Stock up on ammo or stock up on reloading gear/components? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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RMTactical
08-19-2012, 21:01
I think there is a place for both, but curious to see what you guys think. Any of you SHTF'ers reloaders?

Carry16
08-19-2012, 21:28
I have a good supply of both, though I can't imagine being around long enough to need to reload for survival. My primary reload was in .308 where I was doing it for accuracy not cost savings. I wouldn't consider putting my reloads thru my M1A. As such I buy factory ammo for all my semi-auto firearms. Much more factory than reload on hand.

Maine1
08-20-2012, 01:31
Come SHTF, you need AMMO, not components.
Ammo assembled when you were focused on the task, not jittery from the zombies and canibals beating on the door.
That said, definitley have the ability to reload everything you shoot, and plenty of primers, powder, ect.
What you do not need, others will.
Of course, once you aquire all this, load it up. It stores more compactly as ammo then in components.

TangoFoxtrot
08-20-2012, 04:26
Ammo on hand. No reloading in my plans. No time or equipment.

Johnny Cache
08-20-2012, 22:03
Good question.
I actually have a reloading kit that I've never taken out of the box.
I also have a ton of ammo saved up, but it is ultimately finite since I went with the most non-domestic round possible-the 5.45.:blondmoment: The 5.45 surplus has been cheap for a good run, but if outside supply is ever cut off, I'm simply ****ed. There's not even a domestic source for reloading components for that caliber.
Anyway, that's why I've been considering a switch to a 5.56 AK, or possibly even an AR.

Mr.Pliskin
08-21-2012, 08:24
For hunting calibers (308) I figure 500 rounds will last a very long time. For the fighting calibers I dont think I'd want to stay to collect the brass.

Myth
08-21-2012, 08:42
Go with ammo. Ammo is easier to transport, less susceptable to contaminations (moisture, oils, etc) that would render it useless, takes up less room in storage, requires less skill to work with, and most importantly...it is always ready to go at a moment's notice.

I do reload, and have for over 40 years, but I do so only for accuracy in certain rifles, for rifles chambered in wildcat rounds, or for those chambered for rounds that are too hard to find commercially. And frankly, factory ammo has improved so much in quality since I started handloading that I really don't see enough accuracy improvement anymore to warrant the time invested, so most of my reloading these days is for the wildcats and hard-to-find ammo. For combat, I would always recommend factory-loaded ammo where it is an option. Still, all of that said, I have dies and components for every caliber I own other than .22 rimfire, and I have equipment to take used .22 rimfire cases and process them into jacketed .224" or .243" bullets (Corbin is where I got this equipment if you are interested). Waste not, want not!

Myth

DoctaGlockta
08-21-2012, 08:52
IMO if you practice/use your weapons regularly then reloading can make sense depending on what caliber.

If you are just storing for FUBAR times then just store factory ammo.

I started reloading a few years ago because there was no ammo on the shelves.

That is not the case these days.

quake
08-21-2012, 08:58
My take on it, from a year or so ago
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1382761

I do reload and have for nearly 30 years, and do have quite a bit of components on hand. But come shtf, I'd rather have my stuff assembled than not. As dexters pointed out, there's the issue of cleaning the brass if nothing else. We can do that via generator power while it's running for other purposes (or even clean it by hand, but that'd be horrid); but if I were in a true bug-in shtf situation with dirty brass on hand, I'd go ahead & clean all of it at once, and then load rounds until I ran out of something and couldn't anymore. (Unless, as LG1 points out, my right arm falls off first; which is a distinct danger if you have enough components on hand...)

Fwiw, I do clean my brass when I first put it up, but if it's set for any length of time (which most of it has) I actually re-clean it immediately prior to loading it up, just for polishing & de-tarnishing reasons.

kirgi08
08-21-2012, 09:45
:goodpost: :agree:

That being said,I gave up "reload" space for food/ammo and other needs.We have ammo and BP and other means ta reload.We do have components for barter.'08.

mac66
08-21-2012, 11:42
I would say ammo first. However, having the ability to reload is a plus in my book. Not only from the "I can make my own ammo" perspective but also the "I can make lots of different loads to fit my needs". I think it would have some value in the long term to have the ability to create custom loads. Sub sonics for example.

I retired a year and a half ago and am now just dragging out all my reloading stuff. I now have time to play around again and create different kinds of loads.

pugman
08-28-2012, 08:18
Like nearly everything, I have put way too much thought into this and settled strictly on stocking up on ammunition.

It also depends greatly on what type of S is hitting your fan, how extensive (or paranoid) your plans are, do you have a stable AO, how much you shoot now, etc.

To me, the only two reasons to reload are 1) cost 2) the skill set you acquire by reloading.

Do you have children or an extended family? Do your stockpiling thoughts extend to them? I don’t know how long properly stored powder lasts…but I’ve shot 60 year old ammunition without a hiccup.

If you have a reloading station, do you ever think you may need to move it? It would really suck living in a suburb of Atlanta, Chicago or any major metro area to find out due to some situation (riots, nuke, biological attack, whatever) you have 20 minutes to leave a house

How much do you think you might be able to find, beg, borrow or steal in case the SHTF?

Imagine a “reasonable” emergency happens right now in the form of a major biological attack, the inevitable failure of the Federal Government, terrorists set off a dirty bomb somewhere, etc. On a going forward basis, how much ammunition do you really think you will need for hunting, training and defensive purposes? Considering most people I know feel in this type of environment their main goal would be to avoid conflicts at all costs 1,000 rounds each of a defensive rifle and pistol caliber, shotgun rounds in slugs/shot mix and 5,000 rounds of .22LR would go a long way.

My personal stash goes way above this but I have the financial means to buy it, the place to store it and the means to move it fairly quickly if I needed to.

JDSTG58
08-28-2012, 17:08
........

Carry16
08-28-2012, 20:07
For me the only reason to reload was to gain the accuracy of hand loaded ammo. I only reloaded rifle ammo, mostly .308. I can consistently hit a 6" paper plate at 300 yards with my ammo, but not with store bought. YMMV

Ruble Noon
08-28-2012, 20:25
I think there is a place for both, but curious to see what you guys think. Any of you SHTF'ers reloaders?

If you stock up on reloading gear and components, you have stocked up on ammo.

actionshooter10
08-28-2012, 21:43
For me the only reason to reload was to gain the accuracy of hand loaded ammo. I only reloaded rifle ammo, mostly .308. I can consistently hit a 6" paper plate at 300 yards with my ammo, but not with store bought. YMMV

That's only 2 moa. ALL of my ammo shoots 2 moa out of my bolt guns. My reloads shoot .5 to 1 moa. Something sounds off in your setup.

OP-Have both. I agree with Myth. Keep factory ammo on hand but have the means to reload everything you shoot.

JimIsland
08-28-2012, 22:13
Re-loading is fine and dandy but whos going to be standing post while you are re=loading?? I gotcha Back!!

cowboy1964
08-28-2012, 23:19
Not many keep tens of thousands of rounds of loaded ammo sitting around. Many here keep that much in components.

It's analogous to keeping prepared food vs having a garden. The well-prepped person has both.

Apetrulis01
08-29-2012, 20:54
I have Factory ammo for SHTF but I do reload. I reload for competition though. Now, if time permits I can kick up the powder charge and store them up before I have to leave, but reloads are for competition and factory for everything else.

Do what I do, if you go to Walmart, every time you go there buy a box of ammo. It will add up quick.

Adam

SDDL-UP
08-29-2012, 22:27
I have both.

For SHTF you really want LOADED AMMO - you might never even get a chance to a magazine change in a serious SHTF scenario, much less reload components.

In an EOTWAWKI you'll want both - components allow you to be more flexible for your end purpose. It's also cheaper once you get setup, but it takes a new reloader thousands of rounds to recouperate the initial expense.

AK_Stick
08-30-2012, 00:47
Both.


Loaded ammo is good to have one hand, but eventually you'll need to resupply.


I've got a healthy quantity of both, and I plan to reload as I need it. If for no other reason than ammo can be traded.

I Shooter
08-30-2012, 01:55
I do both. I have a stock of factory ammo and reloaded ammo for every thing I have. Well not the 22LR. Then I have all the parts needed to reload every thing several times over. As far as having to move it. I do. When I go out west I take my reloading stuff with me. All the stuff fits in two dry boxes. One box is parts and the other tools. I can't buy 358 Winchester any more so I have to make them. The 308 and the 243 like what I make better than any thing I can buy. The 44 gets down loaded for the 4" and up loaded for the 8" and 7.5". You can't find stuff like that to buy so you have to make it. With my set up I can load 100 rounds of custom ammo in about three hours. I think the time is worth it. I also find it relaxing. Besides every body needs a hobby. You all have a great day.

TACLOAD
08-30-2012, 06:58
I have a nice stockpile of factory stuff. I have enough components to last a very long time when ammo on the self becomes non existent or the price gouging starts again, like back in ,08.

Myke_Hart
08-30-2012, 10:11
If you stock up on reloading gear and components, you have stocked up on ammo.

I agree.

Stock up on components and make what you need with a little extra. Then restock on components.

Keep the cycle and you will never have old ammo laying around.:embarassed:

Warp
08-30-2012, 21:48
Ammo for SHTF loading.

Components for practice/training/skills maintenance over the long haul.

shotgunred
08-31-2012, 05:57
When I reload I save over 50% on pistol fmj's and more on rifle. The only factory ammo I have is a few hundred rounds of self defense ammo for every day carry and 22LR. All the rest I make myself. With my setup I can make over 1000 rounds of pistol ammo an hour. With reloading the only critical component is the primers.

Training with you choice of weapon is necessary if you are going to keep your skill level up. Why not pay half price?

dudel
08-31-2012, 12:01
I did both. Only about a hundred rounds of various factory centerfire ammo. Lots of components and 22LR though.

Even put up some Lee Loaders in reserve.

In this scenario, I suspect ammo will be a valuable trade good. Having plenty is good (factory or reloaded).

LongGun1
09-01-2012, 07:40
I am in the "both" camp.


Lots of loaded ammo stored for the long term..

..and components for reloading..

..especially so for the more customized loads..

..in calibers such as 5.7x28mm, .300 Blackout & .50 BMG


YMMV

kirgi08
09-01-2012, 08:01
I'm in the factory load and components side.We don't have the room ta reload safely.'08.

PM inbound.

Slackinoff
09-01-2012, 10:53
I have consolidated my pistols to 9mm so that I could focus on storing a ton of it, but I kept my .40, .357mag .357sig, and .45 ammo. I also have some .270, 30-30, I dont own any guns in these calibers, but I still keep the ammo around. Do you guys store ammo for calibers you don't currently own guns in? I don't have a bunch stored, just about a couple hundred rounds in each of those pistol calibers. ( Not planning to add any more either)

kirgi08
09-02-2012, 07:03
We do,it'll change a club or rock ta viable weapon.'08.

pugman
09-02-2012, 10:50
I have consolidated my pistols to 9mm so that I could focus on storing a ton of it, but I kept my .40, .357mag .357sig, and .45 ammo. I also have some .270, 30-30, I dont own any guns in these calibers, but I still keep the ammo around. Do you guys store ammo for calibers you don't currently own guns in? I don't have a bunch stored, just about a couple hundred rounds in each of those pistol calibers. ( Not planning to add any more either)

What I store and own: .22LR, 9mm, .357Mag, 12/20 Gauge, .270, 7.62x39...that's it.

The only calibers I own guns in I don't have ammo for were part of my Grandfather's collection.

IMO, see if Obama gets elected and watch the ammunition prices. I ended up selling off all my .45 back after Obama was elected. I sold it walking around a gun show 1) the frenzy fed the prices 2) gun show prices made what I was selling mine for look reasonable (I mean come on $80 for a 50 round box of .380?) 3) I made a 230% profit

2nd IMO...I would dump the .357 sig. Depending on what you are thinking might happen 1) you don't own a gun in it 2) its a cool round but just not popular enough to be a caliber I think is tradeable post SHTF 3) its expensive enough for those who like/shoot it if O get relected you could sell it at a nice profit

In this scenario, I suspect ammo will be a valuable trade good. Having plenty is good (factory or reloaded).

I know something is better than nothing...but SHTF, would you trust another person's reloads?

quake
09-03-2012, 12:27
...Do you guys store ammo for calibers you don't currently own guns in?...

Some, strictly for folks I know who have guns, but may not have any/much ammunition on hand; and strictly people who I'd be comfortable arming. All either genuine family (as opposed to being just 'relatives'; big difference imo), good neighbors (some of which I count as 'family' even though they're not relatives), and employees as I see a certain sense of responsibility there, to an admittedly limited degree.

Mostly loaded ammunition for this category, but a couple exceptions that I have reloading components and dies & such for, on top of some level of stored ammunition. Those exceptions are for specific calibers & guns for close family members; close geographically as well as otherwise.

Slackinoff
09-03-2012, 15:59
Great responses to my question kirgi08, quake, and pugman. I had not considered some of the things yall mentioned.