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Snapper2
06-24-2012, 19:23
At the risk of sounding paranoid I've got a few questions.Doorbell rings while I'm handloading ammo:supergrin:. Wife and daughter are watching a movie in living room. I answer door (without ccw) and step outside to talk to a man and woman that say they work for kirby and want to give my house a free cleaning. While I'm in the process of sending them on their way my wife calls me back in the house to let me know that according to facebook people are scoping out houses in my neighborhood.:shocked: So I grab my ccw and go back out and tell them NOT INTERESTED.:steamed: This most likely is just a false alarm not worthy of calling police IMO, but I did go back out and watch them walk door to door down the street.So basically all I did was get their license number from their truck.Questions that I have is how are you supposed to handle door to door salesmen?

FatPants
06-24-2012, 19:25
I don't answer the door for anyone I don't know.

Sent from my ADR6350 using Tapatalk 2

Snapper2
06-24-2012, 19:35
I don't answer the door for anyone I don't know.

Sent from my ADR6350 using Tapatalk 2
Not a bad answer, but I usually want to know why someone is in my yard or knocking on my door.

brob2425
06-24-2012, 20:02
Strangers offering to clean your house for free is a red flag right there. Jot down their plates and a good description of them and their vehicle in case you need it.

Sharky7
06-24-2012, 20:03
Get a no solicitor sign and don't answer for them. Or open the door with a hotel or chain lock telling them you are not interested.

Find out if your city has an ordinance against soliciting door to door. Many cities/towns have ordinances that require their solicitors to register or get a permit with the city. Call the police if you think they are soliciting illegally or are suspicious in anyway.

Most of your residential burglaries actually occur during the day. Many people get caught up in their fantasies or watching too many movies and think someone is going to break in in the middle of the night - that's pretty rare. Most residential burglaries happen during the week during the day when everyone is away at work.

It's not uncommon for residential burglary crews to knock on the front and back doors or ring the doorbell first to make sure no one is home. I've investigated quite a few who pass out fake flyers or just claim to have run out of gas if someone actually answers the door. Most of them are hoping when they see you haven't got your mail, no noise from inside, and your newspaper is still on the driveway, and you don't answer the door - they hope you aren't home.

Jon_R
06-24-2012, 20:10
Questions that I have is how are you supposed to handle door to door salesmen?

I tell them no thanks but have a nice day. I look out the window at them before I answer no peep hole and almost always have my CW on me. Never felt there was any problem that required anything different.

Sharky7
06-24-2012, 20:11
Be careful about stepping too far outside your home with them. Google gypsy scams and you will find out quite a bit of information.

I've seen quite a few gypsy scams where one guy will lure you outside to look at your roof, garage, yard, etc while 2 or 3 guys go inside your home to steal.

I am never a fan of people coming to my door trying to sell me crap. If I really needed your service, I will find you.

Anyone trying to sell magazine subscriptions door to door is going to be a dirt bag, so watch out for them.....Lots and lots of dirt bag magazine subscription groups go from city to city all over the USA. They are always run by skells and their "employees" are the types who can't even get a job in fast food. 4 or 5 stay in a hotel room in a city for the week and they work on commission only. They will claim to be college students working toward a trip or goal, but most are in their late 20's with extensive criminal records. If you pay in cash, don't expect to get your magazines. If people invite them into their homes, valuables go missing all the time.

Snapper2
06-24-2012, 20:16
Strangers offering to clean your house for free is a red flag right there. Jot down their plates and a good description of them and their vehicle in case you need it.
Yes, I'm second guessing myself for not getting ID from them instead of just sending them on their way.I did get the plate numbers.

Redheadhunter21
06-24-2012, 20:20
If I'm home alone, I stay inside door opening if others are home I will go outside and close door. I'm pretty good about knowing who is supposed to be at the door vs who is not. If they don't look right I'll just let them wait until they leave. I'm home during the day most of the time so Im at more risk than most.

Oh yea almost forgot I always put the tag number in my phone if they have a vehicle, let it sit for a week before deleting

Snapper2
06-24-2012, 20:21
Get a no solicitor sign and don't answer for them. Or open the door with a hotel or chain lock telling them you are not interested.

Find out if your city has an ordinance against soliciting door to door. Many cities/towns have ordinances that require their solicitors to register or get a permit with the city. Call the police if you think they are soliciting illegally or are suspicious in anyway.

Most of your residential burglaries actually occur during the day. Many people get caught up in their fantasies or watching too many movies and think someone is going to break in in the middle of the night - that's pretty rare. Most residential burglaries happen during the week during the day when everyone is away at work.

It's not uncommon for residential burglary crews to knock on the front and back doors or ring the doorbell first to make sure no one is home. I've investigated quite a few who pass out fake flyers or just claim to have run out of gas if someone actually answers the door. Most of them are hoping when they see you haven't got your mail, no noise from inside, and your newspaper is still on the driveway, and you don't answer the door - they hope you aren't home.
All of this is good to know.Thanks. I do need a chainlock and a peephole too. If I'm armed(ccw) I usually meet them on the porch.

Snapper2
06-24-2012, 20:28
I tell them no thanks but have a nice day. I look out the window at them before I answer no peep hole and almost always have my CW on me. Never felt there was any problem that required anything different.
Yes but then they go next door. If they are up to something they need to know theyre being watched.

Snapper2
06-24-2012, 20:35
If I'm home alone, I stay inside door opening if others are home I will go outside and close door. I'm pretty good about knowing who is supposed to be at the door vs who is not. If they don't look right I'll just let them wait until they leave. I'm home during the day most of the time so Im at more risk than most.

Oh yea almost forgot I always put the tag number in my phone if they have a vehicle, let it sit for a week before deleting
good points. But if they dont look right maybe racking a pump action shotgun from the inside and then set it down and answer....... may I help you?:supergrin: This is probably what I'm doing wrong....I always answer.:dunno:

H&K 4 LIFE
06-24-2012, 20:53
...So I grab my ccw and go back out and tell them NOT INTERESTED. This most likely is just a false alarm not worthy of calling police IMO...

If you felt it was worth arming yourself over, it was probably also at least worth reporting.

If you think it's suspicious activity then go with your gut. Relay any relevant information to the police and let them handle it. They may even subsequently increase the frequency of random patrols in your area.

Who knows, it could be nothing, or you could actually prevent someone else's house from being broken into.

ranger1968
06-24-2012, 21:00
Get a fence, and a gate;

you won't have that problem ever again.

1canvas
06-24-2012, 21:08
Most of your residential burglaries actually occur during the day. Many people get caught up in their fantasies or watching too many movies and think someone is going to break in in the middle of the night - that's pretty rare. Most residential burglaries happen during the week during the day when everyone is away at work.

