Mammograms [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Mammograms


Glock&KimberLady
09-28-2012, 21:21
So I'm 41, my mother in law was diagnosed with breast cancer (very Stage 0, very early, but still lumpectomy and six weeks of radiation :alex: )...oh, and my mom and my aunt on my dad's side both had it...

My appointment is on October 19th. Experiences? Oh, and...the girls are bolt-ons...anyone have experience with THAT?

Lone_Wolfe
09-29-2012, 00:16
Hope all goes well for your MIL.

I had a mammo in Dubai, and the procedure wasn't bad. Can't speak for bolt-ons, though. Mine are real for about another month.

guanoman
09-29-2012, 08:48
Is your MIL on HRT? My mom was on HRT for 6 months when she started having lump issues. Within a year, she had a radical bilat mastectomy. When I pressed the surgeon as to why this happened, the surgeon said "family history, genetics, blah blah blah." I told the surgeon no other female on my mom's side has ever had breast CA. Surgeon said, "Must have been the HRT then. Studies indicate that causes breast CA."

There you have it....

sawgrass
09-30-2012, 08:45
I had a mammogram a week ago Friday. Evidently the new digital images are much better than the old film pics.

I received a call on Tuesday that I needed to go to the breast center at the hospital for more tests.

That needless to say scared the hell out of me. More tests
last Wednesday to conclude that everything is OK.

I don't know about bolt-ons, but I think the image will show what's where. Early detection is important so it's worth getting your boobs squished.

Good luck and I hope your MIL is OK.

Glock&KimberLady
10-09-2012, 14:46
My MIL is on HRT...and so is my mom.

I'm a tetch young for that...and probably won't do it anyway. Too many crappy side effects, by my research.

@sawgrass - I understand that happens a lot. And I hope it doesn't happen to me, because Mr. GKL doesn't handle stuff like this very well. We had a foot cancer (yes, really!) scare and he almost had a nervous breakdown thinking I was going to die on him.

@Lone - and then...bolt ons? Expanders? Or....?

F350
10-09-2012, 15:06
My wife had breast cancer 18 years ago, was the impetus for us getting married. The tumor was interductal and non-palpable, was 4cmX3cmX7cm, large but no lymph node involvement. She had a radical mastectomy, radiation and chemo.

Even if uncomfortable and a bit embarrassing it is worth it, the wife skipped the previous one and her oncologist said if her tumor had gone undiagnosed another 4 months she would have been terminal.

Had problems with the insurance on her last mammogram and had to go talk to billing at the hospital where it was done; I asked why if she only has 1 boobie the cost wasn't half, didn't get any kind of a straight answer to that one.

Lone_Wolfe
10-09-2012, 21:02
My MIL is on HRT...and so is my mom.

I'm a tetch young for that...and probably won't do it anyway. Too many crappy side effects, by my research.

@sawgrass - I understand that happens a lot. And I hope it doesn't happen to me, because Mr. GKL doesn't handle stuff like this very well. We had a foot cancer (yes, really!) scare and he almost had a nervous breakdown thinking I was going to die on him.

@Lone - and then...bolt ons? Expanders? Or....?

Trying to get bolt-ons done on the table. Don't know if I'm going to be able to coordinate that, though.

Glock&KimberLady
10-11-2012, 21:03
If they are doing mastectomy, don't they usually have to let scars heal up and then use expanders? Feel free to PM if this is too public. :hugs:

Lone_Wolfe
10-11-2012, 21:08
If they are doing mastectomy, don't they usually have to let scars heal up and then use expanders? Feel free to PM if this is too public. :hugs:

If they do reconstruction at the same time, the surgeon can leave some skin behind for the plastic surgeon to work with. The will take the nipples off, though.

jerryd
10-12-2012, 09:54
The surgeon my wife went to makes nipples from skin taken off the rump then grafts it to the breast. Then the tatoo artist colors it in and believe me its hard to tell the difference. Unbelieveable what they can do.

Irish Stout
10-13-2012, 11:56
I install and service Mammography equipment. I'm a guy, but saw the thread title and thought I may be able to offer some info.

New digital Mammo systems are very good at imaging the tiniest of calcifications. Implants are not a problem. Your imaging tech should ask about them, if not be sure to mention it. There are specific techniques for implants. The implants will be clearly visible on the image.

I also service Radiation Therapy equipment so I may be able to answer questions about that.

Hope your MIL is doing well.

onalandline
10-13-2012, 12:32
My MIL had breast cancer. Not sure what stage she was, but she had a mastectomy, chemo and radiation. She is a 20 year survivor so far. My FIL had bladder cancer, and is a 27 year survivor so far. Unfortunately, my SIL, their daughter, died at the age of 33 from IBC (Inflammatory Breast Cancer). It is fairly rare, but may be the most aggressive form of breast cancer. Needless to say, my wife has had concerns over the last several years. She has had mammograms starting around 30-ish. She is 42 now. I am concerned thought about the cumulative effects of the radiation/compression associated with mammograms. With her family history, she should be getting ultrasounds as a safer alternative, I believe. Recent studies have shown a possible link between mammography and breast cancer. It kinda scares me to think that what you are doing to help yourself, may be harmful. Here is a link to a doctor's article about using thermography as a screening tool. I have to ask my wife's doctor about this.

Just FYI (I have no affiliation with this): http://naturalhealthcenter.mercola.com/services/Thermography.aspx

Lone_Wolfe
10-13-2012, 23:55
My MIL had breast cancer. Not sure what stage she was, but she had a mastectomy, chemo and radiation. She is a 20 year survivor so far. My FIL had bladder cancer, and is a 27 year survivor so far. Unfortunately, my SIL, their daughter, died at the age of 33 from IBC (Inflammatory Breast Cancer). It is fairly rare, but may be the most aggressive form of breast cancer. Needless to say, my wife has had concerns over the last several years. She has had mammograms starting around 30-ish. She is 42 now. I am concerned thought about the cumulative effects of the radiation/compression associated with mammograms. With her family history, she should be getting ultrasounds as a safer alternative, I believe. Recent studies have shown a possible link between mammography and breast cancer. It kinda scares me to think that what you are doing to help yourself, may be harmful. Here is a link to a doctor's article about using thermography as a screening tool. I have to ask my wife's doctor about this.

Just FYI (I have no affiliation with this): http://naturalhealthcenter.mercola.com/services/Thermography.aspx

IBC IS the most aggessive form of breast cancer, even more aggressive than what I have. May your SIL rest in peace. :angel:

Please tell your wife to inquire about the BRAC analysis. that's a test to determine if she's genetically pre-dosposed to breast cancer. If she is, that's something your doc needs to know.

Glock&KimberLady
10-14-2012, 12:28
I agree with the gene test, althought it's BRC-A (I just read an article, ain't I smart?)

Mammo is Friday, receptionist said at least 50% of the women that come in have implants (!) so no worries there.

The bummer about breast cancer is that it's kne of those things that many people don't catch until it's still late. I like my jubblies, but I don't wanna die for them!

Lone_Wolfe
10-14-2012, 13:24
I agree with the gene test, althought it's BRC-A (I just read an article, ain't I smart?)

Mammo is Friday, receptionist said at least 50% of the women that come in have implants (!) so no worries there.

The bummer about breast cancer is that it's kne of those things that many people don't catch until it's still late. I like my jubblies, but I don't wanna die for them!

I've had the test, you'd think I'd know how to spell it! :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

Hope your mammo come out good. :wavey:

Irish Stout
10-14-2012, 17:04
FYI, ultrasound is not the most accurate method for screening. Standard mammography still offers the best imaging. MRI is possible too. The dose given during an exam is not that much. Do a search and begin to compare radiation exposure between xray, ct, mammo, sun exposure, etc.

jpa
10-23-2012, 20:48
Mammo is Friday, receptionist said at least 50% of the women that come in have implants (!) so no worries there.


That's because all the patients have moved there from California! :tongueout:

onalandline
10-23-2012, 21:22
If someone is positive for the BRCA1 gene, what can be done? It may label you as high risk, and have insurance issues.

Lone_Wolfe
10-24-2012, 00:04
If someone is positive for the BRCA1 gene, what can be done? It may label you as high risk, and have insurance issues.

You can get a mastectomy and reconstruction as a preventative.

onalandline
10-24-2012, 04:53
You can get a mastectomy and reconstruction as a preventative.

That seems a little extreme. I don't know.

Lone_Wolfe
10-24-2012, 22:13
That seems a little extreme. I don't know.

You asked what can be done, and that's the most effective prevention. the other options is to get more thorough screening frequently. Such as both a mammogram and MRI regularly.

onalandline
10-27-2012, 14:42
You asked what can be done, and that's the most effective prevention. the other options is to get more thorough screening frequently. Such as both a mammogram and MRI regularly.

Easier said than done for most women I suppose. Could you imagine if you had a penial cancer gene, and the most effective method of prevention was removal? Holy crap!

Lone_Wolfe
10-27-2012, 14:51
Easier said than done for most women I suppose. Could you imagine if you had a penial cancer gene, and the most effective method of prevention was removal? Holy crap!

Oh, that would be bad! :rofl: :rofl:

Yeah, easier said than done, for sure. But if the alternative is having a 70% chance of getting breast cancer in your life, it may become a little easier.