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Mr. Niceguy
08-09-2012, 08:15
As I was sitting in the Denver airport yesterday afternoon, I received a call from my 16 year old son. He sounded out of breath, and obviously had a huge adrenaline rush going.

He told me he was in the bathroom, and heard a crashing sound. He finished his business, thinking the cat may have knocked something off the counter, and came out of the bathroom to see a figure moving in the kitchen. According to his account, he ran into the master bedroom and grabbed my Springfield XD9 SC and chambered a round while shouting obscenities and for the perp to GTFO as he manuvered toward the kitchen. He heard someone running and the back door swinging open violently, and caught another glimpse of what appeared to be a young man high-tailing it through the sunroom and out into the back yard.

Entry was gained through the back door, which was not locked. Two unlocked doors actually - the door from the patio into the sunroom, and one from the sunroom into the kitchen/den area. The crashing sound was apparently a porcelain figurine that was knocked off a shelf in the kitchen, where a couple of bottles of prescription meds also were. A pair of my son's high-dollar tennis shoes were found abandoned on the kitchen floor near the remains of the porcelain figurine.

My son recalls hearing our dogs barking outside prior to the incident, but disregarded it, as our house backs up to a small park, and our dogs regularly bark at other dogs in the park. Anyone who knew the demographics of our neighborhood would have known that it is filled almost entirely with retired couples and single income families, meaning most houses are rarely empty.

Lessons learned:

Living in a good neighborhood doesn't mean a damn thing.

My dogs are apparently not the valliant guard dogs I imagined they were.

Complacency and unsecured entry points are bad.

That park that provides beautiful views and distance between us and the neighbors, also allows any damn body easy access to our back yard.

Teaching my son gun safety, operation, and profficient use beginning at age 3 was a good thing.

Having all guns secured by lock and key would have cost valuable time, and possibly had tragic results.

Lampshade
08-09-2012, 08:17
Having all guns secured by lock and key would have cost valuable time, and possibly had tragic results.

Conversely, the intruder could easily have come across the gun before your son and thus easily armed himself had he not been prior.

Mr. Niceguy
08-09-2012, 08:21
Conversely, the intruder could easily have come across the gun before your son and thus easily armed himself had he not been prior.

I can't argue with that logic, but those are odds I'm willing to play.

Bruce M
08-09-2012, 08:23
No specific offense intended but to me the most important thing in any house is/are the persons inside. It would seem to me then the thing worth protecting the most with the best security, including locked doors, would be the people. That said glad he was unscathed physically. Safe guess that his call prior to calling you was to 911?

Caver 60
08-09-2012, 08:25
I assume he called law enforcement and filed a report.

J_Rico
08-09-2012, 08:25
Conversely, the intruder could easily have come across the gun before your son and thus easily armed himself had he not been prior.


'Easily' is stretching a bit far. I could agree with 'possibly'.

The owner's son knew where the firearm was stored; the intruder would have to get lucky.

To the OP:

Glad your son is okay. IMO you should be proud that he took steps to protect himself and had the good sense to not chase anyone outside.

Mr. Niceguy
08-09-2012, 08:29
No specific offense intended but to me the most important thing in any house is/are the persons inside. It would seem to me then the thing worth protecting the most with the best security, including locked doors, would be the people. That said glad he was unscathed physically. Safe guess that his call prior to calling you was to 911?

I agree with you completely. As a matter of fact, recently, my son poked fun at me for being vigilant about locking our doors during the day time. I told him that I wasn't paranoid and didn't expect any trouble, but why make it easy on anyone? He didn't see my logic at the time, but I imagine he does now.

And no, he didn't dial 911 first. In his youthful, testosterone-filled machismo, he felt like he had the situation under control. I persuaded him otherwise.

Mr. Niceguy
08-09-2012, 08:31
I assume he called law enforcement and filed a report.

Yes, although the filing of a report is likely all that will come of it.

Bilbo Bagins
08-09-2012, 08:33
Conversely, the intruder could easily have come across the gun before your son and thus easily armed himself had he not been prior.

+1

Most mid-day breakin the criminals are looking for.

Cash
Guns
Jewerly
Small Valuables /electronics
Perscription drugs with a high street value

That bad guy upon entering your bedroom would have made a bee line to

Your nightstand
look under the bed
flip the mattress
Check the closet
Check your dresser drawers

If your son was a little slower on the uptake that burglar would have been armed, and not your son. Your boy could have been killed or at least held hostage and forced to Maximize the burglar's search for valuables. God forbid if its a 16 year old girl, with an badguy armed with dad's gun. A push button or biometric pistol safe only takes a second to open, and prevents bad things like that from happening.

SC Tiger
08-09-2012, 08:37
Glad it turned out with your son not getting hurt. Stuff can be replaced, though it sounds like the BG didn't get any.

There are ALWAYS alternatives to decisions you make that can lead to different outcomes. Yes, the gun could have been under lock and key and the BG would not have been able to get it. By that same token, your son would not have been able to get it either if he didn't have a key. He also could have just taken the pistol, "holed up" in the bedroom and called the police, but then the BG may have gotten the "drop" on him or someone else who came home not expecting to see the BG.

Overall I'd say he did it right, though I'm no expert. I would keep the doors locked (especially the ones you can't see) and perhaps kick the dog (just kidding) but nobody's perfect.

I keep my doors locked when I am at home just out of habit. However, I am bad to leave the front door unlocked if the main door is open and the storm door is the only one closed, or if I go outside to cut the grass or something. Having a 2-year old has helped break me of this (not that I would leave him inside alone anyway.

OctoberRust
08-09-2012, 08:42
Conversely, the intruder could easily have come across the gun before your son and thus easily armed himself had he not been prior.


That's why when I have a son, I'll make sure he has a gun ON him when in my house. :supergrin:

Boom! Just beat the odds baby! :rofl:

simotek
08-09-2012, 08:44
Glad your son is ok. Definitely keep the doors locked!

I've had people ask me why I feel the need to carry in my own house. This is why!

gwalchmai
08-09-2012, 09:09
According to his account, he ran into the master bedroom and grabbed my Springfield XD9 SC and chambered a round...Mr. Peterman?

Bren
08-09-2012, 09:11
Conversely, the intruder could easily have come across the gun before your son and thus easily armed himself had he not been prior.

Ah, the old "if you have a gun it's more likely to be used against you, so don't have guns" argument. Not at all surprising.

certifiedfunds
08-09-2012, 09:13
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1436128

Lampshade
08-09-2012, 09:13
Ah, the old "if you have a gun it's more likely to be used against you, so don't have guns" argument. Not at all surprising.

No, its the "keep your guns secured" argument. (Especially if you leave your doors unlocked.)

Nice try though.

Mr. Niceguy
08-09-2012, 09:43
Mr. Peterman?

Powerful, yet concealable, 16+1 rounds of fire-breathing home protection, integrated trigger and grip safeties. The perfect solution for the wary 2nd amendment enthusiast. Available in XD, XDC, XDSC, and XDM models.:rofl::rofl::rofl:

gwalchmai
08-09-2012, 09:53
:thumbsup:

GlocknSpiehl
08-09-2012, 10:02
This is why we always lock our doors AND have the alarm system armed when we are home.

hamster
08-09-2012, 10:03
This is why we always lock our doors AND have the alarm system armed when we are home.

Same here. It is all about knowing it is happening as early as possible so you have the most time to react.

Foxtrotx1
08-09-2012, 10:55
Why did you take the chance by leaving the gun unloaded? If your son had picked it up and need it right away he may have been killed before chambering.

You just told a cool story bro.

Drain You
08-09-2012, 11:14
The real solution here is to have all children open carry while at home. Not only will this prevent criminals from accessing your guns while they are pooping, but they may get lucky & encounter an over zealous police officer, leading to a large financial settled & retrained for the entire department.

Because everyone knows it is legal to open carry while pooping.

Mr. Niceguy
08-09-2012, 11:56
Why did you take the chance by leaving the gun unloaded? If your son had picked it up and need it right away he may have been killed before chambering.

You just told a cool story bro.

Not unloaded, just empty chamber. He is aware of it being kept in this condition and knows how to chamber a round.

xenophon
08-09-2012, 11:57
Your son did good. And good for you on keeping the gun where he knew where it was. He's old enough. And I'm sure it took him seconds to chamber the round, so fine by me.

+1 for not chasing bad guy outside.

The advantage is on the son who knew where the gun was. Bad guy at disadvantage. And it's up to the badguy to 1) be familiar with gun and 2) chamber round/etc, which is not likely a quick thing for them.

Great timing on son being in bathroom eh? Always the most inconvenient time when something happens :/

jpa
08-09-2012, 12:09
Nobody broke in. Your son was playing football in the house with a friend and broke the statue. He just needed a believable excuse how it got broken....


Just kidding. :)

airmotive
08-09-2012, 12:15
Conversely, the intruder could easily have come across the gun before your son and thus easily armed himself had he not been prior.

That's what got John Travolta in Pulp Fiction.

Mrs. VR
08-09-2012, 12:22
our sons should do lunch:

http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1421548&highlight=foiled

:supergrin:

I'm glad he's ok. That's the most important thing. He did good, buy him a steak dinner!

Mr. Niceguy
08-09-2012, 12:56
[QUOTE=Mrs. VR;19288953]our sons should do lunch:

Indeed.

Carrys
08-09-2012, 14:07
Conversely, the intruder could easily have come across the gun before your son and thus easily armed himself had he not been prior.



So....................you'll take the possibilities of "what if" over what actually happened?

Do you prefer to live in the world "what if" all the time, as most lefties usually do? Seems living in that place allows them to believe as they wish instead of as things really are. They usually like to chat up "what if" scenarios when the way they don't like to live turns out well.:wavey:

TBO
08-09-2012, 14:10
Another False Flag, I see patterns...

Sent from my mind using Tapatalk 2

ray9898
08-09-2012, 14:15
The one thing I have learned in LE is you better be more concerned about a burglary in the middle of the day than at night. Thieves hit during the day when they think no one is home, if they come in when it is occupied at night they normally have more in mind than a simple theft.

Keep your doors locked and at least acknowledge anyone knocking at the door even if you leave it closed.

Ragnar
08-09-2012, 14:19
Lessons learned:

Living in a good neighborhood doesn't mean a damn thing.

My dogs are apparently not the valliant guard dogs I imagined they were.

Complacency and unsecured entry points are bad.

That park that provides beautiful views and distance between us and the neighbors, also allows any damn body easy access to our back yard.

Teaching my son gun safety, operation, and profficient use beginning at age 3 was a good thing.

Having all guns secured by lock and key would have cost valuable time, and possibly had tragic results.


good lessons. Get a shotgun too.

Mr. Niceguy
08-09-2012, 14:22
Another False Flag, I see patterns...

Sent from my mind using Tapatalk 2

Huh???

wprebeck
08-09-2012, 14:30
Huh???

He's channeling Peace Warrior, who sees conspiracies in literally every event that occurs. Think Mel Gibson in "Conspiracy Theory" but without the cool backstory of the character having been really involved in hush hush things.

J_Rico
08-09-2012, 14:45
at least acknowledge anyone knocking at the door even if you leave it closed.

Yes, very important. Been told more than once by local LE and a retired prosecutor. If you ignore someone knocking at your door, the next sound you hear may be breaking glass or splintering wood.

Carrys
08-09-2012, 14:54
If you ignore someone knocking at your door, the next sound you hear may be breaking glass or splintering wood.



Give you odds on what the next sound is, eh?:wavey:

Detectorist
08-09-2012, 14:59
You missed one important lesson.

DO NOT confront an intruder.

He should have dialed 911, stayed put, and be ready to blast the intruder if he got through the door of whichever room your son was in.

Everything turned out fine, which I'm glad.

larry_minn
08-09-2012, 15:05
The one thing I have learned in LE is you better be more concerned about a burglary in the middle of the day than at night. Thieves hit during the day when they think no one is home, if they come in when it is occupied at night they normally have more in mind than a simple theft.

Keep your doors locked and at least acknowledge anyone knocking at the door even if you leave it closed.

So how does that work for folks? If they think I may be home they keep pounding, honk horn, have even have folks pound on windows.

Breadman03
08-09-2012, 15:05
Give you odds on what the next sound is, eh?:wavey:

Kydex v. Melonite.

ray9898
08-09-2012, 15:06
Give you odds on what the next sound is, eh?:wavey:

Yup....but good people lose every day in gunfights. I would rather avoid the situation and I damn well want my family to avoid it if I am not there to act.

ray9898
08-09-2012, 15:09
So how does that work for folks? If they think I may be home they keep pounding, honk horn, have even have folks pound on windows.


Tell them to go away, if they don't let it be known you are phoning 9-1-1 as they are now trespassing and do so if needed.

It gives warning to anyone looking for an unoccupied house to target while you keep the defensive advantage behind a closed door.

ICARRY2
08-09-2012, 16:22
I agree with you completely. As a matter of fact, recently, my son poked fun at me for being vigilant about locking our doors during the day time. I told him that I wasn't paranoid and didn't expect any trouble, but why make it easy on anyone? He didn't see my logic at the time, but I imagine he does now.

And no, he didn't dial 911 first. In his youthful, testosterone-filled machismo, he felt like he had the situation under control. I persuaded him otherwise.

When people tell me I am being paranoid...

I respond with paranoid people live longer. :)

tsmo1066
08-09-2012, 16:28
Not unloaded, just empty chamber. He is aware of it being kept in this condition and knows how to chamber a round.

It doesn't take but a second or so to activate most pistol speed-safes. I'd recommend leaving the gun chambered and ready to go, but secured in a push-button pistol safe.

jph02
08-09-2012, 18:10
...To the OP:

Glad your son is okay. IMO you should be proud that he took steps to protect himself and had the good sense to not chase anyone outside.
This.

xenophon
08-09-2012, 19:33
Hope you and he got take-aways from this one.

Gonzoso
08-09-2012, 20:07
How quick was your son to call the police? Was he hesitant at all to file a report?

Do you have any painkillers in the medicine cabinet? Do you keep track of them?

I don't know you or your son so I'm not trying to offend anyone, but one has to consider the possibility that a boy of 16 could make up a story to conceal something they did while in pursuit of doing something they shouldn't have been.

You said all your neighbors are there all day and its a nice neighborhood, did anyone else see a suspicious young man fleeing the house, or any suspicious cars?

In entering the house in the time it took for your son to get to the gun how did he get to right where the prescription drugs were stored to break a figurine?

Mr. Niceguy
08-10-2012, 07:20
How quick was your son to call the police? Was he hesitant at all to file a report?

Do you have any painkillers in the medicine cabinet? Do you keep track of them?

I don't know you or your son so I'm not trying to offend anyone, but one has to consider the possibility that a boy of 16 could make up a story to conceal something they did while in pursuit of doing something they shouldn't have been.

You said all your neighbors are there all day and its a nice neighborhood, did anyone else see a suspicious young man fleeing the house, or any suspicious cars?

In entering the house in the time it took for your son to get to the gun how did he get to right where the prescription drugs were stored to break a figurine?

I don't take any offense whatsoever to your line of reasoning, and have also given alternative scenarios a lot of thought. Our back door enters into the kitchen / den area of our house. Upon entering, the prescription meds are stored on a small shelf directly in front of you at a distance of around 10 feet at eye level, so it is reasonable to assume someone could have seen them almost immediately upon entering. Lending further credibility to his story, the meds are nothing anyone would be interested in - an antibiotic and blood pressure medication. Not exactly the fun stuff people are looking for, but it would certainly catch someone's eye if they had nefarious intent.

Also, because of an abundance of very mature landscaping, our neighbors have a very obstructed view of our back yard. This is the approach that would have been taken from the park to our sunroom, seen as the sided part of the house:
226989

Here is a view taken from the patio area, looking toward the park where the perp would have entered:
226990

And another view of the back yard, taken from the gate where they would have entered:
226991

Our neighbors do not have the same view of the park because of privacy fences.

My dogs have also been acting strangely since the incident - skittish, extremely submissive to the point of incontinence, etc. They are both ten years old and I know their behaviors very well. This is definitely out of the norm for them.

costanza187
08-10-2012, 09:04
Powerful, yet concealable, 16+1 rounds of fire-breathing home protection, integrated trigger and grip safeties. The perfect solution for the wary 2nd amendment enthusiast. Available in XD, XDC, XDSC, and XDM models.:rofl::rofl::rofl:

That sounds scary until I noticed you said yours was a 9mm?? Isn't that about as dangerous as a bb gun? :dunno:











I kid...I have one of those too.

Mr. Niceguy
10-16-2012, 08:46
Update - Earlier this week, an arrest was made as the result of a daytime burglary in our neighborhood. The perp is a youthful looking 26 year-old of slight build who also lives in the neighborhood (with his parents). My house is directly between his house, and the one that was burglarized, each about 1/4 mile from mine. He matches the description that my son gave. Hopefully the same guy.
http://www.ktts.com/news/173983631.html

nosuchagency
10-16-2012, 09:07
glad it worked out for the best, ng. it's a unique experience to go through having an intruder in your home and definitely changes your perspective. i was recently burglarized during the daytime; however, was fortunate enough that neither of us was home at the time, but what your kid went through brings it to another level entirely. less than 2 months later and i still don't feel easy at home (sick feeling persists), even after getting an alarm installed within 48 hours of event. i rarely carried at home, or even had a firearm nearby prior, but that's changed. anyway, i hope you and yours are able to cope through it.

Sveke
10-16-2012, 09:25
This is exactly why I signed up for my pistol permit. It's a different world now.

I'm only 35 and I graduated high school in 1996. Not that long ago....

I remember no locked doors, no metal detectors, no cameras, no security.....and everything was dandy. Never a violent incident except a good old fashioned fist fight once in a while.

It's a shame.....

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

fwm
10-16-2012, 12:58
+1

If your son was a little slower on the uptake that burglar would have been armed, and not your son. Your boy could have been killed or at least held hostage and forced to Maximize the burglar's search for valuables. God forbid if its a 16 year old girl, with an badguy armed with dad's gun. A push button or biometric pistol safe only takes a second to open, and prevents bad things like that from happening.

That's why in my house, all occupants are armed at all times. No big race to the guns, just pull it and defend.

I live in a 'nice' neighborhood. Killing time while renewing my CCW, I happened to look through the counties book of know criminals addresses. 35 felons live within a 5 block radius of us, and 15 of them are sex offenders. Makes you rethink the term 'nice' neighborhood.

tantrix
10-16-2012, 13:07
Conversely, the intruder could easily have come across the gun before your son and thus easily armed himself had he not been prior.

You need better hiding spots. I have at least 5 handguns within reach anywhere in the house that you wouldn't find.

TK-421
10-16-2012, 13:36
You need better hiding spots. I have at least 5 handguns within reach anywhere in the house that you wouldn't find.

Once I get my own place, I'll be the same way. I'll have guns stashed throughout the house, but in secret compartments that are code activated. Don't want a burglar rummaging through a random drawer and finding a loaded handgun. Plus, once I get a holster, I'll have a firearm strapped to my hip all day every day.

Hell, I might even grab myself one of those bullet resistant SWAT shields if I get really paranoid, and have it hidden behind a false wall in the bathroom. That way they can't shoot through it, and I can return fire from mobile cover. :cool:

Hailstorm
10-16-2012, 13:43
Note to self. Keep a Glock in the shower.

countrygun
10-16-2012, 13:48
Note to self. Keep a Glock in the shower.

You don't already?

Hmmm

raven11
10-16-2012, 13:52
Good to hear your son is ok, and it looks like you thought of ways to prevent it napping in the future

Hailstorm
10-16-2012, 13:53
Shamefully, no. :embarassed:

I was hoping my little datson dogs would delay entry into the house with all the licking.

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y76/1hailstorm/IMG_20120821_211101.jpg

tantrix
10-16-2012, 15:03
Once I get my own place, I'll be the same way. I'll have guns stashed throughout the house, but in secret compartments that are code activated. Don't want a burglar rummaging through a random drawer and finding a loaded handgun. Plus, once I get a holster, I'll have a firearm strapped to my hip all day every day.

Hell, I might even grab myself one of those bullet resistant SWAT shields if I get really paranoid, and have it hidden behind a false wall in the bathroom. That way they can't shoot through it, and I can return fire from mobile cover. :cool:

Good idea. All the doors in the house are security doors with steel cores that aren't penetrable by gunfire. They are heavy and I had to use pretty robust hinges, but I guess if I ever need it, it's there.

The Machinist
10-16-2012, 15:08
This is why my gun goes into the bathroom with me.

TK-421
10-16-2012, 15:15
Good idea. All the doors in the house are security doors with steel cores that aren't penetrable by gunfire. They are heavy and I had to use pretty robust hinges, but I guess if I ever need it, it's there.

If I had the money, every door in my house would be steel core, impenetrable by a 5.56 round. The insides walls, floors and ceilings would be plastered with sheets of kevlar to make sure that the wall could also stop a 5.56. I'd then also have a secret hide-out bunker well stocked with weapons and ammunition, just in case I had to fight my way out.

Oh if only I could win the lottery. Even though it's harder for me than most, since I don't play it. :rofl:

Mrs. VR
10-16-2012, 15:23
That's good news!

tantrix
10-16-2012, 15:32
If I had the money, every door in my house would be steel core, impenetrable by a 5.56 round. The insides walls, floors and ceilings would be plastered with sheets of kevlar to make sure that the wall could also stop a 5.56. I'd then also have a secret hide-out bunker well stocked with weapons and ammunition, just in case I had to fight my way out.

Oh if only I could win the lottery. Even though it's harder for me than most, since I don't play it. :rofl:

Well, the doors weren't too bad cost-wise. Bulletproof glass in the all the windows did cross my mind too, but then I decided against it. It's substantially more than all the steel core doors, and on top of that the walls are still penetrable anyway (rifles can penetrate any home).

I did the doors for sure though, because a gang could break in and all I'd have to do is stand behind the bedroom door with my wife and kids and they'd never get in, or shoot through it.

crazycooter91
10-16-2012, 15:57
This is why my gun goes into the bathroom with me.

Same here, what else am I supposed to mess with while sitting on the crapper? :rofl:

Ironbar
10-16-2012, 17:02
Conversely, the intruder could easily have come across the gun before your son and thus easily armed himself had he not been prior.

Can't just ONE of these stories be told without playing the "what if" game? :brickwall:

raven11
10-16-2012, 17:05
Note to self. Keep a Glock in the shower.

pssh,... only a glock

http://bp3.blogger.com/_-kZfLgIo2Nk/R4m_rn0C2II/AAAAAAAAABI/q5ALn7IDjp4/s400/Cookie+Shower+Gun.png

Ohio Copper
10-16-2012, 17:27
If I had the money, every door in my house would be steel core, impenetrable by a 5.56 round. The insides walls, floors and ceilings would be plastered with sheets of kevlar to make sure that the wall could also stop a 5.56. I'd then also have a secret hide-out bunker well stocked with weapons and ammunition, just in case I had to fight my way out.

Oh if only I could win the lottery. Even though it's harder for me than most, since I don't play it. :rofl:

What happens when you choke on a hot dog and need EMS assistance?


Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

nikerret
10-16-2012, 19:03
...and on top of that the walls are still penetrable anyway (rifles can penetrate any home).


Untrue. I know of a home that would take a .50 cal to have a chance. It is a really cool house in Leawood, KS.

bmoore
10-16-2012, 19:07
What happens when you choke on a hot dog and need EMS assistance?


Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

We will cut a hole in the roof, smash out the ceiling, stick a rool ladder down and start working on the patient.

bmoore
10-16-2012, 19:08
OP I am happy your son is OK and that he knew how to protect himself.

pizza_pablo
10-17-2012, 13:10
Can't just ONE of these stories be told without playing the "what if" game? :brickwall:
Apparently not. :upeyes:

TK-421
10-17-2012, 13:43
What happens when you choke on a hot dog and need EMS assistance?


Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

If I choke on a hot dog, my dumbass deserves to die. :rofl:

Peace Warrior
10-17-2012, 13:54
Nobody broke in. Your son was playing football in the house with a friend and broke the statue. He just needed a believable excuse how it got broken....


Just kidding. :)
Kidding, really? Hmmmmmmm........ not me. There is more to this story than meets the eye.

OP, I would grill your son on ALL the facts, backwards and forwards, until you find the truth. People just do NOT break in a house in the middle of the day unless they either know who lives there, or they know who lives there. :whistling:

I'd love my kid, but i would make sure the story was all there is to know.

(Okay GT'ers, flame on....)

Ohio Copper
10-17-2012, 14:06
Kidding, really? Hmmmmmmm........ not me. There is more to this story than meets the eye.

OP, I would grill your son on ALL the facts, backwards and forwards, until you find the truth. People just do NOT break in a house in the middle of the day unless they either know who lives there, or they know who lives there. :whistling:

I'd love my kid, but i would make sure the story was all there is to know.

(Okay GT'ers, flame on....)

We've had multiple strings of burglaries in my jurisdiction.
Their method was to kick in a back door during midday and grab guns, Xbox, laptops, cash and jewels and be out in a few minutes.
Turns out they knew nothing of the victims other thanthey weren't going to be home because there were no cars in the drive or activity in the house.




Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

Peace Warrior
10-17-2012, 14:07
We've had multiple strings of burglaries in my jurisdiction.
Their method was to kick in a back door during midday and grab guns, Xbox, laptops, cash and jewels and be out in a few minutes.
Turns out they knew nothing of the victims other thanthey weren't going to be home because there were no cars in the drive or activity in the house.




Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

Okay, sure.... :whistling:

Lampshade
10-17-2012, 14:08
People just do NOT break in a house in the middle of the day unless they either know who lives there, or they know who lives there. :whistling:

Lol wut, that's one of the most laughably ignorant things I've read today.

Daytime break ins are actually incredibly common since most people are out of the house during the day.

Peace Warrior
10-17-2012, 14:11
Lol wut, that's one of the most laughably ignorant things I've read today.

Daytime break ins are actually incredibly common since most people are out of the house during the day.
I'm laughing too thinking that criminals would take a chance on possibly going to jail for a long a time, or getting shot, for possibly getting something rather than breaking into a place that they knew had items worth some "real money yo" and that these same items could be fenced quickly.

it's an old adage, but it is true just the same, "People you know, or the people they know, are the ones that break into your home."

ETA: I am NOT referring to your vehicle parked on game day. or at a bar. or at the beach/lake etcetera.

MtBaldy
10-17-2012, 14:12
Glad he's okay. I think he did good. Maybe now he'll lock the doors.

Lampshade
10-17-2012, 14:15
I'm laughing too thinking that criminals would take a chance on possibly going to jail for a long a time, or getting shot, for possibly getting something rather than breaking into a place that they knew had items worth some "real money yo" and that these same items could be fenced quickly.
.

Lol, it happens all the time dude.

I don't know how many reports of daytime burglarlies I've read in my area where all that is taken is a little bit of cash, jewelry, x-Box, etc.

People break into strangers homes, oftentimes during the day.

Peace Warrior
10-17-2012, 14:17
Plenty of people burgle strangers.
I will not disagree, but we have to start at the obvious, and then let the evidence/testimony take us to where the investigation leads.

Teenagers NEVER lie unless their lips are moving. :thumbsup:

Lol, it happens all the time dude.

I don't know how many reports of daytime burglarlies I've read in my area where all that is taken is a little bit of cash, jewelry, x-Box, etc.

People break into strangers homes, oftentimes during the day.
This is true, but most times, they (i.e., the burglars) know what is in the house before they ever set foot on the property. This is a fact. Pure and simple. The people that rip you off when you're not at home already knew you, or knew someone you know before they ever considered making you a victim of their criminality.

Some local detectives around here refer to it as "the short list" [of suspects].

Ohio Copper
10-17-2012, 14:19
Lol wut, that's one of the most laughably ignorant things I've read today.

Daytime break ins are actually incredibly common since most people are out of the house during the day.

I forgot to read who the poster was...


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Ohio Copper
10-17-2012, 14:27
I will not disagree, but we have to start at the obvious, and then let the evidence/testimony take us to where the investigation leads.

Teenagers NEVER lie unless their lips are moving. :thumbsup:


This is true, but most times, they (i.e., the burglars) know what is in the house before they ever set foot on the property. This is a fact. Pure and simple. The people that rip you off when you're not at home already knew you, or knew someone you know before they ever considered making you a victim of their criminality.

Some local detectives around here refer to it as "the short list" [of suspects].

Because that's not a generalized stereotype or anything...


I can kick in few doors and find the same amount of items to steal in every house.

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glockeglock
10-17-2012, 15:25
.....

Mr. Niceguy
10-17-2012, 16:26
Kidding, really? Hmmmmmmm........ not me. There is more to this story than meets the eye.

OP, I would grill your son on ALL the facts, backwards and forwards, until you find the truth. People just do NOT break in a house in the middle of the day unless they either know who lives there, or they know who lives there. :whistling:

I'd love my kid, but i would make sure the story was all there is to know.

(Okay GT'ers, flame on....)
That's funny to hear, because the owners of the home that was burglarized in my neighborhood don't know the young man who was arrested for the crime. Theirs was also a daytime burglary. It seems the young man favored working close to home.

Mrs. VR
10-17-2012, 17:14
I'm laughing too thinking that criminals would take a chance on possibly going to jail for a long a time, or getting shot, for possibly getting something rather than breaking into a place that they knew had items worth some "real money yo" and that these same items could be fenced quickly.

it's an old adage, but it is true just the same, "People you know, or the people they know, are the ones that break into your home."

ETA: I am NOT referring to your vehicle parked on game day. or at a bar. or at the beach/lake etcetera.
Thats EXACTLY what happened at my in laws while my son was there. Both of the criminals pled guilty. They were breaking in during the day BECAUSE they thought no one would be home, and stealing things to fence for drug money.

xenophon
10-17-2012, 20:34
OP, thanks for the update, I remember this thread. I'm sure it was the same guy, would bet on it.

Mr. Niceguy
10-18-2012, 08:53
I can kick in few doors and find the same amount of items to steal in every house.



I agree completely. My neighbors include:

a urologist
a cardiologist
a pediatrician
two orthodontists
a partner in a law firm
another attorney
various other professionals all solidly in the six figure range

I think it would be laughable for anyone to think that any of these homes stood even a slight chance of not having anything worth stealing.

Peace Warrior
10-18-2012, 23:58
Because that's not a generalized stereotype or anything...


I can kick in few doors and find the same amount of items to steal in every house.

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I am being extremely stereotypical, and admittedly so by the way; owever, random break-ins where the burglars/robbers do not have any clue about who or what is inside the home are the extreme exception, but not the rule, as well.

You chided me on you being one who has investigated more crimes than I have, and yet you fail to understand this simple point and commonality with burglaries. Strange you didn't know of this already "copper." :whistling:

A particular girl comes to mind. Mommy goes to work, a "break-in" occurs. Week and a half later, the daughter confesses to having friends in the home while skipping school two days before the break in. As it is all tidied up, there were two people who "knew" her friends from school and these 'friends of friends' are busted for the break in due to pawn shop receipts/surveillance cameras.

Peace Warrior
10-19-2012, 00:00
Thats EXACTLY what happened at my in laws while my son was there. Both of the criminals pled guilty. They were breaking in during the day BECAUSE they thought no one would be home, and stealing things to fence for drug money.
I stand corrected on fiendish drug addicts. Crack and or similar drugs makes people do stupidly outlandish things outside the norm.

mea culpa. :wavey:

Peace Warrior
10-19-2012, 00:05
That's funny to hear, because the owners of the home that was burglarized in my neighborhood don't know the young man who was arrested for the crime. Theirs was also a daytime burglary. It seems the young man favored working close to home.
Maybe criminals today are just not as sophisticated as they were when I grew up.

"Cela blesse le -LOL- de fiertÚ pas sÚrieusement."

Peace Warrior
10-19-2012, 00:10
I get it. I am wrong all the way through thread as when I grew up in the 80's, I "worked with" professionals and not crazy for a fix drug addicts most of the time.

I admit I am wrong on this one. So sorry folks. :wavey:

Peace Warrior
10-19-2012, 00:33
Train your dog to not bark at everything, so it means something when he does.
Wisdom is such a rare commodity these days. Great point GG.

Ohio Copper
10-19-2012, 04:20
I am being extremely stereotypical, and admittedly so by the way; owever, random break-ins where the burglars/robbers do not have any clue about who or what is inside the home are the extreme exception, but not the rule, as well.

You chided me on you being one who has investigated more crimes than I have, and yet you fail to understand this simple point and commonality with burglaries. Strange you didn't know of this already "copper." :whistling:

A particular girl comes to mind. Mommy goes to work, a "break-in" occurs. Week and a half later, the daughter confesses to having friends in the home while skipping school two days before the break in. As it is all tidied up, there were two people who "knew" her friends from school and these 'friends of friends' are busted for the break in due to pawn shop receipts/surveillance cameras.

Still not catching your point.


Burglaries are almost always done by someone the victim knows?

We have plenty of random burglaries and petty thefts from vehicles. Sometimes it's people in the neighborhood, sometimes it's folks from elsewhere. I've had plenty of stuff show up at pawn shops and they were charged with receiving stolen property.


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Peace Warrior
10-20-2012, 08:48
Still not catching your point.


Burglaries are almost always done by someone the victim knows?

We have plenty of random burglaries and petty thefts from vehicles. Sometimes it's people in the neighborhood, sometimes it's folks from elsewhere. I've had plenty of stuff show up at pawn shops and they were charged with receiving stolen property.


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Yes, either someone the victims knows personally, or someone the victim's friends know.

I once knew a burglar that would watch the trash that people threw away. To his eye, TV boxes, stereo boxes etcetera were a dead give away. He just wait till no one was home and go get 'em.

As I made note of in my latest posts, I failed to appreciate the rise in drug addicted criminals. I stand corrected. Even so, IMHO, it takes a lot of balls to make "a lottery type decision" for B & E into someone house nowadays, but to each their own I guess.

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