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RYT 2BER
09-26-2012, 11:44
Hi-

I apologize in advance.. I know there are about a billion "i wanna reload now what do I do" kind of questions on this forum..

I have consistently felt that reloading wasnt worth my effort, but since I am hoping to shoot more and more 10mm, it starts looking attractive $wise.

Although many of you will signifcantly disagree, I am planning on buying a cheapy Lee HAND press (yes you read that right)..

Its cheap, and I love sitting on the couch or bed so I can do this in my lap from some nice videos Ive seen..

With the hand press, set of dies, handprimer and powder spoon set, I should be good to go.. And since 40 and 10mm use the same die set I can just do 40 too since its what I shoot the most...

Whew... ok... so now here is my question... Can someone direct me to a simple listing of "what primer/what powder/ and how much to measure", I can use?

Im not looking for exotic at this point, and I just want a basic recipie to get going.. Honestly I dont want to read about the history of reloading and such as I dont know if this is for me or not..

I know how to use the hand press from watching vids and it seems simple enough... Is there somewhere to obtain a simple recipe without going through a whole book or is this really the only way?

Colorado4Wheel
09-26-2012, 11:53
Lyman and or ABC's of reloading.

ilgunguygt
09-26-2012, 12:10
I didnt see a scale in your list. You absolutely must have a scale. Its not optional. Dippers WILL NOT dip what they say they will. I have yet to ever see a single one that will throw what it says it will. Get a scale. I still use a Lee scale that many people hate, that works perfect for me. Or just get a digital one, but you MUST have one.

FLSlim
09-26-2012, 12:30
Lyman and or ABC's of reloading.
Good advice. I started with a hand press many, many years ago and it wasn't a bad way to get the reloading ball rolling. If you use the dipper that comes with the kit it will throw fairly conservative weights of the powder you choose, and the dippers drop pretty reliable charge weights (volumes) if you are consistent in how you use them (there will be directions with the kit and, I assume, a table showing charges). You'll use Std. large pistol primers and I would suggest a slower burning powder similar to Unique or Power Pistol to start with. The Bad News: once you get a few boxes under your belt, you'll want a table mounted press....:cool:

DoctaGlockta
09-26-2012, 12:32
I started with a Lee Thigh Master. I'd get a Lee hand primer and scale too. Dippers can work but you really need to weigh what they dip and practice getting consistent dips. Most of us use volumetric powder throws so anyone telling you dippers don't work may be misleading you (what they throw is powder dependent). They are not perfect but can work. A Lee powder measure is about $20.00 and works well. I still use mine once in a while.

Then just expect to buy another press at some time as it is written on the Sacred Reloading Tablets somewhere.

byf43
09-26-2012, 12:44
Welcome to the addiction.

Take a seat, right over there ------->
and the doctor will be with you, shortly.

Don't forget to bring plenty of $$$, on your next few visits.

You will see (rather quickly) that you will not want to reload, while in bed. (There are other, more interesting hobbies found, there!)
Seriously. . . not a good idea to load/reload in bed.

F106 Fan
09-26-2012, 12:56
I have never used a dipper so you can choose to ignore everything below.

I wouldn't use a dipper for .40 S&W simply because it is probably the most KB'd cartridge ever created. I'm not saying they can't be loaded safely but I am saying that certain powders don't react well to an overcharge.

And I definitely wouldn't use a dipper for a highly charged cartridge like the 10mm. The only reason the 10mm isn't the most KB'd cartridge ever created is that not many people shoot it and even fewer reload it.

When the difference between a minimum charge and a maximum charge is just 0.5 gr, I just can't come up with a reason to use something like a dipper.

There are powder manufacturer's web sites that will list loads and may be presumed to be credible. I wouldn't accept data from any forum or user group unless I could validate it with a published source.

It does seem a shame to have to buy an entire manual just for one or two loads. But that's just the way it is. I have about a dozen manuals and I'm not even a big time reloader like some of the folks around here.

Buy a book or two, get a powder scale and perhaps a real powder measure. Lacking a real powder measure, I would weigh every single charge.

Here's the tool to trickle the powder into the scale pan:
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/317787/rcbs-powder-trickler

I'm not so sure about the idea of reloading while there is any chance of a distraction.

Richard

fredj338
09-26-2012, 13:09
I have to agree, dippers suck as does the nutcracker Lee press. Why, seriously. If you don;t think it's worth your time, then you'll really feel that way after banging out a handfull on that system.
You need loading manuals, they tell you usefull stuff like what size primer & what powders to do what. There really is no substitute doing it right. Oh sure, I can cobble loads together that go bang w/ just about anything, but my time is more valuable to me than what you are describing. My guns & body parts are worth more than $$ to me as well.
I always tell noobs, if your time is worth sa lot to you, then you need better gear. The min reloading setup should be a decent ss press & beam scale. You can use dippers w/ medium to slow burners where close isn't going to blow things up. Dippers should be avoided at all cost for powders faster than Unique IMO, any caliber. You'll be lucky to get 2/10gr accuracy w/ them.

RYT 2BER
09-26-2012, 13:34
I really appreciate all the advise.... However if dippers are no good that's gonna be a problem.... If I have to weigh out every charge on a scale it's gonna take 2 days to load 100 rounds....

Seems too time consuming for me at that level? Weighing out every charge? I've never done it so maybe I'm not realizing the time involved?

Maybe that trickler is the solution.

Colorado4Wheel
09-26-2012, 14:13
I really appreciate all the advise.... However if dippers are no good that's gonna be a problem.... If I have to weigh out every charge on a scale it's gonna take 2 days to load 100 rounds....

Seems too time consuming for me at that level? Weighing out every charge? I've never done it so maybe I'm not realizing the time involved?

Maybe that trickler is the solution.

Your the guy trying to reload on his coach and take the path less traveled. You can use dippers. Just use unique. But your picking the path and it kinda is going to be what it's going to be. Reloading is worth it. Your probably wasting all the money you spend on the cheap tools and will later end up buying better. Might as well pick a decent setup now and skip the pain of the road less traveled.

ANY Trickler is a PITA for Pistol. It's just not the easy way.

F106 Fan
09-26-2012, 14:23
Yes, trickling charges sucks! There are automatic dispensers but I'm guess they aren't in the budget either.

In the bad old days, I bought an RCBS single stage press kit with a beam scale, a funnel, a loading block and some dies.

I could probably make about 100 rounds per hour if I really concentrated on what I was doing. Maybe not quite that many because I had to trickle every load. Let's say 60 rounds per hour, just for a number.

The standard "El Presidente" drill takes 12 rounds and a good time is way under 10 seconds. So, I could unload in a minute of shooting what took an hour to reload!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combat_pistol_shooting

It didn't take long for me to figure out that a single stage press is not suitable for pistol reloading!

I moved on to a turret press that would probably make an actual 100 rounds per hour and from there to a Dillon 450 that would do about 500 rounds per hour and up to an RCBS Green Machine that would do about 1000 rounds per hour. For the average shooter (a couple of hundred rounds per week), the Dillon 550B is the way to go.

In my view, the absolute minimum press kit for pistol reloading is the Kempf version of the Lee Classic Turret:
https://kempfgunshop.com//index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=shop.flypage&product_id=630&category_id=190&manufacturer_id=0&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=41&vmcchk=1&Itemid=41

This kit doesn't come with the Lee scale which, as it turns out, is a good thing! That scale isn't highly regarded around here by people who have actually used it. Consider a Dillon Eliminator

http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/25215/catid/7/Dillon__039_s___039_Eliminator__039__Scale

The perfect use for that hand press is creating test loads at the range. I certainly wouldn't consider it for pistol loading.

Richard

F106 Fan
09-26-2012, 14:42
I really appreciate all the advise.... However if dippers are no good that's gonna be a problem.... If I have to weigh out every charge on a scale it's gonna take 2 days to load 100 rounds....

Seems too time consuming for me at that level? Weighing out every charge? I've never done it so maybe I'm not realizing the time involved?

Maybe that trickler is the solution.

You could always use the dipper for the majority of the load. Dump a dipper full of powder into the scale pan. If the load is heavy, empty the pan back into the container and try again. If the load is light, trickle a little to bring the scale up to zero. Of course, if the weight is right on, use it.

And you need some kind of loading block to hold the cases and a funnel for pouring the powder from the pan into the cases.

You do this type of reloading in batches. First, you decap and resize all of your cases. Then you prime them all, then charge them all, then seat the bullets and, finally, apply the taper crimp. Most reloaders would give up on the taper crimp and just crimp during the bullet seating stage. I don't recommend skipping the taper crimp stage but I certainly understand why it would happen.

Richard

RYT 2BER
09-26-2012, 15:18
You could always use the dipper for the majority of the load. Dump a dipper full of powder into the scale pan. If the load is heavy, empty the pan back into the container and try again. If the load is light, trickle a little to bring the scale up to zero. Of course, if the weight is right on, use it.

And you need some kind of loading block to hold the cases and a funnel for pouring the powder from the pan into the cases.

You do this type of reloading in batches. First, you decap and resize all of your cases. Then you prime them all, then charge them all, then seat the bullets and, finally, apply the taper crimp. Most reloaders would give up on the taper crimp and just crimp during the bullet seating stage. I don't recommend skipping the taper crimp stage but I certainly understand why it would happen.

Richard

I'm thinking this could be the solution also... I did see some powder measure devices, but when I read the reviews people claim they use the measure then weigh the darn charge anyway so what's the point... I might as well use the technique you've described by simply using the dipper into the scale and then just finagle it a bit to get it right...

Wow... Weighing every charge... Gonna be a looooooong process. :wow:

RYT 2BER
09-26-2012, 15:20
Your the guy trying to reload on his coach and take the path less traveled. You can use dippers. Just use unique. But your picking the path and it kinda is going to be what it's going to be. Reloading is worth it. Your probably wasting all the money you spend on the cheap tools and will later end up buying better. Might as well pick a decent setup now and skip the pain of the road less traveled.

ANY Trickler is a PITA for Pistol. It's just not the easy way.

You could very well be right, but the whole setup is gonna run me like barely $100 so it seems like a good way to try it and even decide if its worth it for my amount of shooting.

F106 Fan
09-26-2012, 15:29
For pistol and bulk rifle loading, almost everybody uses some kind of volumetric powder measure. Most are adjustable over a large range of charges.

The Lee Perfect measure might be acceptable - I haven't used it. I have used the more expensive RCBS Uniflow and 'Lil Dandy measures.

These volumetric dispensers pretty much depend on a solid bench mount to limit vibrations that will cause variations in the charge.

http://www.midwayusa.com/find?userSearchQuery=powder+measure

Still, the only way you can trust a volumetric dispenser is to throw a lot of charges and weigh them. Consistency is still part of the technique to using these.

If you stay away from the max loads, there will be a little room for errors in dispensing.

Richard

ColoCG
09-26-2012, 15:42
I'm thinking this could be the solution also... I did see some powder measure devices, but when I read the reviews people claim they use the measure then weigh the darn charge anyway so what's the point... I might as well use the technique you've described by simply using the dipper into the scale and then just finagle it a bit to get it right...

Wow... Weighing every charge... Gonna be a looooooong process. :wow:

You weigh the several powder drops from a powder measure before you start and occasionally as you reload to verify the measure is throwing an the correct powder charge. It only takes one wrong load to ruin your whole day and gun shooting.

michael e
09-26-2012, 15:56
I have the hand press you are looking at. It's great for depriming, sizing . But I use bench mounted for seating crimping.
If just mild loads I use the dippers if in mid range but you will see that they aren't the same every dip. And look at a different priming system. The little ram that comes in that kit aren't worth the time.

Colorado4Wheel
09-26-2012, 17:09
You could very well be right, but the whole setup is gonna run me like barely $100 so it seems like a good way to try it and even decide if its worth it for my amount of shooting.

Or you could do it right and have a useful product to use if you like it or a sellable product if you decide to walk away from it. 250 to 300 would do it.

Colorado4Wheel
09-26-2012, 17:14
Double Post.

F106 Fan
09-26-2012, 17:27
You could very well be right, but the whole setup is gonna run me like barely $100 so it seems like a good way to try it and even decide if its worth it for my amount of shooting.

So, how much do you shoot? When you start reloading, your shooting will increase. By a bunch...

You are setting yourself up to hate reloading. There's simply no way that the hand loader is going to be a pleasant, or even bearable, experience. If you were making 20 rounds of 30-06 for a hunting trip, sure! Making a couple of boxes of pistol ammo is going to be ugly.

Even a single stage press is too grim to contemplate but you can get a workable Lee press for $68:
Amazon.com: Lee Breech Lock Challenger 90588: Sports & Outdoors@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31Oq4-ROA1L.@@AMEPARAM@@31Oq4-ROA1L

I have never used this press so I have no idea how well it works. But what's to go wrong with a single stage press?

Richard

unclebob
09-26-2012, 17:31
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/807734/lee-reloader-single-stage-press

Even this press is cheaper than the Lee hand press.

fredj338
09-26-2012, 17:50
I'm thinking this could be the solution also... I did see some powder measure devices, but when I read the reviews people claim they use the measure then weigh the darn charge anyway so what's the point... I might as well use the technique you've described by simply using the dipper into the scale and then just finagle it a bit to get it right...

Wow... Weighing every charge... Gonna be a looooooong process. :wow:

A good powder measure throws very accurate charges with most powder types. Set it & then check it, throw the charges the same way each time, as good as it gets. This only works well w/ ball powders & most flake powders but not so well for stick powders. If you really want to waste your time w/ the nut cracker, at least get a powder measure to throw charges & yes you still need a good scale to verify. This precludes any of the Lee powder stuff IMO, just poorly executed gear. You can go cheap on the press & dies, but spend good money on the scale & measure. They can be used later if you go progressive, well at least the scale.
F016 is right, you will not have a great exp reloading on the nut cracker & end up buying something else anyway. You can set it up on a folding workmate & store it if space is a problem. You shouldn't be sitting & watching tv reloading anyway, more foolish than voting OBAMA.

F106 Fan
09-26-2012, 17:51
And to prime, you need to add:
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/728999/lee-ram-prime-priming-unit-for-single-stage-press

Richard

RustyFN
09-26-2012, 18:28
I'm thinking this could be the solution also... I did see some powder measure devices, but when I read the reviews people claim they use the measure then weigh the darn charge anyway so what's the point... I might as well use the technique you've described by simply using the dipper into the scale and then just finagle it a bit to get it right...

Wow... Weighing every charge... Gonna be a looooooong process. :wow:

You only need to weigh the charge from the powder measure to make sure it's throwing the correct charge. Then weigh maybe 10 more to make sure it's consistant and you are comfortable with the charge. After than you can load without weighing any more charges. For example I will weigh 10 charges to make sure the measure is set. Then I might weigh one in the middle and then one when I'm done. The thing is you say you don't know if it's worth your time. then you buy a hand press that will let you load maybe 30 to 50 per hour. That doesn't make sence to me. I wish you luck and hope you enjoy it.

Taterhead
09-26-2012, 18:40
...You shouldn't be sitting & watching tv reloading anyway, ...

Absolutely 100% correct. I would strongly urge the OP to find a way to setup a reloading station, one way or the other. You don't want to be decapping primers on the bed or couch. The stuff is messy and there are toxins. Plus reloading should be done in an environment free of distractions.

This is not a hobby to cut corners with. Get a good manual. The Speer #14 is another option with good instructions. And get a good beam scale.

Loads need to be worked up from starting charges until you arrive at the desired outcome. A scale is essential for measuring powder charges while working up loads. If a load is found that correlates to a dipper size, then the dippers might work ok. As mentioned before, the dippers need to be verified on the scale to ensure that they agree with the weights tested during load workups.

Another essential item is a set of calipers. I didn't see anyone mention this.

RYT 2BER
09-26-2012, 21:54
What the heck am I missing here... I was going to the cheaper route... And I'm already up to $170+ without components and this is with a hand press...?????

Am I mistaken with something??? Am I buying too much???? What am I doing wrong here??



ProdID ProdTitle Price Qty Ext Weight Ext Price

LEE90101 LEE PRIMER POCKET CLEANER $ 2.49
Update
0.1 Lbs. $ 2.49


LY9816049 49TH EDITION RELOADING HANDBOOK $17.99
Update
3.2 Lbs. $ 17.99


LEE90965 LEE 4 DIE SET 40 S&W/10MM CARBID $36.99
Update
1.5 Lbs. $ 36.99


PC050107 ELECTRONIC SCALE 1500 GS $24.99
Update
1.0 Lbs. $ 24.99


LEE90230 LEE AUTO PRIME $15.99
Update
0.7 Lbs. $ 15.99


LEE90600 BREECH QUICK LOCK CHANGE BUSHING $ 6.49
Update
0.3 Lbs. $12.98


PC050080 DIGITAL CALIPER $20.31
Update
0.7 Lbs. $ 20.31


LEE90180 BREECH LOCK HAND PRESS KIT $39.99
Update
2.9 Lbs. $ 39.99

Taterhead
09-26-2012, 22:09
I'll save you $2.50. You don't need a primer pocket cleaner.

If you want to go the electronic scale route, then you'll need to spend money. At least $100. A $25 electronic scale is not dependable enough for me. Otherwise go with a decent beam scale.

Aside from that, this should get you going.

ilgunguygt
09-26-2012, 22:13
My first press was the small Lee 25 dollar bench model. Its still mounted nest to my other presses and still gets used.

fredj338
09-26-2012, 22:27
You don't need cheap dig calipers, the cheaper dial are better. There are no cheap/good dig scales. Cut corners on other stuff, but you need a reliable/accurate method for measuring powder. The Dillon beam is the best cheaper beam scale IMO. A $25 dig scale isn't even a good paper weight.
SUre it's going to cost you some $$, figure a decent ss press setup or Lee Classic Turret, right around $300. You'll pay for all of it in less than 8m if you only shoot 400rds of 9mm/m. Of course, anything less than a LCT is going to cost you a ton of time.

F106 Fan
09-26-2012, 23:00
In my view, you left out the Lee Taper Crimp Die. It is a lot better solution than the Lee Factory Crimp Die in the 4 die set. So, buy a 3 die set and add the taper crimp die.

Do not buy any digital scale that costs less than $100. Particularly for the cartridges you plan to load, the least little bit of error can result in a Kaboom!

If you aren't shooting more than 200 rounds per month (a box a week), you probably shouldn't get into reloading. That is only about $80 worth of ammo and the savings is only going to be about $40. Hardly worth the effort and with your equipment list, it will be a LOT of effort.

OTOH, if you are shooting 500 rounds per month, that's about $200/month and the savings will be about $100/mo. Looking at that over a year, the savings will total around $1200. That much money is worth saving! But it is also enough to pay back the cost of much better equipment.

Good reloading equipment has a resale value of probably around 75%. Dillon stuff will bring in 80-85% because of the name and the 'forever' guarantee. If you don't like reloading, just post your equipment list on the bulletin board at your range. Someone will be looking for it!

Take a longer view...

Richard

RYT 2BER
09-27-2012, 17:42
Although I may get flamed... I did it.. I bought all the stuff.... I didn't buy bullets, powder or primers yet because I bought the book and I figured it would tell me what to buy...

My wife is predicting that in 6 months or less ill have a bench setup :embarassed:

F106 Fan
09-27-2012, 18:13
Welcome to the addiction of reloading! :wavey:

Richard

RustyFN
09-27-2012, 18:17
Although I may get flamed... I did it.. I bought all the stuff.... I didn't buy bullets, powder or primers yet because I bought the book and I figured it would tell me what to buy...

My wife is predicting that in 6 months or less ill have a bench setup :embarassed:

I am going to bet she is right. :supergrin: At least you got started. Congrats and welcome to reloading.

michael e
09-27-2012, 18:26
Wait till you start getting bullet shipments all the time. Then go from bench to needing a room. Thinking that 2500 rounds of 9mm loaded is running low. You are headed down a path that is great. I just spent 200 on more reloading stuff I " needed" when all I really needed was a set of dies for my 270rem.

RYT 2BER
09-27-2012, 18:27
Thanks for all the advice.... I know it might not have been perfect but here was the final order:

PH393939 UNIVERSAL RELOADING TRAY $5.99 1 $5.99
LEE90101 LEE PRIMER POCKET CLEANER $2.49 1 $2.49
LEE90100 LEE IMP. POWDER MEASURE KIT $7.99 1 $7.99
PH836017 BULLET PULLER $12.99 1 $12.99
LY9816049 49TH EDITION RELOADING HANDBOOK $17.99 1 $17.99
LEE90965 LEE 4 DIE SET 40 S&W/10MM CARBID $36.99 1 $36.99
PH205205 DS-750 DIGITAL RELOADING SCALE $23.99 1 $23.99
LEE90230 LEE AUTO PRIME $15.99 1 $15.99
PH672060 ECONOMY ELECTRONIC CALIPER $20.99 1 $20.99
LEE90600 BREECH QUICK LOCK CHANGE BUSHING $6.49 2 $12.98
LEE90180 BREECH LOCK HAND PRESS KIT $39.99 1 $39.99

F106 Fan
09-27-2012, 19:12
Even with carbide dies, I think you are going to want to lube the cases. I have been using Hornady One Shot for about a year and it works very well. It doesn't have to be removed from the loaded rounds.

Richard

Taterhead
09-27-2012, 20:21
Even with carbide dies, I think you are going to want to lube the cases. I have been using Hornady One Shot for about a year and it works very well. It doesn't have to be removed from the loaded rounds.

Richard

Curious about why to lube cases? I never lube pistol cases.

:dunno:

Taterhead
09-27-2012, 20:27
Congrats RYT 2BER. Welcome!

This is a pretty enjoyable hobby.

I and others would still strongly suggest returning the scale and getting a proper beam scale like this:

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/758842/rcbs-model-505-magnetic-powder-scale-511-grain-capacity

or this:

http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/25215/catid/7/Dillon__039_s___039_Eliminator__039__Scale

Your eyes, gun, and fingers will thank you.

RYT 2BER
09-27-2012, 20:40
Congrats RYT 2BER. Welcome!

This is a pretty enjoyable hobby.

I and others would still strongly suggest returning the scale and getting a proper beam scale like this:

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/758842/rcbs-model-505-magnetic-powder-scale-511-grain-capacity

or this:

http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/25215/catid/7/Dillon__039_s___039_Eliminator__039__Scale

Your eyes, gun, and fingers will thank you.

I'm sure you're right and ill get there sooner than later... Just couldn't swing that much for scale yet... I'll load light to avoid any problems, but I'll step up to something more appropriate like you've described when getting more "aggresive" with charges. :supergrin:

Colorado4Wheel
09-27-2012, 20:40
You don't take advice very well and bought a bunch of stuff that really isn't going to serve you well in the long term or that you don't even need. Pretty much everything but the press and the manual and maybe the powder measure.

RYT 2BER
09-27-2012, 20:47
You don't take advice very well and bought a bunch of stuff that really isn't going to serve you well in the long term or that you don't even need. Pretty much everything but the press and the manual and maybe the powder measure.

Understood. I considered things are did lots of Internet reading... Many people have started out with stuff like this as I've observed on the Internet, and they appear to be pleased. Of course it's shoestring way to go, but for me it was a way to give it a whirl. If I really like it and find it to be financially beneficial for me, I'll step up the setup and chalk some of it up to education... The dies and such are usable if I eventually choose to go to a Turret press and such so really the scale is probably the biggest waste at worst.

fredj338
09-27-2012, 20:52
Good luck, keep us posted. Keep in mind advice is free, but knowledge is priceless. Take advantage of those that know more than you. That goes for everything in life.:wavey:

F106 Fan
09-27-2012, 21:36
Curious about why to lube cases? I never lube pistol cases.

:dunno:

With carbide dies it is optional on a press with a lot of mechanical advantage. The OP is using a little hand press.

Even on a large press, the entire process is smoother with the lube. I loaded pistol for a lot of years without lube but after I started using Hornady One Shot, I won't be doing it any more.

The thing about HOS is that it is an aerosol spray and it isn't like the RCBS lube that came with my first press. That stuff was sticky and generally unpleasant to use. HOS is more like spray lanolin.

There is no need to remove it from the completed round. Just shoot 'em.

Richard

Taterhead
09-27-2012, 21:46
With carbide dies it is optional on a press with a lot of mechanical advantage. The OP is using a little hand press.

...
Richard

Great point there, actually.

Thanks.

F106 Fan
09-27-2012, 21:56
I'm sure you're right and ill get there sooner than later... Just couldn't swing that much for scale yet... I'll load light to avoid any problems, but I'll step up to something more appropriate like you've described when getting more "aggresive" with charges. :supergrin:

How are you going to know you are loading light?

We just went through this with another new user:
http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?p=19377225&highlight=kaboom#post19377225

Start at page 4

At the very minimum you need a set of RCBS Check Weights to validate the scale.

It's not my business how you reload so there's no reason for me to rant on about the scale. So, I won't...

But you have been warned by others. It would be best if you paid attention.

Richard

Colorado4Wheel
09-28-2012, 07:03
Other then the dies, if you start actual producing ammo regularly, you won't use any of that stuff for pistol in the future.

RYT 2BER
09-28-2012, 08:18
How are you going to know you are loading light?

We just went through this with another new user:
http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?p=19377225&highlight=kaboom#post19377225

Start at page 4

At the very minimum you need a set of RCBS Check Weights to validate the scale.

It's not my business how you reload so there's no reason for me to rant on about the scale. So, I won't...

But you have been warned by others. It would be best if you paid attention.

Richard


The scale is a Frankford Arsenal and it comes with a calibration weight

Furthermore, the scale gets excellent reviews:

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/175512/frankford-arsenal-ds-750-electronic-powder-scale-750-grain-capacity?cm_vc=2124BrandPopProd

Amazon.com: Frankford Arsenal Reloading Scale: Sports & Outdoors@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41mGKommxkL.@@AMEPARAM@@41mGKommxkL


Thats literally hundreds of reviewers,the majority of which seem to be very pleased. Doesnt make it a sure thing, but again, just because it isnt very expensive doesnt mean its a disaster either...

With all due respect, if it was that bad, you'd be hearing about people like this blowing up and kb'ing all over the place.

I go to ranges all the time... Ive yet to see a kb in person, and Ive yet to have anyone Ive ever shot with ever report it. Its something Ive only seen in pictures on the internet. Again, that doesnt mean it cant happen but with all due respect, you guys are describing it like its a sure thing with this scale.

F106 Fan
09-28-2012, 08:42
The scale is a Frankford Arsenal and it comes with a calibration weight


Every digital scale comes with a 'calibration' weight. For many scales, the calibration weight is somewhere near the end of the range. This scale goes to 750 grains so I would expect the calibration weight to be about 100 times larger than what would actually be measured.

Check weights, OTOH, are much closer to powder charge weights. If I am measuring a 42.2 gr charge, I want a 50 gr check weight. With a combination of smaller weights, I could also set the check weight to 40.0 gr.

http://www.midwayusa.com/find?userSearchQuery=rcbs+check+weights

A calibration weight is necessary to check the range of the scale but it provides no assurance that the scale reads correctly in the area of interest.

Your choice on the scale. Did you read the part where one user pointed out that it can't be used to trickle charge?

And yes, when I was loading a few rifle rounds yesterday, I did indeed use a check weight of 50 gr on my RCBS ChargeMaster and the Dillon D-Terminator I use as a second check. I want the charge to be as consistent as possible with a digital scale. The goal is to put all the shiny bullets in the same hole.

Richard

ColoCG
09-28-2012, 09:09
Thanks for all the advice.... I know it might not have been perfect but here was the final order:

PH393939 UNIVERSAL RELOADING TRAY $5.99 1 $5.99
LEE90101 LEE PRIMER POCKET CLEANER $2.49 1 $2.49
LEE90100 LEE IMP. POWDER MEASURE KIT $7.99 1 $7.99
PH836017 BULLET PULLER $12.99 1 $12.99
LY9816049 49TH EDITION RELOADING HANDBOOK $17.99 1 $17.99
LEE90965 LEE 4 DIE SET 40 S&W/10MM CARBID $36.99 1 $36.99
PH205205 DS-750 DIGITAL RELOADING SCALE $23.99 1 $23.99
LEE90230 LEE AUTO PRIME $15.99 1 $15.99
PH672060 ECONOMY ELECTRONIC CALIPER $20.99 1 $20.99
LEE90600 BREECH QUICK LOCK CHANGE BUSHING $6.49 2 $12.98
LEE90180 BREECH LOCK HAND PRESS KIT $39.99 1 $39.99


You will also need caliber specific shell holders for the Lee auto prime. The shell holder that come with the dies will not work.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/412059/lee-auto-prime-hand-priming-tool-shellholder-19-9mm-luger-40-s-and-w-10mm-auto

RYT 2BER
09-28-2012, 09:13
Your choice on the scale. Did you read the part where one user pointed out that it can't be used to trickle charge?



Yes but you guys said trickling was bad for pistols so my plan was to use a dipper on the scale to get close and then just fine tune at that point..

RYT 2BER
09-28-2012, 09:14
You will also need caliber specific shell holders for the Lee auto prime. The shell holder that come with the dies will not work.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/412059/lee-auto-prime-hand-priming-tool-shellholder-19-9mm-luger-40-s-and-w-10mm-auto

Crap you're kidding me!

**EDIT Thank you for telling me.. I just bought it off eBay... easier to buy a $2 part off ebay then from a large online store...

ColoCG
09-28-2012, 09:36
Crap you're kidding me!

No sorry, I can sympathizewith you. I started reloading much like you are, with a Lyman 310 nutcrcker hand press about 45yrs. ago. The only difference i sI did purchase a good Ohause beam scale. It is the single most important piece of equipment you can have. I also weighed every charge for .38 and .44mag. Yes it was very tediouse but it did produce decent loads. Within a yr. I purchased a SS bench press.

A powder trickler isn't bad for pistol, but it also can be slow and time consuming.

Good Luck.

F106 Fan
09-28-2012, 10:02
Yes but you guys said trickling was bad for pistols so my plan was to use a dipper on the scale to get close and then just fine tune at that point..

I read the review over at Midway. I don't know that the person posting the review has any credibility whatsoever.

However, it seems that the scale wants to take one stable reading and then start from zero for another measurement.

If so, you won't be able to put a dipper full in the pan and then trickle the remainder.

As I said, I don't know if the person writing the review has the foggiest notion about how to use the scale. Every digital scale I have ever used takes repeated measurements.

Richard

fredj338
09-28-2012, 10:06
The scale is a Frankford Arsenal and it comes with a calibration weight

Furthermore, the scale gets excellent reviews:


Thats literally hundreds of reviewers,the majority of which seem to be very pleased. Doesnt make it a sure thing, but again, just because it isnt very expensive doesnt mean its a disaster either...

With all due respect, if it was that bad, you'd be hearing about people like this blowing up and kb'ing all over the place.

I go to ranges all the time... Ive yet to see a kb in person, and Ive yet to have anyone Ive ever shot with ever report it. Its something Ive only seen in pictures on the internet. Again, that doesnt mean it cant happen but with all due respect, you guys are describing it like its a sure thing with this scale.
Look, everyone wants to justify their decision, look at the current political mess of an election. You bought a crappy scale. I don't care what the reviews are . I would 90% of those reviews are from noobs like you that haven't used it enough to really have a good opinions. Again, ask for advice from those that know then choose to ignore it, your kind of on your own then. Again, good luck, I have a feeling you will need some.

superhornet
09-28-2012, 11:09
I like to use dippers and build them specific for the powder load I wish to shoot. Build them both for pistol and rifle. Use a .380 or 9mm case cut down for the pistol. Use a 30/06-or 45-70 for rifle......Weigh the charge I desire, mark the charge on the case and cut it down to acheive the load result. Works great...Handloaded results---When I could hold a pistol steady, won a G17 at Ft. Benning many years ago. Rifle loads--300WSM--W760-180gr Accubond--loaded for a friend who hunts---One buffalo, one moose, one elk, one black bear, one caribou and numerous whitetail. And, these are all mid-range loads, not max....I do use some Dippers in the Lee Kit, but mostly make my own...dippers do work..

RYT 2BER
09-28-2012, 12:42
Look, everyone wants to justify their decision, look at the current political mess of an election. You bought a crappy scale. I don't care what the reviews are . I would 90% of those reviews are from noobs like you that haven't used it enough to really have a good opinions. Again, ask for advice from those that know then choose to ignore it, your kind of on your own then. Again, good luck, I have a feeling you will need some.

Look Im not going to argue with you. But really... Im not trying to justify anything.

I did ask for advice.. I have with this as well as other things in my life solicited advice from multiple sources. Furthermore, Im sorry you are offended that I took an initial shortcut to save some money. It seems more like you are offended that I didnt just blindly do exactly what you said, without utilizing any of my own thoughts or judgements whatsoever.

Well, Im not wired that way. I dont just say "how high" when someone says "jump". I used the information provided from a multitude of sources and made a decision. You want to call it justification? So be it.

But dooont you worry.. I will be SURE not to go asking for advice from y'all again.

RYT 2BER
09-28-2012, 12:54
I read the review over at Midway. I don't know that the person posting the review has any credibility whatsoever.


As I said, I don't know if the person writing the review has the foggiest notion about how to use the scale. Every digital scale I have ever used takes repeated measurements.

Richard

I dont know why I am still involved in this conversation at this point but I dont know what youre talking about.

You keep saying "the person" and "the review".

I posted up a link to midway with 112 reviews and an amazon link with another 46 reviews. That is 168 reviews predominantly positive.

fredj338
09-28-2012, 13:18
Look Im not going to argue with you. But really... Im not trying to justify anything.

I did ask for advice.. I have with this as well as other things in my life solicited advice from multiple sources. Furthermore, Im sorry you are offended that I took an initial shortcut to save some money. It seems more like you are offended that I didnt just blindly do exactly what you said, without utilizing any of my own thoughts or judgements whatsoever.

Well, Im not wired that way. I dont just say "how high" when someone says "jump". I used the information provided from a multitude of sources and made a decision. You want to call it justification? So be it.

But dooont you worry.. I will be SURE not to go asking for advice from y'all again.

I'm not offended, nothing you could do or say to me would offend me. I just get a little tired of people that ask for advice then totally ignore it. Why ask?:dunno: Like my son that asked me about his girlfriend; I told him she would dump him at first chance, so they married anyway. He now listens to solicited advice from those that know better.:supergrin:
I wish you well, really. I would rather see people reload on cheap stuff than not reload at all, but you did ask for opinions, maybe take some of the advice??

F106 Fan
09-28-2012, 16:37
I dont know why I am still involved in this conversation at this point but I dont know what youre talking about.

You keep saying "the person" and "the review".


I referred to a review I read at MidwayUSA.

Here is the web page and the first review at the bottom is what I was talking about.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/175512/frankford-arsenal-ds-750-electronic-powder-scale-750-grain-capacity

Richard

PCJim
09-29-2012, 10:49
The real point should be that, of all the reloading equipment that one needs, the scale is the single most important component that you should never go cheap on. Trust me that from experience I can tell you that inexpensive digital scales will wander and your charges (in a high pressure case to begin with) could become dangerous.

Remember that in reloading, you are creating controlled explosive devices that, within certain parameters, are generally safe. Overcharge a single round due to a $30 scale and the resulting damage to yourself and your firearms could easily run in the thousands, including damages that cannot be repaired.

Taterhead
09-29-2012, 13:25
The real point should be that, of all the reloading equipment that one needs, the scale is the single most important component that you should never go cheap on. Trust me that from experience I can tell you that inexpensive digital scales will wander and your charges (in a high pressure case to begin with) could become dangerous.

Remember that in reloading, you are creating controlled explosive devices that, within certain parameters, are generally safe. Overcharge a single round due to a $30 scale and the resulting damage to yourself and your firearms could easily run in the thousands, including damages that cannot be repaired.

PCJim is exactly right. We are not trying to convey information to puff up our chests. It is not a Chevy vs. Ford thing.

This is the one area that is downright critical: to ensure that the charge that goes into the case is what you expect it to be. There is no way I would rely upon a cheap electronic scale for that purpose -- and virtually no experienced hand loader would either.

Let's think about it this way. You are dealing with a high level of precision. One ounce is a pretty light weight. There are 437.5 grains in one ounce. We handloaders are measuring to the tenth of a grain. That means that you need a tool that is precise to 1/4375 of an ounce!

I have a close contact that I have mentored in handloading. He went with a cheap scale against my suggestions for loading various rifle cartridges. He also had a quality beam scale. For whatever reason, he had more faith in electronics than mechanics.

Results: His velocities were inconsistent with the occasional big outlier low or high velocities with sometimes an ejector imprint on the case head and sticky bolt lift (symptoms of high pressure). A few case head separations later, and I feel that he is lucky to not yet have had a KB. He would not get his mind around the fact that it was his scale that was the culprit. Inconsistent charge weights were evident to everyone but him. After all he "zeroed it regularly" and verified the readings with the included heavy check weight - so the scale must be accurate he argued. He also touted the online product reviews (this sounds familiar).

He told me that he did not use the beam scale because his electronic scale "proved" that the "beam scale was all over the place." When in reality it was the other way around. He would weigh a charge on the electronic scale and move it to the beam scale. The beam scale would show different readings -- high or low. So in his mind the beam scale was inconsitent. In actuality, the beam scale demonstrated how utterly unreliable the electronic scale was.

I have an RCBS 505 beam scale that I like a lot and a set of check weights that will cover 0.5 grains to 60 grains and combinations in between. When I set my scale, the check weights show that the scale is precisely right. If my load is 8.5 grains, I zero the scale, set it to 8.5 and put 8.5 grains worth of check weights on the pan just to be sure. Then the powder throw is adjusted to throw that charge weight and off I go.

OP, we are not trying to be mean to you, or pile on. This is just too darned important. Listen to the experts here on this one issue where there is virtually unanimous agreement (that otherwise never happens here).

fredj338
09-29-2012, 13:40
FWIW, you can NOT verify one scale w/ another unless one scale has been checked using certified or verified check wts. I am always amazed how little people know about their chosen hobby, particulalry when your health is drectly at risk. A 125gr bullet is NOT a check wt, they can vary as much as 0.2gr +/-. I've said it befreo, cheap out on your other gear, but spend good money on a scale. If you arelimited on funds, then it's going to be a quality beam scale. Until someone proves it to me with a lot of use, there are no good/cheap (read much under $100 retail) dig scales for reloading.

FM12
09-30-2012, 23:26
Try Ebay for deals on used equipment. I've bouth several bargains there.

RYT 2BER
10-01-2012, 09:57
My intention is to go and purchase one of the aforementioned scales later this week..

It is frustrating though.. I have looked at the RCBS 502 and 505... Like anything, you have people who say theyre great in reviews, and others who say their crap. I just dont want to make a mistake on a $70-$80 scale here...

The dillion scale I believe can only be purchased from Dillion so I might go that route as well..

I'll make a final decision in the next day soon, but I am waiting for my book (to be delivered tomorrow) so when I see what "components" I need (bullets, powder, primer [dont need brass now]), Ill buy the proper scale... (so I can hopefully order everything at one time).. you know.. shipping sucks so I want to get it all together...

SARDG
10-01-2012, 10:10
My intention is to go and purchase one of the aforementioned scales later this week..

It is frustrating though.. I have looked at the RCBS 502 and 505... Like anything, you have people who say theyre great in reviews, and others who say their crap. I just dont want to make a mistake on a $70-$80 scale here...
Website reviews can be helpful for flagging potential 'gotchas', but sometimes I question the common sense and actual past experience of some reviewers. So although web reviews may help in a decision, you sometimes have to consider the source.

I've seen many reviews of phone apps where people say the app is junk and doesn't work as advertised, and I've downloaded and run them perfectly. It's a similar thing for reloading hardware sometimes. At least most of the 'old' posters around here can stand on their record.

unclebob
10-01-2012, 10:21
When people post reviews. You in most cases donít know if they load 50 rounds a week or 500+ a week. How often do they use the product? Is it a great review because that is what they bought? Or they donít know any difference in the quality of different products.
Like I have said before and others have stated here. Of all the reloading products you buy the scale is the most important. It is one piece of equipment that if it is wrong can destroy a gun and hurt the person.
Some people think that a beam scale is always accurate. I know of two cases where it was not. That is why check weights are very important. To verify that the scale is reading what it should. The weights that come with some of the scales in most cases are calibration weights not check weights. There is a difference. Also it does not do any good to put a 25 or more calibration weight on the scale for a check weight when you are only loading say 3 grains of powder.

Colorado4Wheel
10-01-2012, 10:26
My intention is to go and purchase one of the aforementioned scales later this week..

It is frustrating though.. I have looked at the RCBS 502 and 505... Like anything, you have people who say theyre great in reviews, and others who say their crap. I just dont want to make a mistake on a $70-$80 scale here...

The dillion scale I believe can only be purchased from Dillion so I might go that route as well..

I'll make a final decision in the next day soon, but I am waiting for my book (to be delivered tomorrow) so when I see what "components" I need (bullets, powder, primer [dont need brass now]), Ill buy the proper scale... (so I can hopefully order everything at one time).. you know.. shipping sucks so I want to get it all together...

Get the Dillon and don't look back. No reason to spend more. If you want to spend more I would get the Redding. But ANY decent beam scale is going to be more reliable then the cheap electric. You should also invest in some check weights. But barring spending money on some weights you can make a 5 gr item and check you scale regularly with it to see if it is weighting the same as it was before. That is the downfall of the Electric Scale. People who actually check them regularly will find the cheap ones do drift. Once or twice they are OK. But if you check them 20 times are they reading the same all 20 times that day and the next and the next. In the 5 gr weight range not the huge check weight that comes with the scale.

F106 Fan
10-01-2012, 10:40
It is frustrating though.. I have looked at the RCBS 502 and 505... Like anything, you have people who say theyre great in reviews, and others who say their crap. I just dont want to make a mistake on a $70-$80 scale here...

The dillion scale I believe can only be purchased from Dillion so I might go that route as well..


Either of the RCBS 502 or 505 will be fine. So will the Dillon and it is a little cheaper based on my quick review of web sites.

In either event, you still need a set of check weights.

You can read the User Manuals for each of these scales from the respective manufacturer's web sites. See if there is some part of the description that seems to favor one over the other.

OTOH, if your short list really IS 502, 505 or Eliminator, start a new thread asking specifically about those scales. I don't think you want to ask about the Lee. It isn't highly regarded around here.

CAVEAT:

I have a rather low end RCBS scale that came in a kit I bought about 30 years ago. I don't use it. Further, I haven't used ANY of the listed beam scales. I'm using the Dillon D-Terminator digital scale and an RCBS Chargemaster which incorporates a digital scale.

But I would use any of the 3 and I don't think I have a preference for 2 poise versus 3 poise as long as I can set the charge weight to 0.1 gr.

Richard

F106 Fan
10-01-2012, 10:49
Website reviews can be helpful for flagging potential 'gotchas', but sometimes I question the common sense and actual past experience of some reviewers. So although web reviews may help in a decision, you sometimes have to consider the source.


Even the purported 'gotchas' are often wrong. I just read a review of one of the RCBS scales and it said the scale could only be set to the whole gr and that the 0.1 increment had to be read off the beam pointer. WRONG!

Sometimes it is worth reading the User Manual in advance of purchase just to see if the person writing the review had the faintest glimmer of real knowledge or experience.

Richard

Colorado4Wheel
10-01-2012, 10:56
Also, any issue with a Good Beam is going to be handled easily by the manufacture. Dillon has a STELLAR Customer Service Dept. I have even heard of someone dropping a box of bullets on their scale and Dillon replaced it. Not recommended but that was the report by the owner. You simply can not go wrong with Dillon. People know that Dillon stands behind their mechanical products forever so they have excellent resale as a result. Any issue with any product is promptly handled for free by Dillon. So people buy used Dillon items with confidence and pay a little more as a result.

RYT 2BER
10-01-2012, 12:02
Also, any issue with a Good Beam is going to be handled easily by the manufacture. Dillon has a STELLAR Customer Service Dept. I have even heard of someone dropping a box of bullets on their scale and Dillon replaced it. Not recommended but that was the report by the owner. You simply can not go wrong with Dillon. People know that Dillon stands behind their mechanical products forever so they have excellent resale as a result. Any issue with any product is promptly handled for free by Dillon. So people buy used Dillon items with confidence and pay a little more as a result.

Ill probably just go with the Dillion.. they send me catalogs all the time so I feel like I owe it to them :supergrin:

Theyve spend a ton on catalogs so I think theyve earned the business :supergrin:

Colorado4Wheel
10-01-2012, 12:36
How did you get on the Dillon list?

RYT 2BER
10-01-2012, 15:01
I got news for you... Ive been snooping around looking for a potential component supplier... Looks like the hardest part of reloading is going to be finding bullets!!!!!

SARDG
10-01-2012, 15:16
I got news for you... Ive been snooping around looking for a potential component supplier... Looks like the hardest part of reloading is going to be finding bullets!!!!!
Think of the money you'll save by not using bullets in your reloads!


Are you hoping for something specific? I never have supply problems with Montana Gold, but I order ahead of when I actually need them. They're also a little spendy.

F106 Fan
10-01-2012, 15:34
I got news for you... Ive been snooping around looking for a potential component supplier... Looks like the hardest part of reloading is going to be finding bullets!!!!!

Precision Delta for jacketed bullets
Powder Valley for powder and primers

Powder Valley also sells bullets but the only bullets I have bought from them are Sierra BTHP Match for .308

There's a $27.50 HazMat fee on shipping powder and primers. Therefore, the order size has to be large enough that the savings covers the fee versus buying in small quantities at the LGS.

Montana Gold also makes jacketed bullets. I have bought a bunch of their .45 ACP, 9mm and .223. The prices are better at Precision Delta but sometimes Montana Gold will have what I need in stock.

Once again, look at the stickies. There is one dedicated to suppliers.

Richard

RYT 2BER
10-01-2012, 16:30
How did you get on the Dillon list?

Umm some time ago I had bought a speed strip case from them. I know that doesn't make a lot of sense

Colorado4Wheel
10-01-2012, 16:39
Umm some time ago I had bought a speed strip case from them. I know that doesn't make a lot of sense

Some things are just meant to be. You'll see. ;)

fredj338
10-01-2012, 18:15
Even the purported 'gotchas' are often wrong. I just read a review of one of the RCBS scales and it said the scale could only be set to the whole gr and that the 0.1 increment had to be read off the beam pointer. WRONG!

Sometimes it is worth reading the User Manual in advance of purchase just to see if the person writing the review had the faintest glimmer of real knowledge or experience.

Richard

Again, many people writing reviewes don't have enough exp to understand what they are using.:dunno:

RYT 2BER
10-01-2012, 18:50
Think of the money you'll save by not using bullets in your reloads!


Are you hoping for something specific? I never have supply problems with Montana Gold, but I order ahead of when I actually need them. They're also a little spendy.

Precision Delta for jacketed bullets
Powder Valley for powder and primers

Powder Valley also sells bullets but the only bullets I have bought from them are Sierra BTHP Match for .308

There's a $27.50 HazMat fee on shipping powder and primers. Therefore, the order size has to be large enough that the savings covers the fee versus buying in small quantities at the LGS.

Montana Gold also makes jacketed bullets. I have bought a bunch of their .45 ACP, 9mm and .223. The prices are better at Precision Delta but sometimes Montana Gold will have what I need in stock.

Once again, look at the stickies. There is one dedicated to suppliers.

Richard


Thanks for this info and ill check the stickies. I assume I'll figure it out when I get the book tomorrow... I was under the assumption that load (recipie) data was specific for a particular bullet but I guess I'm going to learn that tomorrow from my reading.

shotgunred
10-01-2012, 19:24
It is. Unfortunately you are not going to find your bullet, powder and primer, case combo. They also do not use the same gun you do.:crying:

That is why smart people check two or more sources and then start LOW and work up.

F106 Fan
10-01-2012, 19:36
^^^^ Pay attention to this!

You will almost NEVER have the exact same components so the caution is to start with the low end of the charge range and work up slowly. The thing is, some powders only have a 0.6 gr range.

Stay away from max. If you need more velocity and you're getting close to max, buy a different powder.

As you work up, stop as soon as you get reasonable accuracy and the gun is functioning properly.

One last time: Stay away from MAX.

You will probably want to buy 1# cans of powder from your LGS as you work on loads. Once you have it all worked out, you can buy in bulk with a quantity sufficient to save some money.

Richard

RYT 2BER
10-05-2012, 12:00
Well you live and learn.

Im big enough to stand up and say when I make a mistake, so here is one of those times.

I was given some advice to go a certain way, and I decided to go on my own so to speak.. now Im paying for it...

Bottom line, I have now actually loaded some rounds using the infamous nutcracker.. although it was a good learning experience, it is painfully slow.... Mostly due to die changes and since I wasnt using a powder measure, I was hand weighing every charge manually on my rcbs beam scale. That is one LONG way to go.

Furthermore, the manual process I think can be troublesome since I almost double charged a round due to the fact that when going by hand I had almost forgotten to move the funnel to another case..

Soooo I just bought a Lee Turret which I think will make things vastly faster, and I can use a powder measure and such...

The hand press, and hand primer among a bunch of things were basically wasted money now...

Live and learn..... I am however looking forward to getting the turret.. I have seen them in action many times and they look pretty enjoyable, while still being controllable and reasonably quick.

fredj338
10-05-2012, 13:01
Well, we tried to help, good choice on the LCT.

unclebob
10-05-2012, 13:22
One of the tricks that I learned when loading on a single stage press was to use two loading blocks. Matter of fact one was red and one was white. The sized and primed brass went in the white loading block with the base up. Pulled the case out of that white block and added the powder and then put that case with powder in the red block. Then when the red tray was full I looked into every case for powder and for the same amount in every case.
You will enjoy the LCT 100% better.

fredj338
10-05-2012, 16:03
One of the tricks that I learned when loading on a single stage press was to use two loading blocks. Matter of fact one was red and one was white. The sized and primed brass went in the white loading block with the base up. Pulled the case out of that white block and added the powder and then put that case with powder in the red block. Then when the red tray was full I looked into every case for powder and for the same amount in every case.
You will enjoy the LCT 100% better.

Another method I use/teach is turn all the sized, primed case mouth down & then turn them up one @ a time to fill. Pretty fool proof as long as you visually verify before placing bullets..:dunno: