality test.. My semi-auto's have lived on mostly remoil with no trouble.. I've also used motor oil, 3 in 1 oil, ATF, 2-stroke outboard oil, or whatever else was laying around with no problems if the firearm was clean..

countrygun
06-16-2012, 14:23
Other than having WD-40 turn to shellac in a gun stored long-term, no.

DWARREN123
06-16-2012, 15:21
Yes but many years ago. M60 machine gun, jungle terrain and lots of rain/water crossings washed the LSA off enough that after 500 rounds the gun started to have problems. Dumped some LSA in the receiver, operated action a few times and it started working fine again. :supergrin:

arclight610
06-16-2012, 15:39
Go to Wal-Mart, buy yourself a quart of Mobil 1 synthetic. You shouldn't ever have to buy lube (gun) again.

Decguns
06-16-2012, 15:54
We had all kinds of problems with CLP in our M16A2s and M4s, but that's all we could get thanks to Hazmat reg's. After 90rds, it's all burned off and leaves behind a sticky residue. Had to improvise quickly "borrowing" dry moly from the avionics guys and motor oil from trans. Both worked surprisingly well.

chewybaca67
06-16-2012, 16:42
Ohhhhh. On firearms.
I was gonna go into my old band days.
But never mind.

samurairabbi
06-16-2012, 17:17
In a variation of the OP question: I have seen many Glocks show up with light primer strikes, not because of a PARTICULAR lube, but because of ANY lube ending up in a critical spot, namely the striker channel. When that channel is lubed, and the vent hole into it clogs because of powder/brass fragments mixing with the lube, then Glock reliability starts to die. Simply cleaning the crud out with a Q-tip restores reliable function.

427
06-16-2012, 17:27
Wasn't a lube issue but an operator issue. I had a buddy who like to run his weapon wet, almost dripping. When we moved to a dry dusty climate, despite warnings, he still ran it wet and it became a dust/dirt magnet.

Quack
06-16-2012, 17:32
yep, but I knew it was gonna happen. Wanted to see how Slide Glide worked on a 1911 in 40 degree weather. As I thought, I was causing FTRB and gun ran fine after I removed it and used oil.

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PlasticGuy
06-16-2012, 19:49
I take and teach a lot of high round count classes. I also hunt a lot, and primarily in the cold of winter. I've had problems with shotguns freezing up in extreme cold, and with lube cooking off of handguns and rifles when run hard. I generally use CLP for cold to moderate temperatures, and FP-10 for hot weather and/or high round counts. I haven't had a problem due to lube since I switched to those products.

3000fps
06-17-2012, 11:20
Not if you run slip 2009

unit1069
06-17-2012, 11:35
Have you ever had a failure that you can really blame on a lube?

Yes.

Several years ago I bought a NIB Steyr M9-A1 from CDNN when they were giving them away for a song and dance. Before shooting it the first time I field stripped, inspected, lightly lubed, and reassembled it as I always do. It shot perfectly.

Back home before cleaning the gun I decided to search the Internet for some advice on this pistol and happened upon a "how to" cleaning video. So I larded the lube on just as the video suggested and the second time at the range I had a number of FTE's, which made me very apprehensive, to say the least. A state conservation agent was there setting up the site for a Boy Scout event the following day and she recommended lubing the gun just like I do with the Glock.

I followed her advice and never had another FTE from that pistol although it turned out to have the wrong extractor and magazine springs. Once those items were replaced free of charge it was the nicest-shooting 9mm I've ever owned and I'd still own it had I not traded for a NIB Steyr S9-A1.

I'm absolutely sure that overlubing that pistol was the cause of the malfunctions.

Berto
06-17-2012, 11:47
It can be a problem in cold weather.
I saw the striker freeze overnight in a 1903 Springfield, remained frozen most of the day until owner (Dad) took it apart. It cost him a buck.
Contrary to popular belief, it can freeze up pistols and revolvers if left sitting in a less than ideal environment, it turns into sludge, blocking fp/striker channels, slowing cylinder rotation,etc.

Berto
06-17-2012, 11:50
Yes.

Several years ago I bought a NIB Steyr M9-A1 from CDNN when they were giving them away for a song and dance. Before shooting it the first time I field stripped, inspected, lightly lubed, and reassembled it as I always do. It shot perfectly.

Back home before cleaning the gun I decided to search the Internet for some advice on this pistol and happened upon a "how to" cleaning video. So I larded the lube on just as the video suggested and the second time at the range I had a number of FTE's, which made me very apprehensive, to say the least. A state conservation agent was there setting up the site for a Boy Scout event the following day and she recommended lubing the gun just like I do with the Glock.

I followed her advice and never had another FTE from that pistol although it turned out to have the wrong extractor and magazine springs. Once those items were replaced free of charge it was the nicest-shooting 9mm I've ever owned and I'd still own it had I not traded for a NIB Steyr S9-A1.

I'm absolutely sure that overlubing that pistol was the cause of the malfunctions.

Yeah, the factory lube on the M9's were causing problems too from sitting in a warehouse for years.
Awesome guns, I need to replace the M9 I gave to my Dad with an M9a1.

Novocaine
06-17-2012, 14:24
Tapping oil will quiet a creaky hinge just fine but will make your Glock jam sooner than a handful of sand.

Lubes are not created equal. Some run, some evaporate, some freeze, some turn into crud. They all are designed to work in a certain way. Guns need so little oil/grease even the most expensive gun-oriented products will not break the bank.

South Fla
06-17-2012, 14:47
When using Breakfree CLP on a Sig P-220 (that was clean) and shooting out in the sunshine in late June. Between the heat from the sunshine and firing the pistol, the Breakfree CLP burnt off in about 50-75 rounds and caused FTE's.

I switched to Tetra Gun Grease and the problems stopped.

I now use WeaponShield's grease with no problems.

Jason D
06-17-2012, 18:10
I have a 1911 that seems to run better wet on oil instead of grease.

Veedubklown
06-18-2012, 05:26
Not really due to a specific lube, but lack of lube, my 1911 if it got dry would start having ftf. Greasing the rails helped that a lot.

Same here, but the trouble mine had was returning to battery. I'm a firm believer that lubrication is a badage for poor machining. No semi-auto should have to be dripping wet. When I see guys at the range with lube gunked up all over thier barrels, guide rods, dust covers, trigger controls, lube running down the trigger, etc... It's gross. I take a can of CLP in my range bag, if needed I'll apply a little, but rarely it is. I keep my 1911 rails greased, and a little lubed.