It's not uncommon for residential burglary crews to knock on the front and back doors or ring the doorbell first to make sure no one is home. I've investigated quite a few who pass out fake flyers or just claim to have run out of gas if someone actually answers the door. Most of them are hoping when they see you haven't got your mail, no noise from inside, and your newspaper is still on the driveway, and you don't answer the door - they hope you aren't home.

I think of door knockers all the time cause if I'm not expecting you I don't answer the door. if I do answer I have a gun in hand behind my back and prepared to be rushed.

Snapper2
06-24-2012, 21:09
If you felt it was worth arming yourself over, it was probably also at least worth reporting.

If you think it's suspicious activity then go with your gut. Relay any relevant information to the police and let them handle it. They may even subsequently increase the frequency of random patrols in your area.

Who knows, it could be nothing, or you could actually prevent someone else's house from being broken into.
The only reason I wasnt armed at the time is that I had my barrel out of my gun checking the hand loads I was making. But I guess your right on reporting it. Gut call. I decided not to. The facebook news/rumors are faster than the news. If you've got teens you stay informed.:rofl:That said, I did inform the neighbors.

Snapper2
06-24-2012, 21:14
I think of door knockers all the time cause if I'm not expecting you I don't answer the door. if I do answer I have a gun in hand behind my back and prepared to be rushed.
wow, I cant help but think that maybe the door knockers need to rethink their line of work.:rofl:

Snapper2
06-24-2012, 21:20
Get a fence, and a gate;

you won't have that problem ever again.
And maybe a couple of bull mastiffs.:supergrin: Cool dogs.
I'm still not use to this neighborhood living even after 7 years.

unit1069
06-24-2012, 22:11
Be careful; a current trend in home invasion robberies is to have a female ring the doorbell and when the unsuspecting residents answer (thinking a female isn't a threat) the male perps bust through suddenly and overwhelm the homeowners.

Always keep a locked door between you and anyone you don't know until you're sure nobody's lurking out of immediate sight. And keep all doors locked, night and day.

Snapper2
06-24-2012, 22:22
Be careful; a current trend in home invasion robberies is to have a female ring the doorbell and when the unsuspecting residents answer (thinking a female isn't a threat) the male perps bust through suddenly and overwhelm the homeowners.

Always keep a locked door between you and anyone you don't know until you're sure nobody's lurking out of immediate sight. And keep all doors locked, night and day.
Thanks for the warnings. Things I want to look into now are a peep hole and chain lock.

ScottieG59
06-24-2012, 22:51
Sometimes, it is a tough call. The break ins around here in the rural outskirts of Kansas City tend to be meth heads and/or local teenagers. Often, they know something about the target but many just drop off a guy or two who goes in. Some are armed in case someone is or comes home.

Often, you will know it is likely a neighbor's kid when pocket items and easy to hide things are stolen.

They tend to directly to the master bedroom and go into dresser drawers and closets.

I know of a local case where the thieves were greeted by large dogs, which they shot and killed. Small dogs or friendly ones are frequently stolen.

One home near us was broken into twice a few weeks apart. Each time, they kicked in the back door. It is common for these guys to come back for more. During the second break in, an alert neighbor called the sheriff's office and discretely followed the thieves' car, giving their address. The thieves were arrested and had broken into at least four homes that day. One was carrying a handgun stolen many years before hundreds of miles away.

A new trick to deal with those with alarm systems is to move the break in to when people are home. The thief will trigger an alarm, run and hide while the homeowner checks things out. The thief will retrigger the alarm in intervals during the night. The goal is to convince the homeowner there is a fault in the alarm and will turn it off pending a professional inspection in the morning. Once the alarm is off, the thief will enter the house. This is a much more dangerous entry and can end out tragically for the homeowner.

Misty02
06-25-2012, 07:32
At the risk of sounding paranoid I've got a few questions.Doorbell rings while I'm handloading ammo:supergrin:. Wife and daughter are watching a movie in living room. I answer door (without ccw) and step outside to talk to a man and woman that say they work for kirby and want to give my house a free cleaning. While I'm in the process of sending them on their way my wife calls me back in the house to let me know that according to facebook people are scoping out houses in my neighborhood.:shocked: So I grab my ccw and go back out and tell them NOT INTERESTED.:steamed: This most likely is just a false alarm not worthy of calling police IMO, but I did go back out and watch them walk door to door down the street.So basically all I did was get their license number from their truck.Questions that I have is how are you supposed to handle door to door salesmen?

I donít. If I want to buy something Iíll either call them and be expecting them, Iíll go buy it at their location or buy it online. I donít buy when others want to sell; I buy when I need something.

.

FuturePharmD
06-25-2012, 11:39
I usually answer the door and inform whoever it is that their services are not needed and I get their info such as car tags and a name from them. I never answer the door without my gun. I always have it in me, but I make sure they get to see it when I answer my door.


Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

IrishSheepdog54
06-25-2012, 11:48
Call the police. I never take issue with people in the neighborhood calling us for a suspicious individual. We'll check them out, and let them know we are watching.

I'd rather catch a burglar and make an arrest, but I will never complain if we scare them out of the area and keep our residents houses from being burglarized.

When I'm home, I always have my off duty weapon ready when answering the door. I've read, and taken, too many home invasion burglary reports. Criminals around here are getting very, very bold.

racer88
06-26-2012, 19:57
Cardinal rule in my house: We don't open the door for anyone we aren't expecting or personally know. EVER. Period. It doesn't matter who they are, what they look like, gender, age, or uniform. We open for NOBODY... unless we are expecting them or know them.

talon
06-26-2012, 20:31
You were outside and then went inside to get a gun and then went back outside. Not a good idea IMHO.

Too much can be twisted around by that.

FireForged
06-26-2012, 21:06
Just my 2 cents.. In this day and age, any door to door solicitors are suspect. Personally I think that better than 50% are simply trying to scope your place out. They are just trying to get a closer look and see what is what. My rule of thumb is Not to open my door to strangers. To answer your original question.. no, I do not think you are paranoid.

Once upon a time these (2) fellows came down my street carrying a wash pale. I watched from a window as they passed several houses on my street and 2 houses where people were outside. They walked past my house and stopped.. One look around and seemed to be counting houses from the corner. They backed up and walked up my driveway. They walked up to the porch and knocked... the pup will nuts and went to the closed door... they kinda stepped back and looked around at the windows and began talking to one another. One seemed to ague with the other and the younger one knocked again. The dog is still barking and hadnt stopped. They left the porch and walking around to the garage and stopped. They stood there about 60 seconds and one sees a camera in the corner of the roof and motions to the other to look. They both begin to walk off, passing more houses as they go. They stopped by a light pole where a beat up old smoking sedan picked them up.

I never called the Sheriff since there is a 45min response time and nothing ever came of this event. I do believe I was being cased.

FireForged
06-26-2012, 21:11
You were outside and then went inside to get a gun and then went back outside. Not a good idea IMHO.

Too much can be twisted around by that.

agreed

Snapper2
06-26-2012, 21:26
Cardinal rule in my house: We don't open the door for anyone we aren't expecting or personally know. EVER. Period. It doesn't matter who they are, what they look like, gender, age, or uniform. We open for NOBODY... unless we are expecting them or know them.
I hear what your saying and that may be the safest way to play it but it really bothers me to have unwanted and uninvited visitors walking in my yard.
You were outside and then went inside to get a gun and then went back outside. Not a good idea IMHO.

Too much can be twisted around by that.
No reason not to go back outside(they were waiting). The reason I put my ccw back on was I was informed that they were casing houses(maybe,maybe not). I'm pretty sure I made mistakes but I'm still trying to learn how to handle solicitors.

Misty02
06-27-2012, 05:22
Cardinal rule in my house: We don't open the door for anyone we aren't expecting or personally know. EVER. Period. It doesn't matter who they are, what they look like, gender, age, or uniform. We open for NOBODY... unless we are expecting them or know them.

Heck, there have been many times when I donít even open the door to people I know. I donít like unannounced guests. People may get told the first time they do it, the second time they get to knock and receive no response in spite there being cars in the driveway. Training new people is rather unpleasant for my husband (heís the good guy in this drama I call our lives). :embarassed:

.

Misty02
06-27-2012, 05:43
I hear what your saying and that may be the safest way to play it but it really bothers me to have unwanted and uninvited visitors walking in my yard.

No reason not to go back outside(they were waiting). The reason I put my ccw back on was I was informed that they were casing houses(maybe,maybe not). I'm pretty sure I made mistakes but I'm still trying to learn how to handle solicitors.

My personal opinion (but Iím often called anti-social, even before I was armed) about handling solicitors is, don't handle solicitors. It doesnít mean I donít observe those that are outside. Sometimes I just look at what the cameras are recording; sometimes I may decide to discretely look through a window to get a better life size look. If someone is suspicious enough the cameras are preferable as they provide views from all around the house, something my own eyes cannot do if Iím standing where I can only see the front of it.

I do have to do something about the new sensor spotlights our kids installed all around the house. Anyone that steps one foot from the sidewalk into our property or anyone that drives in (including ME) gets blinded when those things first go off. I have little doubt my house can be seen from outer space when that happens. Nothing worse than finding something like that on special at Home Depot, I must change all those bulbs or risk permanent retina damage.

We were looking at the video the other day, a poor old man walking his little dog nearly had a coronary when his dog stepped outside the confines of the sidewalk and into our property. It seems he picked a corner that activated three of those spotlights, I think it surprised him he could still jump that high. Poor man.

.

Snapper2
06-27-2012, 16:26
Heck, there have been many times when I donít even open the door to people I know. I donít like unannounced guests. People may get told the first time they do it, the second time they get to knock and receive no response in spite there being cars in the driveway. Training new people is rather unpleasant for my husband (heís the good guy in this drama I call our lives). :embarassed:

.
I guess I'm a lot like that. In the small town we use to live in people actually waved when passing each other. Know them or not. In the city neighborhoods its not so. People seem annoyed and defensive with each other instead of friendly.They call the law when rights have been offended. We dont answer our doors because we dont want to be bothered,hassled or worst.We condition ourselves to be defensive. I'd rather live out in the country but in the mean time I guess I'll adapt. Maybe:dunno:

wjv
06-27-2012, 16:39
Generally speaking I won't open the door for someone I don't know. My wife is just the opposite. . :sad: . . Will open the door for anybody. .

At least the kids know NOT to open the door under any circumstance if they don't know the person.

I guess one thing that would concern me is if someone showed up wearing a police uniform. . . The kids might open the door for someone in uniform. I guess the best approach would be for them to call 911 and ask if the cop is legit. :dunno:

Couple years ago I wouldn't have seen the need to carry at home. Now I'll always be armed, even if it is just a good knife and a little NA Arms .22. Bought my S&W 442 (.38) J-Frame so that carrying a reasonable caliber at home would be easier. I still might pick up a .380 one of these days since they really are easy to carry, yet have a bit more oomph than a .22.

Misty02
06-28-2012, 05:43
I guess I'm a lot like that. In the small town we use to live in people actually waved when passing each other. Know them or not. In the city neighborhoods its not so. People seem annoyed and defensive with each other instead of friendly.They call the law when rights have been offended. We dont answer our doors because we dont want to be bothered,hassled or worst.We condition ourselves to be defensive. I'd rather live out in the country but in the mean time I guess I'll adapt. Maybe:dunno:

It’s not that, time is valuable and for the most part allocated in advance to things that need to get done or time to be spent with the family. I can steal minutes from here and minutes from there as needed to accommodate things not previously scheduled; however, when you allow others to continuously interrupt that, things don’t get done when you need them done. Your life becomes a mess and you become a wreck trying to play catch-up because you allowed others to take over your schedule.

It was more of an issue when our three kids were little. My evenings and most weekends were carefully planned to maximize the use of time. Now I just enjoy my privacy and ability to plan my day to accommodate us, not others. Of course, there is always the unexpected person that calls you to let you know they are in the neighborhood and would like to drop in to say Hi. Those disruptions are enjoyable ever so often, if practiced recklessly by family and friends then it becomes dreaded interruptions. I see it happen to other people quite often, I just don’t allow it to happen to us.

Since I’m the mean one in our home, I’m the one that is given the phone (people already know better than to show up unannounced) because so and so wants to know if they can stop by. If the phone is handed to me with a dreaded face (meaning I don’t feel like attending visitors today) I have absolutely no issues with letting the person know we have other plans.

Were solicitors are concerned; they are not given an opportunity to become a disruption at all. If there is a salesperson inside my house it is because we needed their services, we called them and allocated a certain amount of time to them. Unannounced ones are not acknowledged but are observed until they leave the property. To my knowledge they have never created much of an issue.

.

jph02
06-28-2012, 06:03
...If you think it's suspicious activity then go with your gut. Relay any relevant information to the police and let them handle it. They may even subsequently increase the frequency of random patrols in your area.

Who knows, it could be nothing, or you could actually prevent someone else's house from being broken into.

Call the police. I never take issue with people in the neighborhood calling us for a suspicious individual. We'll check them out, and let them know we are watching...
Agreed. If the polie are too busy to respond to that type of call, at least they've got the information. If manpower's available, my city's police will always stop and check. This type of law enforcement makes your neighborhood less attractive to bad guys.

Misty02
06-28-2012, 06:07
Generally speaking I won't open the door for someone I don't know. My wife is just the opposite. . :sad: . . Will open the door for anybody. .

At least the kids know NOT to open the door under any circumstance if they don't know the person.

I guess one thing that would concern me is if someone showed up wearing a police uniform. . . The kids might open the door for someone in uniform. I guess the best approach would be for them to call 911 and ask if the cop is legit. :dunno:

Couple years ago I wouldn't have seen the need to carry at home. Now I'll always be armed, even if it is just a good knife and a little NA Arms .22. Bought my S&W 442 (.38) J-Frame so that carrying a reasonable caliber at home would be easier. I still might pick up a .380 one of these days since they really are easy to carry, yet have a bit more oomph than a .22.

I would open the door to a LEO only if they arrived in a marked vehicle or if they were expected, otherwise it is the same treatment everyone else gets. UPS, FedEx, same thing, there better be a marked vehicle I recognize or no dice either.

Needless to say, Iím alarmed by some family/friends that are the same as your wife and know more than a couple that believe a knock at the door means you open it to see what the person wants/needs. I was actually visiting one of my husbandís sisters not long ago; we were in the kitchen talking. Someone knocked at the door, she went and answered. No big deal until I realized she was kind of arguing with the person (obvious that she was not expecting or knew him) about being satisfied with their internet provider. It was a sales person offering a package deal of some sort. I peeked out of the kitchen and it was a clean cut person that didnít seem threatening so I decided to take a chance and approach (in retrospect, that wasnít exactly smart of me) because the exchange was starting to antagonize me. Why people open their doors when they are so darn polite that they canít get rid of unwanted visitors is beyond me (not to mention the danger they can represent). I just told the gentleman ďshe said sheís not interestedĒ and closed the door on his face as I wished him better luck on his next stop. Obviously, she thought that was terribly rude, but was also thankful I put a stop to it. The topic of safety and control of your day ruled the next 15 to 20 minutes of the conversation.


PS- Yes, I was armed and had a hold of my firearm where it was not visible to her or the unwanted guest, but I still shouldnít have approached, he was too close to the door and had a hand on it.

.

FifthFreedom
06-28-2012, 07:00
At the risk of sounding paranoid I've got a few questions.Doorbell rings while I'm handloading ammo:supergrin:. Wife and daughter are watching a movie in living room. I answer door (without ccw) and step outside to talk to a man and woman that say they work for kirby and want to give my house a free cleaning. While I'm in the process of sending them on their way my wife calls me back in the house to let me know that according to facebook people are scoping out houses in my neighborhood.:shocked: So I grab my ccw and go back out and tell them NOT INTERESTED.:steamed: This most likely is just a false alarm not worthy of calling police IMO, but I did go back out and watch them walk door to door down the street.So basically all I did was get their license number from their truck.Questions that I have is how are you supposed to handle door to door salesmen?

Well when i answer the door, My angry dog is usually right there trying to get to whoever is knocking so that usually intimidates them enough not to want to stick around lol
as someone suggested, get a no solicitors sign. It works except for JW's usually :whistling:

bear62
06-28-2012, 12:15
To the OP: I carry in my home ........ as well as out and about... :wavey:

Redheadhunter21
06-28-2012, 12:47
Well when i answer the door, My angry dog is usually right there trying to get to whoever is knocking so that usually intimidates them enough not to want to stick around lol
as someone suggested, get a no solicitors sign. It works except for JW's usually :whistling:

Who opens for the JWs anyways, I don't care if it's all women around here they come in groups of 4+ up to around 10. Those odds are not good, even a stupid criminal could figure out that's a good cover.

ithaca_deerslayer
06-28-2012, 12:48
Always carry a gun on you :)

When cleaning, carry the spare.

wjv
06-28-2012, 13:40
Well when i answer the door, My angry dog is usually right there trying to get to whoever is knocking

Same here. . .

Unfortunately. . He doesn't intimidate. . But he can scowl real good. .
http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i303/bcvojak/RVNet3/Toto_02.jpg

bustedknee
06-28-2012, 14:16
At the Gate:
http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d98/leflers/notrespassing.jpg

At the door:
http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d98/leflers/Welcome.jpg

After I open the door I yell back into the house, "Yes dear, I know I'm running out of places to hide the bodies but I know a good spot for two more!"


Watch the Movie Second Hand Lions.
Hub and Garth are my heroes but they are a little too friendly toward salesmen.


:animlol:

Snapper2
06-28-2012, 18:38
Well when i answer the door, My angry dog is usually right there trying to get to whoever is knocking so that usually intimidates them enough not to want to stick around lol
as someone suggested, get a no solicitors sign. It works except for JW's usually :whistling:
Howdy Arik, this gives me an ideal. I can open door and ......say allo to ma lil fren.........she's my first line of defense.:supergrin:

Snapper2
06-28-2012, 19:28
At the Gate:
http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d98/leflers/notrespassing.jpg

At the door:
http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d98/leflers/Welcome.jpg




:animlol:You do know you could put someone's eye out with that dont you?:whistling:

Jason D
06-29-2012, 17:37
Every time someone comes to the door I have to answer it.
I don't like the idea of not answering and someone getting the idea to break in thinking no one is home. I send everyone packing and never answer the door without being armed and blocking the door as best I can with my foot.

Anyone that gets the bright idea of rushing me is going to get hurt.


I hate that I have to do that, but I am not a trusting soul.

RetailNinja
06-29-2012, 21:24
Always carry a gun on you :)

When cleaning, carry the spare.

Next door neighbors of a good friend's parents learned this the hard way. Home invasion while the husband was cleaning ALL of this guns and had them all disassembled. They were almost killed. This was in the evening.

LINK... (http://www.news-gazette.com/news/courts-police-and-fire/2009-01-14/st-joseph-couple-detail-harrowing-home-invasion-robbery.html)

STUCKINNY
06-29-2012, 21:49
Cardinal rule in my house: We don't open the door for anyone we aren't expecting or personally know. EVER. Period. It doesn't matter who they are, what they look like, gender, age, or uniform. We open for NOBODY... unless we are expecting them or know them.

+1
Don't call me... Get no answer

I always have a gun on me in and around my home

ithaca_deerslayer
06-29-2012, 21:54
Next door neighbors of a good friend's parents learned this the hard way. Home invasion while the husband was cleaning ALL of this guns and had them all disassembled. They were almost killed. This was in the evening.

LINK... (http://www.news-gazette.com/news/courts-police-and-fire/2009-01-14/st-joseph-couple-detail-harrowing-home-invasion-robbery.html)

Brutal ordeal. Too bad that shotgun wasn't blasting the bad guy's face off.

eccho
06-30-2012, 00:17
I've never heard of someone offering a "free home cleaning". That sounds incredibly sketchy.

Why on earth would someone want to clean my house for free? either they're looking for tips or seeing if I have anything worth stealing. I wouldn't call 911, but I would call the local non emergency number and ask to file a report.

