Breaking in a New Rifle [Archive] - Glock Talk

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MississipVol
09-28-2012, 22:07
I will be shooting my Colt LE6920 for the first time in the morning. I have heard all kinds of things about how to break in a new rifle including pouring motor oil down the barrel, or cleaning the rifle after each shot for the first several rounds, to just going out and shooting it.

I cleaned and lubed the gun last night. How do you guys break in a new rifle?

TIA

glock_19guy1983
09-28-2012, 22:10
just shoot it. Clean it when it gets dirty.

WoodenPlank
09-28-2012, 22:15
Give it a half decent cleaning to get the preservatives out of the BCG and bore first. Lube with a quality lube (SLiP 2000 has been fantastic for me), shoot the crap out of it, and clean it when you get tired of looking at the filth.

WayaX
09-28-2012, 22:22
"Clean after every shot" break-ins only affect match grade barrels without a chrome lining. As said before, wipe the factory goo out of it (my Colt was covered in it), lube what needs to be lubed, and shoot it.

Hour13
09-28-2012, 22:34
Clean it, lube it, load it, shoot it.

:supergrin:

JW1178
09-28-2012, 22:37
I would give it a good cleaning to get all the residues from manufacturing and the preservatives from being shipped and stored. Lube it real good, maybe a bit more than you really need to so the metal parts that slide together will rub/slide and not grind their wear pattern in. Clean well after use.

The precision of how these weapons are made, they really don't require a "break in" period.

MississipVol
09-28-2012, 22:41
What parts would you guys normally lube on a Colt?

I cleaned it real well, getting all the "goo" out and lubed the bolt carrier, bolt itself, charging handle, and the chamber all with a thin layer of gun oil. (Used Hoppes elite - its all I had.) I also put a few extra drops on the little rings on the bolt and the springs in the lower. I put no oil in the barrel at all.

Anything I miss?

ArmoryDoc
09-28-2012, 23:19
Yes, you missed "reading the manual". It will help. In addition, get rid of the Hoppes. On that gun, use Mobile 1 30W or similar.

MississipVol
09-28-2012, 23:25
Yes, you missed "reading the manual". It will help. In addition, get rid of the Hoppes. On that gun, use Mobile 1 30W or similar.

Really poor instructions in the manual about where to lube/oil the rifle.

That's why I was asking.

Cole125
09-28-2012, 23:56
What parts would you guys normally lube on a Colt?

When I break in a new AR I run it wet. Cover the BCG in CLP or whatever gun oil you use, and shoot the hell out of it.

Clean it well, and oil it lighter, and you should be good to go.

catalyst686
09-29-2012, 00:40
Pour motor oil down the barrel? right....

MrMurphy
09-29-2012, 03:56
CLP or Slip 2000.

Strip it down.

Wipe out any gunk.

Disassemble BCG, un-gunk. Reassemble. Some lube on the bolt head, bottom/top of the BCG and maybe the cam pin. Reassemble rifle. Work the action 3-4 times. Drop 2 drops of lube into the holes on the side of the BCG visible through the ejection port. Work action again. You're in business.

eracer
09-29-2012, 04:51
Breaking in a barrel should only be considered if you have an expensive match barrel.

Chrome-lined barrels (like found on the 6920) do not benefit.

faawrenchbndr
09-29-2012, 04:58
What parts would you guys normally lube on a Colt?



AR15 lube points........

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_3_7/548967_AR15_LUBE_POINTS.html

JBnTX
09-29-2012, 05:05
Pour motor oil down the barrel? right....


I use EVOO olive oil.
Makes the bullets taste better.

:rofl:

..

faawrenchbndr
09-29-2012, 05:19
I use EVOO olive oil.
Makes the bullets taste better.

:rofl:

..

:rofl:

I HAVE used butter flavor Crisco to lube muzzle loaded patches.
Wonder if it would work on the AR?

Hour13
09-29-2012, 06:01
I use EVOO olive oil.
Makes the bullets taste better.

