IDPA vs USPSA - what are the pros and cons? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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GlockinNJ
09-06-2012, 12:07
I'm looking to shoot more than GSSF and I'm considering IDPA and/or USPSA. Would like to hear some pros/cons from the GT community.

I guess I could shoot both, but I really want to learn one format at a time.

I would be shooting either my mostly stock G22 or stock CZ-75.

Chris Chris
09-06-2012, 12:52
Both games are fun, and I shoot both. The best description of the differences between the two of them is this: USPSA is a track meet with handguns. A lot of running is often involved, and sometimes over relatively long distances. IDPA is more of a choreographed ballet. They have rules about using 'cover' properly to engage targets, do not allow more than 10 yards movement between shooting positions, and have far stricter rules on reloading than does USPSA.

In IDPA you also have to shoot with a cover garment on, in keeping with their Defensive Pistol approach. That garmet is not required in USPSA. Holster rules in IDPA are also more strict than USPSA.

Both your G22 and CZ-75 are good to go for both. In fact, with the magazine carriers and proper holster you could shoot either gun in USPSA Production Division or IDPA SSP
(striker fired gun or CZ DA) or ESP (striker fired or CZ cocked & locked).

That might be a good place for you to start to get your feet wet. The games are similar, but with some noticeable differences, but the above gun divisions are virtually identical in terms of equipment.

glock_19guy1983
09-06-2012, 12:57
Ive never shot USPSA, but I can tell you some of the gripes I have with IDPA. Downloading magazines is the biggest one. If I am carrying a g19 I am not going out into the real world with only 10rnds in my mag. Also some of the stock service revolver regulations on speedloader carriers are down right stupid.

whatsupglock
09-06-2012, 13:02
Shoot both! It's too much fun just to choose one. GSSF is incredibly boring compared to run-n-gun. I shoot both. I like both. I have had people tell me I should only shoot one or the other. Bullshevic. There are a ton of people at the matches that will help teach you the rules. Learn the safety rules and go play.

IDPA purists tend to get on my nerves. If I hear one more person use the word "gaming" or "gamer" I might lose my freaking mind! Newsflash folks. IT'S A FREAKING GAME!!!!

You may decide you don't like USPSA or IDPA after shooting one versus the other. I have several friends who don't want to have anything to do with IDPA any more after shooting USPSA. I like both and will continue to shoot both.

And as stated previously, some of the rules are stupid. But it is a game, and games have rules.

Bren
09-06-2012, 13:21
Ive never shot USPSA, but I can tell you some of the gripes I have with IDPA. Downloading magazines is the biggest one. If I am carrying a g19 I am not going out into the real world with only 10rnds in my mag. Also some of the stock service revolver regulations on speedloader carriers are down right stupid.

Downloading magazines is one of the best rules IDPA has. The point is to level the playing field between guns, so that you are comparing skills of shooters, more than equipment. It's a direct response to the USPSA equipment/mag capacity races under various sets of rules. Face it, your gun won't benefit from practice, but you will, so it's better to see how you can do than how your equipment can do. On top of that, matches want to give you 18 round stages that are more fun than they are real-world in terms of round count, so guns that only hold 8-10 rounds and would work great for real self defense would be eliminated from competition if mag capacity was an issue.

As for the OP - try IDPA first. You can be more competitive with your CCW equipment and stock guns and the rules make it much mroe useful as practice for guys who carry a gun for self-defense.

davsco
09-06-2012, 14:57
in my experience (VA/MD/PA/WV), USPSA events are a little bigger - more stages, more targets per stage, more spaced out - so you generally get more shooting in at any given match. Also steel targets and some moving targets which the local IDPA matches generally don't have.

so if there is both an idpa and uspsa match on the same day with a similar drive to the event, i will pick the uspsa match. but if a uspsa match is one day, and an idpa is another day, i try to do them both.

the number one rule by far with both events is safety - muzzle always down range, finger off trigger unless actually in the process of shooting a target. leave your gun in its case until you speak with the match director or a range officer and they'll tell you what to do from there. i wouldn't get too caught up in the rules and differences between the two - just show up, tell them you're the new guy and they'll take care of you, and learn from the guys in front of you. treat the first year as a learning experience. tough to do, but start out slow, focus on front sight, and get good hits. if you get great hits on one stage, speed up a little on the next, and so on.

