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20South
07-05-2012, 21:16
and what did we learn in this house?

The ugly (not catastrophic but very frustrating)

1) young kids lose flashlights assigned to them.
2) young kids leave battery powered lanterns/fans running when they shouldn't
3) My house is not setup for moving air through it naturally
4) It did not take long for the temperature inside the house to hit 89 degrees.
5) Cell service was spotty and at times left us unable to communicate outside of our own 2 way radios (Big hole)
6) My neighbors were largely unprepared for anything - most vacated leaving their homes in a precarious state.
7) Cash. We had it and many of our neighbors didnt. I had heard many of the local stores opened up and were letting one person at a time in with cash only sales. Had we needed something and not had cash, we would have been forced to barter at a disadvantage or drive 20+ miles to an area with an ATM and power.


The good/bad
- The generator did its job, but not having a generator big enough to run our A/C was an issue. It was put in and setup for the cold winter outages. Looking to re-order some finances
- All of the solar rechargers were great. Need to get a few more so every member of my family has one.
- Water was not an issue, we didnt lose it nor tap into supplies
- Seafoam brought new life to a 5 gallon can of gas I forgot to put Stabil in a year ago. I don't know the shelf life of it, but I will have more of that in the future. Seriously good trade potential.
- Sleeping with my pistol plus having my headlamp loosely around my neck became 2nd nature in a hurry.
- Food - Not having to get involved in the panic at our local stores the next day was tremendous. Instead we leisurely strolled down after about day 4 when most peoples power had begun to be restored and an experience like any other day shopping.

In any case, it was eye opening to be in this kind of heat without power for nearly an entire week. While there are things that I will change going forward, we were in a good position had we been forced to continue living this way. Many thanks to all of you out here for the sage advice and sharing of your experiences.

GLOCK17DB9
07-05-2012, 21:27
I hope all the lessons learned will be remembered for the next outage! Good luck:wavey:

smokeross
07-05-2012, 21:57
Yeah. Try it at 25 below 20 miles from town. I am always amazed at how unprepared the masses are. Sounds like you and your family had things pretty much in order. Way to go.

kirgi08
07-05-2012, 22:19
:cool:

Redheadhunter21
07-05-2012, 22:28
6 days is a breeze it's day 10 that most people lose it, glad you did alright though

20South
07-05-2012, 22:31
6 days is a breeze it's day 10 that most people lose it, glad you did alright though

I guess I could see that. It was originally supposed to go out 10 days, but I am not complaining about not having the opportunity to go that long.

RMTactical
07-06-2012, 00:40
6 days is a breeze it's day 10 that most people lose it, glad you did alright though

6 days is good for a trial run, still gave him real world experience.

20South, thanks for the report. Glad things are getting back to normal.

Stevekozak
07-06-2012, 05:18
Good report! Good on ya for being prepared!

Bushflyr
07-06-2012, 11:15
- The generator did its job, but not having a generator big enough to run our A/C was an issue. It was put in and setup for the cold winter outages. Looking to re-order some finances

Good lesson and thanks for the report.

However, the above comment caught my eye. Really, you DO NOT want to be setting up your generator to run your A/C. You're going to wind up with a huge gen and huge fuel consumption.

I would maybe consider it if you regularly lost power for a week at a time 3-5 times a summer, but for emergency type use I would highly recommend getting a couple good fans. Much cheaper and more useful.

Haldor
07-06-2012, 12:33
Good lesson and thanks for the report.

However, the above comment caught my eye. Really, you DO NOT want to be setting up your generator to run your A/C. You're going to wind up with a huge gen and huge fuel consumption.

I would maybe consider it if you regularly lost power for a week at a time 3-5 times a summer, but for emergency type use I would highly recommend getting a couple good fans. Much cheaper and more useful.