Would be willing to bet the police would find it sketchy too.

wprebeck
06-30-2012, 01:26
Next door neighbors of a good friend's parents learned this the hard way. Home invasion while the husband was cleaning ALL of this guns and had them all disassembled. They were almost killed. This was in the evening.

LINK... (http://www.news-gazette.com/news/courts-police-and-fire/2009-01-14/st-joseph-couple-detail-harrowing-home-invasion-robbery.html)

I've gotten to the point in my life where there's not enough room to take down all the guns at one time for cleaning. Hell, there's not enough room to break down the Glocks, much less the rest of them. That gives me a warm fuzzy feeling.


Concerning the OT - I don't answer the door if I don't know you, for the most part. If I do, there's a gun in hand. Oh, and eight large dogs barking from various spots around the house. And, a marked car out in the driveway.

Misty02
06-30-2012, 08:43
Every time someone comes to the door I have to answer it.
I don't like the idea of not answering and someone getting the idea to break in thinking no one is home. I send everyone packing and never answer the door without being armed and blocking the door as best I can with my foot.

Anyone that gets the bright idea of rushing me is going to get hurt.


I hate that I have to do that, but I am not a trusting soul.

You can accomplish the same thing by answering from inside without opening the door and risking your safety. With such proximity to the door and needing to keep one foot locked into position youíre limiting your ability to move. Is there a way to question/talk to the person on the other side from a window, through the closed door or in another way where you can move about and out of their sight if theyíre armed (or just plain big and strong)?

.

Jason D
06-30-2012, 16:17
You can accomplish the same thing by answering from inside without opening the door and risking your safety. With such proximity to the door and needing to keep one foot locked into position youíre limiting your ability to move. Is there a way to question/talk to the person on the other side from a window, through the closed door or in another way where you can move about and out of their sight if theyíre armed (or just plain big and strong)?

.

You can talk to them, but you really can't see anything without opening the door. My front door is a steel door with the windows inset near the top. You'd have to be 6'5" or better to see out.

jdavionic
06-30-2012, 17:19
We are seeing more targeting of the homes in the summer...which seems to happen every summer. Crimes in our neighborhood and nearby neighborhoods always increase during this time of year. Perhaps there's a correlation between this increase and school being out.

Regardless, our neighborhood HOA has off-duty officers patrolling the area at random times during this period. We have also had briefings by local LE on crimes and crime prevention for our area.

The only recent home invasion in my immediate neighborhood (my subdivision) was related to the victim's business routine. He would take money home from the business at the end of the day and make his deposits in the morning. A former employee discovered his routine and rushed him when he pulled into his garage.

We have seen a rise in fake solicitors that survey homes. Two main issues that we've seen. I should note - we have posted signs throughout the subdivision and on all entrances that state "no soliciting".

The first problem is where they are pretending to be solicitors so that they can see if someone is home. If they are home, they give some fake lines about being in the neighborhood for 'lawn care estimates', etc. If they are not home, the home is subsequently burglarized.

The second one that is growing in popularity in the general area (not specific to our neighborhood) is where one person distracts the homeowner while another goes around and enters the home from the back. They just grab what they can get quickly and quietly...i.e., not carrying out the large screen TV.

Our neighborhood LE representative has advised that we do NOT ignore the doorbell. He said that ignoring it may send a signal to them that you are not home. However he also advises that you do not open the door. Talk through the door, ask them for their solicitor license. If they do not produce one, call the non-emergency police and report them with as much details as you can. If they do produce one, you can file a complaint for them soliciting in a posted 'non-solicitor area'.

Obviously your local laws may be different. Just thought I'd share the input that we've received from LE in our area.

10-32
06-30-2012, 17:43
And maybe a couple of bull mastiffs.:supergrin: Cool dogs.
I'm still not use to this neighborhood living even after 7 years.


My buddy Jethro:
http://i46.tinypic.com/fa56kl.jpg




I listen to the police scanner pretty regularly and I hear of these door to door people frequently on there.

I have a NO SOLICITING sign on my front door and my entire backyard is fenced/gated. I ONLY answer the door to people I know and even then, I usually have a gun on me (I CCW at home a lot).
When I see people in my neighborhood I don't know or who seem to be scouting, I get a good description and hang on to any info I can get (lic #, etc).

Never hurts to call the non-emergency number and just make the police aware of it if anything seems suspicious.

Great advice from some of the posters above, thanks for that

*ETA: I also look on my local PD's website. They post local crime trends and occurrences and usually have some helpful tips, or at least things to be aware of

Snapper2
06-30-2012, 18:05
My buddy Jethro:
http://i46.tinypic.com/fa56kl.jpg




I listen to the police scanner pretty regularly and I hear of these door to door people frequently on there.

I have a NO SOLICITING sign on my front door and my entire backyard is fenced/gated. I ONLY answer the door to people I know and even then, I usually have a gun on me (I CCW at home a lot).
When I see people in my neighborhood I don't know or who seem to be scouting, I get a good description and hang on to any info I can get (lic #, etc).

Never hurts to call the non-emergency number and just make the police aware of it if anything seems suspicious.

Great advice from some of the posters above, thanks for that

*ETA: I also look on my local PD's website. They post local crime trends and occurrences and usually have some helpful tips, or at least things to be aware of
I really love that breed. I had a brindle that went by the name Tugboat. Very aloof,trusted no one. But really not that aggressive to animals. His "look" alone were enough to keep people out of his yard.

Snapper2
06-30-2012, 18:14
I too really appreciate all the good information that has been given. Thanks

10-32
06-30-2012, 18:23
I really love that breed. I had a brindle that went by the name Tugboat. Very aloof,trusted no one. But really not that aggressive to animals. His "look" alone were enough to keep people out of his yard.

Haha that picture was taken when we first got our cat and had the gate on our bedroom door so she could get some peace. They get along for the most part now, he chases her around the house every chance he gets, but he never hurts her. He likes to lay his head on her for some reason, which the cat doesn't find amusing, but we do

I'm pretty sure he's the "baddest" dog on my block (he's scared off the neighbor's Doberman a few times when it got loose and wandered into our yard) but he really is a gentle dog when he's not in defensive mode.

It's funny when I take him out in the Bronco, people always try to get him to bark and when he does, they about defecate themselves hahaha
But that same bark is what people hear when they knock on my door, so it works for me

The only down side is that he snores worse than I do

Snapper2
06-30-2012, 18:38
Haha that picture was taken when we first got our cat and had the gate on our bedroom door so she could get some peace. They get along for the most part now, he chases her around the house every chance he gets, but he never hurts her. He likes to lay his head on her for some reason, which the cat doesn't find amusing, but we do

I'm pretty sure he's the "baddest" dog on my block (he's scared off the neighbor's Doberman a few times when it got loose and wandered into our yard) but he really is a gentle dog when he's not in defensive mode.

It's funny when I take him out in the Bronco, people always try to get him to bark and when he does, they about defecate themselves hahaha
But that same bark is what people hear when they knock on my door, so it works for me

The only down side is that he snores worse than I do
LOL.:rofl: One time two minature goats got in the yard. I thought that they would wind up chew toys. The nanny goat alerted me something was wrong. All Tugboat was doing was trying to keep up with the billy and at worst giving him a slobber bath but in no way harming the goat.

Misty02
07-01-2012, 04:10
You can talk to them, but you really can't see anything without opening the door. My front door is a steel door with the windows inset near the top. You'd have to be 6'5" or better to see out.

I can understand what you mean. Just be as safe as you possibly can.

Iím also beginning to like these cameras my sons installed (that I didnít want in the first place). I didnít open doors before I had them, but I also didnít have a view of all around the house from a single location. I still donít like the motion sensor lights but the swiveling cameras are growing on me.

.

Jason D
07-01-2012, 17:27
I can understand what you mean. Just be as safe as you possibly can.

Iím also beginning to like these cameras my sons installed (that I didnít want in the first place). I didnít open doors before I had them, but I also didnít have a view of all around the house from a single location. I still donít like the motion sensor lights but the swiveling cameras are growing on me.

.

Thanks.


I hadn't really thought of cameras. My Bro in law is an IT guy that could rig something like that up for me with no problem.
I'll have to ask him about that.

Misty02
07-01-2012, 17:41
Thanks.


I hadn't really thought of cameras. My Bro in law is an IT guy that could rig something like that up for me with no problem.
I'll have to ask him about that.

Itís really not all that expensive and you donít have to acquire them all at the same time. There is newer technology out there but something like this does the job just fine: [url][url][URL="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0046710G6/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1/182-6146623-3478758?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_r=1NBJDB1PFZ929ZV6YMNV&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_i=B00466X9SY"]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0046710G6/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1/182-6146623-3478758?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_r=1NBJDB1PFZ929ZV6YMNV&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_i=B00466X9SY

Your brother in law may even be able to get a better deal. Thankfully my son in law works installing commercial security systems, Iím not very well versed in this stuff. From your computer you can manually guide the camera where you want as well.

.

Jason D
07-01-2012, 18:25
Thanks again.
You've given me a lot to ponder.

Misty02
07-01-2012, 18:44
Thanks again.
You've given me a lot to ponder.

Any time! :)

I was a bit reluctant at first thinking it was going to be very expensive, the boys were the ones buying, the son-in-law doing all the manual labor, but I was convinced when they showed me the final cost. I blinked an eye and before I knew the house was surrounded by motion sensor light and cameras. The sensor lights are turned on at sundown, off during the day.

My rude awakening came the day after when I got home and it was dark out, I was completely blinded by those lights. We compromised, changed the bulbs and made it bright enough to see what is going on outside, but not enough to disturb the neighbors or blind me in the process. (I'm still not a fan of the lights, the cameras are ok).
:embarassed:
.

Cavalry Doc
07-01-2012, 19:49
I don't answer the door for anyone I don't know.

Sent from my ADR6350 using Tapatalk 2

Just a tip, but a lot of guys bang on the front door, if there is no answer, they break into the back door. Had this happen to a friends wife. Had a long talk about home defense shotguns for ladies shortly after that.

Cavalry Doc
07-01-2012, 19:54
Same here. . .

Unfortunately. . He doesn't intimidate. . But he can scowl real good. .
http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i303/bcvojak/RVNet3/Toto_02.jpg

http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p158/CavalryDoc/Hawkeye.jpg

A loud dog (preferably dogs) and a louder gun are good things to have. So are ADT stickers on every door and window, as well as video surveillance cameras that aren't completely hidden, as in easy to see if you are looking for them.

CookeMonster
07-01-2012, 22:03
Why hasn't anybody mentioned the steel, security screen doors. You can open the front door, but still have a semi-one way (completely one way during the day) visual, complete unimpeded audio and stronger barrier to get through... all the while my two 100+ lb American Bulldogs are barking and my hand is on my CCW.

As for the free house cleaning, Kirby does do this and it's merely a demo to try to get you to buy something. Note to those with neat-freak wives, that vacuum cleaner is more dangerous than a home invasion. You could buy a gun and 10,000 rounds for the price of one of those. :bagoverhead:

Snapper2
07-02-2012, 03:55
As for the free house cleaning, Kirby does do this and it's merely a demo to try to get you to buy something.
................You're a little too late. They've already been found guilty.:whistling:

10-32
07-02-2012, 09:36
Why hasn't anybody mentioned the steel, security screen doors. You can open the front door, but still have a semi-one way (completely one way during the day) visual, complete unimpeded audio and stronger barrier to get through... all the while my two 100+ lb American Bulldogs are barking and my hand is on my CCW.


Do you know of any that won't make the front of my house look "ghetto"? The only ones I've seen look like prison bars and scream 'bad neighborhood'.
I like the security, but I'd like for things to appear a little more low-key

Glenn E. Meyer
07-02-2012, 09:43
My comment - why do folks who go outside with a concealed gun, think they will win a gunfight against folks who have set up to attack you?

CanMan
07-02-2012, 09:44
Get a no solicitor sign and don't answer for them.

I don't answer the door for anyone I don't know.

I'm leery of following anyone outside so I installed a ZMODO CCTV. Not the best solution (can't see vehicles parked up the street or see if there's more than one individual lurking about) but it does let me know who's on my porch and at my door, plus keeps a record too.

Misty02
07-02-2012, 09:48
Do you know of any that won't make the front of my house look "ghetto"? The only ones I've seen look like prison bars and scream 'bad neighborhood'.
I like the security, but I'd like for things to appear a little more low-key

They do have some pretty ornamental ones; however, for the windows I see it as a fire hazard trap and it also doesnít necessarily stop bullets. If I were to answer the door, which I rarely do for people I donít know, among the things I donít want them knowing is my exact location in relation to that door.

.

Misty02
07-02-2012, 09:54
My comment - why do folks who go outside with a concealed gun, think they will win a gunfight against folks who have set up to attack you?

I donít see it as a winning event either. Theyíll know youíll use the door to exit, you might not know exactly where they are located or how many. I prefer to let other better trained individuals to go searching for things that go bump outside at night.

.

racer88
07-02-2012, 13:45
I donít see it as a winning event either. Theyíll know youíll use the door to exit, you might not know exactly where they are located or how many. I prefer to let other better trained individuals to go searching for things that go bump outside at night.



Just go up on the roof and snipe'em! ;)

Snapper2
07-02-2012, 14:11
My comment - why do folks who go outside with a concealed gun, think they will win a gunfight against folks who have set up to attack you?
My position is I dont plan on getting in a gunfight. I'm going for cover if shots are fired. In our neighborhood there are kids that check for unlocked vehicles. They dont break into cars but if unlocked they'll take whatever. If I hear noises outside I'm going to check it out.The police have been called by neighbors many times but nothing gets returned and no one has been caught yet. If everyone stays in their houses the thieves have a field day. In Texas its legal to use deadly force when someone is stealing from you but I'd rather run them off and report them than have a shot fired.If they do not run but attack then thats a different story but some things are worth the risk IMO.

Misty02
07-02-2012, 14:18
Just go up on the roof and snipe'em! ;)

:rofl::rofl: My kids have had visions of me doing something like that.

.

Snapper2
07-02-2012, 14:24
Just go up on the roof and snipe'em! ;)
only after they make it past the bouncing bettys:whistling:

10-32
07-02-2012, 14:42
only after they make it past the bouncing bettys:whistling:

So you know how hard it is to mow around those things too? Man, what a PITA

CookeMonster
07-02-2012, 15:05
Do you know of any that won't make the front of my house look "ghetto"? The only ones I've seen look like prison bars and scream 'bad neighborhood'.
I like the security, but I'd like for things to appear a little more low-key

Some here. (http://www.lowes.com/Windows-Doors/Security-Doors/_/N-1z11pp7/pl?UserSearch=security+doors&rpp=16)

What I really like about them is the steel mesh screen is tack-welded to the bars. Would take some real effort and a LOT of noise to get through them. Plus, it makes visibility into the house near zero in the daytime, and with the porch light on at night and the entry way light off, visibility from the outside is maybe 25%. If you're not as recluse as Misty, it still provides a great barrier while being able to converse with the visitor. If the "prison bar" style is all that was available, I'd have no qualms with one. The screen behind the bars keeps it from looking too institutional.

I'm not on board with the window bars, though I don't live in a bad part of town. Even if I did, I don't know that I could put those on because of the fire hazard.

ETA- We also put on the reflective, thermal window tint. Knocks visibility into the house at near nil during the daytime, but leaves the view from the inside at near 90%. Added bonus is lower A/C bill during the summer.

r3dot
07-02-2012, 15:18
I've gotten to the point of just wanting to be flat out rude. My last one was a few weeks ago, a guy with White Knight Pest Control, and his opening act was asking me if I've seen vampires and other random crap...does it look like I'm a kid? He was extremely persistent and after trying to be nice about it, because I know they're just doing their job, I flat out raised my voice and told him that he needed to GTFO.

I'm about to start playing 'characters' and making them extremely uncomfortable just for my amusement. Don't worry, I'll record it.

Glenn E. Meyer
07-02-2012, 17:33
My position is I dont plan on getting in a gunfight.

What if is their plan? Also, planning to go to cover. What if you are just shot as you wander out?

The BGs are attacking. You don't control the action as much as some posts suggests.

Snapper2
07-02-2012, 18:32
What if is their plan? Also, planning to go to cover. What if you are just shot as you wander out?
Then I'll just have a bad day. But living in fear of this happening is even worst IMO.

Misty02
07-03-2012, 04:38
Some here. (http://www.lowes.com/Windows-Doors/Security-Doors/_/N-1z11pp7/pl?UserSearch=security+doors&rpp=16)

What I really like about them is the steel mesh screen is tack-welded to the bars. Would take some real effort and a LOT of noise to get through them. Plus, it makes visibility into the house near zero in the daytime, and with the porch light on at night and the entry way light off, visibility from the outside is maybe 25%. If you're not as recluse as Misty, it still provides a great barrier while being able to converse with the visitor. If the "prison bar" style is all that was available, I'd have no qualms with one. The screen behind the bars keeps it from looking too institutional.

I'm not on board with the window bars, though I don't live in a bad part of town. Even if I did, I don't know that I could put those on because of the fire hazard.

ETA- We also put on the reflective, thermal window tint. Knocks visibility into the house at near nil during the daytime, but leaves the view from the inside at near 90%. Added bonus is lower A/C bill during the summer.

It is not so much about being a recluse as it is about not allowing others to disrupt our day and our plans for that day. Unless there is a special occasion we plan for I donít like weekday visitors. On weekends, everyone is welcome, as long as they are expected. We have a very large family; many of the women donít work and donít realize weeknight visits throw a wrench on what others need to do. If I donít allow family and friends an open pass to come and go as they please, there is no way Iíll allow it of strangers. I saw it happen to my parents when we were growing up, they would tell us we were doing this or that and plans would evaporate because so and so showed up unannounced, they were too polite to say we had other plans. I cannot begin to count how many times my sister and I stayed all dressed up ready to go somewhere fun and didnít make it due to some unexpected visitor. After people left my parents would apologize to us, we kind of understood and said nothing, but I knew it wasnít fair.

I implemented my visitation rules as soon as I got married, I was definitely not into safety nor did I perceive strangers as a concern back then. It was about having our days go as close as possible to what we had planned.

When the kids were little their friends could come and go as they pleased as long we werenít going out. Now days the only person with that open pass is my daughter, her husband and grandchildren. I donít have to stop what Iím doing when they visit, on the contrary, if weíre working on a project around the house they join and help thus not a disruption to our plans in the least (plus I love seeing and spending time with the little munchkins). :supergrin:
.


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Glenn E. Meyer
07-03-2012, 16:57
Living in fear? What does that mean as compared to setting yourself up to be shot?

You should be afraid, if you plan is to go outside with a concealed gun because there are adversaries outside - waiting for you. Going to cover under fire is a joke.

Posturing about being afraid is not part of rational gun training.

Let's look at this.

People are outside - they are targeting you. You go outside with a concealed gun and have to acquire a target or two. Some might have concealment. One talks to you to divert attention. You are so behind the curve.

Oh, now - do you expect someone to announce - DO YOU UNDERSTAND THE COURSE OF FIRE? SHOOTER READY - BEEP!

Then you move to cover at P1?

Let's be real here.

Misty02
07-03-2012, 17:47
Then I'll just have a bad day. But living in fear of this happening is even worst IMO.

Ok, I have a question: Why did you grab your firearm before going back outside to tell them you werenít interested? Did you do so because you were afraid?

If you are going to have a plan for home defense, one which includes a firearm, does it not make some sense to have a plan that goes beyond going back in the house to grab the firearm because your wife mentioned that according to facebook they may be scoping the houses? Home defense is not about firearms, it is about doing the prudent thing. The firearm is for when all else has failed and that is your only choice left.

When you have plans and reasons for doing things certain ways you do them out of habit, not out of fear. I carry at home, so Iím not armed when I answer the door because Iím afraid, Iím armed when I answer the door because Iím armed at home. I donít ignore uninvited and unexpected guests because Iím afraid; I ignore them because I have no desire to acknowledge people that have no consideration for my time and plans. I donít go outside when there are unknown people there or if there are unexpected noises because it is not prudent to do so, it too is a habit. Now, if something made my spidey senses go off and gave me reason to believe there was more to it, I would be on the phone to 911. I might or might not be a tad afraid at that point.

.

Snapper2
07-03-2012, 18:20
Ok, I have a question: Why did you grab your firearm before going back outside to tell them you werenít interested? Did you do so because you were afraid?

When you have plans and reasons for doing things certain ways you do them out of habit, not out of fear.
. I'll be honest here. I think its smart to carry a firearm for home protection but not to the point you freak out if you're caught without one. I had the barrel out of my gun,heard doorbell, thought it was family member coming home, answered door, talk to solicitors,was called back into the house and was informed of people checking houses out in neighborhood, made angry by thought,installed barrel back in carry gun, went back outside....there......it wasnt fear but anger. I feel all better now. But thinking of it now, I would hope I'd handle it the same in the future. I'm usually carrying.

Snapper2
07-03-2012, 18:41
Living in fear? What does that mean as compared to setting yourself up to be shot?

You should be afraid, if you plan is to go outside with a concealed gun because there are adversaries outside - waiting for you. Going to cover under fire is a joke.
.
Now there's a thought. Lets blow holes through the neighborhood. Not really following you here I guess. Please explain? Yes, if I know or (feel they could be) armed I would not go outside. But no, I will not stay in my house because I'm afraid everyone that comes in my yard is armed.

Snapper2
07-03-2012, 19:04
Oh, now - do you expect someone to announce - DO YOU UNDERSTAND THE COURSE OF FIRE? SHOOTER READY - BEEP!

Then you move to cover at P1?

Let's be real here.
:rofl: Thats good. Uh,no sir!

Arc Angel
07-03-2012, 19:57
At the risk of sounding paranoid I've got a few questions.Doorbell rings while I'm handloading ammo:supergrin:. Wife and daughter are watching a movie in living room. I answer door (without ccw) and step outside to talk to a man and woman that say they work for kirby and want to give my house a free cleaning. While I'm in the process of sending them on their way my wife calls me back in the house to let me know that according to facebook people are scoping out houses in my neighborhood.:shocked: So I grab my ccw and go back out and tell them NOT INTERESTED.:steamed: This most likely is just a false alarm not worthy of calling police IMO, but I did go back out and watch them walk door to door down the street.So basically all I did was get their license number from their truck.Questions that I have is how are you supposed to handle door to door salesmen?

Well, ....... ever since our home was invaded back in 1990 we've developed several hard fast rules for how we deal with people outside our home. First off, we don't open the front door to talk to people we don't know. We talk to all strangers through the front living room window, instead. Second, there is always, at least, one fully loaded and ready-to-go pistol at hand. When I used to reload I always had a pistol on the other side of the bench. When I come home from the range and tear down a pistol for cleaning, same thing!

Who's most likely to come back when you're not home and rob the place? Any of the repairmen or maintenance people you have, or have had, on the property and inside the house. If someone needs to enter our home in order to fix something I have absolutely no compunction about asking that person for both a business card and his drivers license, or a state ID card. (No ticky, no shirty - Ever!) ;)

Finally, whenever you can see a vehicle license plate always take the number down along with a brief description of the vehicle, itself. Generally speaking, if you don't act like a, 'soft target' then you won't be treated that way, either.

Misty02
07-04-2012, 05:52
I'll be honest here. I think its smart to carry a firearm for home protection but not to the point you freak out if you're caught without one. I had the barrel out of my gun,heard doorbell, thought it was family member coming home, answered door, talk to solicitors,was called back into the house and was informed of people checking houses out in neighborhood, made angry by thought,installed barrel back in carry gun, went back outside....there......it wasnt fear but anger. I feel all better now. But thinking of it now, I would hope I'd handle it the same in the future. I'm usually carrying.

I donít understand, what were you angry about? I can understand caution and possibly second guessing yourself after what your wife mentioned, but anger? Were the people rude and try to push their way inside the house or something?


.

Snapper2
07-04-2012, 09:14
I donít understand, what were you angry about? I can understand caution and possibly second guessing yourself after what your wife mentioned, but anger? Were the people rude and try to push their way inside the house or something?


.
No, just the thought of people stealing made me angry and reminded me that I didmt know who I was dealing with. The people were as nice as could be(for salesmen).

Cavalry Doc
07-05-2012, 18:54
No, just the thought of people stealing made me angry and reminded me that I didmt know who I was dealing with. The people were as nice as could be(for salesmen).

Had a real nice guy selling cleaning products come to the door, went off and got very angry when I politely declined, evidently him not making a good living was all my fault. I always keep the insulated screen door locked, with an extra bolt lock, not just the handle lock. I wished him all the luck in the world, apologized, and went back inside. I used to always answer the door armed, but with the surveillance system, only when it's someone I don't know.

Snapper2
07-05-2012, 19:19
Had a real nice guy selling cleaning products come to the door, went off and got very angry when I politely declined, evidently him not making a good living was all my fault. I always keep the insulated screen door locked, with an extra bolt lock, not just the handle lock. I wished him all the luck in the world, apologized, and went back inside. I used to always answer the door armed, but with the surveillance system, only when it's someone I don't know.
:rofl:wow,its your fault man. Man, people how long has it been like this? I guess country living had spoiled me. Welcome to the real. I guess I need a doorbell that says"GET OFF MY LAWN":supergrin: Really sad.

Cavalry Doc
07-05-2012, 19:41
:rofl:wow,its your fault man. Man, people how long has it been like this? I guess country living had spoiled me. Welcome to the real. I guess I need a doorbell that says"GET OFF MY LAWN":supergrin: Really sad.

Solid eye contact, paying attention to his hands at all times, firm voice, I wish you all the luck in the world, hand behind my back..... I don't think he noticed that part, he was too busy being ticked.

I now have a "No Soliciting" sign on the door Replaced the welcome mat with a chalk outline on porch..

http://www.cod.edu/course/Information/soc2230f7/chalk.jpg



Joking about the chalk outline. :supergrin:

kirgi08
07-05-2012, 21:42
I doubt that.'08. :whistling:

rockmyglock
07-05-2012, 23:49
Strangers offering to clean your house for free is a red flag right there. Jot down their plates and a good description of them and their vehicle in case you need it.


about 10 years ago i was a kirby salesman and that is exactly how we did it. we would offer to clean one room while we demonstrate the equipment. however we mostly worked off referrals and appointments were booked by phone. what happens when u run out? u gotta get more referrals and the best way is door to door.

as a side note:
they were great machines and cleaned really well and we are talking 10 yrs back so im sure they are better now. however even though i sold them i would never buy one for the price they went for especially knowing that there was a 400% mark up on them. they were still pretty cool though, i mean have u seen a vac that paints walls?