:rofl:

..

:animlol:

Epic.


..

mjkeat
09-29-2012, 06:59
Since we're being serious I'll share. I use the blood of anti 2A liberals and the semen of war gods. Just apply once, I'd wear gloves who knows what types of deseases are floating around in the lib DNA. No need to even clean.

Big Bird
09-29-2012, 07:02
Shoot it until it starts to jam. Since its a Colt that should be in the first couple of magazines... :) Then clean it and repeat.

WoodenPlank
09-29-2012, 07:08
"Clean after every shot" break-ins only affect match grade barrels without a chrome lining. As said before, wipe the factory goo out of it (my Colt was covered in it), lube what needs to be lubed, and shoot it.

Barrel break in is bunk (http://www.6mmbr.com/gailmcmbreakin.html), and always has been - even for match barrels. The only thing it helps is fatten the barrel makers wallet.

What parts would you guys normally lube on a Colt?

Anything I miss?

CLP or Slip 2000.

Strip it down.

Wipe out any gunk.

Disassemble BCG, un-gunk. Reassemble. Some lube on the bolt head, bottom/top of the BCG and maybe the cam pin. Reassemble rifle. Work the action 3-4 times. Drop 2 drops of lube into the holes on the side of the BCG visible through the ejection port. Work action again. You're in business.

Ding ding ding. I usually wipe down all the surfaces with SLiP 2000 when I field strip the bolt. The rest of the time, all I do is hit the cam pin, the gas rings (pull back the bolt about an inch, and you'll see the shiny steel gas rings through the two forward witness holes in the carrier), and the rear witness hole (dribbles down to bolt tail and/or firing pin, I believe) with 2 drops of oil each. Keeping the gas rings wet is the key, though.

pag23
09-29-2012, 07:56
I followed the advice of Mr Murphy, Plank, Surf, FAA, Ai, and others when I read this forum in regards to clean and maintaining and I have had no issues at all.

WayaX
09-29-2012, 08:14
Barrel break in is bunk (http://www.6mmbr.com/gailmcmbreakin.html), and always has been - even for match barrels. The only thing it helps is fatten the barrel makers wallet.

That link gives a 100 round break-in. That's insane. Whenever I've done it. I follow Krieger's M14 barrel break-in, which is at most 20 rounds. It also gives the physical reason that McMillan says he has never heard. This isn't a slight against Gale, as he does wonderful work with his stocks.

Leigh
09-29-2012, 08:40
...and the semen of war gods. ....

How do you manage to get the.....never mind.:rofl:

Airhasz
09-29-2012, 08:55
How do you manage to get the.....never mind.:rofl:

I can just picture it...:rofl:

GT CLASSIC!!! :rofl::rofl::rofl:

Roger1079
09-29-2012, 16:10
I have heard all kinds of things about how to break in a new rifle including pouring motor oil down the barrel, or cleaning the rifle after each shot for the first several rounds, to just going out and shooting it.
Motor oil down the barrel? Umm.....:rofl:

My break in on my rifles has always been clean, lube, and shoot. Repeat when dirty.

fuzzy03cls
09-29-2012, 16:25
The only thing I do is run hot 5.56 ammo only for 500 rounds. Then I switch to cheap steel case .223. Using full power ammo gets all the parts & chamber worn in. Less of a chance of failure with steel case IMHO.

TangoFoxtrot
09-30-2012, 05:12
Check it , clean it, lube it, check it again, shoot it and clean it whether you fire 1 or 500 rounds. Like your life depends on it, because someday it just may.

MajorD
09-30-2012, 09:51
lube in the area where the barrel extension is locked by the bolt lugs is ok- but no oil in the chamber itself. chamber itself should be dry.

mjkeat
09-30-2012, 09:52
If someone was to take a new AR out of the box, randomly dump lube in it, transfer it to a soft case, through it in the trunk, drive to the range, run a couple/few hundred rounds of steel case through it as fast and hard as possible, drive home and throw it in the safe, would that be wrong? Would it cause some sort of damage or make that AR somehow less reliabale?