And investigate have a whole house fan installed instead. Being able to exhaust the hot air from the house makes the difference between uncomfortable and unbearable.

quake
07-06-2012, 12:58
...for emergency type use I would highly recommend getting a couple good fans. Much cheaper and more useful.

And investigate have a whole house fan installed instead. Being able to exhaust the hot air from the house makes the difference between uncomfortable and unbearable.

+1 on these ideas, plus a couple others. A soaker hose or sprinkler on the roof can make a huge difference in house temperature if you have the water to run them. Also might consider a simple, removeable window a/c unit for emergency use. They can be had down to 500-600 watts & up and might be worth looking at.

pugman
07-06-2012, 13:07
Just an idea on the flashlight thing..

My brother went through some similar with his six year old daughter...the solution: light sticks.

Obviously they are not as bright and compared to the cost of a set of batteries are more expensive. This said, daughter misplaces a lightstick - no big deal. There is nothing to leave on as it will eventually die. When he was without power for a few days but wanted to go outside to run around (he was there with her) - just connect it to her via a belt, necklace, etc.

And to a six year old they are waaayy cooler

I would maybe consider it if you regularly lost power for a week at a time 3-5 times a summer, but for emergency type use I would highly recommend getting a couple good fans. Much cheaper and more useful.

While this is sound advice; I see you are in Washington. Wisconsin hit a record yesterday....as in the hottest temperature ever recorded in Milwaukee at a 115; there is literally no wind or what does blow feels like a hair dryer.

A couple of fans won't do it....not here...not now. Thankfully we are supposed to cool way down to the upper 90's by the weekend.

racerford
07-06-2012, 13:38
Good lesson and thanks for the report.

However, the above comment caught my eye. Really, you DO NOT want to be setting up your generator to run your A/C. You're going to wind up with a huge gen and huge fuel consumption.
.......

You are comparing the cust of running a generator to have AC versus the cost of running it on normal power. Yes it is much higher. Or maybe the cost of running fans.

I compare it to having to go stay in a hotel out of the area. I compare it with the cost of the running the generator with the comfort of my familiy and getting to secure my home.

KKnow if you don't have the money the bank or in an emergency fund.... well you do what you have to.

At my house we have a standby generator that runs key circuits (septic, firg freezers, microwave, some lights and one of the airconditioners). It has saved me from staying in a hotel several times. It was really helpful when our children were babies, even if only for peace of mind.

Everyone's mileage varies.

20South
07-06-2012, 13:47
Just an idea on the flashlight thing..

My brother went through some similar with his six year old daughter...the solution: light sticks.

Obviously they are not as bright and compared to the cost of a set of batteries are more expensive. This said, daughter misplaces a lightstick - no big deal. There is nothing to leave on as it will eventually die. When he was without power for a few days but wanted to go outside to run around (he was there with her) - just connect it to her via a belt, necklace, etc.

And to a six year old they are waaayy cooler


This is a great idea. We always have them around Halloween and they do generate enough light to get the kids around the house. I wont let them out on our dark streets unattended anyway. Thanks!

20South
07-06-2012, 13:50
+1 on these ideas, plus a couple others. A soaker hose or sprinkler on the roof can make a huge difference in house temperature if you have the water to run them. Also might consider a simple, removeable window a/c unit for emergency use. They can be had down to 500-600 watts & up and might be worth looking at.

I went to look for a small window unit, but apparently most people had the same idea as I had. I will wait until the fall when they go on clearance now and pick one up for next year. I really like the idea of soaking the roof too. Our roof is metal so I would assume it to go a long way towards cooling if I could continuously move water across it. Ive never looked into it.

20South
07-06-2012, 13:52
And investigate have a whole house fan installed instead. Being able to exhaust the hot air from the house makes the difference between uncomfortable and unbearable.

