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PaunchyP
09-04-2012, 07:34
So I've been reading in some of the other forums here on GT and have found a couple of threads regarding misfires and problems with reloads for the G17. I was pretty much sold on getting into reloading and after I read the stickys in this forum I decided on what equipment I thought I'd like to start with. However, I'm beginning to rethink this if there are safety and efficacy issues with the G17. I'm new to shooting handguns so I don't completely understand some of what was being said but one thing was that it's bad to use reloaded ammo in a Glock because it has an unsupported barrel. I think they were saying this caused problems with feeding and the seating of the round in the chamber. One guy mentioned a case where the side blew out of his brass on a reloaded round. If anyone can give me a dumbed down explanation and give me guidance on moving forward with or steering away from reloading for my 17 it would be greatly appreciated.

-Paul


Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engin

Three-Five-Seven
09-04-2012, 07:52
Most of us start reloading when the amount of shooting we do each month extends our budgets to the breaking point.

Cheap, re-manufactured ammo is available in 9mm. If your round count gets above 200 rounds per month, then perhaps reloading is a good idea. If you are a casual shooter, or not yet involved in a shooting sport, then reloading probably doesn't make sense.

New handgun shooters should always have a .22 pistol to practice with. When you've put tens of thousands of rounds through your .22, and thousands through your Glock, or become involved in a shooting sport, then you might start thinking about reloading.

I have lots of friends with expensive loading equipment that has sat idle for years. They just don't shoot enough to warrant the expense of reloading.

With respect to the gist of your question: Hell yes, reloading is potentially dangerous and a person must be well educated in the process in order to be safe. Get involved in a shooting sport and the folks in that community will teach you everything you need to know about shooting and reloading. Get a .22 first.

PaunchyP
09-04-2012, 07:58
I'm already shooting 500+ rounds per month out of the 17 and I feel like the addiction is just getting ramped up. My thought was I will watch my usage and educate myself with reading plus I know a couple of guys that reload til December and make the decision then. You know just in time for good ole St. Nick to help me out with all of the equiepment. ;-)

Jim Watson
09-04-2012, 08:24
I know any number of people who reload for all calibers of Glock with no problems. The horror stories are nearly always about something other than a G17.

There is so much cheap 9mm out there that you have pay attention to detail to save money by reloading. You have to buy components in quantity, especially shopping for the best buy on bullets. You have to be anal about picking up your brass... and anybody else's who does not recover it.

Or you can load for purpose. A name brand JHP will run the cost of reloads up to the price of Cheapmart Econoball. But it will be more accurate and can simulate your defense ammo.
A 147 grain bullet costs more than a 115, but I find subsonic loads more comfortable and controllable to shoot, worth it to me in matches.

unclebob
09-04-2012, 08:26
You need to decide if you want to get into reloading? We already know that you shoot 500rds a month if you start reloading figure on doubling that amount. You need to start thinking about if you plan on getting into any competition? How much do you want to spend on reloading equipment? And how much time do you to spend on reloading? Also do you have or planning on reloading for other guns? That will determine on what press will work for you.
Reloading for a Glock is just like loading for any other gun. I have reloaded and shot over 200,000 rds. through 17 different Glocks and have not had any trouble that you mentioned. Most of the time it is the person that was doing the reloading fault and not the gun.
:welcome:

F106 Fan
09-04-2012, 08:31
I thought the "unsupported chamber" thing for Glocks went away a couple of decades ago. Yes, there was an early problem with the .40 S&W (bad brass was a big part of the problem) but I have never heard about a problem with the 9mm.

Do you have any idea how many hundreds of millions of rounds of ammo are reloaded by hobbyists each year? And yet somehow, we're all still here. I suspect that every competitive shooter is reloading and, at least for IDPA, most are shooting 9mm. Millions of rounds of 9mm...

I don't have a Glock 9 but I do load for an XD9 and I do it using brass I pick up off the range that has been shot in a Glock. I can tell it's Glock brass by the rectangular extrusion in the primer. AFAIK, only Glock has a rectangular opening for the striker. The brass is fine and I have yet to see any that appears to have the 'guppies' of the old time .40 S&W.

But, if you're worried about it, use an aftermarket barrel.

There is the issue about shooting lead bullets in Glock barrels. Glock is pretty clear in the Owner's Manual about not doing this. Of course, they, and every other manufacturer, recommend against shooting reloads. Yet here we are! Shooting reloads... Hundred of millions of them.

Yes, there is risk in reloading. It is possible to overcharge a case and blow up a gun. It is also possible to not charge a case, stick a bullet in the barrel and then chase it with another round. This 'squib-bang' event is almost guaranteed to blow up the barrel.

There are 'kabooms' from time to time. It also happens with factory ammo every once in a while. But as a reloader, you have every opportunity to correctly charge the case, you make the decision to stay away from maximum loads, you get to choose which powder you use and you get to decide how much velocity it takes to punch a hole in paper. No whining if you make a bad choice!

This is a reloading forum. Of course we reload!

Richard

F106 Fan
09-04-2012, 08:46
I'm already shooting 500+ rounds per month out of the 17 and I feel like the addiction is just getting ramped up. My thought was I will watch my usage and educate myself with reading plus I know a couple of guys that reload til December and make the decision then. You know just in time for good ole St. Nick to help me out with all of the equiepment. ;-)

Get a copy of "ABCs Of Reloading". It is even available as an eBook from Amazon. Read through it a couple of times and read the excellent stickies at the top of this forum.

As to the "couple of guys that reload"? You can only learn what they know and you won't know what they don't know. Get a book and then talk to them. You may find out that the book explanation of the fundamentals is pretty helpful. At least you will get the terminology down.

A typical press like the Dillon 550 does 4 things in sequence:

Decap, resize the brass and insert a new primer
Bell the case mouth and charge with powder
Seat a bullet
Taper crimp to close up the case mouth.
It doesn't make a lot of difference which press you get, these are the steps (assuming the brass has been cleaned). For pistol loading, it doesn't get any more complex. Just 'rinse and repeat' to crank out about 500 rounds per hour on a 550. There are faster presses that cost more money and slower presses that cost less money but the Dillon RL550B is the workhorse of the reloading community.

Richard

PaunchyP
09-04-2012, 08:57
Well I was thinking based on reading the sticky that I liked the LCT kempf kit. Sounds like you get a lot for the money. I have several riffles and figured if loading for the 9mm goes well I will buy more dies and learn to reload those as well. Also my wife and I are very like to start conceal carry within the next year so we will be looking at two more handguns then as well. Haven't really started shopping at all so idk if we would stick with the 9mm or choose a different caliber. Either way I would plan to reload practice rounds for those guns as well. I'd love to get into some shooting sports/competitions but at this time am not aware of what's available in my immediate area or what the cost would be. I know I wouldn't want to travel much due to our work schedules so that may be the deciding factor there. Regardless I really enjoy and spend enough time at the range shooting enough rounds that I think financially it could be be beneficial.

@Richard: Thanks for the encouragement. I assumed the opinions here might be biased towards reloading, but I also figure you guys know enough to tell me if those are legitimate concerns or operator error and if any of what I read was specific to the G17 or 9mm round. Also looking for opinions as to whether the benefits out weigh the risk given that 9mm is relatively cheap and abundant. Some of the other rounds I wouldn't be able shoot regularly at the market price that's why I chose the 9mm to start but it seems like I could still save money reloading and perhaps cover the cost of equipment in less than one year.

fredj338
09-04-2012, 09:07
I have lots of friends with expensive loading equipment that has sat idle for years. They just don't shoot enough to warrant the expense of reloading.

With respect to the gist of your question: Hell yes, reloading is potentially dangerous and a person must be well educated in the process in order to be safe. Get involved in a shooting sport and the folks in that community will teach you everything you need to know about shooting and reloading. Get a .22 first.

Well the expense in reloading i sbuying the gear. So if yor friends have gear & not reloaing, it's a fear factor not cost IMO. Yes, reloading is potentially dangerous, so is shooting ro driving a car. Do it worng, bad things will happen. Don't pay attention, bad things will happen.
Having said that, reloading for a GLock is no diff than any other gun. WIth the possible exception of load an all lead bullet (debatable) the GLock i sactually a bit easier to get good results with do to the slightly generous chambers. So if you want to start reloading, even for 100rds a month, good for you.
The smart way, take a certified class. The next best is read a ton. Start with ABCs of Reloading & a good manual like he Speer #14 or lyman #49. Read the reloadign sections twice, then you can consider buying gear. Go slow, ask questions, it isn't harder than learning to drive a car.:dunno:

techiej
09-04-2012, 09:13
Between my son & I we shoot about 7-800 rounds of 9mm and 250-300 rounds of 30-06 per month.

We are starting to reload and based upon our current ammo usage we were able to buy a filly equipped Hornady LNL AP w/case feeder, bullet feeder, a case prep station and all the goodies (including building a heavy duty set of benches) and calculated a break-even point (including cost of consumables) of about 2 1/2 years.

So we went for it and are enjoying the reloading process as well.

There is a bit of a learning curve - especially with a progressive -- but it gets much easier with time. If you can, see if someone can show you how to reload on their press before deciding.

If you don't enjoy reloading, then no amount of savings will be worth your time...it is a hobby in and of itself. The $ justification just makes it easier to sell the wife on the "investment".

Boxerglocker
09-04-2012, 09:13
OP, I'll be short and to the point. Learn the process, pick your equipment, buy your components to load a standard 124g FMJ load with a good metering, reasonably density powder to help avoid double charges, use the primer of your choice. Find data for and develop a good mid range load at about 135 power factor for your G17 and move on.
I don't know why the whole unsupported barrel thing in Glock keeps rearing it's ugly head lately. It has NEVER been an issue in 9mm only in the early .40's

PaunchyP
09-04-2012, 09:29
^^^^^^ Thanks!!!

Colorado4Wheel
09-04-2012, 09:36
I'm already shooting 500+ rounds per month out of the 17 and I feel like the addiction is just getting ramped up. My thought was I will watch my usage and educate myself with reading plus I know a couple of guys that reload til December and make the decision then. You know just in time for good ole St. Nick to help me out with all of the equiepment. ;-)

Reload with confidence. Nothing different about a G17 and nearly any other gun besides the lead bullet debate.

F106 Fan
09-04-2012, 09:53
Well I was thinking based on reading the sticky that I liked the LCT kempf kit. Sounds like you get a lot for the money.

If you go with the Kempf kit, select the Pro Auto Disk upgrade. This particular incantation of the LCT kit comes with something that is important but not usually included (I forget what) but most important, it doesn't include the Lee scale which isn't highly regarded around here.

Remember that it takes 4 handle strokes to produce a single loaded round. Take that 200-250 rounds per hour with a bunch of salt! If a Dillon 550 that requires one stroke per loaded round produces 500 rounds per hour (and I have NEVER gotten close to that!), how can the LCT get much more than 125? Whatever...

Disclaimer: I have two 550s and have never even seen an LCT.

Watch the reloading videos on YouTube...

Buy a decent scale. It will last a lifetime and is independent of caliber, weapon or loading press. Either the Dillon Eliminator (beam scale) or D-Terminator (digital) will be fine. Buy some RCBS check weights. If you buy a digital scale, don't spend less thant $100. The cheap ones are not good enough!

Richard

Jim Watson
09-04-2012, 09:56
The edition of Glock owners manual I found had nothing to say about lead bullets.
"No liability whatever can be accepted if inexpertly manufactured or inexpertly filled ammunition is used."

SARDG
09-04-2012, 15:34
So I've been reading in some of the other forums here on GT and have found a couple of threads regarding misfires and problems with reloads... ...One guy mentioned a case where the side blew out of his brass on a reloaded round...
That poster:
a) used a cheap digital scale
b) did not calibrate his scale for more than a year, and
c) had no check weights

If you were to follow that lead, you can almost certainly be guaranteed similar results. If you can read and follow printed instructions, you should have no problem with any kind of press. Based on the use of the 4 syllable word efficacy, and even spelled correctly, I'd say you have a head start. :supergrin: And based on some recent posts, I am beginning to think that common sense may be the biggest virtue for reloading.

I am but a common 'girl' (well, 50-60 years ago maybe) and I began reloading about 6 months ago with a 650 press and Titegroup powder - both apparently a questionable choice for a beginner. I began reloading to make match ammo - not save money. Coincidentally, I suppose I save a few bucks, even using premium components. I feel it is a completely safe hobby and ALL my reloads so far have been shot in my Glocks - 9mil mostly, and some .45; right now, perhaps 15K rounds / year. Id shoot more, and reload more but Im retired and dont have much time. I started with a 650 because I like to get what I need up front and not deal with upgrading soon after.

ColoCG
09-04-2012, 16:13
Remember that it takes 4 handle strokes to produce a single loaded round. Take that 200-250 rounds per hour with a bunch of salt! If a Dillon 550 that requires one stroke per loaded round produces 500 rounds per hour (and I have NEVER gotten close to that!), how can the LCT get much more than 125? Whatever...

Disclaimer: I have two 550s and have never even seen an LCT.

Richard

I'm not sure about you and your Dillon550, but I guarantee you can load more than 125 on the LCT.

I think if I was trying I could do 125 on my SS,not continiuously but for a run.:supergrin:

F106 Fan
09-04-2012, 17:30
I'm not sure about you and your Dillon550, but I guarantee you can load more than 125 on the LCT.

I think if I was trying I could do 125 on my SS,not continiuously but for a run.:supergrin:

Yes, everybody wants to talk about burst rate, not sustained throughput over several hundred rounds. My 1050 will do 1200 rounds per hour - for about 5 minutes when it runs out of primers. I was sizing over 1400 .223 rounds per hour on my 650 - but I didn't need to set a bullet or add primers.

Heck the LCT might be FASTER than a 550 according to this review at 7:08. He claims 500 rounds per hour!

Lee Classic Turret Press Review 2 - YouTube

One of the commenters to the video says he gets 100 rounds in 45 minutes (about 133/hour) running really fast and suggests that 100 rounds per hour is a good rate for a beginner.

As I said, I have never seen one of the LCTs. But I know for a fact that 4 handle pulls per round is a lot slower than 1 handle pull per round. And I know that if I include loading primer tubes (and I do), I don't come anywhere close to 500 rounds per hour on the 550.

Richard

ColoCG
09-04-2012, 17:52
Yes, everybody wants to talk about burst rate, not sustained throughput over several hundred rounds. My 1050 will do 1200 rounds per hour - for about 5 minutes when it runs out of primers. I was sizing over 1400 .223 rounds per hour on my 650 - but I didn't need to set a bullet or add primers.

Heck the LCT might be FASTER than a 550 according to this review at 7:08. He claims 500 rounds per hour!

Lee Classic Turret Press Review 2 - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRn_twi9B0g)

One of the commenters to the video says he gets 100 rounds in 45 minutes (about 133/hour) running really fast and suggests that 100 rounds per hour is a good rate for a beginner.

As I said, I have never seen one of the LCTs. But I know for a fact that 4 handle pulls per round is a lot slower than 1 handle pull per round. And I know that if I include loading primer tubes (and I do), I don't come anywhere close to 500 rounds per hour on the 550.

Richard

Richard , when I mentioned not that many continuously I was referring to a SS.

No, you will never get 500rd's per hr. on a LCT. And a hundred rds per hr. may be a good rate for a beginner, But with practice and more experience 200rds. per hr is very doable for anyone with experience without trying to hard. More can probably be done but it may be pushing it for some people.

If you don't believe me ask others who are familar with the LCT, C4W for example.

shotgunred
09-04-2012, 18:05
I'm not sure about you and your Dillon550, but I guarantee you can load more than 125 on the LCT.

I think if I was trying I could do 125 on my SS,not continiuously but for a run.:supergrin:

Most people load a hundred and then do the math. But I was curious about the real 1 hour output is.
SO I did some testing a couple of years ago. I will see if I can find it. What I did was have someone who had a press for a while reload for 1 hour straight. They could preload how many primer tubes they had on hand but if they needed more they had to load them on the clock.
I did the 550 myself. My 1 full 1 hour rate was somewhere in between 500 and 550, the guy that did the 650 managed to crank out a little over 1100 in 1 hour.

F106 Fan
09-04-2012, 18:26
I did the 550 myself. My 1 full 1 hour rate was somewhere in between 500 and 550, the guy that did the 650 managed to crank out a little over 1100 in 1 hour.

I assume you had the primer tubes loaded, right? I think that's the key to getting the rates that Dillon states.

I wonder if that primer tube filler machine will keep up with a 650 or 1050? It would need to load a tube every 5 minutes to make it to 1200 rounds per hour.

It would be better to have a helper reloading the primer feed tube. Then the operator could just work on pulling the handle and feeding bullets.

Richard

Arc Angel
09-04-2012, 18:37
So I've been reading in some of the other forums here on GT and have found a couple of threads regarding misfires and problems with reloads for the G17.

I was pretty much sold on getting into reloading and after I read the stickys in this forum I decided on what equipment I thought I'd like to start with. However, I'm beginning to rethink this if there are safety and efficacy issues with the G17.

I'm new to shooting handguns so I don't completely understand some of what was being said but one thing was that it's bad to use reloaded ammo in a Glock because it has an unsupported barrel. I think they were saying this caused problems with feeding and the seating of the round in the chamber.

One guy mentioned a case where the side blew out of his brass on a reloaded round. If anyone can give me a dumbed down explanation and give me guidance on moving forward with or steering away from reloading for my 17 it would be greatly appreciated.

Naaa! ....... You're presently being put off by a lack of familiarity and experience. I reloaded for more than 40 years. During this time I had no more than 4 squibs and no overcharged or improperly sized cartridge cases. Why? I think because I was very carefully and scrupulously trained in how to reload by the best reloaders in our 500 + man gun club. Three older men who were very patient and taught me how to reload very very well.

We were talking about reloading at the range this past weekend. I realize that I stayed in firearms and shooting all these years NOT because I love guns or shooting them, BUT because my first love is actually reloading. Myself and two of my neighbors are longtime reloaders. One of these neighbors is a woman; and, for a fact, she can reload better than anyone else in the county; (including me) and she is the only person I have ever permitted to supply reloaded cartridges for my guns.

How many trouble-free reloads do I have through two of my Glock pistols? 10 to 15 THOUSAND rounds would be a realistic estimate. It all comes down to training, familiarity, and FORCE OF HABIT. If you are careful, don't allow yourself to be easily distracted, and have very good safety habits, then you will be fine. (And, produce a lot of quality ammunition!)

It would help if you had an old man with a ruler to teach you and smack you across the back of your hand every time you made a reloading goof; however, barring this, I'd suggest you contact the NRA and seek reloading instruction. I was lucky. When I started reloading I, coincidentally, had a good workbench; and, fortuitously, my first reloading equipment purchases were from RCBS. Later on I moved over to Dillon Precision; and the tech support departments at both companies are excellent!

I was, also, lucky enough to enjoy reading reloading manuals - especially the technical sections at the front of these manuals. I gave up reloading two years ago; (Because I finally reached THAT time in my life.) but I still have two reloading manuals left on my desk. Speer, Sierra, and Hornady always did it for me. After I'd been reloading for awhile I discovered, 'The ABC's of Reloading'. It's a very good metallic cartridge reloading manual for a beginner.

Here's the NRA's phone number. You can call them for a list of instructors and reloading classes in your area: 703-267-1500.

http://www.nrahq.org/education/index.asp



PS: Suggest you lose the, 'unsupported chamber' mumbo jumbo. It makes you sound like a real amateur. :supergrin: First generation Glocks, second generation Glocks, and early third generation Glocks DID HAVE very generous, open chamber mouths. (Hence the stories about unsupport chambers.) However, since around the middle of the third generation serial number range Glock pistols no longer have wide open chamber mouths; and the bottom of Glock chambers (Which is, usually, the, 'open part'.) now closely support the cartridge case heads.

Here look at this: It's a picture of different Glock chamber mouths: 9mm, 357 SIG, 40 S&W, 10mm, and 45 ACP. It'll help you to understand what's being talked about: http://img66.imageshack.us/img66/2205/bigversionofglockrebate.jpg

Keep your Glock clean and well lubricated, make absolutely certain to size and charge your reloads correctly. When your Glock is new DO NOT FIRE TOO FAST, and you will NOT be, 'blowing the sides of your cases out'. Furthermore, while your Glock is new I strongly suggest that you do NOT use reloaded ammunition until AFTER you've, 'verified' the pistol with, at least, the first 500 store-bought, factory rounds. (I'm a very careful person; and, sometimes, I've gone for a good 1,000 fired factory rounds before I considered a polymer frame pistol to be verified.)

Wal-Mart is an excellent place to buy, (crappy & weak) 'range ammo' with which to break your new Glock in. Personally, I prefer CCI/Speer, 'Blazer Aluminum' and Federal, 'Champion' store-bought ammunition. (Now that I think about it, I've had more squibs and partially sized cartridges from, 'Blazer' ammo - both aluminum and brass - than I've ever had with homemade reloads.)

fredj338
09-04-2012, 18:40
Remember that it takes 4 handle strokes to produce a single loaded round. Take that 200-250 rounds per hour with a bunch of salt! If a Dillon 550 that requires one stroke per loaded round produces 500 rounds per hour (and I have NEVER gotten close to that!), how can the LCT get much more than 125? Whatever...


Richard
Agree, dig deeper, you find many LCT users are priming off press or such & then counting rds/hr starting w/ sized/primed brass. 150rds/hr sustained seems reasonable. I have gotten 500rds/hr on the 550B, but it's more comfy doing 400, pretty easy w/ most calibers. That's only one pull of the handle every 9sec! That would include loading the primers from preloaded tubes.

F106 Fan
09-04-2012, 19:31
Agree, dig deeper, you find many LCT users are priming off press or such & then counting rds/hr starting w/ sized/primed brass. 150rds/hr sustained seems reasonable. I have gotten 500rds/hr on the 550B, but it's more comfy doing 400, pretty easy w/ most calibers. That's only one pull of the handle every 9sec! That would include loading the primers from preloaded tubes.

I'm in the 400 rounds per hour category as well, if I have tubes loaded. There's nothing wrong with a 550 for someone shooting a couple of thousand rounds per month. But with 4 people shooting out of my ammo can, I thought I should pick up the pace.

The thing about the LCT is that it produces ammo at what is probably an acceptable rate (to start) at a price point that is very attractive.

Richard

Colorado4Wheel
09-04-2012, 19:53
Agree, dig deeper, you find many LCT users are priming off press or such & then counting rds/hr starting w/ sized/primed brass. 150rds/hr sustained seems reasonable. I have gotten 500rds/hr on the 550B, but it's more comfy doing 400, pretty easy w/ most calibers. That's only one pull of the handle every 9sec! That would include loading the primers from preloaded tubes.

People who have issues with the LCT priming are either not shimming it up (when needed) or are not being careful. Shimming it with a washer is simple and makes it prime much better.
I had to shim both of mine. Shimmed I load 200 rds easily.

SARDG
09-04-2012, 20:30
I assume you had the primer tubes loaded, right? I think that's the key to getting the rates that Dillon states.

I wonder if that primer tube filler machine will keep up with a 650 or 1050? It would need to load a tube every 5 minutes to make it to 1200 rounds per hour.

Richard
I have it. The timer runs for 2 minutes and within that time all 100 are loaded in the tube. That's a theoretical max of 3000 per hour.

fredj338
09-04-2012, 21:07
oops!

fredj338
09-04-2012, 21:09
People who have issues with the LCT priming are either not shimming it up (when needed) or are not being careful. Shimming it with a washer is simple and makes it prime much better.
I had to shim both of mine. Shimmed I load 200 rds easily.

I'ld still have to see it Steve, a full hours worth, not 6min x 10. Like guys saying they can do 100rds on a ss press. From scratch w/ th sizing die already set, just not possible for handgun at least IMO. I've timed it & I am a pretty exp reloader.:whistling:
I load primer tubes sitting in front of the nightly news. No time lost, no time counted in reloading as I am multi tasking.:supergrin: If you can't do 400rds/hr on a 550, from hitting the bench to leaving it, then you are doing something wrong.:dunno:

shotgunred
09-04-2012, 21:36
I assume you had the primer tubes loaded, right? I think that's the key to getting the rates that Dillon states.

I wonder if that primer tube filler machine will keep up with a 650 or 1050? It would need to load a tube every 5 minutes to make it to 1200 rounds per hour.

It would be better to have a helper reloading the primer feed tube. Then the operator could just work on pulling the handle and feeding bullets.

Richard

I had to load 1 tube on the 550 and mark had to load 6 on the 650. Mark has a primer loader but I think he loaded 5 tubes to start.

I have 6 primer tubes that I use for small primers.

Boxerglocker
09-04-2012, 21:57
I could never do better than 120-130 average on a LCT. I did do 200 once just to see if I could do it and I did... but just not a comfortable pace for me. I have 7 small primer tubes and load them all up once a week or so all in one sitting (takes me 15 minutes) just to get it out of the way.

Colorado4Wheel
09-04-2012, 22:11
I'ld still have to see it Steve, a full hours worth, not 6min x 10. Like guys saying they can do 100rds on a ss press. From scratch w/ th sizing die already set, just not possible for handgun at least IMO. I've timed it & I am a pretty exp reloader.:whistling:
I load primer tubes sitting in front of the nightly news. No time lost, no time counted in reloading as I am multi tasking.:supergrin: If you can't do 400rds/hr on a 550, from hitting the bench to leaving it, then you are doing something wrong.:dunno:

So 100 rds in 25 mins was very doable for me. Best is 22mins. Yes that is an honest time of 25mins of actual loading. So I could take a 10min break and load another 100 and still have loaded 200 rds in a hour.

Zombie Steve
09-04-2012, 22:17
<--- had to look up what efficacy means.

<--- reloads good.

http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x214/sbecht/grinser008.gif


You'll be fine.

paragon1
09-04-2012, 23:06
I can do 200 rounds per hour on the LCT. I find it faster to manually set the primer instead of using the primer feed.

Colorado4Wheel
09-04-2012, 23:08
Shim the prime assembly up with a washer.

fredj338
09-05-2012, 09:09
Just a note, when I time a run, it's for one hour, not 10min x 6 or what ever. Priming off the press must be counted or it's not a valid number. To prime off press means decapping first. No way you are doing 200 decapping/sizing, then hand priming, then finishing. I imagine one can dot off a record run fo what ever in a few min. I hace done 1000rds/hr on a 650 for a 6min run, but it's not a realistic 1hr total. You have to fill primers, adjust the occassional case misfeed, etc. SO I stick to 700rds/hr as a realsitic number. So while some say they can get 200rds/hr on a LCT, it's not realsitic unless you cazn repeat that, from scratch, for 1hr, every hr. My own rules, feel free to use your own.

Colorado4Wheel
09-05-2012, 09:51
So while some say they can get 200rds/hr on a LCT, it's not realsitic unless you cazn repeat that, from scratch, for 1hr, every hr. My own rules, feel free to use your own.

I can do that for 1 hour easily. I have done it on rare occasions.

Boxerglocker
09-05-2012, 10:07
:popcorn: I'm waiting for the YouTube video "Fast and the Furious LCT" starring C4W

emtjr928
09-05-2012, 10:19
Ok,,, Which of you is going to take the plunge and build a full out "Race Press"? :-)

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Colorado4Wheel
09-05-2012, 10:36
:popcorn: I'm waiting for the YouTube video "Fast and the Furious LCT" starring C4W

I posted it a while back. But 100 rds in 25 mins is just 4 rounds every minute so that is just one pull of the handle ever 3.75 seconds. Quick but doable.

Colorado4Wheel
09-05-2012, 11:45
http://s145.photobucket.com/albums/r215/98sr20ve/?action=view&current=LCTVideoBetter.mp4

1:15 secs. Including me walking into to frame and out of the frame to turn the camera on and off. 5 rounds made. You can see the pace is not really that fast. Basically I made the five rounds in a little over a minute.

fredj338
09-05-2012, 13:31
Ok,,, Which of you is going to take the plunge and build a full out "Race Press"? :-)

Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

Already done, it's called a 1050 w/ bullet feeder.:supergrin:

fredj338
09-05-2012, 13:39
I can do that for 1 hour easily. I have done it on rare occasions.

Curious, since you can't preload primer trays on the LCT, how long does it take to load the tray? Another reason I don't like micro runs of 100 & then have someone say I can load this or that in an hour, not realistic. If it takes you 3-4 min to recharge primers, then you've lost a bit of time. Just asking, not doubting you Steve, I just don't see 200rds over an hour sustained.
Like quoting cost of reloading using components bought 5yrs ago, not realistic, especially if trying to explain advantages or disadvantages to noobs. As I noted, I can do a 6min run of 100 on the 650, most of the time. In no way am I equating that to 1000rds/hr, it's not sustainable. I've never done 30min w/o something happening to pull a min or two out here & there.:dunno:

Zombie Steve
09-05-2012, 13:40
I can do that for 1 hour easily. I have done it on rare occasions.

Never seen you break 20 minutes at a stretch.

Brewing that pumpkin ale tonight at my house around 4 or 5. Don't bring any women of high morals (although they might appreciate the shiny brass).


:cool:

Sellersm, Hoser - you're invited too. Actually, any of you butt heads feel like coming to Colorado Springs tonight, send me a pm.

:beer:

whatsupglock
09-05-2012, 13:46
I shoot nothing but reloaded ammunition out of my Glocks. Having said that, I am very careful about producing quality ammo and I gauge check every single round that comes off of the press. I also don't reload lead at all. I use only jacketed or plated bullets.

No problems for me. I still have both eyes, 10 fingers, and my guns work just fine. I have never had any misfires with the 30,000 or so rounds I've loaded, but I get a boat load of misfires with winchester white box.

Colorado4Wheel
09-05-2012, 13:55
Curious, since you can't preload primer trays on the LCT, how long does it take to load the tray? Another reason I don't like micro runs of 100 & then have someone say I can load this or that in an hour, not realistic. If it takes you 3-4 min to recharge primers, then you've lost a bit of time. Just asking, not doubting you Steve, I just don't see 200rds over an hour sustained.


So my 25 mins per 100 is a real time. Not a extrapolated time. I did it and have done it many times. It was not hard. 22 mins is the fastest I can go. I would not want to do that speed for long but I have loaded a actual 100 rds on a LCT in 22mins and I took a video while doing it. That brief video shows me loading 5 rds in a little over a minute (take out the stop and start of the 1:15 time of the video). So do the math. 25 mins is very doable for 100 rds. If you can do 100 in 25 mins then you only need 50 mins to do 200rds. So you have 10 mins for a break and to load primer setup. Lee has the easiest primer setup to load. You dump them in, shake till they are oriented properly and your done. It's that simple. Less then a minute. Think about dumping primers in a primer tray but never using the pickup stick. Also, my lee primer flipper for the LCT is better then any other unit I have used. It works very well. Much better then my Dillon tray.

BUT

I am like you. I don't actually load on ANY press for a complete hour very often. I have done it on rare occasions with the 650. Only when it's really important.

My LCT is not stock. Custom roller handle. Makes loading much easier and less tiring. I also have a very efficient work space. That is critical.

Colorado4Wheel
09-05-2012, 13:57
Never seen you break 20 minutes at a stretch.

Brewing that pumpkin ale tonight at my house around 4 or 5. Don't bring any women of high morals (although they might appreciate the shiny brass).


:cool:

Sellersm, Hoser - you're invited too. Actually, any of you butt heads feel like coming to Colorado Springs tonight, send me a pm.

:beer:

My last appt is at 4:30. I will be a little later.

F106 Fan
09-05-2012, 14:00
Curious, since you can't preload primer trays on the LCT, how long does it take to load the tray?

I have been curious about that. Can the primer tray be interchanged? Could I have a dozen preloaded trays?

Is the tray large enough to upend a box of primers? Some primers come properly oriented (but not Federal) and if the tray is big enough, reloading it would be alot faster than loading a tube after gyrating the primers on a flip tray.

No, I'm not going to ditch my Dillons, I am just curious.

Richard

Colorado4Wheel
09-05-2012, 14:05
I have been curious about that. Can the primer tray be interchanged? Could I have a dozen preloaded trays?

Richard


You could buy multiple primer trays. It's would be a total waste of money. The lee tray for the LCT has little dimples not concentric circles. It is with out a doubt the best primer flipper I have ever used (better then the Load Master one for sure). It is a little on the small side. It takes very little time to flip the primers and put the lid back on the unit.

For those that don't know. To load a LCT primer setup (and most lee presses), you simply drop the primers onto the tray, shake till they are properly oriented, put the lid on, snap it back into the press. Your done at that point.