Glock 22 (40 S&W) for My Wife [Archive] - Glock Talk

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frizz
07-10-2012, 08:03
Would anyone mind giving opinions about the Glock 22 for a woman who does not like full-sized .45 M1911s. My wife can manage one, and could use one in an emergency, but she hates the recoil.

She lurves her 9mm Baby Glock G26, and she's a good shot. I like it too! But I prefer the more-powerful .45.

For practical reasons, I think my carry & house-defense pistol should be something that she is comfortable using. I think the .45ACP Glock 21 will have the same problem.

A few years ago, she fired a full-sized Springfield Armory XD in 40SW, but it was too long ago for us to remember her reaction to it. Grrrrrrr! I think she was OK with it, but I'm not sure.

We may be able to use a friend's Glock 22, but that isn't a sure thing. Renting one isn't possible because there are so few ranges here.

So, ladies (and gentlemen who have direct experience with women shooters who are like my wife) what do you think? Also, anyone know of self-defense ammo that is designed to smooth the "snap" recoil?

Victoriagotagun
07-10-2012, 09:44
I doubt she is going to like the recoil of a .40 S&W if she doesn't like shooting a 1911. Sounds like your just looking for an excuse to buy something that you will like more.

She really likes her G26 so she should stick with that. But if your dead set on buying another gun for "her" then check out a Glock 19 or 17.

ChicagoZman
07-10-2012, 11:43
I'm guessing she will prefer a full size 9MM, as the recoil will be more manageable for her than the .40 or .45.

My wife doesn't much care for pistols, but loves a revolver (Ruger GP100 .357). One of my daughters also prefers the Ruger to everything else while my other daughter prefers a 9mm Glock and/or a 1911 .45.

While some of my female students prefer larger caliber pistols, many choose 9mm. With modern self defense ammunition (premium brand hollow point), you really cannot go wrong with a 9mm IMO.

frizz
07-10-2012, 12:22
I doubt she is going to like the recoil of a .40 S&W if she doesn't like shooting a 1911. Sounds like your just looking for an excuse to buy something that you will like more.

She really likes her G26 so she should stick with that. But if your dead set on buying another gun for "her" then check out a Glock 19 or 17.

I thank you for your opinion regarding the .40's recoil, but there is no need to be rude or snide. I would appreciate it if you would not make unwarranted assumptions about me.

I do not want a 40SW because I prefer the more-effective round and smoother recoil of the .45. I am thinking of changing MY defense pistol to one that she can use in an emergency situation. It is a compromise based on practicality.

I do not tell my wife what to use because I don't have the right. Matter of fact, I think she should use the 5-shot Taurus snubby she first bought, but she wants more rounds; it may be against my advice, but it is her decision.

frizz
07-10-2012, 13:26
I'm guessing she will prefer a full size 9MM, as the recoil will be more manageable for her than the .40 or .45.

My wife doesn't much care for pistols, but loves a revolver (Ruger GP100 .357). One of my daughters also prefers the Ruger to everything else while my other daughter prefers a 9mm Glock and/or a 1911 .45.

While some of my female students prefer larger caliber pistols, many choose 9mm. With modern self defense ammunition (premium brand hollow point), you really cannot go wrong with a 9mm IMO.


Thanks for the tips, especially the reminder about modern SD ammo.

I should clarify that this is a question of changing what I use. She will continue to use the G26 because she is comfortable with it.

I don't want drop down to 9mm because I like big calibers. While I agree with you that you can't go wrong with a 9mm, I just prefer something with more "OOMPH".

Do you mind a question about 9mm ammo? I'd like to get some short barrel ammo for her to try, but I don't want to waste $20-30 if it is pretty clear that she'll hate it or if it isn't a real benefit.

I'm thinking about Speer's Gold Dot short barrel ammo (ballistics at bottom). She has no trouble with +P ammo, but how is Gold Dot SBA going to do in the recoil department?

BTW, we both have been using Remington Golden Saber (she uses the 124g +P) but I'm thinking about switching to Speer Gold Dot.

Any opinion on how the short-barrel ammo will compare to regular ammo?



Both rounds use a 124g Gold Dot bullet. The fps & ft.lbs are @ bbl.

SBA+P, 3.5in bbl: 1150fps, 364ft.lbs
Reg+P, 4.0in bbl: 1220fps, 410ft.lbs

ChicagoZman
07-10-2012, 15:56
Speer GDHP Short Barrel (124gr +P) is the same as their standard GDHP 124gr +P with the exception of the bullet itself, which expands at somewhat lower velocities, such as what it would be out of a 3.5" barrel Glock 26 vs. a 4.0" barrel Glock 19 or 4.5" barrel Glock 17. I believe the Speer load is slightly hotter than the Remington, but I doubt you would notice a difference as they're both the same weight and both +P.