Bren
09-06-2012, 15:37
in my experience (VA/MD/PA/WV), USPSA events are a little bigger - more stages, more targets per stage, more spaced out - so you generally get more shooting in at any given match. Also steel targets and some moving targets which the local IDPA matches generally don't have.

The opposite around here - a big complaint at the local matches is that they are as big as a major match and take all day and pretty much every stages has multiple movers, steel targets, etc. to reset every run. You won't see one that is under 100 rounds.

glock_19guy1983
09-06-2012, 15:51
The opposite around here - a big complaint at the local matches is that they are as big as a major match and take all day and pretty much every stages has multiple movers, steel targets, etc. to reset every run. You won't see one that is under 100 rounds.

I like large matches. I have to drive an hour to the nearest IDPA match, so if its a 100 or more rnd match it is more worthwhile for me. We usualy have 30 or more shooters and it goes pretty fast if everyone will help reset and paste with one person helping the shooter pick up his brass.

BuckyP
09-06-2012, 16:11
In general, USPSA is more of a shooting challenge, IDPA a "rules" challenge. You'll see far more procedural errors at an IDPA match, and typically more misses at a USPSA match.

USPSA uses a fault line (piece of 2x4) to show you where you can and cannot shoot from. You are either touching the ground outside the line, or you are not. IDPA uses a subjective form of cover. Depending on who is running you (and who you are), will depend if you are or are not behind cover.

By virtue of the rules and course descriptions, there are typically few options on how to shoot an IDPA stage, positions must be approached in order, targets must be shot in order. USPSA allows for options, sometimes minor, sometimes major, depending on the course designer.

I'll add one more thing, IDPA sometimes requires you to "cheat" to win. I'm specifically referring to "round dumping". That is, shooting an extra round at a target to make the reload more convenient. Some people are quite blatant about it (like dumping 3 rounds into the down zero at a 4 yard target), but more commonly a better shooter will pluck a down 3 and make it up. The latter is hard to call, as you are allowed to make up shots.

As for equipment, when IDPA first began, USPSA required high and equipment, and even more important high capacity magazines (which at the time were expensive and hard to find due to the AWB that was in effect). Today, USPSA has Production and Single Stack which can be effectively shot with IDPA gear, with the addition of a couple more mag pouches (and of course the magazines to fill them).

A couple years ago, I liked them both equal. I liked what IDPA was trying to accomplish, but think some of the subjectiveness fell short. Admittedly, I don't know what the answer is to resolve this. I still shoot both on a regular basis. Given the option, however, I'll pick a USPSA match over IDPA.

ron59
09-06-2012, 20:18
You have to "download mags" in USPSA production division also which is the closest comparison to IDPA, so that's a silly statement.

My biggest complaint is the "cover" call in IDPA. It's a judgement call by the R.O. and often not applied evenly/fairly IMHO. Far too subjective I think.

I started with that and by far prefer USPSA now. USPSA can be overwhelming to a newbie though.... LOTS of targets on some stages and tough to get your head around.

RJ 71
09-06-2012, 20:38
I shoot both. Mostly because I enjoy shooting. USPSA is more challenging mentally and physically but both IDPA and USPSA are a ton of fun. My advice is find a match and shoot it. Don't worry about which one is better in someone else's opinion. Shoot both and decide for yourself. They are different games with different rules but they are Games and remember games are supposed to be fun.

BuckyP
09-07-2012, 05:32
You have to "download mags" in USPSA production division also which is the closest comparison to IDPA, so that's a silly statement.


What statement are you referring to? :dunno:


I started with that and by far prefer USPSA now. USPSA can be overwhelming to a newbie though.... LOTS of targets on some stages and tough to get your head around.

I think it's tougher for a Newbie to grasp the concept of "tactical priority" and "tactical sequence" than dealing with a few extra targets on a stage.

Bren
09-07-2012, 05:36
I like large matches. I have to drive an hour to the nearest IDPA match, so if its a 100 or more rnd match it is more worthwhile for me. We usualy have 30 or more shooters and it goes pretty fast if everyone will help reset and paste with one person helping the shooter pick up his brass.

Here's a stage from a local monthly IDPA match - I believe I even shot in this one. Down the side are links to the other stages, so you can see the number of props and shots going into it.

IDPA at BGSL Stage 2 - 18 Oct 08 - YouTube

ron59
09-07-2012, 11:07
What statement are you referring to? :dunno:


Post #3, where the guy says "downloading mags" is his biggest complaint about IDPA.

#1. The REASON for that, is that many states don't allow higher capacity magazines. So they implemented the "max 10 rounds" rule so that people from those states, when they went to a match in another state or a national event.... would still be on level playing field, as opposed to having to adjust for a difference. It makes plenty of sense.

#2. Also, out of all the divisions in USPSA, I'd say the Production division is the one closest to IDPA for comparison reasons. It too has a max of 10 rounds for the same reasons I mentioned above.

So to use that statement has a knock against IDPA is pretty ridiculous, actually.

whatsupglock
09-07-2012, 11:18
Round dumping is the rule that chaps my ars. I have had people tell me that I shoot too good to take extra shots, so if I do, I'll get a 20 sec ftdr. BS. A 15 yard make-up shot is not round dumping. If people are going to gripe, make every blasted stage limited vickers!!!!! Solves the problem.

Chris Chris
09-07-2012, 12:21
IDPA and USPSA are games. Games have to have rules. You don't have to agree with the rules, you just have to abide by them or accept the penalty for violating them.

I'm sure that NFL defensive linemen object to the rules about 'roughing the quarterback' and defensive backs probably aren't too happy with the 'pass interference' rules. But, they have to abide by them.

Complaining about the rules doesn't accomplish much. If you don't like the rules in one game, play another.

glock_19guy1983
09-07-2012, 12:45
Here's a stage from a local monthly IDPA match - I believe I even shot in this one. Down the side are links to the other stages, so you can see the number of props and shots going into it.

thanks. I like the idea of a swinger for a non threat. looks like a fun stage.

whatsupglock
09-07-2012, 13:39
IDPA and USPSA are games. Games have to have rules. You don't have to agree with the rules, you just have to abide by them or accept the penalty for violating them.

I don't mind the rules. Rules make the game more challenging. What bothers me is when the rules are not applied equally across the board.

Chris Chris
09-07-2012, 14:19
I don't mind the rules. Rules make the game more challenging. What bothers me is when the rules are not applied equally across the board.

I will grant you that with a BIG +1.

I've been a SO for about seven years (MA in one Division and EX in 3 others) and have shot major matches ranging from the World Championship, through several Nationals, some Regionals and a bunch of state championships.

The quality of the SOs can vary greatly. I have even seen a Novice Class shooter serving as an SO at Sanctioned matches.... along with plenty of MMs who haven't been shooting the sport for even a year.

Yeah... they often put their own spin on things while they strut around embued with their 'important status'.

It's a sore point with many experienced IDPA competitors.

The good news is that the IDPA Tiger Teams are looking closely at this SO/experience issue. There may be new Rules that require a certain level of IDPA experience (either time or Classification) to gain more experienced people in the SO position... along with a retest and re-certification of existing SOs. That should help.

The TTs are also going through a total Rule review that may produce some other changes.

We can only wait and hope.

ron59
09-08-2012, 17:52
I don't mind the rules. Rules make the game more challenging. What bothers me is when the rules are not applied equally across the board.

This is where I was mentioning "the cover" call.

R.O.'s suck buddies don't get called as tightly, newbies are over policed.

Way too subjective of a rule, yet is so crucial to time.

ADK_40GLKr
09-08-2012, 19:41
If I am carrying a g19 I am not going out into the real world with only 10rnds in my mag.

Even if I am carrying my G17 I have to go out into the "real world" with 10 in my mag. My 27 only has 9 (+ 1 in the chamber).

Maybe that rule levels the playing field for us NY'ers, & others.

Seale Team
09-08-2012, 20:21
I don't mind the rules. Rules make the game more challenging. What bothers me is when the rules are not applied equally across the board.

THIS^^^^^^. I could get on a soap box.

I read a new shooter once who summed up the differences like this IIRC...."In IDPA you can always lose a stage and claim you did it more "Tactically" and save face. In USPSA the overall scores show who did what and its put up or shut up, no excuses."

I felt he summed it pretty well.

waktasz
09-08-2012, 21:09
You can shoot USPSA like a tactical timmy too if you want.

Walk Soft
09-08-2012, 21:16
The opposite around here - a big complaint at the local matches is that they are as big as a major match and take all day and pretty much every stages has multiple movers, steel targets, etc. to reset every run. You won't see one that is under 100 rounds.

I attended my first one last month at BGSL and it was an all day affair.I was starving by 1pm,didn't finish until 4pm.There was multiple movers,steel targets,etc.Great fun though.Next time I'm packing a lunch.:supergrin:

mingaa
09-08-2012, 21:34
i shoot both. Mostly because i enjoy shooting. Uspsa is more challenging mentally and physically but both idpa and uspsa are a ton of fun. My advice is find a match and shoot it. Don't worry about which one is better in someone else's opinion. Shoot both and decide for yourself. They are different games with different rules but they are games and remember games are supposed to be fun.

bingo!!

marvin
09-08-2012, 22:46
i don't let the rules bother me, i know they are both games so i just play by what ever the rules are.

i've also shot bullseye and steel along with action pistol matchs different rules for different games.

AZson
09-09-2012, 09:57
USPSA your score is heavily based on time while IDPA is balanced with time and target score. I think of USPSA as a kind of spray and pray competition and IDPA is based on every day CCW's. I like IDPA better.

waktasz
09-09-2012, 11:26
The basis of USPSA scoring is Points divided by time. You need both. Someone who says USPSA is spray and pray doesn't know anything about the sport.

The most recent match I shot I shot 91% of the points (which is pretty bad for me). The guy in 3rd place shot every stage faster than me, but only shot 84% of the points. Guess who won?

Seale Team
09-09-2012, 13:30
The basis of USPSA scoring is Points divided by time. You need both. Someone who says USPSA is spray and pray doesn't know anything about the sport.


Very well stated.

ron59
09-09-2012, 17:19
USPSA your score is heavily based on time while IDPA is balanced with time and target score. I think of USPSA as a kind of spray and pray competition and IDPA is based on every day CCW's. I like IDPA better.

:rofl::rofl::rofl:

You should shoot some of the matches I do, where many of the targets are partially hidden by "no shoots". Spray-and-pray would give you so many penalties you'd be terrible.

No.... you gotta be accurate to be good.
You probably just saw guys shoot in half the time you did with a few less points than you had and came up with that conclusion. The truth of the matter is the best guys are super fast AND accurate.

Do some Googling, you'll quickly find that an IDPA Master is usually considered equivalent "only" to a USPSA *A* class shooter. USPSA has two classes above that (Master and Grand Master).

If you want to shoot the Pro Am Steel match, you have to shoot at the highest classification you have in IDPA/USPSA. He lists the comparison table here:
http://proamshooting.com/SCORING/scoring.html

Also... in GSSF, if you're a Master in any other shooting sport, you have to register as Master in GSSF. *Unless* you're an IDPA Master... they don't even consider that as good enough. LOL.

Bottom line... an IDPA Master is pretty much doodly-squat compared to other shooting organizations. You truly want to test your shooting skills of speed/accuracy, shoot USPSA.

davsco
09-09-2012, 18:51
guys let's not rag on each other's choices. idpa and uspsa are both a ton of fun and a great chance to shoot under mildly stressful situations. in both you have to be both accurate and fast. shooting slow, or missing your butt off, will put you in the bottom of the pack on both formats. to the OP and everyone else, try them both (and also gssf, steel challenge, 3 gun, and everything else) and see what suits you best.

BuckyP
09-10-2012, 03:52
The basis of USPSA scoring is Points divided by time. You need both. Someone who says USPSA is spray and pray doesn't know anything about the sport.


Very well stated.

Very well stated.

And for those who shoot Production (minor scoring), accuracy is even more critical.

MrVvrroomm
09-10-2012, 06:34
I shoot both, much prefer USPSA

et45
09-12-2012, 16:55
Whoever stated downloading mags in IDPA leveled the playing field between guns is wrong. the divisions(CDP,SSP ESP...) do not compete against each other.There is no "High Overall" winner in IDPA or USPSA for that matter.

waktasz
09-12-2012, 17:00
It levels the playing field between guns with different factory magazine capacities dopey.

et45
09-12-2012, 17:01
As for the quality of the SOs in IDPA I was both a USPSA RO and a IDPA SO and the RO class was far more in depth than the SO class.ROs also have to recertify every year.

et45
09-12-2012, 17:05
It levels the playing field between guns with different factory magazine capacities dopey.

thats a whiner response if I ever heard one "billybobs gun hold 1 more billet than mine"Most all SSP guns have at least a 16 rd capacity anyway

waktasz
09-12-2012, 19:02
thats a whiner response if I ever heard one "billybobs gun hold 1 more billet than mine"Most all SSP guns have at least a 16 rd capacity anyway

It's not whining, it's the truth. You can't possibly deny that that's the reason the founders of IDPA did it. That and the AWB.

Jon_R
09-12-2012, 19:32
Whoever stated downloading mags in IDPA leveled the playing field between guns is wrong. the divisions(CDP,SSP ESP...) do not compete against each other.There is no "High Overall" winner in IDPA or USPSA for that matter.

I believe his intended comment is inside the divisions and is true. If you could fill up the mags you would see less G27s and more G17s in SSP as giving up the rounds would be a lot more costly in standings than just the loss of weight and sight radius. When a string can't make you fire more than 18 rounds I bet you would see some 18 round guns built for the rules.

I am ok with 10 round mags as I want to do reloads for the value of doing reloads. I would probably like to load 8 in them so I get an extra reload but I can't actually under the rules.

I shoot all the action sports I can find. USPSA, IDPA, and 3-Gun. Whatever is offered closest when I have a weekend day free to go.

ron59
09-12-2012, 19:34
thats a whiner response if I ever heard one "billybobs gun hold 1 more billet than mine"Most all SSP guns have at least a 16 rd capacity anyway

If it's not the same, it's not the same. Me with 16 and you 18? Not fair. There has to be *A* number. The AWB limit of 10 makes sense anyway.

With 18 rounds... you wouldn't even have to reload for most stages. Reloading is *good*.

4Rules
09-12-2012, 21:10
:cool:

IDPA - YouTube

4Rules
09-12-2012, 21:13
Hitler banned from the Brian Enos forums - YouTube

GlockinNJ
09-13-2012, 08:47
:rofl::rofl::rofl:

Man, you are funny, 4rules.

HoldHard
09-13-2012, 10:17
IDPA = NASCAR
USPSA = Formula One

In IDPA there is only one way to shoot a stage. Everyone shoots the same targets in exactly the same order from the same position as described in the stage scenerio.

In USPSA there could be several ways to shoot a stage. The stage description can be as short as one sentence "Engage targets as they become visible from within the shooting area." You have to figure out what targets to shoot from where and when to do reloads. The different divisions have guns that hold 8 rounds (Single Stack) up to 29 rounds (Open).

IDPA requires a "cover garnment" to be worn. They require you to retain a magazine that has rounds left in it, so you have to put it in a pocket during the reload process. You do not have to retain an empty magazine, hence the extra shots fired to get it empty. The serious IDPA shooters at my club use a vest as a cover garnment with nice big open pockets. In USPSA, magazines with rounds left in them do not have to be retained.

There are several other members at my club that shoot both and they call IDPA "IPSC Lite". One guy is an IDPA Master and "B" class in USPSA Production division. He uses the same gun, holster and magazine carriers (he just adds a couple more magazines when shooting USPSA).

I have shot both and enjoy them both. IDPA is just not doing very well at my club due to burn out. The same set of people design, setup, Safety Officer, score, tear down and publish the match results. They have been at it for the last four years! But that can happen anywhere in any sport.

The USPSA group has been shooting at the club for 15 years. They are organized and groom replacement people for every position, from pistol committee rep all the way through the ranks.

As I age, the Open division with it's dot optics has become attractive. It still allows older people to shoot. We have several individuals at the club that are in their 70's and one that is 84 that shoot Open division and have a great time doing it. They compete against each other in the "Super Senior" classification.....

Sometimes, it just boils down to the people. When you shoot the stage exactly like the guy in front of you did but get a Failure To Do Right (FTDR) penalty, that might influence you slightly.

Remember. Both are volunteer sports. So be nice to the range officers and safety officers, even the one that gave you the FTDR penalty..... without them volunteering their time and effort, there would not be any competition shooting.

To the OP, it's all fun. Go shoot both and find out what you like.

HH

Chris Chris
09-13-2012, 13:37
Very well put!

PEC-Memphis
09-13-2012, 13:41
In IDPA there is only one way to shoot a stage. Everyone shoots the same targets in exactly the same order from the same position as described in the stage scenerio.

This simply isn't true as an absolute. Sure, there are stages where your statement applies - but it depends upon stage design. We often have more than one choice of start position - and then other choices of how to engage targets. Depending upon the design, these choices can make the strategies for the stage quite different. As an example, which side of a hallway can change the target array to be engaged first, how far you can proceed down the hallway and maintain cover, etc. Determining the best strategy on some (well designed stages) can be more difficult in IDPA than in USPSA.

BuckyP
09-13-2012, 14:07
This simply isn't true as an absolute. Sure, there are stages where your statement applies - but it depends upon stage design. We often have more than one choice of start position - and then other choices of how to engage targets. Depending upon the design, these choices can make the strategies for the stage quite different. As an example, which side of a hallway can change the target array to be engaged first, how far you can proceed down the hallway and maintain cover, etc. Determining the best strategy on some (well designed stages) can be more difficult in IDPA than in USPSA.

While this is true, it has to do with stage design, it has been quite rare in the many IDPA matches that I have shot.

HoldHard
09-13-2012, 14:12
This simply isn't true as an absolute. Sure, there are stages where your statement applies - but it depends upon stage design. We often have more than one choice of start position - and then other choices of how to engage targets. Depending upon the design, these choices can make the strategies for the stage quite different. As an example, which side of a hallway can change the target array to be engaged first, how far you can proceed down the hallway and maintain cover, etc. Determining the best strategy on some (well designed stages) can be more difficult in IDPA than in USPSA.So your choices are to go down the left side or the right side. Ok, but that still seems limited, but maybe it's just me.

Good stage design is critical to a successful match, one that the competitors talk about after they leave.

Challenging stage designs are where the same target is available from two or three different shooting locations and you have to decide where they should be engaged. You also have to remember that you have already shot them when they "appear" a second or third time.

Steel targets that activate a moving target are normally placed where other targets can be engaged before the moving target even appears. You have to be able to gauge the speed of the mover and how many "static" targets you are going to engage before going after a moving / disappearing target. Do I shoot the activator, then the one paper target beside it then go for the mover, or do I go for both the paper and the additional steel after hitting the activator?

PEC-Memphis I understand where you are coming from but only having two ways to shoot a stage compared to 5, 6 or 7 different ways appears to be a bit more difficult, especially where the stage description has "Start anywhere within the shooting area" as the start position. Now those are really fun....

HH

PEC-Memphis
09-13-2012, 16:55
So your choices are to go down the left side or the right side. Ok, but that still seems limited, but maybe it's just me.

That was just one example for one part of one stage for a couple of arrays. We have some good stage designers - some of the "trickiest" appear to be the most simple. Some separate the "high masters" from the "low masters", but still can be completed by a MM.

Yes, there are stages that are very limited in choices, and it takes a good designer to keep the CoF's interesting with options.

Don't get me wrong, USPSA is a great sport and there is no negative implication here. But the statement about IDPA CoFs only being shot one way by every shooter just isn't correct - and while the variations may only be a couple of seconds at the same skill level - matches are won and lost by less.

If you want to discuss limited choices, refer to Steel Challenge. But yet Steel Challenge is a great sport attracting many professional shooters.

sciolist
09-13-2012, 20:02
IDPA is an attempt to add (or retain) a "defensive" component to Practical Shooting, which some find to be contrived. USPSA is more evolved as a sport, and requires a much higher level of handling and shooting proficiency to do well.

Ironically, IDPA's contrivances make it less realistic than USPSA - where the objective is simply to engage the targets in the most efficient manner the competitor can find.

The typical criticism of USPSA is that it's too gamey, but all of these sports are games. If you're interested in using a shooting game as a means of developing modern pistol handling skills, USPSA is for you. If you want to get good with a carry-type gun, shoot production.

bornhunter04
09-17-2012, 14:17
They are all games. I haven't shot uspsa yet but I do shoot IDPA regularly. I believe either 'game' will improve your pistol handling skills exponentially.

I like IDPA because of the rules that require cover and you to keep from exposing yourself to the targets. One of the things that attracted me to the sport was that I could use my carry gun/holster/cover garment and be competitive. Plus there was no additional cost to start competing.

IDPA is a thinking man's game. There are some courses that you really have to be aware of your surroundings and where targets are. If your moving through the course a foot one way or another you might expose yourself to targets while engaging others, thus incurring a penalty.

I don't understand the grip about the downloaded mag capacity. It was designed to level the playing field, and also make it easier for stage creators to force reloads (which must be done behind cover). It levels the playing field by allowing people in non-2A friendly states with 10 round mag limits to travel to another state and be competitive. Will I ccw with more rounds. You bet. Do I appreciate being 'forced' to reload on the clock under stress? Dang right!

To the op, go shoot both. Lots of people do. There's guys at our club that shoot IDPA, USPSA, and Cowboy action. Any day of shooting is better than any day at work.

bornhunter04
09-17-2012, 14:22
This simply isn't true as an absolute. Sure, there are stages where your statement applies - but it depends upon stage design. We often have more than one choice of start position - and then other choices of how to engage targets. Depending upon the design, these choices can make the strategies for the stage quite different. As an example, which side of a hallway can change the target array to be engaged first, how far you can proceed down the hallway and maintain cover, etc. Determining the best strategy on some (well designed stages) can be more difficult in IDPA than in USPSA.

I've seen this on many occasions. Earlier this year, we had one stage that messed a lot of shooters up. Many guys forgot to engage 1 or 2 targets on it just simply because as you moved down the hall you had to be careful of how far you went. There were 2 or 3 ways to shoot it at least and that's assuming your didn't screw up.

GlockinNJ
09-17-2012, 14:52
Thanks again for all the input. I just shot my first IDPA match this weekend and it was great. I now understand many of the comments made about it being rules-based. But, I'm okay with the format. The rules give the shooter more to think about under duress and I like that kind of challenge.

Bottom line: it was fun and I'm sure it will make me a better shooter and that's exactly what I am looking for. One day I will try UDPSA too.

waktasz
09-17-2012, 15:01
What club did you shoot at?

GlockinNJ
09-17-2012, 15:09
What club did you shoot at?

Somerset, NJ. And I can't say enough about the staff there. Very knowledgable and accommodating of newcomers. A few times when another shooter made a procedural error, I asked a SO to explain to me what happened so that I can learn and they were very helpful.

waktasz
09-17-2012, 15:18
Gotcha. I've been there a few times. It was indoors right?

BuckyP
09-17-2012, 16:40
Somerset, NJ. And I can't say enough about the staff there. Very knowledgable and accommodating of newcomers. A few times when another shooter made a procedural error, I asked a SO to explain to me what happened so that I can learn and they were very helpful.

Agreed. The folks that run that match are great. I've been there a few times. They started capping match attendance because they were getting too many shooters. Are they still doing that?

GlockinNJ
09-17-2012, 18:30
Gotcha. I've been there a few times. It was indoors right?

Yep, indoors.

GlockinNJ
09-17-2012, 18:32
Agreed. The folks that run that match are great. I've been there a few times. They started capping match attendance because they were getting too many shooters. Are they still doing that?

I think so. The web registration says they take 30 shooters and it looked like a full house on Sunday. It took about 5 1/2 hrs to complete, including pizza break. It was run very smoothly and safely by the staff, but it just took a while due to the number of shooters.

waktasz
09-17-2012, 18:33
Make sure to check out some of the matches west of the Delaware in a place we like to call America.

If you haven't already found it, this is the #1 website to keep an eye on for IDPA events in the area.

http://www.nepaidpascores.net/

TheBelly
09-20-2012, 11:25
I don't give a crap whether I'm major or minor caliber.

I don't give a crap whether I'm in the production, limited, open, space craft, or sasquatch class.

I care about being able to use my equipment how I would in real life. I use it as training by putting the stress of time into my shooting. Other than having people shoot back, I can't think of any other way to get the stress in there.

I only ask two questions about my shooting when I get done with a stage: Did I have any Misses? Did I hit any No-Shoots? I'm accountable for every bullet, so just get to what matters to me.

I care about the A, B, C, D zone hits because I can't miss fast enough to win a real gunfight.

I will cheat in real life if it means going home or going to the morgue, so I wll pick the competitions that allow me to cheat how I will shoot in real life.

BUT.... That's just me... Define the end goal, and then find (or create) the path to it.

jhayesvw
09-23-2012, 21:00
I don't mind the rules. Rules make the game more challenging. What bothers me is when the rules are not applied equally across the board.

This is the exact problem I had in IDPA.
the RO was calling me for "penalties" they did not call others for. Such as not being far enough behind cover and taking extra shots. Neither of which I did intentionally or any differently than other people.
I was however faster my 2nd time out than most of the people that had been shooting there for years. They called me a gamer, whatever that is. and then said they would score me hard.
I stopped shooting IDPA after that and focused on USPSA.

I love USPSA because its more individual. I have to read the stage and decide where I want/need to reload. What I want to shoot first, second, third, etc. Which side I want to start on and where I want to go.
If I want to go farther forward to increase my accuracy or if I think I can hang back and shoot from a distance.

USPSA all the way.
I think IDPA could be fun but not when I shot it with SOME of the people I shot with.