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abq87120
08-26-2012, 08:40
I am a new loader and bought Berry 9mm 124g HBFP DS bullets and 40 S&W 120g FP DS bullets when I got my press set up.

I'm using the Lyman loading book (and the internet) and cannot find a COAL for flat point bullets. I am concerned about setting the depth too deep and causing excessive pressure.

I have these powders:

Accurate No. 7
IMR 800X
Hodgdon Clays

Does anyone have a load recommendation using these flat point bullets? Please include COAL.

I do plan to buy different bullets for my next batch. I was just so eager to get started with my new rig that I ran down to my LGS and bought whatever was in stock in my calibers. From now on, I will plan ahead and buy components that I have load data for, lol.

Thanks in advance,
Dan in ABQ

fredj338
08-26-2012, 12:11
Dan, as always; OAL IS BULLET & GUN SPECIFIC. SO you need to fit the bullet to your bbl & magazines. Sicne you are using a completely diff bullet than any data source, you will have to work up the load from starting data. A plated is not a jacketed & a HB is not a solid base. You are pretty much loading like a wildcat at this point, so hopefully your exp level is there, a chronograph & understanding of pressure signs is very helpful when loading compeltely off the books as you are.
A good starting OAL for most 9mm & a TCFP will be aboit 1.110". Yes it is short, but that is what the TCFP does. Add to that the longer bullet being a HB & the fact it is HB, it's a total crap shoot. Start low & work up, all I can advise. What works in my gun may not in yours.

PCJim
08-26-2012, 18:23
Like Fred said, you're using a rather odd 9mm bullet given that it has the hollow base. Being that it is a plated bullet, I would seat the 9's as long as possible (make sure you have enough bullet in the case to provide adequate purchase on the bullet) and start low.

For the 40S&W plated, if they are not HB, start off with a published load book's starting load and work up from there. Just starting out, you don't want any barn burners. Find a charge that cycles your pistol and has good accuracy, and leave it at that. You can start on hotter loads, if desired, when you have more experience under your belt.

F106 Fan
08-26-2012, 18:55
The other responders have given you a couple of suggestions and I was going to add to the list. However, I deleted that posting before I ever clicked 'Submit Reply'.

Here's the thing about the bullets you bought: You will never find load data. Even for plated round nose or HP bullets, you will find the data quite scarce. Then there is the idea that starting your reloading career by 'guessing' seems really bad.

So, my revised suggestiong is this: STOP! Put those bullets on the shelf for a time when you have more experience and go get some bullets that match the data you have. It's unlikely (I hope) that you bought thousands of them but there was probably a reason they were the only thing in stock. Nobody else wanted them!

My strong suggestion is that you buy your bullets in somewhat larger quantities from places like:
http://www.precisiondelta.com/product.php?indx=5
http://www.montanagoldbullet.com/

You can buy 'baggie' quantities of Winchester bullets from Cabela's but they are overpriced. Still, delivery is usually quite fast and we're only talking about 100 of each (I suppose):
http://www.cabelas.com/product/Shooting/Reloading/Reloading-Components%7C/pc/104792580/c/104761080/sc/104275080/Winchester-Pistol-Bullets-Per-100/731774.uts?destination=%2Fcatalog%2Fbrowse%2Fshooting-reloading-reloading-components%2Fwinchester%2F_%2FN-1100194%2B1000005171%2FNe-1000005171%2FNs-CATEGORY_SEQ_104275080%3FWTz_l%3DSBC%253Bcat104792580%253Bcat104761080%26WTz_st%3DGuidedNav%26WTz_st ype%3DGNU&WTz_l=SBC%3Bcat104792580%3Bcat104761080%3Bcat104275080

Look at the bullet selection and see if anything matches your load data.

I'm not much on 'guessing'. I like my load data to come from a manufacturer and I prefer the printed document.

Not much help, I suspect...

Richard

abq87120
08-27-2012, 07:01
Thank you all. I sincerely appreciate all of the advice. I believe I am going to follow your excellent advice and go buy some bullets I have load data for and start that way.

I am kind of amazed that the Berry hasn't published some loading tables for their products. I wonder what it would do for their repeat sales if people could actually figure out what to do with their bullets.

I'm really looking forward to loading. I retired quite a while ago. But I have only just now reached a point where I can spend as much time on the range as I please. I have a new Lock-n-Load that's been sitting in a moving box for quite a while. It's now mounted on a new work bench in the garage. I joined a terrific local range that shoots lots and lots of IDPA and USPSA events. My goal is to shoot 1000 rounds a week and enjoy the hekk out of myself.

Thanks again for the advice and the links.

Dan in ABQ

PCJim
08-27-2012, 08:00
Dan,
For that quantity of shooting per week, I would strongly suggest you consider moving to an all lead bullet instead of a jacketed bullet. The cost savings is SIGNIFICANT, and the paper won't know the difference. Most 9mm shooters prefer either a 125gr or 147gr bullet.

If you are using a polygonal-barreled pistol (Glock, HK), you will need to be very alert to potential lead buildup in the barrel. You CAN shoot lead thru them, but need to develop a load that has minimal leading and still keep an eye on the barrel.

If a lands/grooves barrel, leading doesn't matter except for cleaning. For that, a few strands of copper Chore Boy wrapped around a bronze brush will make quick work of removing it with a few swipes thru the barrel.

fredj338
08-27-2012, 08:54
Dan,
For that quantity of shooting per week, I would strongly suggest you consider moving to an all lead bullet instead of a jacketed bullet. The cost savings is SIGNIFICANT, and the paper won't know the difference. Most 9mm shooters prefer either a 125gr or 147gr bullet.

If you are using a polygonal-barreled pistol (Glock, HK), you will need to be very alert to potential lead buildup in the barrel. You CAN shoot lead thru them, but need to develop a load that has minimal leading and still keep an eye on the barrel.

If a lands/grooves barrel, leading doesn't matter except for cleaning. For that, a few strands of copper Chore Boy wrapped around a bronze brush will make quick work of removing it with a few swipes thru the barrel.

I would normally agreee, but noob reloaders trying to get lead bullets to run well in semiautos can be quite a trial & erro process. Nope, buy 2000 PD 115gr or 124gr FMJ, loads those & get the feel for the process down. Then going off the books will be a bit easier. I shoot lead in all the handgun calibers, but small bore high pressure rounds are the most diff to get right.

F106 Fan
08-27-2012, 09:10
Thank you all. I sincerely appreciate all of the advice. I believe I am going to follow your excellent advice and go buy some bullets I have load data for and start that way.

I think that is an excellent way to begin!


I am kind of amazed that the Berry hasn't published some loading tables for their products. I wonder what it would do for their repeat sales if people could actually figure out what to do with their bullets.


Well, Berry's does say to load somewhere between mid-range lead bullet data and mid-range jacketed bullet data. So, the max is mid-range jacketed data. They also recommend limiting velocity to 1200 fps, I believe.

The assumption is that you have data for an identical jacketed bullet. But, in terms of the hollow base bullet, there is no jacketed data. Case volume will be higher so pressure would be lower but so would velocity. The recoil might not be enough to operate the slide so an increase in charge would be required. No big deal for someone with some experience in developing loads but kind of a big deal for someone just starting out.

Above there is a recommendation to consider lead bullets. You should definitely put this on your list. They are far cheaper and as long as barrel leading is under control, they are the way to shoot. I load lead for my shooting but, by edict, my grandson shoots FMJ. So, I load both.

As Fred commented, wait a little while before transitioning to lead. It's no big deal but there are some things to watch for - particularly if you are using a Glock barrel. I have tried lead bullets in my G21SF and they worked fine. Even the dreaded semi-wadcutter fed just fine. Barrel leading was minimal and no worse than what I get in one of my Colt 1911s. I replaced the Glock barrel with a KKM and it seems to me that the leading is a little worse. Maybe it's because the barrel is new. Just something to be aware of.


I'm really looking forward to loading. I retired quite a while ago. But I have only just now reached a point where I can spend as much time on the range as I please. I have a new Lock-n-Load that's been sitting in a moving box for quite a while. It's now mounted on a new work bench in the garage. I joined a terrific local range that shoots lots and lots of IDPA and USPSA events. My goal is to shoot 1000 rounds a week and enjoy the hekk out of myself.

Yes, retirement is great! I retired at the end of 2003 and I don't miss a moment of that working nonsense. Everybody I want to shoot with either works or goes to school so I sometimes have to trek to the range by myself. Kind of takes most of the enjoyment out of it. But I would still rather be retired!

Maybe I should concentrate on rifle as it is more of an individual endeavor as opposed to action pistol which is more fun in a group.

Good luck on your reloading venture!

Richard

dkf
08-27-2012, 10:31
Go down to your local shop and pick up a box or two of Hornady or Nosler jacketed bullets and load them up. Yes they are pricey compared to bulk bullets but it is a good way to get you up and running. I started by buying a few boxes of Hornady XTPs and went from there. Then once I had some loads under my belt I started buying larger amounts of other bullets.

For 9mm bullets one of the best bang for the buck is the Precision delta 124gr JHP bullets at $86 shipped per 1000.

abq87120
08-28-2012, 07:40
Thanks again to all. I do shoot 40 S&W with a Glock G23. I have read the lead section of in the few loading pubs I have. I also have a couple of LWD SS barrels. The 40-9 conversion is the one I'm concentrating on because my wife has a G26. I also have their 357 Sig barrel. BTW, these drop in with no other mods other than 9mm mags. They shoot factory ammo great. The 40-9 took 124g bullets when the gun was new to get reliable recoil. I have several cases on the recoil spring now and shoot 115g WWB without FTEs.

I'll figure out which end of my press is which before getting into the lead thing, But do plan to investigate that.

Thanks again,
Dan in ABQ