Pay attention! [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Boxerglocker
08-09-2012, 07:46
A shooting acquaintance at a recent local 2 day, three gun match had a unexpected surprise during his first stage:

http://images5a.snapfish.com/232323232%7Ffp635%3A9%3Enu%3D68%3C5%3E%3A47%3E254%3EWSNRCG%3D345964%3A2%3B4345nu0mrj

24 plus grains of pistol powder in his .223 loads :wow:

Apparently he got sidetracked with a issue loading on his 1050 and inadvertently picked up his pistol powder and filled up the hopper.

The second AR belongs to his buddy that shares the ownership of the 1050. Same result different stage.

Colorado4Wheel
08-09-2012, 07:58
Lucky they ran out of guns.

BuffaloBo
08-09-2012, 08:34
Goes to show what can happen when loading on a dillon....:whistling: :tongueout:

country85
08-09-2012, 08:56
WOW.... Glad no one got hurt, but that's a couple thousand dollar screw up that could have killed some one and is easily preventable..

Murphy's Law
08-09-2012, 08:58
I would have thought with Power Pistol that a double charge would be hard to do and that the brass would have been over flowing trying to stuff that many grains. I use Varget and H335 for my .223 and 308 and I know for a fact you could not double charge without spilling powder all over the place. Anyhow, I'm very glad no one was injured. Red, Blue or Green presses one must always pay attention to the job at hand. In my years now of reloading my only mistake was a squib which I blame it on Judge Judy.....LOL
:supergrin:

fredj338
08-09-2012, 09:17
I would have thought with Power Pistol that a double charge would be hard to do and that the brass would have been over flowing trying to stuff that many grains. I use Varget and H335 for my .223 and 308 and I know for a fact you could not double charge without spilling powder all over the place. Anyhow, I'm very glad no one was injured. Red, Blue or Green presses one must always pay attention to the job at hand. In my years now of reloading my only mistake was a squib which I blame it on Judge Judy.....LOL
:supergrin:

Well 24gr of PP is not going to over flow a 223 case.:wow: Lucky is all I can say. It's not inatention, it's stupidity. What powder does he load 223 w/ that he could mistake it for PP? Why would he have both on the loading bench? The 1050 is fast enough, the reloader doesn't need to be going so fast as to do something like that during setup. Glad no one was hurt & it's just an expensive lesson learned.

Boxerglocker
08-09-2012, 09:21
I would have thought with Power Pistol that a double charge would be hard to do and that the brass would have been over flowing trying to stuff that many grains. I use Varget and H335 for my .223 and 308 and I know for a fact you could not double charge without spilling powder all over the place. Anyhow, I'm very glad no one was injured. Red, Blue or Green presses one must always pay attention to the job at hand. In my years now of reloading my only mistake was a squib which I blame it on Judge Judy.....LOL
:supergrin:

This wasn't a double charge.... he loaded his usualy pistol powder, rather than rifle.

Three-Five-Seven
08-09-2012, 09:33
1. Keep all powder in a separate location from the loading bench. (i.e. NOT on shelves above the bench)

2. Have only one powder at a time on the bench.

3. When you go to get a bottle of powder, chant the name of that powder as you walk to the storage location. Say the name of the powder as you pick the bottle up at the storage location. Look at the label of the bottle as you walk from the storage location to the loading bench. Say the name of the powder again, and look at the label, as you set the bottle down on your loading bench.

That's how I do it anyway.

I am agitated over the new graphic designs on Alliant powder bottles. Easy to confuse red dot with Reloader 17, etc.

There ought to be an industry standard that says powder manufacturers cannot change the graphics on their products -- ever.

Glad no one was hurt during this adventure.

p.s. I really don't get why suspect ammo was continued in service after first kaboom.

simotek
08-09-2012, 09:35
Maybe a check list would be a good idea.

Boxerglocker
08-09-2012, 09:58
p.s. I really don't get why suspect ammo was continued in service after first kaboom.

Apparently they were on opposite sides of the range starting different stages.

dkf
08-09-2012, 10:36
I would have thought with Power Pistol that a double charge would be hard to do and that the brass would have been over flowing trying to stuff that many grains.Sounds like he used "Pistol Powder" not "Power Pistol".

I'll bet his the pistol powder he used was quite a bit faster burning than the rifle powder he was supposed to use.

Sounds like an expensive lesson to learn. Maybe less chance they will not make the same mistake again.

WeeWilly
08-09-2012, 10:45
Lucky they ran out of guns.

:rofl:

Good one.

bush pilot
08-09-2012, 10:58
That's an oh **** moment. It'll take more than JB Weld to fix it I'm afraid.

Taterhead
08-09-2012, 11:05
1. Keep all powder in a separate location from the loading bench. (i.e. NOT on shelves above the bench)

2. Have only one powder at a time on the bench.

3. When you go to get a bottle of powder, chant the name of that powder as you walk to the storage location. Say the name of the powder as you pick the bottle up at the storage location. Look at the label of the bottle as you walk from the storage location to the loading bench. Say the name of the powder again, and look at Heresy label, as you set the bottle down on your loading bench.

That's how I do it anyway.
...

I am pretty anal too. I have pretty much they same mental process. My powders are stored in a different room away from my bench. The last thing I do before my first charge is thrown is take one final glance at the powder and one at my load data.

Glad no one was hurt in the kabooms.

ustate
08-09-2012, 11:09
Ouch, glad they're okay. I bet he won't make that mistake again.

DoctaGlockta
08-09-2012, 11:31
Call me simple minded but I only have two powders that I load with right now.

Unique

Tac

I have two powder set ups with my LNL. One for each.

Both are marked with respective powders.

I have no issues.

Glad no one got hurt.

shotgunred
08-09-2012, 11:46
Body parts are harder to replace than guns. As long as no one was permanently hurt then it was just an expensive lesson.:wow:

Makes me think I should start wearing gloves when I shoot.

DoctaGlockta
08-09-2012, 12:01
Do you know if the rifles failed after one shot or were there multiple rounds fired before the guns gave up?

alank2
08-09-2012, 12:14
Hi,

Luckily it sounds like no one got hurt. Fast pistol powders in those quantities are way high pressures!! 200kpsi ?

Thanks,

Alan

Boxerglocker
08-09-2012, 12:51
Do you know if the rifles failed after one shot or were there multiple rounds fired before the guns gave up?

One shot..



Luckily it sounds like no one got hurt. Fast pistol powders in those quantities are way high pressures!! 200kpsi ?



Exactly

fredj338
08-09-2012, 13:14
Call me simple minded but I only have two powders that I load with right now.

Unique

Tac

I have two powder set ups with my LNL. One for each.

Both are marked with respective powders.

I have no issues.

Glad no one got hurt.
I load for more than 24 diff rounds & I have well over a dozen diff powders. Follow the rules, you can't make such a mistake:
One can of powder on the bench ONLY.
Verify the powder you are using is the one you really want.
Progressive presses make reloaders lazy. Maybe because I started on a ss press, I never violate the basic rules. I have three presses on the bench & can have three diff calibers going at once. Only one powder is on the bench at any given time. All the powder measures have tape on them w/ the powder in the measure marked. Read the label on the fricking can, match it to the label on the measure & your reloading data, how hard is that?:dunno:

unclebob
08-09-2012, 13:18
Goes to show what can happen when loading on a dillon....:whistling: :tongueout:

Does not matter if you are loading on a Lee single stage or a Camdex. If you have a brain fart and use the wrong powder. One of the problems is if the person loads a lot they start getting complacent. I know that was part of my problem when in over 50 years of loading, finally had a squib load.

IndyGunFreak
08-09-2012, 18:53
p.s. I really don't get why suspect ammo was continued in service after first kaboom.

Agreed... I understand them being on opposite sides of the range, but I'd like to think that if I was sharing my 1050 with someone and something like that happened... as soon as I realized I had all my body parts, I'd immediately go over and tell them to cease using that ammo.

WiskyT
08-09-2012, 18:55
Maybe if he spent more time being careful, and less time color coordinating his guns and wardrobe, he wouldn't have blown up.

WiskyT
08-09-2012, 18:57
:rofl:

Good one.

It is a good one.

WiskyT
08-09-2012, 19:04
http://youtu.be/KUtdXzBSVaU

Boxerglocker
08-10-2012, 07:31
Maybe if he spent more time being careful, and less time color coordinating his guns and wardrobe, he wouldn't have blown up.

Really Whiskey? :upeyes: The point of me posting this thread was to inform everyone particularly the newbs of what real consequences are in being complacent. Posts like this really don't help the cause.

Agreed... I understand them being on opposite sides of the range, but I'd like to think that if I was sharing my 1050 with someone and something like that happened... as soon as I realized I had all my body parts, I'd immediately go over and tell them to cease using that ammo.

I wasn't at this match, was away on vacation at the lake with the family. The reports I got back from the group was exactly as you had stated. An attempt was made to cease the other shooter from continuing but he had literally started his stage at the exact same time.

WeeWilly
08-10-2012, 08:48
Really Whiskey? :upeyes: The point of me posting this thread was to inform everyone particularly the newbs of what real consequences are in being complacent. Posts like this really don't help the cause...

While I don't speak for anyone else, I know in my own case, it was pretty easy to get light hearted with humor when it was made clear everyone was OK physically... if not fiscally. :crying:

The point of the thread is a good one. We all can get complacent at times, a thread like this is a good wake up call. It is amazing to me how many reloaders have only the internet for their source of how to's. For those, this type of thread can be a genuine life (or eye or finger, etc.) saver.

shotgunred
08-10-2012, 09:16
With the possible exception of Fred it could happen to anyone. It does seem strange that it would happen on a 1050. I would think that they would have a completely different tool heads for rifle and pistol setups. You would certainly need different charge bars. He must have grabbed the totally wrong powder and filled the powder hopper with it.

I know that I had to throw away a couple of pounds of powder this year because the tag fell off my powder hopper and I didn't remember which powder I was using at the time. I normally write the powder and the charge on the back of an empty primer box and then hold it on the powder hopper with a rubber band. This has always worked before but that time the tag was missing when I went to load up some more ammo. Being that I normally load low to medium pistol loads it probably would not have made a difference. But why take a chance just to save $8.00 worth of powder.

Zombie Steve
08-10-2012, 09:22
I'm going to start using Titegroup for everything... that way, I can't get powders mixed up.


...off to load some .30-06!


:wavey:





















:whistling::supergrin:

Colorado4Wheel
08-10-2012, 09:23
What difference does the press make? The guy grabbed the wrong powder and started loading. Could happen to anyone not paying attention no mater what press they own.

shotgunred
08-10-2012, 09:32
I was thinking that they were probably switching from pistol to rifle and didn't get all the powder out of the hopper. A lot of people use the same powder hopper for different calibers.

fredj338
08-10-2012, 09:45
With the possible exception of Fred it could happen to anyone. It does seem strange that it would happen on a 1050. I would think that they would have a completely different tool heads for rifle and pistol setups. You would certainly need different charge bars. He must have grabbed the totally wrong powder and filled the powder hopper with it.

.
Oh it "could" happen, I could also win the lottery or be hit by lightening, but not likely. Approach reloading w/ caution, respect what can happen, stupid things like that will never happen to you. Progressive press are a huge problem, gets the reloader into the handle pulling mode instead of handloader mode. Follow basic rules of reloading, you'll be safe. Nothing is impossible, but stick to the script & it's pretty damn foolproof. There will always be better fools though.:dunno:

unclebob
08-10-2012, 09:50
What difference does the press make? The guy grabbed the wrong powder and started loading. Could happen to anyone not paying attention no mater what press they own.
That is why also I like to empty the powder measure after finished loading for the day. To put the powder back into the powder canister. Doing that gives me a second look to make sure I was using the right powder. Also on the powder measure I have labels telling me the amount of powder, type of powder and the COL.
Even if there was a little bit of powder left in the powder measure. It would have only affected one round not two. Especially a rifle round.

Boxerglocker
08-10-2012, 10:03
What difference does the press make? The guy grabbed the wrong powder and started loading. Could happen to anyone not paying attention no mater what press they own.

That's exactly what happened... and the point of me posting the thread. Distractions of any type can have serious consequences. No matter how much of a veteran reloader you are.

Colorado4Wheel
08-10-2012, 11:35
When I used multiple powders in my 550 I would alway empty it at the end. But on my 650 I only load 9mm and only use Solo1000. No need to swap powders out at the end.

Boxer, I am glad you posted it. It's a good warning. It's a shame some people use this as a way to try and score red or blue points. That is silly.

fredj338
08-10-2012, 12:49
When I used multiple powders in my 550 I would alway empty it at the end. But on my 650 I only load 9mm and only use Solo1000. No need to swap powders out at the end.

Boxer, I am glad you posted it. It's a good warning. It's a shame some people use this as a way to try and score red or blue points. That is silly.

I'm not sure anyone is trying to do that. Stupid is as stupid does, regardless of equip used. I have known others to do sim things, always violating basic reloading safety rules. Self taught is fine, but if you don't learn & follow some of those basic safety rules, you are evenetually going to do what that guy did. Verifying the powder & data used is really, really basic.:dunno: Again, something like a 1050 is fast enough you can spend 5min getting it setup safely & correctly. No one should be in that much of a hurry when your press can do 1000rds/hr.:whistling:

WiskyT
08-10-2012, 14:29
Really Whiskey? :upeyes: The point of me posting this thread was to inform everyone particularly the newbs of what real consequences are in being complacent. Posts like this really don't help the cause.


Sorry, but that dude is Tosh.0 material and I'm going to find it amusing. If you get all butt-hurt about that, I don't care.

Boxerglocker
08-10-2012, 14:51
Sorry, but that dude is Tosh.0 material and I'm going to find it amusing. If you get all butt-hurt about that, I don't care.

That "dude" in the pic isn't the owner of either AR, he's merely holding them while the picture was taken to illustrate what happened. Your making assumptions based on the color of ones shirt... and you don't even have the right guy.

It's amazing how there are so many comments making assumptions that the person it happened to was some completely inexperienced newbie that completely had no clue.

He brain farted and paid the consequences. I know the guy and would estimate that he has several tens of thousands of rounds of reloads under his belt. I know he's been reloading for at least 4-5 years and shoots every weekend as a sponsored shooter and a top ranking on at that in USPSA, Area 1.

It could happen to anyone... luckily in this case no one was seriously hurt. As I said earlier my reason for posting this was as a warning to everyone to be careful regardless of your experience. Don't get complacent and pay attention.

WiskyT
08-10-2012, 15:10
The car, both guns, and the too-tight spandex shirt are all the same color. Either way, it's goofy to paint your guns blue and blow them up.

These are all symptoms of the guns being treated as toys, not the deadly instruments they are. It goes hand in hand with the whole gaming crap that people get involved in. In motorcycling, they call them "squids".

Zombie Steve
08-10-2012, 15:21
Tell him his gut isn't big enough to rock one of those tight shirts. If the matches I've been to are any indication, he's doing that wrong too.

WiskyT
08-10-2012, 15:26
Tell him his gut isn't big enough to rock one of those tight shirts. If the matches I've been to are any indication, he's doing that wrong too.

It's not a shirt

http://net.archbold.k12.oh.us/ahs/web_class/Spring_10/BlueManGroup_Buehrer/Images/BMG4.jpg

Zombie Steve
08-10-2012, 15:32
Just got my slide re-blued.

http://img337.imageshack.us/img337/394/s4020649bi5.jpg

shotgunred
08-10-2012, 15:36
The car, both guns, and the too-tight spandex shirt are all the same color. Either way, it's goofy to paint your guns blue and blow them up.

These are all symptoms of the guns being treated as toys, not the deadly instruments they are. It goes hand in hand with the whole gaming crap that people get involved in. In motorcycling, they call them "squids".

Of course his black gun could just look blue because the picture was taken by a cheap cell phone camera and the blue was bleeding through.

WiskyT
08-10-2012, 15:37
Just got my slide re-blued.

http://img337.imageshack.us/img337/394/s4020649bi5.jpg

Send me the tape from the sights. I want to use it as a swatch so Home Depot can mix me up a bucket of that stuff. My LNIB High Standard Victor would look great in that.

Zombie Steve
08-10-2012, 15:56
Come now... you don't think I'd shoot a polymer gun, do you?

Boxerglocker
08-10-2012, 16:18
The car, both guns, and the too-tight spandex shirt are all the same color. Either way, it's goofy to paint your guns blue and blow them up.


They are black...

Of course his black gun could just look blue because the picture was taken by a cheap cell phone camera and the blue was bleeding through.

Winner, winner chicken dinner.

WiskyT
08-10-2012, 16:19
Come now... you don't think I'd shoot a polymer gun, do you?

Sure, why not? The ones who protest the most are the ones doing it. Come on out of the closet and be proud of your plastic gun. You can even marry it in Colorado I think.

http://www.vac-u-boat.com/images/VacUCrackerPix/FusionMystic.jpg

WiskyT
08-10-2012, 16:22
They are black...



The tires are black. That sausage casing the guy is wearing is blue. The guns sure look blue, but I'll take your word for it that what used to be guns are black. Maybe they were blue before they got blowed up real good?

ursoboostd
08-10-2012, 16:32
Boxer, thanks for posting the story/pics. I won't be a Monday Morning QB. Glad nobody got hurt.

Zombie Steve
08-10-2012, 16:54
Sure, why not? The ones who protest the most are the ones doing it. Come on out of the closet and be proud of your plastic gun. You can even marry it in Colorado I think.

http://www.vac-u-boat.com/images/VacUCrackerPix/FusionMystic.jpg

OOOoooOOOoooOOoo.... mystic prism effect. Bedazzles bad guys.

WiskyT
08-10-2012, 17:11
OOOoooOOOoooOOoo.... mystic prism effect. Bedazzles bad guys.

I figured they had you in mind with the "Decorator's Touch":pjmn:

Zombie Steve
08-10-2012, 17:45
I'm bored.

http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/s480x480/423426_2380270243797_708993281_n.jpg

Highspeedlane
08-10-2012, 17:50
1. Keep all powder in a separate location from the loading bench. (i.e. NOT on shelves above the bench)

2. Have only one powder at a time on the bench.

3. When you go to get a bottle of powder, chant the name of that powder as you walk to the storage location. Say the name of the powder as you pick the bottle up at the storage location. Look at the label of the bottle as you walk from the storage location to the loading bench. Say the name of the powder again, and look at the label, as you set the bottle down on your loading bench.

That's how I do it anyway.

I am agitated over the new graphic designs on Alliant powder bottles. Easy to confuse red dot with Reloader 17, etc.

There ought to be an industry standard that says powder manufacturers cannot change the graphics on their products -- ever.

Glad no one was hurt during this adventure.

p.s. I really don't get why suspect ammo was continued in service after first kaboom.

Good advice. Reloading is not too dissimilar from carpentry. Look twice, load once.

fredj338
08-10-2012, 23:01
Boxer, thanks for posting the story/pics. I won't be a Monday Morning QB. Glad nobody got hurt.

There is no Monday mornign qbing, the guy knows what he did wrong. He is just getting hammered a bit for doing it. I still want to know what powder he thought he was loading.:dunno:
PP is an Alliant powder, totally diff can than a Hodgdon or IMR powder. Alliant doesn't make many powders suitable for the 223, so??????

Kwesi
08-11-2012, 06:46
Boxer: thanks for sharing this important reminder. It's too easy for one to want to judge how or why, etc. I've only been loading for a couple years but I thought I took great care in paying attention, seriously. Then I had two squibs (different outings). As I reflected on my reloading procedures I realized how many distractions occur; either client calls, etc. I invested in Alan's Press Monitor as an additional accountability plan, not to take the place of paying close attention to every case BEFORE I pull the handle (550). So glad to hear the shooters were not injured.

Boxerglocker
08-11-2012, 09:52
There is no Monday mornign qbing, the guy knows what he did wrong. He is just getting hammered a bit for doing it. I still want to know what powder he thought he was loading.:dunno:
PP is an Alliant powder, totally diff can than a Hodgdon or IMR powder. Alliant doesn't make many powders suitable for the 223, so??????

I don't know exactly what powders they were suspect W231, TG... I see him at a match sometime soon and ask.

Boxerglocker
08-11-2012, 10:03
Double tap...

norton
08-11-2012, 10:12
We are human. We all make mistakes, no matter how smart, clever or careful we are.
This thread is a great reminder of reloading basics. Pay attention, don't get distracted.
Thanks to the op for reminding all of us.

Keoking
08-11-2012, 10:19
Boxer,
In a week, start another thread in GNG. This time say that your buddy blew up the first gun, just shook it off, and grabbed his backup gun to finish the stage. I want to see how that thread goes. :supergrin:

Wash-ar15
08-11-2012, 22:42
A must be really mad at J these days. I heard through the grapevine what happened.

sourdough44
08-12-2012, 07:57
Production numbers over quality can lead to that.

fredj338
08-12-2012, 18:54
I don't know exactly what powders they were suspect W231, TG... I see him at a match sometime soon and ask.

Consider that Alliant makes only stick powders for rifle loads, I can't figure out how anyone mistakes a flake powder for a stick powder. So again, that is well beyond a mistake.:dunno:

Boxerglocker
08-12-2012, 22:04
A must be really mad at J these days. I heard through the grapevine what happened.

OH, yeah... :upeyes: But goes to show you there are advantages to sharing equipment. However, loading your own ammo is always the best option. I always have it in the back of my mind that I alone don't shoot my loads. I load for my fiance and boys as well. Check, double check and then check again.

Production numbers over quality can lead to that.

This case had nothing to do with quality over production... he simply wasn't focused and EFF'ed up.

PsychoKnight
08-14-2012, 16:59
This makes me think twice about my offer to load for a shooting group I've been want to help out. The main guy bought a 550 about 3 yrs ago but can't get around to setting it up. About 20 of the 35 or so guns they use belong to him. Its a lot of work for him to to give private safety lessons before newbies come to the outings, and bring and set up all the tables, canapies, target holders, and bring his arsenal, so no energy left for loading. He said he's got a ton of brass and components if I wanted to load for the gorup. He said I'm the only one whom he trusts to reload because it was me and my reloads that got him started into shooting decades ago. I'm finalizing my choice of loads as I'm rereading this thread over and over. Will I be guilt ridden if something goes wrong? Do I just say "wow" and walk away when somebody gets their $2,500 gun blown up due to a handload error of mine? Or worse, what's the implication on my conscience if someone is seriously hurt? Its one thing to let family and my best friends use my reloads, but to load for a large group of people . . . now, I dunno. What'cha think?

Boxerglocker
08-14-2012, 17:04
This makes me think twice about my offer to load for a shooting group I've been want to help out. The main guy bought a 550 about 3 yrs ago but can't get around to setting it up. About 20 of the 35 or so guns they use belong to him. Its a lot of work for him to to give private safety lessons before newbies come to the outings, and bring and set up all the tables, canapies, target holders, and bring his arsenal, so no energy left for loading. He said he's got a ton of brass and components if I wanted to load for the gorup. He said I'm the only one whom he trusts to reload because it was me and my reloads that got him started into shooting decades ago. I'm finalizing my choice of loads as I'm rereading this thread over and over. Will I be guilt ridden if something goes wrong? Do I just say "wow" and walk away when somebody gets their $2,500 gun blown up due to a handload error of mine? Or worse, what's the implication on my conscience if someone is seriously hurt? Its one thing to let family and my best friends use my reloads, but to load for a large group of people . . . now, I dunno. What'cha think?

I wouldn't do it. :upeyes:

WiskyT
08-14-2012, 17:08
This makes me think twice about my offer to load for a shooting group I've been want to help out. The main guy bought a 550 about 3 yrs ago but can't get around to setting it up. About 20 of the 35 or so guns they use belong to him. Its a lot of work for him to to give private safety lessons before newbies come to the outings, and bring and set up all the tables, canapies, target holders, and bring his arsenal, so no energy left for loading. He said he's got a ton of brass and components if I wanted to load for the gorup. He said I'm the only one whom he trusts to reload because it was me and my reloads that got him started into shooting decades ago. I'm finalizing my choice of loads as I'm rereading this thread over and over. Will I be guilt ridden if something goes wrong? Do I just say "wow" and walk away when somebody gets their $2,500 gun blown up due to a handload error of mine? Or worse, what's the implication on my conscience if someone is seriously hurt? Its one thing to let family and my best friends use my reloads, but to load for a large group of people . . . now, I dunno. What'cha think?

I wouldn't do it. It sounds like a big operation. IMO, the odds of a mistake go way up when you are going beyond the intent of the equipment you are using. The 550 is a good machine for a "hobbyist". You can exercise the due caution needed to load a few hundred here, and a few hundred there, with it. But if you are trying to do high volume, with deadlines, your attention could easily slip.

fredj338
08-14-2012, 18:06
Or worse, what's the implication on my conscience if someone is seriously hurt? Its one thing to let family and my best friends use my reloads, but to load for a large group of people . . . now, I dunno. What'cha think?

Exaclty. I'll let my family memebers shoot my ammo. If something did happen, I would ceratinly be paying the bills. Fastest way to lose friends is blow up a gun &/or put out an eye. I have offered my friends to come over & use my gear anytime under my super, but I won't pull the handle for them.:dunno:

norton
08-14-2012, 18:24
Exaclty. I'll let my family memebers shoot my ammo. If something did happen, I would ceratinly be paying the bills. Fastest way to lose friends is blow up a gun &/or put out an eye. I have offered my friends to come over & use my gear anytime under my super, but I won't pull the handle for them.:dunno:

Yep, I agree. I shot my Dads stash of reloads after he passed. He is the only one I would trust.

PsychoKnight
08-14-2012, 19:00
Thanks, guys. That's what my gut was telling me. I'll call off the offer. I'll contribute by providing my reloads for free for people to shoot only with my own guns.

sourdough44
08-16-2012, 04:33
You could give or sell reloads to another & they could have a malfunction/ accident that was in no way connected to the ammo used, plugged bore/ wrong ammo for gun, etc.. In this case some may think that your ammo was the problem, even though it had nothing to do with it.

I do load for one family member, that's about all.