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cajun_chooter
09-10-2012, 15:08
I think i want to get started re-loading.. years ago i use to re-load for hunting purposes... mostly rifle.. i now want to buy a loading press for loading mostly 9mm ammo..
any suggestion on what brand of press that is most trouble free... easiest to set up.. and where to buy would be most helpful..

thanks,

sellersm
09-10-2012, 15:45
Read through the stickies at the top of this forum.

To save time, you may want to tell us the intended volumes you'll need to load, as that determines most of what we'd recommend.

Welcome to the madness, er sickness, er disease, I mean the rewarding & effective hobby!

F106 Fan
09-10-2012, 15:46
We just did this last week:
http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1441898

There are some stickies at the top that go over many of the options.

Before anyone can help in any realistic way, you need to decide (and tell us) how many rounds you plan to shoot, of how many calibers, over what period of time. If you want to shoot 1000 rounds per week, the recommendation will be a lot more expensive than if you want to shoot 1000 rounds per year.

It would be helpful if we had some idea of your budget. If you only want to spend $300 then the equipment list will be much different than if you want to spend $1200.

Why would anyone start out at $1200? Ask SARDG, she wanted to shoot competitively and that's what it takes to make dumpster quantities of ammo in a short period of time.

Most everybody around here has chugged vast quantities of the Blue Kool-Aid and will recommend Dillon equipment. You can spend some time here:
http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/customize-reloader.html

You can also get "The ABCs of Reloading" as a beginning book. It is available at Amazon in both a paper version and as an eBook.

Richard

Bucknasty
09-10-2012, 15:50
It seems like the same questions get asked here everyday. What press to buy, should I lube?, sort brass or mix?, load data? They should make a search function...

cajun_chooter
09-10-2012, 15:55
I did read thru the stickys ... i don't want a slow press.. but i don't want to spend $1200 either... either a Dillion 550 or a Hornady progressive... i think... i have spent quite a bit of time reading reviews on both.. Dillion & Hornady... i read that hornady had some problems ... but not sure they got that their shortfalls corrected..
i was hoping i would ask on here with the vast knowledge and experience on reloading to prevent me from buying a press and then selling it for a press i should have bought in the first place..

thanks,

F106 Fan
09-10-2012, 15:57
It seems like the same questions get asked here everyday. What press to buy, should I lube?, sort brass or mix?, load data? They should make a search function...

Oddly enough, they have! :rofl:

Richard

F106 Fan
09-10-2012, 16:13
I did read thru the stickys ... i don't want a slow press.. but i don't want to spend $1200 either... either a Dillion 550 or a Hornady progressive... i think... i have spent quite a bit of time reading reviews on both.. Dillion & Hornady... i read that hornady had some problems ... but not sure they got that their shortfalls corrected..
i was hoping i would ask on here with the vast knowledge and experience on reloading to prevent me from buying a press and then selling it for a press i should have bought in the first place..

thanks,

The Dillon 550 is the workhorse of the reloading community. Most everybody around here has at least one (I have 2). Loading around 400 rounds per hour seems realistic. They're great machines.

There isn't much enthusiasm for Hornady progressives around here. There have been issues. I don't know if there still are.

Dillon presses are guaranteed forever! Except the 1050 which is more of a commercial machine.

There is a press configurator at Dillon so you can add in the various options and see how it comes out. Many of the options can be purchased later. Sure, the strongmounts are great and they help elevate the press. But so will a higher bench or a block of wood. The bullet tray is nice because it gets the bullets up where you need them. So will a block of wood! The powder check alarm is nice - especially on FAST machines where powder gets used quickly. OTOH, you can just look at the hopper when you add primers. It worked for YEARS before the alarm was invented. I still don't have roller handles.

Buy the bare press and the required dies and you are ALMOST good to go. You need a quality scale (don't pay less than $100 for a digital scale). Dillon has quality scales both beam and digital. Beam is good enough unless you plan to trickle charge a LOT of rifle ammo. For pistol ammo, you only check the powder measure every once in a while.

You need a primer flip tray and some extra primer pickup tubes. You can buy caliber conversions as they come along.

EDIT: Add a pair of calipers (digital or dial) plus a case gauge (Dillon has them). Eventually, you will want some kind of tumbler. Sure, I'm going to recommend Dillon but there are others. Franklin Arsenal isn't highly regarded around here. Add some Hornady One Shot case lube - highly recommended!


Richard

unclebob
09-10-2012, 16:14
I did read thru the stickys ... i don't want a slow press.. but i don't want to spend $1200 either... either a Dillion 550 or a Hornady progressive... i think... i have spent quite a bit of time reading reviews on both.. Dillion & Hornady... i read that hornady had some problems ... but not sure they got that their shortfalls corrected..
i was hoping i would ask on here with the vast knowledge and experience on reloading to prevent me from buying a press and then selling it for a press i should have bought in the first place..

thanks,

You need to give out a lot more information. Other that just loading 9mm. You came up with the 550. I would take it any day over the LNL. Personally I donít think they have worked all the bugs out.

F106 Fan
09-10-2012, 16:58
i was hoping i would ask on here with the vast knowledge and experience on reloading to prevent me from buying a press and then selling it for a press i should have bought in the first place..

thanks,

If you buy a 550, it may still not be the last press you buy. But you will probably never want to get rid of it. They are very handy to have around and, since caliber conversions are reasonably priced, it will always see use for odds and ends.

However, if you got into serious competitive shooting, you might want something faster for a specific caliber. I shoot a lot of .45 ACP. I decided that with 4 of us shooting out of my ammo can that I needed (really, WANTED) a 1050. So, I bought one. We also shoot a bunch of 9mm and .223 and caliber conversions for the 1050 are pricey. So, I bought a 650 for those.

I load lesser quantities of .38 HBWC and the 550 does a great job for those. But 200 rounds might be a lot so it's hardly worth buying a 650 conversion. It's not worth the time to make the conversion even if I had the parts. I can knock them out in half an hour on the 550.

Presses seem to multiply like rabbits!

Richard

SBray
09-10-2012, 17:49
If you buy a 550, it may still not be the last press you buy. But you will probably never want to get rid of it. They are very handy to have around and, since caliber conversions are reasonably priced, it will always see use for odds and ends.

However, if you got into serious competitive shooting, you might want something faster for a specific caliber. I shoot a lot of .45 ACP. I decided that with 4 of us shooting out of my ammo can that I needed (really, WANTED) a 1050. So, I bought one. We also shoot a bunch of 9mm and .223 and caliber conversions for the 1050 are pricey. So, I bought a 650 for those.

I load lesser quantities of .38 HBWC and the 550 does a great job for those. But 200 rounds might be a lot so it's hardly worth buying a 650 conversion. It's not worth the time to make the conversion even if I had the parts. I can knock them out in half an hour on the 550.

Presses seem to multiply like rabbits!

Richard

I went the 550 route for my (first) progressive bullet reloader and I have found it to be an excellent selection. Especially since the carousel does not automatically rotate with each operation of the handle. It is nice that the shell stay on the same station when making adjustments. You just got to pay attention and make sure you rotate it after you check powder drops and die settings.

There have been times I wish I had gotten a 650 but I have three calibers to load for and do not shoot thousands of shells per year, so the 550 works just fine for me.

Steve

unclebob
09-10-2012, 17:59
I went the 550 route for my (first) progressive bullet reloader and I have found it to be an excellent selection. Especially since the carousel does not automatically rotate with each operation of the handle. It is nice that the shell stay on the same station when making adjustments. You just got to pay attention and make sure you rotate it after you check powder drops and die settings.

There have been times I wish I had gotten a 650 but I have three calibers to load for and do not shoot thousands of shells per year, so the 550 works just fine for me.

Steve

It is very easy to make the 650 manual indexing. You can stop primer feed or brass feed.

sciolist
09-10-2012, 18:04
This is a good source of information on the Dillon stuff, and a good place to buy: http://www.brianenos.com/store/dillon.html

Sounds like OP probably wants either a 550 or 650, depending on volume. If you have enough time to load at the rate of 300-400 rounds/hour, the 550 is a great press.

fredj338
09-10-2012, 18:05
I would go 550 because of the versatility. It's about as trouble free as a progressive can be but the priming slide is & will always be an issue, unless the redesign it. Still, a terrific press that will out last you. IT has a sustained rate of 400-500rds/hr if you start with pre loaded primer tubes. Still, takes less than 2min to fill a primer tube.

sellersm
09-10-2012, 18:17
I still don't see where you mentioned the desired quantity of reloading and the time you have to spend doing it? Or did I miss it?

As to where to buy: that's been answered: brian enos' site is the best if you're going to get a Dillon.

So far we know you don't want slow, but don't want to spend $1200. Those aren't exactly the best requirements to work with... The Lee Classic Cast Turret (as mentioned in the "Kempf kit" in the stickies) isn't exactly slow, and it's nowhere close to $1200!! But will it meet your needs? Who knows? We don't know what your requirements are!

PCJim
09-10-2012, 20:19
You can sometimes find used Dillon presses. They generally sell for 75-80+% of new press prices. When you consider that 10 years from now, you can sell a newly bought press for what you paid for it (unless the administration drives our economy into a serious tailspin), its only time value you've lost on your money.

I own three 550s, two of which are set up on the bench. One on a strongmount for standing while loading, the other bench mounted for reloading while sitting. Probably have a dozen quick change setups now since I've picked up a few extras. Caliber changes are quick, and there is no die adjustment save maybe for the bullet seater if you decide to use a different bullet.

cajun_chooter
09-11-2012, 08:28
well, after reading until my eyes hurt.. i think i have narrowed it down to 2... either the Dillion 650 or Hornady 095100 progressive.. there is a considerable difference in price.. if i could find a good used press .. i will consider it

is the Hornady 095100 a dependable machine ?

thanks again for the replys.. i hope to avoid a mistake by asking questions IN ADVANCE

unclebob
09-11-2012, 08:42
Between a 650 and LNL with case feeder. There is about 50.00 difference in price. Without a second thought I would get the 650 over the LNL any day. There are a few things on the LNL I like but overall the 650 is the way to go. I would get the 650 even if I didnít get the case feeder.

Colorado4Wheel
09-11-2012, 08:47
I think i want to get started re-loading.. years ago i use to re-load for hunting purposes... mostly rifle.. i now want to buy a loading press for loading mostly 9mm ammo..
any suggestion on what brand of press that is most trouble free... easiest to set up.. and where to buy would be most helpful..

thanks,

Dillon
www.Brian Enos.com

The rest is in the sticky.

Rich22
09-11-2012, 08:47
well, after reading until my eyes hurt.. i think i have narrowed it down to 2... either the Dillion 650 or Hornady 095100 progressive.. there is a considerable difference in price.. if i could find a good used press .. i will consider it

is the Hornady 095100 a dependable machine ?

thanks again for the replys.. i hope to avoid a mistake by asking questions IN ADVANCE

I will throw this out there as I made a decision in a similar situation to yours fairly recently. I picked the Hornady LNL AP. I can say I have not had a problem with the press that was not my fault except that Unique does not meter in the powder measure for squat. On the other hand I have had about a metric ton of issues with the Hornady Dies, I have sent two out of three back to the factory for work or replacement. From what I looked at in making my decision I came up that if I wanted to start with a case feeder, the Dillon 650 would have been the best choice and if I did not want to start with one that the LNL AP was the correct choice for me. I believe with the press, dies, scale etc etc my grand total to get started not including components or bench was just over 700.

Rich

F106 Fan
09-11-2012, 08:56
You probably won't find much enthusiasm for Hornady progressives around here. But you're right, there is a difference between the Hornady and Dillon in terms of cost.

The 650 is almost useless without the case feeder and by the time you get a 650 fully loaded, it will cost $1000. I know whereof I speak (or type) as I bought one a few months ago. Fully loaded from BrianEnos.com - I saved about $30 on shipping by ordering from Brian.

It IS possible to drop shells into the feed tube on the 650 and delay buying the case feeder and it is also possible to add a case feeder to the LnL AP.

Are you sure you need to load around 1000 rounds per hour? I'm not suggesting that there is no need because I have a 650 and I also have a 1050 for .45 ACP.

Bare machine against bare machne, the Dillon is $150 more expensive. In both cases, the bare machine will work but it is a waste of a perfectly fine 650 to run it that way. And if I had the LnL, I would certainly be adding a case feeder.

Of the 650 owners on this forum (and there are several) I have yet to see even one bad comment.

I don't own a LnL but I thought about buying one a while back. I'm glad I spent the extra money for the 650 because I only spent it once!

Richard

Colorado4Wheel
09-11-2012, 09:08
well, after reading until my eyes hurt.. i think i have narrowed it down to 2... either the Dillion 650 or Hornady 095100 progressive.. there is a considerable difference in price.. if i could find a good used press .. i will consider it

is the Hornady 095100 a dependable machine ?

thanks again for the replys.. i hope to avoid a mistake by asking questions IN ADVANCE

Dillon has a long track record of happy customers. It owns most the market as a result.

Hornady is constantly updating machines and has some nice features. But if you want a machine that works as advertised get the Dillon. Several of us on this forum tried the LnL and it just did not work to the same standard as a Dillon.

Obviously anyone can have issues with a press. It's just more prevalent with the Hornady.

Cost alone is no reason to buy a press you will likely use for decades.

unclebob
09-11-2012, 09:20
The 650 is almost useless without the case feeder and by the time you get a 650 fully loaded, it will cost $1000. I know whereof I speak (or type) as I bought one a few months ago. Fully loaded from BrianEnos.com - I saved about $30 on shipping by ordering from Brian.

It IS possible to drop shells into the feed tube on the 650 and delay buying the case feeder and it is also possible to add a case feeder to the LnL AP.
You might think that the 650 is worthless without a case feeder. But there are a lot of people out there that have a 650 and do not use a case feeder. Also there are people that have adapted the Lee case feeder on the 650.

Colorado4Wheel
09-11-2012, 10:15
The 650 is almost useless without the case feeder and by the time you get a 650 fully loaded, it will cost $1000.

Richard

I am in a airport so I am going by memory.

650 cost about $550, case feeder is about $220. That gives you a machine with options on it that the LnL doesn't even offer. So it's no were near $1k. If Hornady doesn't even offer the option it is kinda hard to argue that one machine needs that option and the other is just fine with out it. At least if you get the Dillon you have a machine that can grow with your future desires. And I know from experience that the Dillon roller handle/ammo bins/bullet trays are way better then the aftermarket stuff you can get for the LnL.

F106 Fan
09-11-2012, 10:25
You might think that the 650 is worthless without a case feeder.

The feed tube of a 650 holds just 9 .223 cases (yes, I went out and counted). I can load 9 rounds in about 20 seconds, 30 at the outside. Then I would have to fill the tube again. It might actually be faster to feed one at a time into a 550.

I realize people operate the 650 without a case feeder and that is just fine. Maybe they want to defer the cost of a case feeder for a while. That makes sense.

Otherwise, operating a 650 by filling the tube is no faster than a 550! The only added feature is the auto-indexing. A nice feature but probably not worth the extra cost over a 550.

EDIT: The 650 would still have the advantage of 5 stations which would allow use of the Powder Check Alarm.

Richard

F106 Fan
09-11-2012, 10:43
I am in a airport so I am going by memory.

650 cost about $550, case feeder is about $220. That gives you a machine with options on it that the LnL doesn't even offer. So it's no were near $1k. If Hornady doesn't even offer the option it is kinda hard to argue that one machine needs that option and the other is just fine with out it. At least if you get the Dillon you have a machine that can grow with your future desires. And I know from experience that the Dillon roller handle/ammo bins/bullet trays are way better then the aftermarket stuff you can get for the LnL.

I was pretty careful to say "fully loaded"!

Press: $566.95
Case Feeder: $218.95
Low Powder Sensor: $41.95
Powder Check Alarm: $69.95
Carbide Pistol Die Set: $63.95
Strongmounts (550/650): $48.95
Bullet Tray: $41.95

TOTAL $1,052.65

Roller Handle: $44.95 <--- I didn't buy

I realize that some of the options could be added later. In that case, the 650 plus case feeder is just $785.90.

It's up to the user to decide which options are necessary. The only one I consider optional (of the ones I bought) is the low powder sensor. The hopper is right up front so there's every opportunity to look at it while adding primers (every 5 minutes or so).

The Powder Check Alarm is the entire reason for having 5 stations on a 650. It is also the main reason I wanted the press. It's hard to see down inside .223 cases, even with a light. In my view, it's not optional.

My bench is 38" high and the strongmounts lift the press to an almost perfect height for someone who is 6'1". The goal is to get the knob up to shoulder height.

ADD: Having lifted the press to a workable height leaves bullets quite far away and there is a lot of hand/arm motion required to fetch and place the bullet. The bullet tray puts the bullet stock in a usable position, close to station 4 where the bullet is seated. I rest the heel of my hand on the bullet tray.

I also realize that there are other dies on the market. But NONE of them have the features of the Dillon dies. I like them! At most, there is the potential to save $40 on dies by buying cheap. In fact, dies may already be on hand.

Richard

fredj338
09-11-2012, 12:55
Between a 650 and LNL with case feeder. There is about 50.00 difference in price. Without a second thought I would get the 650 over the LNL any day. There are a few things on the LNL I like but overall the 650 is the way to go. I would get the 650 even if I didn’t get the case feeder.

It's probably closer to $100 but still, hands down the 650 is a better machine. The priming system alone is worth the $100, throw in the better case feeder, & IMO, the tool heads vs bushings, primer warning, the 650 is a better tool.
I ran my 650 for about a month w/o case feeder. it really is no faster than my 550B. The time taken to stop & fill the feed tube negates the very, very small if any gain by auto indexing.
As to cost, again, IMO, cost should not factor into it. There are lots of things you do not need on the 650, a powder sensor is pure waste of money, you are looking right at the measure. Strong mount, maybe, depends on how you load, sitting or standing. Roller handle, also nice but not needed.
So you can get into a 650 w/ case feeder for about $800. Over 20yrs, that is $3.33/m! Not even a gal of gas a month. SO never consider cost for good tools used often, worth every penny. Sure, if you only want to load 500rds a month, no one needs a 650. Something like the LCT is fine. I was happy loading 500rs/m on a ss press.

cajun_chooter
09-11-2012, 13:13
Well.. after reading until i got tired of reading.. i have decided to go with a Dillon 650... the one thing that made up my mind over the Dillon 550 was the fact that its possible to double load powder... i don't like the idea of blowing up my glock and hurting myself.. i won't shoot thousands of rounds a week.. but i don't want to sit & reload for a long time either...

so .. anyone have a lead on a good used Dillon 650 ?
i understand all dealers have to folow MSRP on Dillion equipment so price will be just about same everywhere..

thanks everyone for your feedback... i prolly will get a Dillon as soon as i can find a deal on one..

F106 Fan
09-11-2012, 13:57
The auto-indexing feature is another good reason to select the 650 but millions and millions of rounds have been loaded on 550s without incident.

If you buy the press and options from brianenos.com, shipping is free. It might add a day to delivery but shipping is probably $30 or more.

I bought my 650 from Brian although all my other Dillon presses were purchased directly from Dillon.

Richard

F106 Fan
09-11-2012, 14:05
the one thing that made up my mind over the Dillon 550 was the fact that its possible to double load powder... i don't like the idea of blowing up my glock and hurting myself.. i won't shoot thousands of rounds a week.. but i don't want to sit & reload for a long time either...


One of the more common recommendations from this group is to use a slower powder like Unique rather than a fast powder like Bullseye or Titegroup.

http://www.hodgdon.com/burn-rate.html

Fast powers are often used for light loads but in this application it is easy to double charge a case and not have overflow.

Unique will almost always overflow the case with a double charge.

Richard

cajun_chooter
09-11-2012, 14:43
One of the more common recommendations from this group is to use a slower powder like Unique rather than a fast powder like Bullseye or Titegroup.

http://www.hodgdon.com/burn-rate.html

Fast powers are often used for light loads but in this application it is easy to double charge a case and not have overflow.

Unique will almost always overflow the case with a double charge.

Richard

good info... i liked the lesser price of a 550.. it gives me another option... i just might go that route..

SARDG
09-11-2012, 14:57
...
EDIT: The 650 would still have the advantage of 5 stations which would allow use of the Powder Check Alarm.

Richard

...The Powder Check Alarm is the entire reason for having 5 stations on a 650. It is also the main reason I wanted the press. It's hard to see down inside .223 cases, even with a light. In my view, it's not optional.

Richard
I use the Powder Check Alarm and like having it. I bought my press used and it came with it, so I use it.

But with only 5 stations my choices are already limited; I want to keep the Powder Check, I have an RCBS Bullet Feeder sitting here that I will mount as soon as I get a bracket made for my application, and I absolutely want to seat and crimp separately. I am already short one station with the 650 and in some ways outgrew it as soon as I got the bright idea of the bullet feeder. Personally, I wouldn't/couldn't consider a press with fewer than 5, but I'd like, 6 stations. I'll likely eliminate the Powder Check when I install the bullet feeder. It's either that, or seat/crimp in one die.

F106 Fan
09-11-2012, 14:57
If you ever want to get to a case feeder, the 550 isn't the best way to start. The add-on case feeder just doesn't work as well as the designed-in case feeder on the 650.

The three pluses of the 650 are the case feeder, the 5 station toolhead that accomodates the powder check die and the auto-indexing.

Either press, 550 or 650, will do an excellent job. The 550 has only 4 stations, is manually indexed (not a really big deal because it is done while the bullet is being placed), doesn't really have a case feeder and can realistically pump out 400 rounds per hour. But it just can't accomodate the powder check die.

The 650 is a lot like Barbie (the doll). It has everything! I'm pretty sure it can crank out well over 800 rounds per hour and 1000 wouldn't surprise me as long as the primer tubes were prefilled.

It is often suggested that a 650 isn't a good choice for a first press because of the automation. Nonsense! It can certainly be operated one cartridge at a time while learning its functions. Just drop one shell at a time down the feed tube! SARDG started with the 650 and has had no issues.

If the 650 is a viable candidate, cost wise, then the 550 would be a real step backward.

Richard

F106 Fan
09-11-2012, 15:21
I use the Powder Check Alarm and like having it. I bought my press used and it came with it, so I use it.

But with only 5 stations my choices are already limited; I want to keep the Powder Check, I have an RCBS Bullet Feeder sitting here that I will mount as soon as I get a bracket made for my application, and I absolutely want to seat and crimp separately. I am already short one station with the 650 and in some ways outgrew it as soon as I got the bright idea of the bullet feeder. Personally, I wouldn't/couldn't consider a press with fewer than 5, but I'd like, 6 stations. I'll likely eliminate the Powder Check when I install the bullet feeder. It's either that, or seat/crimp in one die.

I am far from an expert on this but 'apparently' the Hornady bullet feeder die will also seat the bullet. This leaves station 3 open for the powder check alarm.

http://ultimatereloader.com/tag/dillon/

EDIT: I just watched the video and the bullet is NOT seated by the Hornady bullet feed die. Instead a conventional seating die is used to seat and crimp the cartridge. It wouldn't be my first choice to eliminate the taper crimp die but I could get talked into it.

I thought I saw a side loading bullet feeder once where the mechanism places the bullet over the case mouth from the side and the seating die was just a regular die. But I might have been on my meds...

Richard

SARDG
09-11-2012, 15:49
I am far from an expert on this but 'apparently' the Hornady bullet feeder die will also seat the bullet. This leaves station 3 open for the powder check alarm.

http://ultimatereloader.com/tag/dillon/

I thought I saw a side loading bullet feeder once where the mechanism places the bullet over the case mouth from the side and the seating die was just a regular die. But I might have been on my meds...

Richard
Hmmm... I didn't get that out of that page Richard. He's using a combined seat/crimp die. The (RCBS) bullet feeder dies are little more than metal tubes with flexing nylon inserts and an O ring. It seems the Hornady is another variation on the same theme. RCBS instructions say that the case may have to be belled more than usual to accept the bullet, and leave it in the case vertically.

The side-bullet feeder sounds a bit like the case feeder works, but of course the case is eventually slid on a track into a nice horizontal slot on the shellplate. I think a side-bullet feeder would have a difficult time placing the bullet correctly as the bullet is slightly recessed into the case bell. Dunno. I do know that lots of folks have had good luck with the RCBS-650 marriage, so I have a modicum of faith that it will work. Will probably take some tweaking and a perhaps a few expletives though. :)

Colorado4Wheel
09-11-2012, 15:53
The bullet feed die just puts it on top of the case. It doesn't seat the bullet.

SARDG
09-11-2012, 16:01
...It is often suggested that a 650 isn't a good choice for a first press because of the automation. Nonsense! It can certainly be operated one cartridge at a time while learning its functions. Just drop one shell at a time down the feed tube! SARDG started with the 650 and has had no issues.

Richard
I did... and I started in full-auto too. :) The Dillon manuals are good. If one takes their time and does the setup and startup procedures in order - and undestands each step and how it relates to the bigger picture, it shouldn't be a problem.

But then, I'm also the noob that started with Titegroup and never had a problem (in the 1 lb of use). I'm still using a relatively fast powder - though less so than Titegroup.

I am fairly methodical though - some would say anal. :faint:

unclebob
09-11-2012, 16:07
I did... and I started in full-auto too. :) The Dillon manuals are good. If one takes their time and does the setup and startup procedures in order - and undestands each step and how it relates to the bigger picture, it shouldn't be a problem.

But then, I'm also the noob that started with Titegroup and never had a problem (in the 1 lb of use). I'm still using a relatively fast powder - though less so than Titegroup.

I am fairly methodical though - some would say anal. :faint:

Telling a person to load one round at a time is so they see what is happening at each step. They are looking at a single tree and not the whole forest.

F106 Fan
09-11-2012, 16:17
The bullet feed die just puts it on top of the case. It doesn't seat the bullet.

Yes, you're right! I went back and edited my post.

It's too bad that the die won't seat the bullet. But as I said in my edit, I could get talked into using a combined seat/crimp die if I could keep the powder check alarm AND have a bullet feeder.

But I would want to do it on my 1050.

I could also get talked out of the powder check alarm. After all, I got along without one for a very long time. It's a nice touch but it's not indispensible. The upgraded Dillon Powder Measure mechanism is very reliable. I don't envision ever having an "oops" in dispensing powder.

Then, too, it's awfully difficult to short stroke a 1050.

Richard

SARDG
09-11-2012, 17:00
...I could also get talked out of the powder check alarm. After all, I got along without one for a very long time. It's a nice touch but it's not indispensible.


Richard
I couldn't even hear the Piezo sounder in the Powder Check Alarm with my hearing loss. I could hear the Primer Alarm however, so when I was at the NRA Nat'l Convention in St. Louis this Spring I found the Dillon booth and asked them if they could send me a primer buzzer 'cause I couldnít hear the other one. When I got home, it was in the mail I picked up from the Post Office and I traded-out the buzzers.

F106 Fan
09-11-2012, 17:35
You just can't beat Dillon's customer service!

Richard

Colorado4Wheel
09-11-2012, 17:43
thanks everyone for your feedback... i prolly will get a Dillon as soon as i can find a deal on one..

You will find it difficult to save more then 20% most the time.

Atomichoe094
09-11-2012, 19:04
we should just keep this as a sticky as well. lol

emtjr928
09-11-2012, 19:16
I just added a Dillon 650 from Brian Enos. No shipping charges. Nice guy to deal with. My LCT from Kempf is still on the bench, but looks kinda jealous.

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RustyFN
09-11-2012, 19:47
Just for those that might not know if you have a FFL including C&R you can get a pretty good discount on Dillon at Graf's. That's how I bought my 550.

SARDG
09-11-2012, 21:02
Just for those that might not know if you have a FFL including C&R you can get a pretty good discount on Dillon at Graf's. That's how I bought my 550.
For a measly $30, I've been thinking about applying for a C&R FFL. Maybe it's time...

fredj338
09-11-2012, 21:27
Just for those that might not know if you have a FFL including C&R you can get a pretty good discount on Dillon at Graf's. That's how I bought my 550.

Also, if you are a NRA cert reloading instructor, Dillon will work a deal for you direct. Finding cheap used Dillon gear is pretty much hit or miss, mostly miss.