How do you carry your revolver? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Cam83
07-01-2012, 10:50
Do any of you all carry on a empty chamber?

Do you think it's necessary with modern revolvers?

If you have a 5 shot j-frame and you're carrying on a empty chamber you only have four rounds in the gun.

Yes, I do realize it shouldn't take more than one but I feel better with the gun loaded to capacity.

Just wondering what some of your all's thoughts were on the subject.

janice6
07-01-2012, 10:53
I have every round I can carry, ready for use. (.357 Magnum 6 rounds)

I have never been able to see how reaction can be better then action.

To each his own.

I need all the advantage I can get. Time is my most important advantage.

I don't pull the trigger if I don't want to shoot a gun.

hogship
07-01-2012, 10:54
No, and no!

Load it up with five rounds........unless it's an antique.

ooc

El_Ron1
07-01-2012, 10:57
Oh my.

Sgt127
07-01-2012, 11:01
As a general rule, any quality DA American revolver built after WWII is safe to carry with a round under the hammer.

Since you mention a J frame, if it has a model number stamped on the frame, where the crane closes the cylinder, it is unquestionably safe if it has not been tampered with.

CourtCop
07-01-2012, 11:03
Wait... What?

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Darkangel1846
07-01-2012, 11:09
I always carry with all chambers loaded, in a holster, in pocket or on the hip.

Cam83
07-01-2012, 11:47
Just a thought.

For as long as I can remember anyone in my family carried with the hammer on an empty chamber.

Probably just a habit from the old days when there could have been a few incidents.

smokeross
07-01-2012, 12:06
If I am packing a revolver without the transfer bar safety, and want all chambers loaded, I simply turn the cylinder so the hammer rests between chambers. Like when I have an old Colt .45 on my hip in bear country.

fnfalman
07-01-2012, 12:11
I carry a Benjamin in the fifth charge hole for just in case.

carbuncle
07-01-2012, 12:19
I don't always carry a revolver, but when I do I carry fully loaded.

dcc12
07-01-2012, 12:54
S&W M60 CT grips, big dot tritium every hole filled with 357 silvertip. in a holster; right front pocket.

Metal Angel
07-01-2012, 13:08
I carry a Benjamin in the fifth charge hole for just in case.

:rofl:

OP, if your revolver has the proper safety for carrying with all holes hot (it most likely does) then carry with all of them hot. It might, and probably will, take more than one shot to put down a threat. You want as many shots as you can.

ronin.45
07-01-2012, 14:26
I carry fully loaded. Even if I was carrying an old gun, I'd still top it up.

Bruce M
07-01-2012, 14:34
I carry a Benjamin in the fifth charge hole for just in case.:rofl::rofl:

I carry a couple Benjamins and a fifth...

I don't always carry a revolver, but when I do I carry fully loaded.

I don't always drink beer, but when I do it's a Trappist fifth.

L Pete
07-01-2012, 14:36
Cam83,...where have you been all these years? Is your real name Rip Van Winkle?

All modern revolvers can be carried fully loaded, whether five or six rounds. Fill all....repeat "all" charge holes in the cylinder, unless you carry something made before 1945.

They're all meant to be carried with a fully charged cylinder these days, and hopefully, they're at least +P rated.

Bruce M
07-01-2012, 14:37
Just a thought.

For as long as I can remember anyone in my family carried with the hammer on an empty chamber.

Probably just a habit from the old days when there could have been a few incidents.


There was a time when that was an excellent idea. Most likely any double action revolver you would carry can be safely carried with a round in each chamber. If the revovler is old enough to need an empty chamber it may be valuable enough such that you might want to reconsider carrying it.

Berto
07-01-2012, 14:48
Unless it's a SAA design or turn of the 20th century DA without the hammer block or transfer bar, you're safe to load all chambers. No good reason not to.

Quiet
07-01-2012, 14:57
I don't always carry a revolver, but when I do I carry fully loaded.