Airhasz
09-30-2012, 10:26
If someone was to take a new AR out of the box, randomly dump lube in it, transfer it to a soft case, through it in the trunk, drive to the range, run a couple/few hundred rounds of steel case through it as fast and hard as possible, drive home and throw it in the safe, would that be wrong? Would it cause some sort of damage or make that AR somehow less reliabale?

:rofl::rofl::rofl:

mjkeat
09-30-2012, 13:50
:rofl::rofl::rofl:

Any sort of worthwhile feedback or just another worthless reply? Will the scenario I mentioned cause any ill side effects?

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

pag23
09-30-2012, 18:40
here we go again....

mjkeat
09-30-2012, 18:45
Is it not a legitimate question?

pag23
09-30-2012, 18:50
It is, but sometimes this back & forth, although amusing, can take away from the post.

Walk Soft
09-30-2012, 19:07
If someone was to take a new AR out of the box, randomly dump lube in it, transfer it to a soft case, through it in the trunk, drive to the range, run a couple/few hundred rounds of steel case through it as fast and hard as possible, drive home and throw it in the safe, would that be wrong? Would it cause some sort of damage or make that AR somehow less reliabale?

I hope not because that's pretty much how I broke in my LE6920,minus the "randomly dumping lube" part.

mjkeat
09-30-2012, 19:21
It is, but sometimes this back & forth, although amusing, can take away from the post.

The issue is people claim something is wrong/right but refuse to back it w/ anything solid. Then they resort to name calling when people disprove, w/ fact/ hands on experience, what they are claiming.

I hope not because that's pretty much how I broke in my LE6920,minus the "randomly dumping lube" part.

I do it as well and have yet to notice any difference or problems.

fuzzy03cls
10-01-2012, 07:16
Any sort of worthwhile feedback or just another worthless reply? Will the scenario I mentioned cause any ill side effects?

Oh your serious? I think most of us thought you were not...... Then no it won't break anything. Although you may have some function problems with the steel case brand new.

Hour13
10-01-2012, 07:26
It is, but sometimes this back & forth, although amusing, can take away from the post.

Lol, sometimes?

Mayhem like Me
10-01-2012, 08:19
Any sort of worthwhile feedback or just another worthless reply? Will the scenario I mentioned cause any ill side effects?

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

No..

Cleaning the bolt tail and chamber will be harder in my personal experience when the crap is left to harden and cure...

mjkeat
10-01-2012, 09:32
I seriously wanted Airhasz to answer my question.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

catalyst686
10-01-2012, 17:45
I use EVOO olive oil.
Makes the bullets taste better.

:rofl:

..


HAHAHA, that's great!

rockapede
10-01-2012, 18:56
If someone was to take a new AR out of the box, randomly dump lube in it, transfer it to a soft case, through it in the trunk, drive to the range, run a couple/few hundred rounds of steel case through it as fast and hard as possible, drive home and throw it in the safe, would that be wrong? Would it cause some sort of damage or make that AR somehow less reliabale?

With a quality gun like a 6920 it wouldn't hurt a thing. Inspect it, wet down the bcg, and shoot the heck out of it. If it doesn't run right within a 30 round mag, it doesn't need broken in: there's something wrong, either with the gun or a mismatch of ammo/parts (light loads with too much buffer etc).

michael_b
10-01-2012, 21:41
I followed the advice of Mr Murphy, Plank, Surf, FAA, Ai, and others when I read this forum in regards to clean and maintaining and I have had no issues at all.

I second that. I followed their advice and my AR functioned flawlessly.

Go easy on the Slip EWL, a little goes a long way. That stuff is impressive.


Posted from my iPhone

windflags
10-01-2012, 23:33
2 or 3 wet patches, if you see copper then scrub it out, some barrels never stop fouling, the faster the bullet the more copper you will see. Most benchrest shooters break in new barrels, it takes a 1/2 day...

rockapede
10-02-2012, 06:09
2 or 3 wet patches, if you see copper then scrub it out, some barrels never stop fouling, the faster the bullet the more copper you will see. Most benchrest shooters break in new barrels, it takes a 1/2 day...

This is completely unnecessary on an AR, IMO.

WoodenPlank
10-02-2012, 11:25
2 or 3 wet patches, if you see copper then scrub it out, some barrels never stop fouling, the faster the bullet the more copper you will see. Most benchrest shooters break in new barrels, it takes a 1/2 day...

If it's taking you half a day to break in a new barrel, you're doing it wrong.

mjkeat
10-02-2012, 13:13
Some might say if you're taking any time to break in a barrel you're doing it wrong.

Has anyone come across any "scientific" data covering the break-in process and over cleaning of ARs?

eracer
10-03-2012, 05:57
Barrel break in is bunk (http://www.6mmbr.com/gailmcmbreakin.html), and always has been - even for match barrels. The only thing it helps is fatten the barrel makers wallet.I love it when the people who make match barrels (you know, the one's like Bartlein and Krieger who advocate barrel break-in?) are called self-serving idiots by some guy on the internet.

How exactly does breaking in a barrel increase their revenue?

:rofl:

Mayhem like Me
10-03-2012, 06:43
I love it when the people who make match barrels (you know, the one's like Bartlein and Krieger who advocate barrel break-in?) are called self-serving idiots by some guy on the internet.

How exactly does breaking in a barrel increase their revenue?

:rofl:

Match barrels have a finite number of rounds before they lose match tolerances. There is no real reason to break in a match barrel they have been hand lapped. More detrimental to accuracy is poor cleaning or cleaning with the wrong products.

Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

eracer
10-03-2012, 06:56
Match barrels have a finite number of rounds before they lose match tolerances.True. But a proper break-in of a quality match barrel should take no more than 10-20 rounds.

There is no real reason to break in a match barrel they have been hand lapped.You contradict what some well-regarded barrel manufacturers suggest. Are you a well-regarded barrel manufacturer?

More detrimental to accuracy is poor cleaning or cleaning with the wrong products.No argument there. But that does not negate the benefits of proper break-in, like increased match accuracy, which is course the reason for buying a match barrel in the first place.

Mayhem like Me
10-03-2012, 07:07
As a young man I had an apprentice with a match barrel maker.
Not going to speak for him or his family but you will find no correlation between the 15 to 20 rounds of breakin you claim and better grouping or longevity. Nor will you have a less capable barrel if you do not follow a strict break in procedure.
I am open for any evidence you may have to the contrary.

Here is another well respected opinion.

http://www.6mmbr.com/GailMcMbreakin.html
Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 11:18
Lube the gun GI style:

A. Get a spray bottle and load it up with Break-Free CLP.

B. Spray liberally through the ejection port and the mag well.

C. Spray liberally down the bore.

If the weapon were to malfunction, then repeat Steps A through C. Then call armorer.

mjkeat
10-03-2012, 11:32
One of my professors, a highly educated man w/ tenure, says Obama is good for our nation. Because he says so does that make it so?

mjkeat
10-03-2012, 11:35
Lube the gun GI style:

A. Get a spray bottle and load it up with Break-Free CLP.

B. Spray liberally through the ejection port and the mag well.

C. Spray liberally down the bore.

If the weapon were to malfunction, then repeat Steps A through C. Then call armorer.

Never heard of that being done. In fact a spray bottle would be a horrible idea. The lube would seep out and cover everything. I would hate to spend a week or more in the field w/ CLP covering everytihng I need to survive. CLP covered gummie bears do not sound appetizing.

bmoore
10-03-2012, 11:39
I put barrel break in right along side "you just have to rack a pump shotgun and people will vanish".

mjkeat
10-03-2012, 11:55
I put barrel break in right along side "you just have to rack a pump shotgun and people will vanish".

LOL I love this one as well. In my opinion if I were a "bad guy" the racking of a pump by the "good guy" would give me a tactical advantage. Now I know where you are and you don't know where I am. I win.

Same goes w/ lasers IMO.

cciman
10-03-2012, 18:37
For an off the shelf combat weapon, forget the religious ritual.

There is no good scientific testing of what good break in truly is, or (if done correctly) how to measure the result. If and when a barrel does not live up to x-expectation- the explanation therefore is; IMPROPER break in. If anyone has well conducted scientific study that proves squat- present it here.

Most will tell you what they learned/heard from others and repeat as dogma. Certainly one can temperature treat the barrel without ever firing it (either with cryo or heating, even chrome lining or nitriding will also heat the barrel beyond what you recreationally will do), but again, how to measure the result while controlling all the other variables?

Go to the range and shoot the 100-800 rounds at semi auto speeds, with occasional walks to hang new targets, it will then be broken in. Do not use steel cleaning rods, and clean from the breech. When the barrel wears out after you first blow your family budget on ammo, then buy a cheap (in ammo terms) replacement barrel.

Mayhem like Me
10-03-2012, 18:48
The thinking, is that the chamber reaming leaves small jagged edges like teeth at the edge of the chamber into the rifling these teeth strip copper from jackets that vaporizes and deposits on the barrel. The teeth are worn away with 5-20 rounds, the extra copper fouling is supposedly why you should clean after each round..

a good cleaning with a good copper solvent is really all you need, if the break in procedure makes sense , use it...on a super grade match barrel, not an AR15 with a CL barrel.

Powder
10-03-2012, 19:47
LOL I love this one as well. In my opinion if I were a "bad guy" the racking of a pump by the "good guy" would give me a tactical advantage. Now I know where you are and you don't know where I am. I win.

Same goes w/ lasers IMO.

Yeah, but are you really gonna go down that dark hallway knowing somebody with a locked and loaded shotgun is waiting down there.......

rockapede
10-03-2012, 19:56
Yeah, but are you really gonna go down that dark hallway knowing somebody with a locked and loaded shotgun is waiting down there.......

I wouldn't assume the person breaking into my house was rational.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 20:02
Never heard of that being done. In fact a spray bottle would be a horrible idea. The lube would seep out and cover everything. I would hate to spend a week or more in the field w/ CLP covering everytihng I need to survive. CLP covered gummie bears do not sound appetizing.

It was a joke.

mjkeat
10-03-2012, 20:24
Yeah, but are you really gonna go down that dark hallway knowing somebody with a locked and loaded shotgun is waiting down there.......

I sure as **** would if I needed down that hallway in order to complete my task. And I'm not even high on meth or some other sort of courage increasing drugs. Ask how I can be so sure.

It was a joke.

Hard to tell w/ you sometimes, fnfalman :embarassed:

fnfalman
10-04-2012, 14:42
Hard to tell w/ you sometimes, fnfalman :embarassed:

Or at least a half-truth.

I've seen range masters and NCOs walking around with Break-Free spray bottles to correct malfunctions plenty of times.

smokin762
10-04-2012, 15:28
I treat all my firearms the same. Before I shoot it, I take it apart and inspect it. Then I clean everything and then I oil it. I take it to the range and start checking what ammunition it like the best.

I donít think a break in period for modern firearms is needed. I think itís just a thing of the past.

Toby196
10-05-2012, 22:13
Or at least a half-truth.

I've seen range masters and NCOs walking around with Break-Free spray bottles to correct malfunctions plenty of times.No doubt. During all of our trips to the range during Basic, each of the Drill Sergeants/Range Officers had a giant spray bottle of CLP to "solve" any reliability issues. All of the "troubled" rifles were absolutely drenched with lube, to the point where the CLP was literally dripping from the receiver. Then again, we were using ~40 year old, Vietnam-era, M16's (most were A1's converted to A2's).

Ah, the joys of OSUT at Fort Lost in the Woods. :sigh: