Looking for a Progressive Press, LNL [Archive] - Glock Talk

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elijah58
09-02-2012, 06:15
Hey guys,
I am looking for a hornady Lock and Load Ammo Plant with as much accessories I can find already with the press. If any of you guys have one or know someone that does please let me know via PM. I am not dead set on the LNL but so far it looks really good to me. I am using a Lyman turret press now and with my wife shooting 50 - 100 rnds per week while I am at work, it is very hard to keep up.
Thanks,

unclebob
09-02-2012, 06:54
If you want a press with case feeder etc.. Forget the LNL and get a Dillon 650 and save yourself of headaches. Between a LNL and Dillon with case feeder itís about 50 differences in price.

Boxerglocker
09-02-2012, 07:49
If you want a press with case feeder etc.. Forget the LNL and get a Dillon 650 and save yourself of headaches. Between a LNL and Dillon with case feeder it’s about 50 differences in price.

:agree:

The LNL Ammo plant includes a bullet feeder which will restrict you to FMJ bullets only unless you mod the feeder die.

I am using a Lyman turret press now and with my wife shooting 50 - 100 rnds per week while I am at work, it is very hard to keep up.
Thanks,

My XL650 is always set-up to go my common range 9mm or .223 FMJ loads. If the inclination hits me I and have an extra 20 minutes. I load a couple hundred rounds.

Colorado4Wheel
09-02-2012, 08:05
100 rds a week is not worth a casefeed and all that stuff. You could do 100 rds in 10 mins on a 550 for a lot less money and hassle of a more complicated setup. But having owned a LNL with casefeeder and a 650 with casefeeder I would get the 650 for sure.

shotgunred
09-02-2012, 08:11
100 rounds a week is really nothing and even a turret press will knock them out in less than an hour. Looking at all the guns you have listed you are going to have quite a bit of money tied up in caliber conversions. I suggest that you take a look at the LNL AP or the Dillon 550 if you can live without the case feeder. If you think you want the case feeder then just buy the Dillon 650 and be done with it.

The LNL AP and the Dillon 550 are both capable of up to 500 rounds and hour. The Dillon 650 is capable of up to 900 rounds and hour.

elijah58
09-02-2012, 09:47
100 rounds a week is really nothing and even a turret press will knock them out in less than an hour. Looking at all the guns you have listed you are going to have quite a bit of money tied up in caliber conversions. I suggest that you take a look at the LNL AP or the Dillon 550 if you can live without the case feeder. If you think you want the case feeder then just buy the Dillon 650 and be done with it.

The LNL AP and the Dillon 550 are both capable of up to 500 rounds and hour. The Dillon 650 is capable of up to 900 rounds and hour.

Thanks,
I am definately looking at one of those, Thought I had my mind made up until I posted this, which is a good thing. I am loading for the 9mm, 10mm, .357 sig, .40, and .45 acp. and usually when I start I try to load between 500 and 1k

labdwakin
09-02-2012, 09:55
C4W (Stevie) is right, XL650 all the way.

elijah58
09-02-2012, 10:01
C4W (Stevie) is right, XL650 all the way.

OK, can someone look at this link and tell me what else is needed for the press to load the calibers listed two posts up. I am not familiar with the progressive presses yet and don't know what is needed and not needed.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/DILLON-XL-650-LOADING-MACHINE-NIB-2012-PRODUCT-38SP-357MAG-Inc-3-PCS-die-set-/261092183059?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cca4e8c13

Boxerglocker
09-02-2012, 10:23
OK, can someone look at this link and tell me what else is needed for the press to load the calibers listed two posts up. I am not familiar with the progressive presses yet and don't know what is needed and not needed.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/DILLON-XL-650-LOADING-MACHINE-NIB-2012-PRODUCT-38SP-357MAG-Inc-3-PCS-die-set-/261092183059?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cca4e8c13

Go to Brian Enos for all the info you need and order from him. He pays for shipping on orders over $400. From the sounds of it a XL650 is way overkill for your needs, your going to be well over $1600 when it's all said and done for all the calibers you have listed.
I would suggest you start with a 550 with 1 or 2 caliber conversions and get familiar with the press.

labdwakin
09-02-2012, 11:13
so, I priced it all out on Dillon's website.

$1,429.89
That's the total for a 650 with a casefeeder and individual toolheads for each caliber you listed and conversion kits needed. The way Dillon's conversion kits work you only need one conversion kit for 10mm, 40 SW, and 357 Sig because all the parts are the same except the powder funnel and you really don't want to have to swap the funnel back and forth for 40 and 10mm. That price also includes shipping. That price does NOT include dies so if you need those too it will be a bit more. Probably about another 250-300 bucks.

DoctaGlockta
09-02-2012, 11:36
FWIW I have an LNL-AP w/o case for bullet feeder.

I have never got the primer system to work consistently but I use a hand primer anyway.

It has been a good press and at the time it was a good deal.

Caliber changes are cheap compared to a Dillon.

Customer service has been great and they sent out parts if needed mostly free of charge.

I would get an LNL over a 550 however. With an LNL when you pull the handle the press moves your cartridge to the next station. A 550 does not.

fredj338
09-02-2012, 11:41
If you want a press with case feeder etc.. Forget the LNL and get a Dillon 650 and save yourself of headaches. Between a LNL and Dillon with case feeder it’s about 50 differences in price.

^^THIS^^ While the LNL is a pretty good auto indexing press, if you want a case feeder, spend the extra $100+ & get a 650. The priming system of the 650 is better, the case feeder is better, the tool head is better. You can add the bullet feeder, RCBS or Hornady, to the 650 as easily. It will restrict you to plated, non lubed lead or jacketed bullets though. AS noted, for 1000rds a month, none of us need a 650 w/ all the bells & whistles. A LNL w/o feeders of any kind will do an easy 400rds/hr, so will a 550 or 650 w/o feeders.

Boxerglocker
09-02-2012, 11:50
so, I priced it all out on Dillon's website.

$1,429.89
That's the total for a 650 with a casefeeder and individual toolheads for each caliber you listed and conversion kits needed. The way Dillon's conversion kits work you only need one conversion kit for 10mm, 40 SW, and 357 Sig because all the parts are the same except the powder funnel and you really don't want to have to swap the funnel back and forth for 40 and 10mm. That price also includes shipping. That price does NOT include dies so if you need those too it will be a bit more. Probably about another 250-300 bucks.

you don't have to swap anything out for .40 and 10mm just readjust the dies.
I prefer to just have separate toolheads and clean out my 2 powder measures each of which has a small the other a large powder bar with Unitek micrometer dials installed.
I never have more than one powder on the bench at any time period. That's my golden rule.

elijah58
09-02-2012, 13:07
so, I priced it all out on Dillon's website.

$1,429.89
That's the total for a 650 with a casefeeder and individual toolheads for each caliber you listed and conversion kits needed. The way Dillon's conversion kits work you only need one conversion kit for 10mm, 40 SW, and 357 Sig because all the parts are the same except the powder funnel and you really don't want to have to swap the funnel back and forth for 40 and 10mm. That price also includes shipping. That price does NOT include dies so if you need those too it will be a bit more. Probably about another 250-300 bucks.

Wow,
I am confused now..........:dunno:I guess I will do some more research. Thanks guys,
I plan to reload 9,10,357 sig,.40, .45 already have the dies, tumbler, powder measure, scales, priming tool on a Lyman turret press, its just too slow going.

labdwakin
09-02-2012, 13:38
A 550 will speed you WAY up from using the old turret press... and if you throw the turret press out, lemme know where ya threw it, k? LOL

Colorado4Wheel
09-02-2012, 14:52
You need to consider what you really need. Are some of those calibers seldom shot and can be managed with your current press? Is 100 rds in 30 mins fast enough to save a ton of money on caliber conversions? Could one or two calibers be loaded on the progressive? That is the type of things to consider.

F106 Fan
09-02-2012, 15:00
Wow,
I am confused now..........:dunno:I guess I will do some more research. Thanks guys,
I plan to reload 9,10,357 sig,.40, .45 already have the dies, tumbler, powder measure, scales, priming tool on a Lyman turret press, its just too slow going.

Re: That eBay link you provided for a 650. That price doesn't include the case feeder and it is no bargain.

I bought my 650 for 9mm complete and ready to go from BrianEnos.com for right at $1000. Caliber conversions are pricey for the 650, particularly if you want to have a complete powder measure for each.

Sit down with the 650 manual and see exactly which caliber conversion parts you really need. I would set up a complete tool head (including powder measure and powder check alarm) for evey caliber. But that's just me and you certainly don't have to start that way.

You are also going to need a large primer setup for the 650 to reload .45 ACP. For about $80, you can buy the complete system and interchanging requires removing only two machine screws. Keep the small primer punch in place and use it to set the large primers - or so I have read.

Check your calibers against the case feed plate. They may all use the same one so you might not need to buy a plate. The regular caliber conversion kit contains all the stuff you need to change to get the case feeder to work.

Setting up a 650 to do 5 calibers right away is going to break the bank. I would buy the press set for the caliber I shot most and work into the changes over time.

The 550 is a lot more economical for both the basic machine and the caliber conversions. Of course, it is somewhat slower at around 500 rounds per hour and it doesn't have a case feeder.

Apparently, the RL550B with all the options is $735 for a single caliber:
http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/23594/catid/1/RL_550B
The basic machine is $440.

Richard

shotgunred
09-02-2012, 15:26
FWIW I have an LNL-AP w/o case for bullet feeder.

I have never got the primer system to work consistently but I use a hand primer anyway.

It has been a good press and at the time it was a good deal.

Caliber changes are cheap compared to a Dillon.

Customer service has been great and they sent out parts if needed mostly free of charge.

I would get an LNL over a 550 however. With an LNL when you pull the handle the press moves your cartridge to the next station. A 550 does not.

You never got the primer system to work consistently but you use a hand primer anyway? WTF!
Why buy an expensive press and then don't use it?
Why would you recommend this press over another press when you could never get it working right in the first place?

elijah58 do some research on the Dillon 550.
With the 550 you would need conversion kits for 9,40 and the .45. The 10,357 will use the parts from the 9 and 40 kit. Actually you don't even need the 9mm conversion kit. You can use the shellplate for the 40 kit and get the buttons and powder funnel separately.

In all likelihood the 550 is going to be your best choice.

Colorado4Wheel
09-02-2012, 15:46
My LnL would never seat primers properly. 1% would be high but not visually so. So I kept having misfires. 550 never did this and the 650 that replaced the LnL was perfect as well. LnL is just weak in a lot of areas. If you get lucky your good, if not your miserable.

fredj338
09-03-2012, 01:11
FWIW I have an LNL-AP w/o case for bullet feeder.

I have never got the primer system to work consistently but I use a hand primer anyway.

It has been a good press and at the time it was a good deal.

Caliber changes are cheap compared to a Dillon.

Customer service has been great and they sent out parts if needed mostly free of charge.

I would get an LNL over a 550 however. With an LNL when you pull the handle the press moves your cartridge to the next station. A 550 does not.
Well, if I had to prime off press, why have a progressive? Also, manual indexing is no slower than auto indexing, you either watch the shell plate turn & put a bullet on the case or your turn it yourself, no real speed advantage. The only real benefit to the LNL over the 550B is the extra stn. If I had to decap & prime off press, I would sell a machine that made me do that.:dunno:

Boxerglocker
09-03-2012, 07:38
Well, if I had to prime off press, why have a progressive? Also, manual indexing is no slower than auto indexing, you either watch the shell plate turn & put a bullet on the case or your turn it yourself, no real speed advantage. The only real benefit to the LNL over the 550B is the extra stn. If I had to decap & prime off press, I would sell a machine that made me do that.:dunno:

:agree: Makes no sense to me why people admit that a machine has a significant flaw, yet recommend it anyways.

unclebob
09-03-2012, 07:41
:agree: Makes no sense to me why people admit that a machine has a significant flaw, yet recommend it anyways.

Because that is what they have.

DoctaGlockta
09-03-2012, 08:47
You never got the primer system to work consistently but you use a hand primer anyway? WTF!
Why buy an expensive press and then don't use it?
Why would you recommend this press over another press when you could never get it working right in the first place?

elijah58 do some research on the Dillon 550.
With the 550 you would need conversion kits for 9,40 and the .45. The 10,357 will use the parts from the 9 and 40 kit. Actually you don't even need the 9mm conversion kit. You can use the shellplate for the 40 kit and get the buttons and powder funnel separately.

In all likelihood the 550 is going to be your best choice.

For me loading primer tubes and hand priming is almost a wash. I usually load two step. First brass prep including priming. 2nd charging and seating on the press. It works for me and I get to handle the brass culling the rejects. :wavey:P

SARDG
09-03-2012, 09:18
Because that is what they have.
Not me... :) I have a 650, but would recommend a 1050 if money is no object.

Colorado4Wheel
09-03-2012, 09:42
For me loading primer tubes and hand priming is almost a wash. I usually load two step. First brass prep including priming. 2nd charging and seating on the press. It works for me and I get to handle the brass culling the rejects. :wavey:P


It can't be a wash. You still have to load the hand primer. You also have to de-prime in a separate step.

On a progressive that works you just load in the cases and de-prime and prime in no time at all. Loading the primer tube takes very little time. Way less then de-priming alone would take on a Single stage.

shotgunred
09-03-2012, 10:05
For me loading primer tubes and hand priming is almost a wash. I usually load two step. First brass prep including priming. 2nd charging and seating on the press. It works for me and I get to handle the brass culling the rejects. :wavey:P
Which probably explains why you question whether reloading is for you or not.
http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1440029

ROGER4314
09-03-2012, 10:15
I have had 3 Dillon RL 450's and one RL550. I like the interchangeable tool heads on the 550 and have a rack full of them all set up and ready to go.

For 50-100 rounds per week, a Rock Chucker single stage would be ideal and switching calibers would be simple. The set up on a progressive is just too slow for that limited number of rounds. I use loading blocks on the single stage press and whip out rounds in 50-100 round batches.

I invested in 6 powder measures (4 RCBS and 2 Lyman 55's) and keep each set up for a specific charge. I pick one up, dump some powder in it, check a few charges then rock & roll. There are plenty of ways to speed up the reloading process!

Flash

fredj338
09-03-2012, 10:31
It can't be a wash. You still have to load the hand primer. You also have to de-prime in a separate step.

On a progressive that works you just load in the cases and de-prime and prime in no time at all. Loading the primer tube takes very little time. Way less then de-priming alone would take on a Single stage.

Exactly. It's fine to do it that way, I have to deprime 223 brass first time thru, but to stick w/ a machine that MAKES you do that, nope, buy better gear. IT's not gear snobbery just facts. If the goal is loading a lot of ammo qucikly, then you buy better gear. No way around that really.:dunno:
FWIW, I fill my primer tubes sitting in front of the tube watching news or whatever. SO I don't count my time filling primer tubes or boxing/inspecting ammo. Multi tasking is great.

DoctaGlockta
09-04-2012, 14:46
Which probably explains why you question whether reloading is for you or not.
http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1440029

I only questioned with the current pricing and availability of factory ammo there may be some calibers that may make more sense for me to purchase. I like to reload. But I don't have oodles of time to do so nor can I ever get long sessions in :wavey:.

Colorado4Wheel
09-04-2012, 14:52
You would feel better if you owned a Dillon 650. I have no doubt about that. Your process, that is being forced on you by your defective Hornady is a time waster.

DoctaGlockta
09-04-2012, 15:11
You would feel better if you owned a Dillon 650. I have no doubt about that. Your process, that is being forced on you by your defective Hornady is a time waster.

You may be right Steve.

unclebob
09-04-2012, 15:19
That is one of the reasons why I will never recommend a LNL to anyone. The LNL is way too much of a hit and miss press. I know with a Dillon they will do everything they can to make it right if something is wrong. If you have to prime off of a Dillon itís your choosing not the fault of the press.

RustyFN
09-04-2012, 15:32
That is one of the reasons why I will never recommend a LNL to anyone. The LNL is way too much of a hit and miss press. I know with a Dillon they will do everything they can to make it right if something is wrong. If you have to prime off of a Dillon itís your choosing not the fault of the press.

Exactly. I saw too many problems with Lee and Hornady when I bought my progressive. Everybody knows the Lee problems. The Hornady from what I saw on several forums had priming issues and I also saw 3 or 4 threads where the connecting point of the ram and shell plate broke in half. I bought a Dillon 550 and couldn't be happier, unless somebody would like to give me a 1050. :supergrin: