colt 1991 compact trigger & safety [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : colt 1991 compact trigger & safety


bandit99
06-28-2012, 10:43
I want to replace my Colt compact's plastic factory trigger with a Harrison Design trigger. What length is the factory trigger? Harrison offers short, medium, and long. I would like to keep the same length. I don't think its a short trigger.

I would also like to swap out the ambi safety. I've got one right now that has the tab that slides under the right grip panel. My Kimber full size has an ambi safety that does not have the tab and uses a modified hammer pin. It feels like it engages much better than the one on my Colt. Wilson has a similar model for triple the price of the Kimber and Caspian has one that looks like it uses the modified hammer pin but still has the grip tab. I am a lefty. Is the Wilson worth the price difference?

mr_fender
06-29-2012, 19:38
Stock trigger looks like long length to me.

The feel of the thumb safety click is determined mostly by the plunger spring tension and the shape of the front of the left side safety which the plunger rides against. If the spring is weak or the point of the safety cam is too rounded, it will not have a positive click on or off. A good gunsmith can reshape it for you to improve the feel.

ca survivor
07-02-2012, 07:10
"left side safety"

bandit99
07-02-2012, 07:31
"left side safety"

Would you elaborate? Are you suggesting to ditch the ambi safety and use the standard one?

fnfalman
07-02-2012, 10:09
Would you elaborate? Are you suggesting to ditch the ambi safety and use the standard one?

I've seen some lefties who can flick the left side thumb safety lever off as quick as anybody while using their thumbs to cross over.

mr_fender
07-02-2012, 11:26
"left side safety"

Good eye. I meant the cam on the left side safety. I'll edit my original post.

mr_fender
07-02-2012, 11:36
I also would leave installing a thumb safety to a gunsmith unless you know exactly what you are doing. The thumb safety has to be very carefully fit to the sear so that there is absolutely no sear movement when the safety is engaged no matter how hard you squeeze the trigger. If you carry condition one (cocked and locked) there is absolutely no margin for error on a 1911 safety.

Veedubklown
07-02-2012, 11:37
I've seen some lefties who can flick the left side thumb safety lever off as quick as anybody while using their thumbs to cross over.

I tried to get used to that, and man it was a beast. Trying to throw your thumb around the beaver-tail after flicking it off is a killer when your on the buzzer (IDPA). I've seen guys do it, but... why? To each their own.

I have the kymber safety, and I got mine in blue, because my pistol is mostly blue/black, so I'd fit it, cold blue it, and call it a day... no. Their part is not made of stainless steel, it is not made of steel at all, it's zinc. Pot metal. MIM. Now, this isn't a structual piece, all it does is prevent hammer/sear travel, and give a place for your grip safety to hang off of, but it won't take a blue. If you get the kymber peice (It IS nice, it really is), get it in stainless. I had the same question about the kymber vs the wilson safeties, but the HUGE price difference made that choice for me.

1911Tuner
07-02-2012, 11:53
If you carry condition one (cocked and locked) there is absolutely no margin for error on a 1911

Sure there is...as long as the hammer hooks aren't shortened and squared with a heavy escape angle on the sear. US Army Ordnance specs allowed for .005 inch of sear movement. Who places the pistol in Condition One and starts yankin' on the trigger?

Cut the hooks square and to .018 or .020 long and make an escape cut on the sear, and all bets are off. Then the safety needs to be precisely fitted.

Truthfully, the pistol can be carried in Condition Zero. Just don't grip the pistol and pull the trigger. In the holster, the grip safety still blocks the trigger and the half-cock will still grab the sear if the hooks shear off...which is unlikely...or the sear suddenly turns to powder, in which case the gun will fire regardless of which position the safety is in.


The "locked" part of cocked and locked refers to the slide...not the hammer. The safety will not block the hammer if the sear disintegrates...which won't happen because the sear isn't that fragile.

The thumb safety wasn't added for cocked and locked carry anyway. It was added on request by the US Cavalry for temporary reholstering when a mounted trooper found himself hanging onto a frightened horse, and had need to jam it back into the holster in a hurry and free up both hands...with the assumption that he would then reacquire it and carry on with the fight. Even in those days, the guys realized that man under stress may forget to get his finger off the trigger before reholstering...something that Gaston either failed to consider or chose to ignore.

Fitting a safety isn't all that complicated. It requires a little patience, and a "Cut and Try" approach...but assembling the pistol without the grip safety lets the installer see exactly where to cut and how much material needs to be removed.

1911Tuner
07-02-2012, 11:55
I tried to get used to that, and man it was a beast. Trying to throw your thumb around the beaver-tail after flicking it off is a killer when your on the buzzer

The best way is to wipe the safety off with the index finger just as the hand finds the gun and starts the draw. This does mean that the pistol is in Condition Zero during the draw, but minding the trigger puller's proximity to the loud button until the muzzle is forward of your feet will make it uneventful. I've watched a few competitors holster their pistols before a weak-hand stage in Condition Zero. Practice.

Of course, you could always revert back to Browning's true intent, and use the half-cock as a safety...and finish cocking it in the holster as your hand finds the grip. With a little practice, it's not all that slow.

bandit99
07-02-2012, 12:26
I'm going to take the pistol to a gunsmith for the install. I'm ordering a few parts here and there and plan on having them installed together. I just received the EGW recoil setup along with their carry bushing. I'm also going to get the Harrison solid trigger along with their rear sight and will probably end up with the Wilson safety whenever it gets back in stock.

ca survivor
07-02-2012, 13:53
I've seen some lefties who can flick the left side thumb safety lever off as quick as anybody while using their thumbs to cross over.
no sorry I was referring to the first poster who said the plunger been in the right side.

mr_fender
07-02-2012, 17:28
You are absolutely correct 1911Tuner. I can be done easily, if you know what you are doing. I was merely suggesting a gunsmith to be on the safe side for a carry piece. Not so much for safety against an accidental/negligent discharge but rather to prevent the possibility of the hammer falling to half cock on a carry weapon. Could be a bad thing if you quickly draw on a threat only to find your firearm is not fully cocked. If you are expecting condition one, it needs to reliably stay that way.