+1 :supergrin:

collim1
07-01-2012, 17:52
Unless its a reproduction of a classic revolver and the manual states not to carry on a loaded chamber I would carry it fully loaded.

I remember a thread several years ago about a guy that shot himself in the leg with a holstered SAA reproduction after the hammer snagged and fell with just enough force to ignite the primer.

Cam83
07-01-2012, 19:46
I guess I have been under a rock lol or maybe I'm just old school.

Never the less thank you for the humor and information guys.

gunowner1
07-01-2012, 20:55
Carry my 65-3 fully loaded no matter what. I don't understand why some folks carry with the hammer on an empty chamber.

cowboy1964
07-01-2012, 21:59
Full and in a holster.

No worries.

USSOCOM
07-02-2012, 20:07
No, and no!

Load it up with five rounds........unless it's an antique.

ooc


Yep, what he said. :whistling:

porschedog
07-02-2012, 20:11
J frame? Five beans, please.

CajunBass
07-03-2012, 00:56
I.m much too lazy to hunt for a D/A revolver that isn't safe to carry fully loaded to worry about it.

barth
07-03-2012, 01:11
If your carry revolver looks like this antique, you might want to leave a chamber empty.
https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/ballistic-basics-cover.jpg
https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/ccm-columns/ballistic-basics/five-beans-in-the-wheel/
“Is this thing safe to carry fully loaded?”
I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard that question asked about a perfectly normal, newly-manufactured revolver that is obviously not a copy of something that was originally carried on the mean streets of Dodge City. The answer, of course, is almost certainly “Yes,” but why is the question so common?

Well, because the answer wasn’t always “Yes.” The first commercially-available revolvers, back in the mid-1800s, were “cap-‘n’-ball” guns, each chamber hand-loaded with a ball, powder and a separate percussion cap. While the hammer could be lowered between chambers, this wasn’t positively safe unless the gun was carried in a flap holster; safer still was to lower the hammer on a chamber without a percussion cap fitted.

Meanwhile, as far back as the 1890s, Iver Johnson was using a device called a transfer bar that worked as a sort of hammer block in reverse…

The earliest cartridge revolvers also had hammers that caused their firing pins to actually rest on the primer when they were lowered. A sharp enough blow to the hammer could cause loud noises and unwanted holes at unexpected times unless the chamber underneath it was empty.

In the later 19th Century, Smith & Wesson started using a “rebounding hammer” on their top-break revolvers. Unless the trigger was held fully to the rear, a spring and metal block pulled the hammer back so that the firing pin did not contact the primer and the revolver could be carried fully loaded. In the early 1900s, Colt went one better on their double-action revolvers and introduced a hammer block, a sliding metal bar that prevented the firing pin from being able to reach the cartridge unless the trigger was all the way back. During World War II, S&W copied the feature on their revolvers and has used it ever since.

Meanwhile, as far back as the 1890s, Iver Johnson was using a device called a transfer bar that worked as a sort of hammer block in reverse: When the bar was raised, the hammer hit the bar and the bar hit the firing pin. Unless the trigger was pulled there was no way for the hammer to even reach the firing pin. You could “hammer the hammer,” as their ads crowed, and the gun wouldn’t fire. Ruger uses this same system in their double action revolvers, as well as all New Model single actions made after 1973.

In short, if the revolver in question is a double-action revolver made in the last 60 years it almost certainly has two safety devices to prevent the firing pin from contacting the primer unless the trigger is held fully to the rear.

(Prior to 1973, Ruger single action revolvers were more faithful to their cowboy roots, in that they could fire if the hammer was struck a blow with a round in the chamber, but a couple of high profile accidents caused them to switch to the transfer bar system and the older “three screw” single-action Rugers are now collector’s items.)

In short, if the revolver in question is a double-action revolver made in the last 60 years it almost certainly has two safety devices to prevent the firing pin from contacting the primer unless the trigger is held fully to the rear. If it was made any time in the 20th century it has at least one. “Five beans in the wheel” is for antiques and their copies.