Underwood 220 gr hardcast [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Underwood 220 gr hardcast


deadandgone
09-21-2012, 14:55
I'd been waiting for this....although I'm not sure I thought I would see a 220 grain....velocity seems outstanding....hmmmm....

harrygunner
09-21-2012, 16:47
I was hoping for and suggested a 200gr WFNGC. The reasons being, one still gets good penetration, but more importantly, allows a standard Glock barrel rifling to stabilize the bullet.

Too heavy and this happens ( hickok45's video) : Glock 20 with heavy cast bullets - YouTube

Yondering
09-21-2012, 23:56
The standard Glock rifling is fine for heavy bullets. It's the poor fit and crappy tolerances of that 230gr bullet that Double Tap uses that's the problem. The same is true for any cast bullet, they just usually aren't that bad.

Ken52789
09-22-2012, 12:49
Gosh darn it! Now I've gotta save up for some 220 hardcast. Oh well i guess the 200 xtps, 135 noslers, and 165 gold dots will tide me over for now lol.

Ramjet-SS
09-24-2012, 20:25
This is exciting ammo for the hunting 10mm enthusiasts.

The video is a good ole boy evaluation but cinder blocks are just too tough to cook. Even slow cooking doesn't tenderize them!

edhead35
09-26-2012, 13:04
Using a G20, KKM 6" barrel, would the 220gr HC Underwood require more than the stock spring?

Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk 2

plouffedaddy
09-26-2012, 16:45
Using a G20, KKM 6" barrel, would the 220gr HC Underwood require more than the stock spring?

Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk 2

Require--no. Might eject better.

edhead35
09-26-2012, 17:02
What weight spring should I use with this ammo?

bac1023
09-26-2012, 20:42
Very cool :cool:

10mm is an awesome round.

bac1023
09-26-2012, 20:46
I was hoping for and suggested a 200gr WFNGC. The reasons being, one still gets good penetration, but more importantly, allows a standard Glock barrel rifling to stabilize the bullet.

Too heavy and this happens ( hickok45's video) : Glock 20 with heavy cast bullets - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-m0satEkGjw&feature=related)

Great video as usual from Hickok45.

However, someone needs to tell him that there's a big difference between hot 10mm and hot 44mag.

Travelin' Jack
09-26-2012, 20:47
I was hoping for and suggested a 200gr WFNGC. The reasons being, one still gets good penetration, but more importantly, allows a standard Glock barrel rifling to stabilize the bullet.

Same here. That said, I'm pretty impressed with the 200gr TMJ Speer rounds. They seem to hold together very well.

arushus
09-27-2012, 10:52
What weight spring should I use with this ammo?

IMO, you should use the same spring weight you use for any other hot 10mm round.

Otto33
09-27-2012, 13:07
Per an email I got from Underwood, all bullets stabilized perfectly through a stock barrel. Even so, do you guys think I could expect leading since the bullets are not gas-checked?

Great forums btw. Glad to finally be part of it!

icelandicstud
09-27-2012, 16:57
these bullets are gas checked.

edhead35
09-27-2012, 17:07
IMO, you should use the same spring weight you use for any other hot 10mm round.

I just need a starting point on spring weight. This is my first venture into hotter loaded 10mm until I start reloading.

Otto33
09-27-2012, 19:02
these bullets are gas checked.

I had assumed they were, but the email I received from Kevin at Underwood specifically stated that the bullets are NOT gas checked. That's what lead me to post the question about leading in the stock barrel.

Taterhead
09-27-2012, 20:05
I just need a starting point on spring weight. This is my first venture into hotter loaded 10mm until I start reloading.

Just shoot it with the stock spring weight and see if you feel that it is problematic. At that point you might boost spring weights if you find a specific reason, but it is totally not a requirement.

The only time my gun has failed (other than due to worn parts) is when I switched to a 22# spring. The stock spring is 100% with whatever loads I run. I replace it every 3000 rounds.

arushus
09-28-2012, 16:56
I just need a starting point on spring weight. This is my first venture into hotter loaded 10mm until I start reloading.

I run an ISMI 22lb spring on my G20, and it's never failed me once, even with .40sw tulammo. I wish I had gotten the 24lb ISMI spring tho, 22lb wasnt enough for my gun with hotter ammo, it would still sling brass fifteen or twenty feet.

Like tater said, it isnt a necessity, shooting with the stock spring is perfectly fine. Personally, I do recommend a heavier spring if youre going to be shooting a lot of hot stuff, just to keep the battering down on your gun, but that's just me.

arushus
09-28-2012, 16:58
Per an email I got from Underwood, all bullets stabilized perfectly through a stock barrel. Even so, do you guys think I could expect leading since the bullets are not gas-checked?

Great forums btw. Glad to finally be part of it!

Every bit of research ive done indicates that so long as you check your barrel every fifty rounds, and clean it when necessary, you will be fine...

doverpack12
10-03-2012, 22:10
This is exactly what i've been waiting for. Although i kind of expected a 200 grain bullet. The 220 is fine with me if it works well. That is interesting if it is truly not gas checked. Any idea when it can be ordered, or has anyone recieved any yet and shot it?

doverpack12
10-04-2012, 07:32
I sent Underwood an email last night after my post. Here is the reply i got early this morning.

My question is on item number 242. Is the hard cast bullet gas checked?
No, it is not.
If you have any other questions or need anything else, please let me know.
Thanks, Kevin

SDGlock23
10-04-2012, 09:13
Merely guessing here, but they may be SNS casting hardcast 220gr. bullets. I have a number of these but I've never shot any out of the stock bbl and they're not gas checked either. I can't imagine they would lead terribly, but would expect them to lead some.

SolidBrass
10-04-2012, 19:38
Underwoods TMJ 200 and 220 Hardcast are both "out of stock" :faint: I'll hold out for re-supply instead of buying DT's overpriced/underpowered offering. Until then my best bear round is the Underwood XTP sadly.

_The_Shadow
10-04-2012, 21:52
Handloading and casting are insurances to eliminate short falls and allows you to produce custom premium quality ammo and some savings over the long haul.
Good luck!

pasky2112
10-04-2012, 22:23
I just need a starting point on spring weight. This is my first venture into hotter loaded 10mm until I start reloading.
Underwood uses a 24# spring...he told me. He shoots hot all the time, so I'd imagine. I use a 22# SS rod/spring. Works great in both worlds.
Enjoy!

nickE10mm
10-05-2012, 07:53
Handloading and casting are insurances to eliminate short falls and allows you to produce custom premium quality ammo and some savings over the long haul.
Good luck!

^^^ this ....

Everytime I hear someone post "gosh, now i gotta save for XXXX ammo" I just chuckle and think about my beloved Lee Classic Turret in my basement.

If you have the means to get setup for reloading ($300 or so up front), I'd HIGHLY recommend it.

harrygunner
11-11-2012, 18:17
Wanted to get some chronograph results and see how the Underwood 220gr hard cast works in a Glock 29.

I decided to compare the spread of hits of the 220gr HC between my 1911 with its Bar-Sto barrel and my third generation Glock 29. The G29 is standard, except for a metal recoil rod assembly with a standard 17lb recoil spring.

I placed the target at 30 yards and shot slow strings with my hands resting on a shooting bag. Took lots of time to make sure my sights were aligned consistently. Each square on the target is 1x1". The group in the upper left is from the Glock. The better centered group is from the 1911. Proves in my mind that the Glock barrel does stabilize the 220gr ammo. Then I shot the Glock at a distinguishable formation on a berm about 60 yards away, standing off-hand. The hits were comfortably close to the target, showing again, the bullets stabilize.

Here are the chronograph results

Altitude: 3221 ft, Temperature: 48 degrees, Barometric pressure: 26.9 inHg

10mm Underwood ammo -

Glock 29

180gr XTP : 1263, 1266, 1255, 1253, 1299 : avg 1267 ft/s
200gr XTP : 1133, 1120, 1141, 1153, 1170 : avg 1143 ft/s
220gr HC : 1075, 1082, 1084, 1104, 1094 : avg 1088 ft/s

1911 4.25" Barrel

180gr XTP : 1271, 1265, 1269, 1299, 1253 : avg 1271 ft/s
200gr XTP : 1181, 1187, 1199, 1183, 1167 : avg 1183 ft/s
220gr HC : 1152, 1153, 1165, 1156, 1161 : avg 1157 ft/s

Target attached:

bushjumper
11-11-2012, 21:57
10mm Underwood ammo -

Glock 29

....
220gr HC : 1075, 1082, 1084, 1104, 1094 : avg 1088 ft/s

1911 4.25" Barrel

....
220gr HC : 1075, 1082, 1084, 1104, 1094 : avg 1087 ft/s

Target attached:

Was one of these a cut and paste gone bad? They are exactly the same...(well except for your calculation of the average :D)

BTW I just got some of the 220 HC in the mail, it's back in stock (as of last week anyway).

harrygunner
11-11-2012, 23:57
Thanks. Corrected that line.

NoJoy
11-12-2012, 01:37
Does anyone know if Underwood is using a stock barrel to achieve his chrono results? 220gr@1200fps out of a 4.6" barrel is outstanding.

nickE10mm
11-14-2012, 18:20
Does anyone know if Underwood is using a stock barrel to achieve his chrono results? 220gr@1200fps out of a 4.6" barrel is outstanding.

My GUESS would be 800X... but possibly Longshot.

Buckeye 7x57
11-15-2012, 07:03
I just received my new shipment from Underwood including a box of 220 grain hardcast. I love Underwood's speedy shipping and customer service. Ordered on Sat. And received them on Tues. The 220 grain loads will be my new woods carry round.

posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire (http://www.outdoorhub.com/mobile/)

gatorboy
11-15-2012, 12:21
Underwood uses a 24# spring...he told me. He shoots hot all the time, so I'd imagine. I use a 22# SS rod/spring. Works great in both worlds.
Enjoy!

DT does as well. It gives a few more FPS as the extra weight delays the unlocking a fraction of a fraction of a second. When I shot alot of hot 10mm I found 21# (G29) and 22# (G20) were plenty for the most powerful loads. The 24# G20 and 23# G29 springs returned diminishing results in my experience. Lighter springs really do result in less recoil, especially muzzle flip but more frame battering. There is more battering when slide go's back to battery with heavier springs though. If stock is 17-18#, a 22# spring is 20-25% heavier. Plenty for two well-designed pistols with very heavy slides by any standards.

nickE10mm
11-15-2012, 14:59
DT does as well. It gives a few more FPS as the extra weight delays the unlocking a fraction of a fraction of a second. When I shot alot of hot 10mm I found 21# (G29) and 22# (G20) were plenty for the most powerful loads. The 24# G20 and 23# G29 springs returned diminishing results in my experience. Lighter springs really do result in less recoil, especially muzzle flip but more frame battering. There is more battering when slide go's back to battery with heavier springs though. If stock is 17-18#, a 22# spring is 20-25% heavier. Plenty for two well-designed pistols with very heavy slides by any standards.

Spot on, I agree. A little increase in spring weight is appropriate but nothing overkill.

I use a 20lb spring for NUCLEAR loads in my 6" Fusion and had a 20-22lb spring in my G20 and they are or were both perfect.