Speer GDHP SB Short Barrel is what I use exclusively in my J-Frame S&W for pocket duty, although I practice with whatever cheap .38spl +P I can find in 125-135gr weight so as to duplicate feel and point of impact.

janice6
07-10-2012, 16:20
Good. Nice gun. I hope she likes it.

frizz
07-10-2012, 16:24
Speer GDHP Short Barrel (124gr +P) is the same as their standard GDHP 124gr +P with the exception of the bullet itself, which expands at somewhat lower velocities, such as what it would be out of a 3.5" barrel Glock 26 vs. a 4.0" barrel Glock 19 or 4.5" barrel Glock 17. I believe the Speer load is slightly hotter than the Remington, but I doubt you would notice a difference as they're both the same weight and both +P.

Speer GDHP SB Short Barrel is what I use exclusively in my J-Frame S&W for pocket duty, although I practice with whatever cheap .38spl +P I can find in 125-135gr weight so as to duplicate feel and point of impact.
For the Remington Golden Sabers, I did handloads because I couldn't find any cheap ammo that was close enough.

I bought some Golden Saber bullets once, and I got so close to 100% feel that it was hard to tell the difference. Another advantage was the feeding issue. At a buck per shot, it is not really practical to run 100 rounds through to check for feed problems. I think the handloads were a hair over 1/3 the cost.

cysoto
07-10-2012, 16:41
...a woman who does not like full-sized .45 M1911s. My wife can manage one, and could use one in an emergency, but she hates the recoil.

If she "hates" the recoil of a .45ACP 1911 she will absolutely despise the recoil of the .40S&W (especially in a plastic gun).

Every indoor range that I have ever visited offers the Glock 22 as one of their rental options. It might be a good idea for her to visit an indoor range with rental option and try out the G22 for herself.

ChicagoZman
07-10-2012, 20:00
For the Remington Golden Sabers, I did handloads because I couldn't find any cheap ammo that was close enough.

I bought some Golden Saber bullets once, and I got so close to 100% feel that it was hard to tell the difference. Another advantage was the feeding issue. At a buck per shot, it is not really practical to run 100 rounds through to check for feed problems. I think the handloads were a hair over 1/3 the cost.
Try Winchester 124gr NATO for practice. It will give a pretty good approximation of a +P load.

Through a Glock, if I fire 50 rounds of self defense ammo without a failure I believe I'm good to go, but others will recommend 200 rounds or more for extra comfort.

frizz
07-11-2012, 03:13
Try Winchester 124gr NATO for practice. It will give a pretty good approximation of a +P load.

Through a Glock, if I fire 50 rounds of self defense ammo without a failure I believe I'm good to go, but others will recommend 200 rounds or more for extra comfort.

That is a good price. It's not much more than bulk on ammoman. Thanks for the tip!

One thing that I HATE about the 1911 world is the acceptance of a "break-in" period of at least a few hundred rounds before you "trust" it. I like Glocks because there is no such bull even mentioned, let alone accepted.

For a 1911 used for competition and nothing else, I can understand. But anything else? NO WAY!

When new military weapons are assembled for final delivery, they are ready. An infantry soldier doesn't have to go to the range and "break it in" with 400 shots, right?

OK. I'm off my soap box.

frizz
07-12-2012, 05:17
Speer GDHP Short Barrel (124gr +P) is the same as their standard GDHP 124gr +P with the exception of the bullet itself, which expands at somewhat lower velocities, such as what it would be out of a 3.5" barrel Glock 26 vs. a 4.0" barrel Glock 19 or 4.5" barrel Glock 17. I believe the Speer load is slightly hotter than the Remington, but I doubt you would notice a difference as they're both the same weight and both +P.

Speer GDHP SB Short Barrel is what I use exclusively in my J-Frame S&W for pocket duty, although I practice with whatever cheap .38spl +P I can find in 125-135gr weight so as to duplicate feel and point of impact.

I just thought of something the ladies (and all shooters who have problems with recoil, for that matter) need to know about before they plop down $$$ for a box of new ammo.

For all short-bbl ammo out there, I'd like to see some data on actual performance of it vs. regular ammo.

The data should include speed/energy numbers and bullet performance on targets. It also must have subjective opinions from many different shooters on the perceived recoil.

If the brands that tout their faster burning powder give a nasty recoil, you have useless ammo.

Likewise, if the overall performance isn't a LOT better than regular ammo, you have ammo that may be good, but not worth a switch (or a higher price.)

ChicagoZman
07-12-2012, 07:28
For all short-bbl ammo out there, I'd like to see some data on actual performance of it vs. regular ammo.

The data should include speed/energy numbers and bullet performance on targets. It also must have subjective opinions from many different shooters on the perceived recoil.

If the brands that tout their faster burning powder give a nasty recoil, you have useless ammo.

Likewise, if the overall performance isn't a LOT better than regular ammo, you have ammo that may be good, but not worth a switch (or a higher price.)
I think you'll find interesting commentary regarding actual bullet performance on the GATE Self Defense Forum. Mas Ayoob supports the use of SGDHP SB in .38 as it has actual street creds in New York and Chicago. Not sure there is any such data available regarding 9mm, but he may know.

Schrag4
07-12-2012, 19:05
My wife is not a fan of our Glock22. It's a bit big for her hands and the recoil is too much for her. She prefers the SR9c I got for her (smaller grip and considerably less recoil) but in my opinion that's still too much recoil for her. It's not that she couldn't get used to it, she just doesn't have the desire to spend the time to get used to it. I almost feel like she'd be more effective with a pistol in 22LR - her shots would stay on target after the first shot, which is simply not the case today with 9mm and especially 40S&W. I try to get her out shooting whenever I can but she doesn't have much interest so I won't push the issue.

Just my 0.02, YMMV

frizz
07-13-2012, 11:57
My wife is not a fan of our Glock22. It's a bit big for her hands and the recoil is too much for her. She prefers the SR9c I got for her (smaller grip and considerably less recoil) but in my opinion that's still too much recoil for her. It's not that she couldn't get used to it, she just doesn't have the desire to spend the time to get used to it. I almost feel like she'd be more effective with a pistol in 22LR - her shots would stay on target after the first shot, which is simply not the case today with 9mm and especially 40S&W. I try to get her out shooting whenever I can but she doesn't have much interest so I won't push the issue.

Just my 0.02, YMMV


I am assuming that you are looking at something for her to carry concealed.

You may know the saying that goes something like this: "The 380 you have right now is better than the .45 you have at home." I think this is true even for a .22 revolver.

It is pretty well established that just displaying a firearm ends the vast majority of dangerous confrontations; bad guy(s) run away. If that doesn't work, opening fire ends even more confrontations with the same result, even it you don't hit anyone.

A 22LR isn't likely to stop an enraged and determined attacker, but let's not forget that even a 9mm or ANY handgun usually takes a little time to stop that kind of threat. The mechanism of physically (as opposed to mentally) disabling an attacker is usually bleeding out.

But so what? That sort of threat is probably far less likely than a deadly car wreck. (I'm guessing here.)

If I may offer MY two cents, I think a good revolver for her to try is a 38SP.

So long as the springs aren't too heavy, a 38SP is a lot better than a 22LR, IMO. A small 5 shot is easy to conceal, and easy to shoot, so long as the springs aren't too heavy and the frame isn't too light.

I know someone who got a Taurus 85 Ultralight that had such bad springs on it you had to squeeze it to get it to fire. He said that 10 rounds made his hand hurt for two days.

A $15 spring replacement kit from Brownell's took care of that.

glockforlife100
07-13-2012, 17:55
frizz The solution is in your question. I have shot the Gold Dot Short Barrel from my 26 and my 27. While MY favorite is my Glock 35, I have the Glock 26 for my wife. There is little difference between the Short Barrel recoil and the regular Gold Dot. I would say let her stay with the Glock 26. I find the Glock 35, 30SF, 26 and 27 to all be more than adequate for any self defense situation. As they say, speed is good but accuracy is final. If she is comfortable with the 26 (9mm), why argue with police departments and military units around the world?

George4
07-13-2012, 22:53
I read your post and then skipped the replies, trying only to focus on an answer to what I understood you were looking for. My wife was not a pistol shooter. She has good sized hands, stands about 5'9" and weighs about 180, age 60. I taught her to shoot my Glocks, i.e. 22, 23 and 26. She fires the best with the 22 and has qualified twice on our TX CHL course with no issues. The 23 also is good for her. She could not qualify on the TX CHL course with the 26. My thoughts were as she ages and if arthritis should ever become an issue then just drop in a Lone Wolf conversion barrel and off she goes using a pistol that she is familiar with,(22 and/or the 23) and less recoil from the 9 mm round. Hope this helps you in making your decision.

bob_stone4
07-14-2012, 20:24
Does anyone know where I can get a glock26/27 fairly new or in great shape?

SDGlock23
07-15-2012, 11:32
I recently was at the range with a couple who were trying out some firearms. Many guys think a .38 from a little revolver is the way to go...and most of the time they're wrong. Recoil in a big .357 shooting 38's is one thing, drop down to a 15oz gun then the 38 seems to take on an entirely new persona. This guy bought a little light weight .38 for his wife...she did not like it. There are many guys that complain about the recoil of little 38's.

My ex had to have a .45...she eventually got around to shooting okay with it, but at first was horrible, hitting the ground just feet in front of her she was nosediving so badly...which most new shooters do, or anybody who cannot tolerate much recoil at all.

Anyways this particular lady shot my .22 Buckmark very well, everything else she wasn't so good at...I've seen very few folks who can shoot a little gun accurately.

I can promise you this, a .40 cal Glock (any size) will recoil more than a 1911 .45. To add, the .40 in general recoils more than the .45. I cut my teeth on the .40, and my two Glock .45's kick less than any .40 I have. Of the three (9mm, .40, .45), recoil from least to most is: 9mm, .45, .40. The .40 is no joke, it offers 9mm capacity and .45 like and better performance.

If she shoots the 9mm well, let her shoot that. The big G21 and even the G30 do shoot very well and only recoil a little more than the 9mm, it sounds to me like you have both 9mm and .45 ammo, so why not keep it that way? The .40 is a great cartridge, but it's not going to be better for recoil sensitive shooters, just the opposite in fact.

velogirl84
07-16-2012, 08:17
Hi Frizz,

Let me start by introducing myself as Michelle. I am currently the only female 5 gun master in IDPA and rank as one of the top female IDPA shooters in the country. My current competition gun in stock service pistol is the glock 22.

For defense, it is not what you send but where you send it. Whatever gun allows you do place accurate shots on target fast, then use that gun. I have chosen the glock for competition and concealed carry because of it's reliability and ease of use. If you wife can shoot a glock 26 and will carry it, let her use it. In teaching I have found the glock 17 to be the best overall gun for women. The 9mm recoil is not bad (especially if you are not reloading) and the full size gun is much easier to shoot, reload, and clear malfunctions. A 17 can easily be concealed in a purse or inside the waistband (where I carry) and can be use for competition if she desires to give it a try. Just my thoughts.

frizz
07-18-2012, 15:58
Does anyone know where I can get a glock26/27 fairly new or in great shape?

Bob -

You should be able to get a NEW one for $500.

An easy option is to to use Galleryofguns to get one from a local, independent gun shop. They have a retailer finder, and a lot of dealers let you search items and prices on the site.

I'm not a fan of buying used guns that are in great shape. It doesn't seem like you get much of a discount off the new price in exchange for taking the risk of buying a problem gun.

The reason? While not all guns with "low mileage" are lemons, it is my opinion that they are more likely to have problems because I question the person's motive in parting with a new gun. Could be that it had a problem or two.

frizz
07-21-2012, 02:07
What I remembered/realized and finally decided...


I realized that because I prefer the recoil of a .45 over the recoil of a .40S&W (based on firing two different guns) I do not need to have a .40 for concealed carry.

While I love my Springfield 1911 .45, there is the downside of 7 rounds/magazine. The Glock 21's 13 rounds/magazine provides 6 more rounds that could potentially make a difference if (heaven forbid) I have to fire to protect myself and -- more importantly -- my wife.

I don't think worrying about the very unlikely event that my wife would have to use my pistol in a self-defense situation justifies me carrying something that is far less than optimal for me.

Thank you all for your input!

Cat91
07-22-2012, 13:09
I carried a G27 for three years and switched to a G23C. The porting helps with the recoil and I like the grip better. I think a 22 would be too big.

ZO6Vettever
07-26-2012, 13:48
My wife carries a G26 and loves it. She shoots my G30 and doesn't object to the recoil. I also find it not much more than a 9mm. However she fired my nephew's .40 Sig and said it hurt more than his 357mag. The .40's seem to twist and I don't like them either. I'm guessin' I couldn't fire too many rounds out of a G27. If she likes the G26 get her some ballistic superior self defense ammo. Double Tap has some that approaches a lot of .40 ammo. A +2 Glock brand mag extension adds 2 and gives the pinky a place to grip.