Which safe do you prefer? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Fisherman
08-03-2012, 09:34
It's time to upgrade the weapons storage facilities here and I'm looking for advice. Many safes are available and I expect that some of them are of better quality than others. Just wondering, though, if there is one that is geared toward multiple handguns-up to 8 or 10. Most of the ones I see are either aimed at long guns or only 1 or 2 pistols. Opinions? :fishing:

Don At PC
08-03-2012, 10:02
I have a small 3 shelf Liberty Safe and I can 24 pistole/revolvers in it. I have had it about 10 years and have had zero problems with it.

Don

unclebob
08-03-2012, 10:16
From a Lock Smith friend of mine get one with a dial and not an electric combination.
Also go bigger than what you think that you need.

PM720
08-03-2012, 12:03
From a Lock Smith friend of mine get one with a dial and not an electric combination.
Also go bigger than what you think that you need.

I have heard this too but never the REAL reason other that the EMP danger from the tin foil crowd. :whistling:

Totally agree on getting the bigger safe. I now have 2 looking at at a third. :embarassed:

misunderestimated
08-03-2012, 15:08
It's time to upgrade the weapons storage facilities here and I'm looking for advice. Many safes are available and I expect that some of them are of better quality than others. Just wondering, though, if there is one that is geared toward multiple handguns-up to 8 or 10. Most of the ones I see are either aimed at long guns or only 1 or 2 pistols. Opinions? :fishing:

What price range.

I have a long gun safe I added shelf's and rack to house my hand guns. I also stuck with the old technology of a dial to open it. All of the real nice big and fancy safes will not fit down my basement steps. I feel bigger is better in this case so they can walk off with it

SARDG
08-03-2012, 16:40
I have this safe, and it's frequently on sale:
http://www.harborfreight.com/executive-safe-95824.html

You will have to ad shelves or wire hanger mounts for handguns. I keep 3 long guns, plus some handguns in it. There is a separate locked compartment for documents. You can see it's fairly roomy. You should bolt these things to the floor and/or wall.

It's an electronic lock which I like a lot - very quick access and key backup. If both fail, call Glockrunner - our resident safecracker.

Fisherman
08-03-2012, 16:46
Probably, for what I want, $500 would likely near the top range. I've been doing some research today and Stack-On has some good looking products. The quality seems to be well regarded, the safe can be bolted to floor, wall or ceiling and with the use of hangers made by Gun Storage Solutions the capacity can be effectively doubled. I agree that bigger is better but I don't want to buy something bigger than I need and I can pretty much see a limit to what I'll need to store. I'm just amazed at the variety of safes out there and the reviews of a lot of them tell me that "buyer beware" really counts here. :fishing:

Fisherman
08-03-2012, 16:55
Hey Sardg: The safe you show looks good, as well. I have a couple of long guns that I wasn't too worried about but that unit would add even more available space and the hangers are easy. As for bolting it to the floor and wall-you bet. :fishing:

SARDG
08-03-2012, 17:42
Hey Sardg: The safe you show looks good, as well...
Probably easy enough to check out at any HF. A friend and I were able to wrestle it off my truck and into the house with a mover's dolly - but by that same token, 2 crooks could get it out if not tied down.

I threw about 150 lbs of boxed 147gr bullets (not cartridges) in the bottom to help dissuade burglars too.

Glockrunner
08-03-2012, 17:46
I have heard this too but never the REAL reason other that the EMP danger from the tin foil crowd. :whistling:

Totally agree on getting the bigger safe. I now have 2 looking at at a third. :embarassed:
Well here is the reason; electric locks usually last on the average of 5 - 7 years with a couple exceptions that most people don't want to pay for.

Mechanical locks used by todays safe industry are not as well built as the locks of even 15 years ago. BUT they will last a lot longer than the electrical locks. And the S&G 6730 is the workhorse here. Nothing less.

For an electrical lock I have to stand by Globalok.

I didn't address the safe. I do a lot of work for most all the manufactures so I won't name brands but I will state this. You get what you pay for so check each brand out well before you spend that cash.

SARDG
08-03-2012, 17:58
Well here is the reason...
Were your ears ringing Bob - I only mentioned you a few minutes ago? :supergrin:

Glockrunner
08-03-2012, 18:03
Were your ears ringing Bob - I only mentioned you a few minutes ago? :supergrin:
Just saw the thread now.... was entertaining the wife after supper or I would have been here sooner.:rofl:

FAS1
08-03-2012, 18:04
Well here is the reason; electric locks usually last on the average of 5 - 7 years with a couple exceptions that most people don't want to pay for.

Mechanical locks used by todays safe industry are not as well built as the locks of even 15 years ago. BUT they will last a lot longer than the electrical locks. And the S&G 6730 is the workhorse here. Nothing less.

For an electrical lock I have to stand by Globalok.

I didn't address the safe. I do a lot of work for most all the manufactures so I won't name brands but I will state this. You get what you pay for so check each brand out well before you spend that cash.

Look for the UL Group 2 rating on a mechanical lock. Many locks on less expensive safes don't carry that certification. Look it up and see what it means as far as the lock standards. There's a lot to it.

Glockrunner
08-03-2012, 18:18
Look for the UL Group 2 rating on a mechanical lock. Many locks on less expensive safes don't carry that certification. Look it up and see what it means as far as the lock standards. There's a lot to it.

Even the S&G 6741 carrys the Grp II rating and the fence and lever of the 6741 are made of zamak, cast as one piece. The zamak fence is narrower than the brass one, greatly increasing the dialing tolerance. The S&G 6730 model is the better of the two unless you want to go a step more secure with a Grp II M lock which resist manipulation better than the GrpII locks.

Really a Grp1 would be the way to go (strickly for quality) but that is overkill I believe for a gun safe.

Jeff Davis
08-03-2012, 18:22
I have a cheapy Homak and will never make that mistake again, here is my two cents - buy something twice as big as you think you need - you will fill it in five years (or less) and need something bigger or a secondary before you know it. Firearms somehow multiply whenever there is disposable income in the general area - prepare for that. Get something expensive enough to fit your needs, don't cheap out even if you have to hold off for a while on that next gun you want...

TexasGlockster
08-03-2012, 21:22
Potentially above your price range but for what you are wanting to do I would be looking at Hollon Safes (http://www.hollonsafe.com/). For you I would recommend the FB-685E. Seems to be going for about $805. It has a 2 hour fire rating and is rated for burglars (something you won't find in many safes of this size) and has the option of either a dial or an electronic lock.

For about $615 you can get the HS-750E which is still has the 2 hour rating but isn't meant to be a serious deterrent to determined burglars. Check them out. They are really high quality safes and a pretty considerable bargain considering what you are getting.

Gary1911A1
08-04-2012, 04:20
I'm not the OP, but has anyone had any experience with the Bunker Bed that was advertised on GT a few years ago?

PM720
08-04-2012, 10:45
Well here is the reason; electric locks usually last on the average of 5 - 7 years with a couple exceptions that most people don't want to pay for.

Mechanical locks used by todays safe industry are not as well built as the locks of even 15 years ago. BUT they will last a lot longer than the electrical locks. And the S&G 6730 is the workhorse here. Nothing less.

For an electrical lock I have to stand by Globalok.

I didn't address the safe. I do a lot of work for most all the manufactures so I won't name brands but I will state this. You get what you pay for so check each brand out well before you spend that cash.

So you are saying they physically wear out? My guess would be the keypad from regular usage?

Scott

dudel
08-04-2012, 10:49
Well here is the reason; electric locks usually last on the average of 5 - 7 years with a couple exceptions that most people don't want to pay for.


+1. Even if they don't fail, they keys used for your combination get more use than the others. Over time, they clue the crook into which keys to press. You can get around this by changing the combination often enough to even up the wear on all keys.

I just got a Cannon safe (Cannon series) with the dial lock. I like that they not only have electrical outlets but also ethernet and USB connectors inside. I plan to keep my backup drives connected in the safe. The little heat they put out will replace the dehumidifier rod. I also plan to have a wireless camera on it to monitor access to the safe.

Ended up spending a bit more than I had planned; but it's cheap compared to the guns and data it will secure.

Glockrunner
08-05-2012, 06:38
So you are saying they physically wear out? My guess would be the keypad from regular usage?

Scott
I my industry the keypad is the second thing we troubleshoot by several methods depending on the manufacturer of the lock.

Batteries first.

After replacing the keypad (if necessary) and it don't open then it is most likely a lock box failure or the wires going to the lock.

Each manufacturer has their own situations inherent to their product/models. Useage can play a part too.

Safes designed for gun storage usually do not have a loaded device to remove all tension off the locking bolt and this can create added wear that can over time cause the lock to failure prematurely.

If you desire and aquire an electronic lock fine! Just know that when it "starts acting up," like failing to open the first time replace the battery(s). If that doesn't fix the problem, save yourself a bunch of money an replace the lock with another one. You are paying for convienence here and it isn't cheap as compared but at least, you won't wait until you can no longer gain access to your contents. Drilling is much more expensive.

PM720
08-05-2012, 13:15
Thanks for the info. I have 2 AmSec's with electronics. No issues to date but I may need to consider a change based on this. How hard is it to change the lock?

Scott

BK94
08-05-2012, 16:58
Have had mine for a few years with no issues.

http://www.patriotsafe.com/

Glockrunner
08-05-2012, 20:15
Thanks for the info. I have 2 AmSec's with electronics. No issues to date but I may need to consider a change based on this. How hard is it to change the lock?

ScottI can only say this is a job for an experienced safe man. One wrong move and the container will be locked until it is drilled open. Besides, a qualified technician can help you select a quality lock and do the installation so you have a warranty also.

A qualifed technician can be located at the Safe and Vault Technician assoc. here: http://www.savta.org/