We have a fan that circs the air continuously through the house which is on one of the emergency power circuits. However, our house is 126 years old and insulates like a greenhouse for the most part. Eventually it does start feeling like a hair dryer.

kirgi08
07-06-2012, 14:09
I went to look for a small window unit, but apparently most people had the same idea as I had. I will wait until the fall when they go on clearance now and pick one up for next year. I really like the idea of soaking the roof too. Our roof is metal so I would assume it to go a long way towards cooling if I could continuously move water across it. Ive never looked into it.

Set up a rain barrel system ta help reuse the water/rainwater they may catch.You'll havta decide between potable and non for it's use.'08.

garyo
07-06-2012, 14:55
All the speculation and talk about what could possibly happen, deeply pales to a good report like this. Thanks for taking the time to write down your thoughts, it is very much appreciated!

AK_Stick
07-06-2012, 15:45
Good lesson and thanks for the report.

However, the above comment caught my eye. Really, you DO NOT want to be setting up your generator to run your A/C. You're going to wind up with a huge gen and huge fuel consumption.

I would maybe consider it if you regularly lost power for a week at a time 3-5 times a summer, but for emergency type use I would highly recommend getting a couple good fans. Much cheaper and more useful.



Really depends upon the size of generator you need, and the type of generator.

A good quality diesel, or NG generator will use less gas than some of the larger gas powered generators, and provide more power.

RWBlue
07-06-2012, 16:40
3) My house is not setup for moving air through it naturally
4) It did not take long for the temperature inside the house to hit 89 degrees.
5) Cell service was spotty and at times left us unable to communicate outside of our own 2 way radios (Big hole)
6) My neighbors were largely unprepared for anything - most vacated leaving their homes in a precarious state.
7) Cash. We had it and many of our neighbors didnt. I had heard many of the local stores opened up and were letting one person at a time in with cash only sales. Had we needed something and not had cash, we would have been forced to barter at a disadvantage or drive 20+ miles to an area with an ATM and power.

.

I was in a house that lost power.
3) Most houses are not setup to move air.
4) Opening up the windows at night helped, but not having power for a fan ment is didn't help much.
5) Cell service was a big hit and miss. I think we lost a tower the night of the storm because the area normally had bad signal had none. I considered pulling out the ham radio, but didn't have anyone I really wanted to talk with locally. In a real SHTF, I would want to have the HAM listing to traffic and FM radio.
6) Some neighborhoods are different. The one I was in had generators running all night. The house I was in had a generator, but it died sometime on Saturday.
7) Cash. I didn't need any. I didn't use any. But I had it and was happy I did.

The house I was in had a generator large enough to run the AC. It really wasn't that big. IMHO, I suggest getting the generator big enough for the house, but only run the AC if needed.

I have a solar charger on order. I was unhappy when I had to leave to power up some devices. I will get a larger panel to charge the large computer later on.

Water wasn't an issue until a day after the power came on. Then it was off for 15 hours. I am using my bottles so I don't have to boil. I will refill the same 2 liter bottles for the next time.

No issues with fuel. The tank was full to start with and I need to refuel sometime next week.

I sleep with a gun with light next to me. No change. My eyes get use to the dark. I can ID an issue with no problems.

I had access to a grill and had just purchased a pile of food. I will continue to eat my grilled food for the next week.

I also used my work site as a backup facility. They have freezers, ice machine, showers, full sized backup generator, ..... There are good things about working for who I work for.

auto-5
07-06-2012, 17:28
Get a window unit that you can use to cool one room and run on your generator. BTW got my power back monday.

mac66
07-06-2012, 18:23
Dodged a bullet this time but many in my area are still without power since Monday.

When we had the big outage in 2003 I learned a few things, and have applied them a few times since.

1. Light is very comforting. Sitting around in the dark without it is depressing.

2. Even a little light is enough to light a room for most things. Once your eyes get used to the low light it you really don't need much more light.

Our forefathers used candles and lanterns which were good enough. However, candles and/or lanterns heat up a room pretty fast in the summer. I found small LED lanterns work well and last a long time. In addition, I hang a couple chem-lights in the stairwells and bathrooms to provide ambient light. Pretty easy to walk around without flashlights if there is even just a little light.

3. Generator-I have mine hooked to a circuit in the house that includes the sump pump, refrigerator, and one light circuit. I do not have it hooked to the AC and I only ran it 20 minutes out of every two hours. That was enough to keep the refrigerator cold.

4. Cooling-I have a basement and as such can draw air in through it while exhausting the air with a fan out an upstairs window. Drawing air into the basement cools it as it moves. Close all other windows except one in the basement and one upstairs and you get a pretty good draft going. Here's a clue, don't use a fan to draw air in, use the fan to push the hot air out and it will automatically draw air in.

If you don't have a basement there are a number of other ways to cool the air entering the house. Look up natural cooling techniques. Our fore fathers knew how to live in hot weather long before AC was invented.

There are a lot more things but most are pretty common sense things.

Warp
07-06-2012, 22:40
On the topic of A/C...I think a portable unit you can run with your generator would be pretty good. Just run it in one room (bedroom). We have a portable unit for our bonus room. It works outstandingly well. I hope to get a generator that can handle it, as well as fridge/freezer (even if not at the same time).

Houses do get hot fast. Our A/C went out not long ago and, just as the OP said, the house got up to 89* very quickly. (less than a day in my case) Fans would absolutely not cut it, especially if children were involved.

Good AAR

cowboywannabe
07-06-2012, 23:31
if the amish can do it all their life then damn it i can for a week.

G29Reload
07-07-2012, 00:15
I'm in N VA and supposedly a million people in my area were without at some point.

Mine went out Fri night at 10p and was on at 9 the next morning.

That was quick, based on what I've heard.

One possible reason?

Don't wait to call it in. I'm on the west end of Loudoun and the storms came in from the west and north. It's possible mine was fixed so quickly because they may repair in the order they're called in.

I picked up the cell phone the minute power went out.

The recording said, stand by while we analyze circuits in your area. I guess they have a way to detect certain outages by area. The recording then responded that none had been reported and asked if I wanted to complete the report, I responded yes.

The power coming on Sat AM saved the weekend.

So, do not assume because the power is out that someone else will call it in, or that the power company must know about it. Once you're sure its not a blink out, say its out more than 30 seconds, DIAL!

Put them on speed dial if you have to.

Next item: Portable propane fridge. I have a Dometic 4000 portable.

http://www.bensdiscountsupply.com/dometicdrc40003-wayportablerefrigerator.aspx

Only thing is, it takes several hours to ramp up the chill.
It helps to plug it in on AC when storm season starts. When the power goes out, unplug it and switch to propane. It will stay cold half a day until you do so there's some slack if you come home from work to find the power has been out for awhile. Runs on 1lb Coleman / Bernzomatic cylinders and there are adaptors for 20lb BBQ bottles.
A 1lb cylinder will run the thing for 2-3 days! You can get a 2-pack of 1lb'ers for 5 bucks at WM.

Mine's on AC now and stocked with essentials (Beer!)

For running a table lamp, spinning the coffee grinder, charging a cellphone, powering a laptop, I have this:

http://www.donrowe.com/inverters/xp_powersource_400.html

Basically a big UPS with waaay more amphours available then the ones you find in Staples to run a PC on.

It will run a table lamp in the LR for 4 hours a night for 3-4 nights if necessary. Waay easier than going out in the garage to run a generator, and it covers 90% of what I need for power outages under 48 hours except for the well or TV watching.

cowboywannabe
07-07-2012, 00:25
i use to live in Loudoun and Prince Williams counties. just go to the casino in Charles Town and have fun instead of sitting around being miserable.....

G29Reload
07-07-2012, 00:32
Not when you have stuff to do!

For that matter, I don't know if the casino even had power. They may have, but apparently WV had most of the outages in this past storm. Got hit bad. Even if the casinos were open, so many gas stations were without power that the few that did have it were guarded by cops. Coulda been really ugly. I'd rather stay home and keep an eye on things.

eyelikeglasses
07-07-2012, 01:00
As far as A/C goes, try a swamp cooler. They are all over Afghanistan, despite they don't have many swamps. My layman's view of the contraption is as simple as water misting in a shaded area. I don't know the science, cause I was just a soldier, but it worked. I know amusement parks have the same thing.

TangoFoxtrot
07-07-2012, 05:50
and what did we learn in this house?

The ugly (not catastrophic but very frustrating)

1) young kids lose flashlights assigned to them.
2) young kids leave battery powered lanterns/fans running when they shouldn't
3) My house is not setup for moving air through it naturally
4) It did not take long for the temperature inside the house to hit 89 degrees.
5) Cell service was spotty and at times left us unable to communicate outside of our own 2 way radios (Big hole)
6) My neighbors were largely unprepared for anything - most vacated leaving their homes in a precarious state.
7) Cash. We had it and many of our neighbors didnt. I had heard many of the local stores opened up and were letting one person at a time in with cash only sales. Had we needed something and not had cash, we would have been forced to barter at a disadvantage or drive 20+ miles to an area with an ATM and power.


The good/bad
- The generator did its job, but not having a generator big enough to run our A/C was an issue. It was put in and setup for the cold winter outages. Looking to re-order some finances
- All of the solar rechargers were great. Need to get a few more so every member of my family has one.
- Water was not an issue, we didnt lose it nor tap into supplies
- Seafoam brought new life to a 5 gallon can of gas I forgot to put Stabil in a year ago. I don't know the shelf life of it, but I will have more of that in the future. Seriously good trade potential.
- Sleeping with my pistol plus having my headlamp loosely around my neck became 2nd nature in a hurry.
- Food - Not having to get involved in the panic at our local stores the next day was tremendous. Instead we leisurely strolled down after about day 4 when most peoples power had begun to be restored and an experience like any other day shopping.

In any case, it was eye opening to be in this kind of heat without power for nearly an entire week. While there are things that I will change going forward, we were in a good position had we been forced to continue living this way. Many thanks to all of you out here for the sage advice and sharing of your experiences.

Good unscheduled training, now it has taught you some things to improve on. Glad all went well. Last September my wife and I were in sort of the same situation and we learned some lessions as well.

G21FAN
07-07-2012, 08:10
As far as A/C goes, try a swamp cooler. They are all over Afghanistan, despite they don't have many swamps. My layman's view of the contraption is as simple as water misting in a shaded area. I don't know the science, cause I was just a soldier, but it worked. I know amusement parks have the same thing.


Swamp coolers dont work as well in a humid enviroment. Helps some, but not like a hot low humid area.

mac66
07-07-2012, 14:52
Here is a link to some passive cooling ideas. Some have been mentioned here.

The point is that if SHTF for a long period of time you can't store enough gas to run the AC forever. It might be a good idea to start doing some passive cooling techniques. If nothing else it will reduce power consumption in the summer even if you use your AC all the time.

Warp
07-07-2012, 16:59
Link?

Lone Kimono
07-07-2012, 18:58
Didn't the Egyptians do something like wetting their drapes to cool things off?

kat1950
07-07-2012, 20:08
I feel for you people up there, you just got a good lesson on what it is like to live in Florida, we have thunderstorms every day in summer in Orlando, when the east coast sea breeze meets the west coast sea breeze early evening, winds kick up from 20 mph to 60 mph, an inch of rain and humidity goes from 70 per cent to 90 per cent, right now its 10:00 pm, not running A.C. 84 degrees outside 78 per cent humidity, house temp is 88 but running 10 ceiling fans and all windows open, go through this from May to Oct, having lived here for my entire life I'm used to the heat, its the mosquitoes buzzing around prior to there feeding frenzy that kill me.

My heart goes out to you people up there, just thank god it is not a way of life.

Cavalry Doc
07-07-2012, 20:16
and what did we learn in this house?

The ugly (not catastrophic but very frustrating)

1) young kids lose flashlights assigned to them.
...


Not a comment on the kids, just what we called them in the Army. Dummy cords. Little bit of 550 cord, about 2.5 feet, tie one end to a flashlight, the other to a belt loop. Wrap the cord around the light and stick it in their pocket. Works good for some adults too, depending on how hard you are going to be moving.

UneasyRider
07-07-2012, 21:03
+1 on these ideas, plus a couple others. A soaker hose or sprinkler on the roof can make a huge difference in house temperature if you have the water to run them. Also might consider a simple, removeable window a/c unit for emergency use. They can be had down to 500-600 watts & up and might be worth looking at.

This is what I have at home for hurricanes, a small window shaker and a 7K generator that can run the important stuff.

I also have a summer tent with a king size inflatable bed and a heat shielding tarp to block the sun. It gets really hot in the house.

UneasyRider
07-07-2012, 21:15
Love your post! Nothing compares with a "Real Life Experience" like yours. We get it here in Florida quite a bit and it pays off, when the power goes out you hear a hundred generators start running. Unfortunatley nobody plans much past A/C and batteries... we all have guns down here so you can't count that as a prep.:supergrin:

Tim808
07-08-2012, 00:36
Someone mentioned that calling in the outage quickly may bring your power back on more quickly.

It may, but not likely.

Power companies will generally try to re-energize circuits to critical areas (military bases, hospitals, polices stations, etc) & large customers (shopping centers, big high rises, business buildings, etc)

They only have so much manpower & will need to use it efficiently. If your out in the sticks, you will probably have to wait a little longer. They generally start at the main trunk and continue out to the branches.

Whenever there is an outage in my area, the Walmart is always energized before my neighborhood.

UneasyRider
07-08-2012, 05:52
Someone mentioned that calling in the outage quickly may bring your power back on more quickly.

It may, but not likely.

Power companies will generally try to re-energize circuits to critical areas (military bases, hospitals, polices stations, etc) & large customers (shopping centers, big high rises, business buildings, etc)

They only have so much manpower & will need to use it efficiently. If your out in the sticks, you will probably have to wait a little longer. They generally start at the main trunk and continue out to the branches.

Whenever there is an outage in my area, the Walmart is always energized before my neighborhood.

In Florida they have a defined list starting with government services, hospitals, shelters, food stores, gas stations, on down. We are lucky when Jeb Bush was governor we got some really good planning and most of our food stores, gas stations and major highway intersections have big diesel generators that can run them. We also have plans to reverse the direction of our highways to a single direction (this does not happen without a plan) and the immediate distribution of fuel from our ports into tanker trucks. Every time they just get better at it.

Big Bird
07-08-2012, 06:25
Amish folks go to the basement when it gets hot like this...

No problemo...

TangoFoxtrot
07-08-2012, 06:28
I know if anything major happened here in Luzerne county a lot of people are going to die. The county is not only corrupt but has weak leadership. Its every man for himself. God help us all!

Cavalry Doc
07-08-2012, 06:30
Amish folks go to the basement when it gets hot like this...

No problemo...

Problemo. No basement. Most homes in the middle of Texas don't have them.

But that's what we did in Germany in 2003. Temps around 105, no AC, not even in the Clinic. The smart ones cleaned out the basement storage rooms and stayed there.

mac66
07-08-2012, 07:07
Here is the link about passive cooling ideas...

http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Cooling/passive_cooling.htm

squirreld
07-08-2012, 09:31
Lots of good ideas here.
Its nice reading other peoples real world experience.

I would like to add 2 snippets.

1. Don't fill a generator's fuel tank up to the top when the gas you are pouring in came from a cooler temp than the gas that is in the generators tank. The gas heats up and then overflows back out the gas cap. :shocked:
Yeah, you wanna talk about an oh **** moment.

2. Good quality diesel gensets, 1800 rpm, burn through roughly HALF the amount a fuel and generate twice the power of 3600 rpm gasoline generator. The downs side, the diesel genny's can be $$$.

If your looking at a $3000 plus dollar gasoline generator, you may want to look into a diesel alternative.

RWBlue
07-08-2012, 10:23
Here is the link about passive cooling ideas...

http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Cooling/passive_cooling.htm

Very interesting link

edcrosbys
07-08-2012, 10:51
1) young kids lose flashlights assigned to them.
2) young kids leave battery powered lanterns/fans running when they shouldn't


We use these lights for the kids. They are always on the charger and light up instantly when power goes off. We're run them for almost 2 days and not had them die.
http://www.oxo.com/p-967-tooli-top.aspx




3) My house is not setup for moving air through it naturally
4) It did not take long for the temperature inside the house to hit 89 degrees.
- The generator did its job, but not having a generator big enough to run our A/C was an issue.


We're looking at doing the same thing now! 100+ temps this outage were tough. The basement made it livable though!

6) My neighbors were largely unprepared for anything - most vacated leaving their homes in a precarious state.

A few houses down was robbed when they vacated!

Warp
07-08-2012, 12:23
A few houses down was robbed when they vacated!

Robbery requires threat or use of force. If they had already vacated they most certainly were not robbed.

Were they burglarized? Stolen from?

edcrosbys
07-08-2012, 16:07
Robbery requires threat or use of force. If they had already vacated they most certainly were not robbed.

Were they burglarized? Stolen from?

Thanks for the edification.

I was told someone "went in" through a side door and "took some jewelry". I'll leave it to those more knowledgeable and caring to determine the correct verbiage.

FireForged
07-10-2012, 09:04
Our city of 200,000 was dark for 8 straight days last year with only a few Gov facilities having gen power. Yep, there was a Gov imposed cerfew, yep there was looting and a couple citizen (justified) SD shootings, yep there was some disorder at gas stations and groceries while supplies were exhausted, yep, people violated curfew and were arrested others just roamed the streets of my neighborhood doing who knows what. I didnt sleep well that week.

My FAILURES:

GAS: Caught on quarter of a tank of fuel, gas stations ran out in hours. I drove a estimated 40miles for gas (outside) our city and found that the very first gas station with fuel was overun with people. I had no choice but to wait it out in long lines full of disorder and chaos. I will tip my hat to 4 humongus country boys who decided to make some order.

Com: I had to listen to local updates on a cheesey am/fm radio that didnt pick up well. A mom-pop diner less than 3 miles from me had gen power and was serving hot meals and I had no idea hahahah!

Frozen goods: $500 worth of spoiled supplies with no way to keep them cold for 8 days.


Community: no sense of community, I never saw another neighbor except for brief passing moments.

Good stuff: Dozens of local churches set up food, water and general aid banks throughout the city. Police/EMS/Fire were on full turn out with no offdays. Churches grilled meat that was donated from Groceries and delivered them to food banks and emergency responders.


My fixes: I said it before and didnt follow my own advice... NEVER go lower than half a tank of gas. I now have a extra 25gal in the shed that is treated for storage.

Upgraded to a better radio receiver.

Bought a very small gen to operate i freezer.

Side Note: I did use my canteen stove each day to boil water for oatmeal but i basically lived off of canned good, oatmeal, peanutbutter, beef jerky, trailmix. I did have running water but decided after the 3rd day to use my stored aqua-tainer water since I didnt know the condition of our water plant.

prism
07-11-2012, 16:14
But that's what we did in Germany in 2003. Temps around 105, no AC, not even in the Clinic. The smart ones cleaned out the basement storage rooms and stayed there.


wow, flashback.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2003_European_heat_wave

engineer151515
05-04-2013, 09:48
bump for the approaching summer

k7ant
05-04-2013, 10:48
This thread has a lot of interesting experiences. Back in 2002
here in my are we had to evacuate for the Rodeo/Chediski
fire. Dam near burnt up Arizona! We had about 8 hours to
prepare to go and loaded all our records/pictures et al in
the car and hooked up out 5th wheel to the truck. I loaded
extra gas and water and anything else I could find. I drove
out to the Dry Lake area 15 miles or so from Heber and
parked in a pull out by the road. From here I had phone
coverage and could actually see back into the area where
the fire was burning.

If there comes a time and we have to evacuate again, I
won't do it. When the Sheriff comes by next time, I am
not home! We would have been better off at home in
our house. The fire burned within a 1/4 mile of my house
but to get to us it would have had to jump 2 major
roads.
We had a generator, so our comfort wasn't to bad. We
set up and just played camper in the woods for 2 weeks.
In addition to the holding tank in the camper we also
had a porta potty, extra water and fuel. It was a long
week before we found out our house was spared.

I keep my 5th wheel ready to go all the time and also
at times here in a rural area we loose power for days
at a time. I can setup to run the house on generator
power in about 5 minutes. Last power outage we were
the only house within a 4 block area to have lights on.
A friend drove by and later commented he could even see my tv in the window.
The problem I have here isn't power or
food but water. I am trying to decide how to store
water as when the power goes off usually we have
water but when their back up goes down and we need
water a couple of 5 gallon cans won't be enough.

Aceman
05-04-2013, 11:54
This thread has a lot of interesting experiences. Back in 2002
here in my are we had to evacuate for the Rodeo/Chediski
fire. Dam near burnt up Arizona! We had about 8 hours to
prepare to go and loaded all our records/pictures et al in
the car and hooked up out 5th wheel to the truck. I loaded
extra gas and water and anything else I could find. I drove
out to the Dry Lake area 15 miles or so from Heber and
parked in a pull out by the road. From here I had phone
coverage and could actually see back into the area where
the fire was burning.

If there comes a time and we have to evacuate again, I
won't do it. When the Sheriff comes by next time, I am
not home! We would have been better off at home in
our house. The fire burned within a 1/4 mile of my house
but to get to us it would have had to jump 2 major
roads.
We had a generator, so our comfort wasn't to bad. We
set up and just played camper in the woods for 2 weeks.
In addition to the holding tank in the camper we also
had a porta potty, extra water and fuel. It was a long
week before we found out our house was spared.

I keep my 5th wheel ready to go all the time and also
at times here in a rural area we loose power for days
at a time. I can setup to run the house on generator
power in about 5 minutes. Last power outage we were
the only house within a 4 block area to have lights on.
A friend drove by and later commented he could even see my tv in the window.
The problem I have here isn't power or
food but water. I am trying to decide how to store
water as when the power goes off usually we have
water but when their back up goes down and we need
water a couple of 5 gallon cans won't be enough.

I'm just gonna say it it and I don't care:

Fire CAN jump two major roads. You are a dumb@$$ if you don't go and eff with the fire.

windpoint
05-04-2013, 18:35
I'm just gonna say it it and I don't care:

Fire CAN jump two major roads. You are a dumb@$$ if you don't go and eff with the fire.

Yes Yes Yes!!! One tiny little spark.

Cavalry Doc
05-05-2013, 08:06
bump for the approaching summer

Barely noticed here. Record low temps here. Actually have to wait until it's warm enough to mow the grass.

The sweet potatoes and beans are torqued. But the rest of the garden seems to be doing pretty well.

kirgi08
05-05-2013, 08:27
Bad day here,greenhouse took a large amount of wind damage.I got panels blown out and a cracked truss/aluminum.I can't do a thing ta this monsoon moves out.Lost a 1/3 of my stock.'08. :rant: