One eye or both eyes? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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pistolcompetitor
09-02-2012, 22:49
Any GSSF shooters out there close one eye for the farthest targets, like the 20 and 25 yard ones in Five to Glock?

I know the "both eyes open" topic is covered, like, everywhere. But I wanted to get the GSSF perspective.

Me: Gen4 G17 stock shooter with stock sights. R eye dominant and I almost always shoot with both eyes open. Just came back from a bullseye challenge (tightest group possible at 10 yards), which made me realize I think I do better for this type of shooting by squinting my left eye shut. Different from GSSF but I'm rethinking my strategies for the next match.

OrGlocker
09-02-2012, 23:29
I use both, it's easier with two than it is with one, besides the name of the game when it comes to GSSF is speed and accuracy, it's not "Bullseye".

mike g35
09-03-2012, 03:12
The way my twenty give yard shots have went this year I believe I'm using the both eyes closed method!! LOL :rofl:

Jason L
09-03-2012, 06:35
Right handed and left eye dominant, I shoot with my right eye closed... It's weird but works for me. Can't shoot a rifle that way though.


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GlockinNJ
09-03-2012, 06:37
Right handed and left eye dominant, I shoot with my right eye closed... It's weird but works for me. Can't shoot a rifle that way though.



Ditto for me.

Don At PC
09-03-2012, 06:48
Right handed and right eye dominant. I shoot with both eyes open however since cataract surgery I have to cover the top 1/3 of my left lense with opace(spelling) scotch tape so that I do not have a double sight picture. Front sight is sharpe and clear and target a little fuzzy as it should be. Of course after shooting a string I can see the hits and target rings clearly even at the 25 yard range.

Of course Conyers will be my first match since having cataract surgery on my second eye so could be a whole new ball game. But dry firing in the back yard the front sight is sharpe and clear with NO glasses, red dot now is a total"No Go" but since I am an amateur thats no big deal.

This is one of those situations that is unique to each individual.

Don

ede
09-03-2012, 07:07
Both open, but I can't see my sights clearly. So far nothing I've tried has helped much.

jakebrake
09-03-2012, 07:10
right eye dominant, been shooting with my left eye closed for 39 years....i can't shoot with both eyes open.

feel free to ridicule me now.

shadow_dog
09-03-2012, 07:12
Both open, but I can't see my sights clearly. So far nothing I've tried has helped much.

Have you tried borrowing Bama's shooting glasses yet? It seems like the least he could do for you, since all you do for him.:whistling::supergrin:

TattooedGlock
09-03-2012, 07:24
Both eyes open at point black distances. More of a one eye squint at longer ranges.

ede
09-03-2012, 11:53
Both open, but I can't see my sights clearly. So far nothing I've tried has helped much.

I'm not allowed to touch Bama's stuff unless I'm loading mags for him, cleaning, washing, mowing, etc.

Don At PC
09-03-2012, 11:56
I have heard that Bama's shooting glasses are really mirrors so that he can see the smiles on his face as he shoots.


Don

AKRover
09-03-2012, 12:02
I too am right handed but left eye dominant. For long range I close my right eye, for closer targets I keep both open. The only long gun I can actually shoot right handed is my AR because of the red dot sight, but I'm so used to left handed shooting the other way feels unnatural. Even left handed I shoot my AR with both eyes open using the red dot.

pistolcompetitor
09-03-2012, 14:36
Thanks, everyone. Guess I'll try squinting one eye for just the 20 and 25 yard shots. We'll see what happens, so to speak.

TheExplorer
09-03-2012, 15:03
I tried the squinting, but my NRA instructor refused to let anyone pass who didn't use both eyes. I believe it was 15 yards?

SARDG
09-03-2012, 15:37
I tried the squinting, but my NRA instructor refused to let anyone pass who didn't use both eyes. I believe it was 15 yards?
That's a little extreme! Which class was it?

TheExplorer
09-03-2012, 15:40
That's a little extreme! Which class was it?

Funny thing, just the intro to handguns!

SARDG
09-03-2012, 16:44
Funny thing, just the intro to handguns!
First Steps Pistol and Basis Pistol Shooting are both 15' or 5 yds and NRA likes to instruct to shoot with both eyes open. But if a student can demonstrate consistent accuracy with one eye, it should be accepted.

kyglockshooter 2.0
09-03-2012, 21:48
When I shoot I try to keep both eyes open so that I'm able to be aware of what's going on around me, such as has someone walked down range on accident or something that is more important than my score. By allowing part focus on that I probably shoot a little bit slower, yet I do not care at all if it means I am a more aware shooter, which in turn hopefully means safer shooter

Alexd29
09-04-2012, 07:51
I tried the squinting, but my NRA instructor refused to let anyone pass who didn't use both eyes. I believe it was 15 yards?

Hmmm. Sounds like some of the so called "Nra certified pistol instructors" we have around here. its their way or no way. I shoot with both eyes open, but am left eye, right hand dominant. I cock my head to put my left eye in front of the sights. Ive been told multiple times i should shoot left handed.

try different things but do what works best for you. some people will put a clear piece of tape on one side of their shooting glasses to help them focus with the other eye, while keeping them both open.

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TucsonGlocker
09-04-2012, 08:56
Both eyes open at point black distances. More of a one eye squint at longer ranges.

I go by this method as well.. May not be the best, but it works for me :supergrin:

bryandover
09-04-2012, 09:27
I shoot with both eyes open but squint during scoring, sometimes it's painful. :embarassed:

TheExplorer
09-04-2012, 10:28
First Steps Pistol and Basis Pistol Shooting are both 15' or 5 yds and NRA likes to instruct to shoot with both eyes open. But if a student can demonstrate consistent accuracy with one eye, it should be accepted.

Correct, I meant 15 Feet, not yards.

Seale Team
09-04-2012, 11:27
right eye dominant, been shooting with my left eye closed for 39 years....i can't shoot with both eyes open.

feel free to ridicule me now.

You won't be by me. I do the same and usually, not to badly.

I tried the squinting, but my NRA instructor refused to let anyone pass who didn't use both eyes. I believe it was 15 yards?

There are many who instruct, who shouldn't.

SARDG
09-04-2012, 11:31
Hmmm. Sounds like some of the so called "Nra certified pistol instructors" we have around here. its their way or no way...

...try different things but do what works best for you...
Hey David - I are one of those so-called instructors. :)

Understand that NRA keeps a tight rein on their instructors and essentially requires them to "teach the book." NRA has been known to go so far as to insert a ringer into a class to insure that instruction is administered the NRA way. Once you are audited like that, you get jumpy, but controls are in place to protect the integrity of NRA courses nationwide.

Clearly, you've worked through your challenges quite nicely, but about 110% of the students an NRA instructor sees are complete neophytes, and if they've had any instruction it's come from watching movies or some relative or friend who clearly instilled all sorts of bad habits. Many are a danger to themselves and others.

We have to correct these habits and get our students down the path to safe firearm handling and shooting-fundamentals, and the curriculum in the "book" does a wonderful job.

I try to get students to follow the book. If they can demonstrate both safety and proficiency, I will work with them to help them successfully pass the course. 99.9% cannot demonstrate safety OR proficiency and have to first unlearn very bad habits. Those who cannot demonstrate safety and proficiency do not pass.

NRA instructors do a good job, but under the conditions and guidelines that NRA imposes.

BamaTrooper
09-04-2012, 14:22
Have you tried borrowing Bama's shooting glasses yet? It seems like the least he could do for you, since all you do for him.:whistling::supergrin:

:quiet:... don't tell ede, but he isn't missing the targets, he just doesn't know he is shooting blanks.

BamaTrooper
09-04-2012, 14:23
Both eyes open at point black distances. More of a one eye squint at longer ranges.

If you can manage a good squint, ala Clint Eastwood, the NRA D1 target wil give you a free b zone hit.

TheExplorer
09-04-2012, 14:49
Hey David - I are one of those so-called instructors. :)

Understand that NRA keeps a tight rein on their instructors and essentially requires them to "teach the book." NRA has been known to go so far as to insert a ringer into a class to insure that instruction is administered the NRA way. Once you are audited like that, you get jumpy, but controls are in place to protect the integrity of NRA courses nationwide.

Clearly, you've worked through your challenges quite nicely, but about 110% of the students an NRA instructor sees are complete neophytes, and if they've had any instruction it's come from watching movies or some relative or friend who clearly instilled all sorts of bad habits. Many are a danger to themselves and others.

We have to correct these habits and get our students down the path to safe firearm handling and shooting-fundamentals, and the curriculum in the "book" does a wonderful job.

I try to get students to follow the book. If they can demonstrate both safety and proficiency, I will work with them to help them successfully pass the course. 99.9% cannot demonstrate safety OR proficiency and have to first unlearn very bad habits. Those who cannot demonstrate safety and proficiency do not pass.

NRA instructors do a good job, but under the conditions and guidelines that NRA imposes.

I was lucky. With the exception of two cackling women, everyone was paying close attention at all times and we (students) helped each other out. It was a great experience and I was happy to continue my education with them.

Funny thing I remember was them telling you never to hold a gun gangster style for fear of BTF. Now that happens even if you hold it the right way!

Butch
09-04-2012, 18:42
Both eyes!

Mama gave ya two of them for a reason.... :)

Alexd29
09-04-2012, 18:54
Hey David - I are one of those so-called instructors. :)

Understand that NRA keeps a tight rein on their instructors and essentially requires them to "teach the book." NRA has been known to go so far as to insert a ringer into a class to insure that instruction is administered the NRA way. Once you are audited like that, you get jumpy, but controls are in place to protect the integrity of NRA courses nationwide.

Clearly, you've worked through your challenges quite nicely, but about 110% of the students an NRA instructor sees are complete neophytes, and if they've had any instruction it's come from watching movies or some relative or friend who clearly instilled all sorts of bad habits. Many are a danger to themselves and others.

We have to correct these habits and get our students down the path to safe firearm handling and shooting-fundamentals, and the curriculum in the "book" does a wonderful job.

I try to get students to follow the book. If they can demonstrate both safety and proficiency, I will work with them to help them successfully pass the course. 99.9% cannot demonstrate safety OR proficiency and have to first unlearn very bad habits. Those who cannot demonstrate safety and proficiency do not pass.

NRA instructors do a good job, but under the conditions and guidelines that NRA imposes.

Definately not trying to take anything away from the NRA courses, or all of the hardworking instructors who volunteer countless hours to help people get into shooting, or become more proficient with firearms of all types. My hat is off to you, as well as everyone else who makes time to ensure the future of our 2nd amendment rights continue to shine brightly. Thank you :thanks:

We just have a local "creepy old man" at our range who uses the "Im an NRA certified pistol instructor" line to get close to any women who he finds attractive, but there is no way you could have known that. So i should have just kept quiet. I apologize

I have never taken any classes or training, I am completely self taught. I think i would enjoy going through a beginner handgun course, if for no other reason than to help new shooters.

I don't know if ill make Conyers this year, but I'm considering shooting the Pro Am next year in Frostproof FL. I'd love to meet you, Ron, Bama, and many of our other southern members.

SARDG
09-04-2012, 19:24
...We just have a local "creepy old man" at our range who uses the "Im an NRA certified pistol instructor" line to get close to any women who he finds attractive, but there is no way you could have known that. So i should have just kept quiet. I apologize...

...I don't know if ill make Conyers this year, but I'm considering shooting the Pro Am next year in Frostproof FL. I'd love to meet you, Ron, Bama, and many of our other southern members.
No apology required or expected. I think I wrote those paragraphs to point out what goes on 'behind the scenes' with NRA instructors. I had no idea that being an NRA instructor was a chick magnet thing. :rofl: Probably won't work as a guy magnet 'cause guys aren't impressed with women who know 'stuff'.

Never considered myself ProAm material, but Frostproof isn't that far from me. I should check it out and watch the Pros that show up; they also need IDPA SOs. :dunno:

You're likely to see all the Glocktalkians at Conyers. Hope you can make it.

Kitty

SARDG
09-04-2012, 19:26
Both eyes!
What do you know!?! :tongueout:

janice6
09-04-2012, 19:55
My practice for the last few years has been to use both eyes. I like the difference in the field of view with both eyes.

Target shooting is different for me, one eye.

Butch
09-04-2012, 20:12
What do you know!?! :tongueout:
Well.....I'm pretty sure it's Tuesday.....but it felt like Monday all day. :)

Butch
09-04-2012, 20:16
Target shooting is different for me, one eye.
Are we talking about 'real' bullseye competition type target shooting?

SARDG
09-05-2012, 09:13
Are we talking about 'real' bullseye competition type target shooting?
I don't think a lot of folks shoot bullseye anymore Butch - or at least the numbers seem to be dwindling compared to the run and gun disciplines. You still shoot it I imagine. I still shoot the. 22 part occasionally. May I use 1 eye for that?

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Butch
09-06-2012, 06:19
I don't think a lot of folks shoot bullseye anymore Butch - or at least the numbers seem to be dwindling compared to the run and gun disciplines. You still shoot it I imagine. I still shoot the. 22 part occasionally. May I use 1 eye for that?
Best not to....

The problem with closing one eye is that it will create eye strain, the muscles you use to unnaturally hold that eye shut will tire and give you one more distraction to deal with.

Better to cover the eye you're not using. Some folks cover the whole lens of their glasses with tape and just take the glasses off when not actively shooting, but I wear glasses all the time so I use just a small piece of masking tape on the spot of my left lens that my left eye looks through when actually aiming the gun. That way my right (dominant) eye is actively looking at the sights, and my left eye is passively looking at the tape on my glasses.

And yes, I've been a bullseye competitor for my entire adult life! :)

Seale Team
09-06-2012, 12:09
I dont think anyone could disagree that two eyes open doesnt have some advantages. The issues arise when Instructors tell someone that it is the only way to shoot well.

I know a double GM in USPSA, Master in GSSF and IDPA who has always squinted one eye. He shoots both open with rifle, but not pistol.

Noponer
09-06-2012, 13:04
...
I know a double GM in USPSA, Master in GSSF and IDPA who has always squinted one eye. He shoots both open with rifle, but not pistol.

I am the opposite... shoot with both open with pistol & shut one eye with a rifle (scope or iron sights). I am trying to learn to keep both eyes open with a rifle, but shoot one so little that it's more difficult.

I am right-handed & right eye dominant, but developed a wrinkled retina in my right eye a few years ago & had to switch to my left eye. I tried closing the right eye, using tape, etc. for a while, but it did not work well for me.

I have now learned to aim with my left eye & shoot with my right hand & keep both eyes open. Sometimes I have to squint at first to get lined up, but then I can keep going with both eyes open. I do tend to tilt the gun a little, but try not to.... Dave Sevigny shoots with his left eye & right hand & does not tilt the pistol, so it can be done & done well.

whatsupglock
09-06-2012, 13:10
Both eyes open at all times.