lets talk motorcycles [Archive] - Glock Talk

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dabigguns357
09-30-2012, 21:24
My wife and I have been talking about buying 2 motorcycles,one for each one of us.I have mine picked out but i haven't got a clue about hers.

I've owned 2 in the past but she has never been on one.So how do I go about getting her in some classes or something to help her get road ready(we have till spring).

A friend has a 2009 Honda rebel 250 for sale like the one in the pic.My question is this,wouldn't something this little be a bit small for highway or just right for her and her small size.

Any advice would be great before I spend 2,000 on a bike she may or may not be able to handle.

http://i427.photobucket.com/albums/pp354/dabigguns357/99130945_4thumb_550x410.jpg
http://i427.photobucket.com/albums/pp354/dabigguns357/99130945_2thumb_550x410.jpg

Glock&KimberLady
09-30-2012, 21:31
A start for classes...

http://www.learn2ride.com/

And/or

http://www.dmv.state.va.us/webdoc/citizen/drivers/m_course.asp

Can't help you with selection as I'm a dirtbike rider. I can say that weight (and shifting it back and forth, especially when stopped) along with height are important to us wimmins. I had far less trouble moving around my 230 than my 250...and thought I'd have heart failure every time I stopped on a 650 dual sport and had to sidesaddle the bike just to keep from dropping it. :alex:

dabigguns357
09-30-2012, 21:39
A start for classes...

http://www.learn2ride.com/

And/or

http://www.dmv.state.va.us/webdoc/citizen/drivers/m_course.asp

Can't help you with selection as I'm a dirtbike rider. I can say that weight (and shifting it back and forth, especially when stopped) along with height are important to us wimmins. I had far less trouble moving around my 230 than my 250...and thought I'd have heart failure every time I stopped on a 650 dual sport and had to sidesaddle the bike just to keep from dropping it. :alex:

Good reading for her.

So how hard would it be for someone like her to learn,at age 37 she hasn't ever been on one.

I don't know who is going to need more of a nerve pill,her or I:wow:

Jim B in CO
09-30-2012, 21:55
...she has never been on one.So how do I go about getting her in some classes or something to help her get road ready...
Get her a dirt bike and have her learn to ride on that before she ever ventures out on the street.

Happypuppy
09-30-2012, 22:06
Start small there is a huge market for small used bikes and they are easy to sell. Too big of a bike scares new riders and are really heavy for them to get started in.


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gumpmonkey
09-30-2012, 22:15
The old rule of thumb in the 70's was don't ride anything so heavy you can't pick it up by yourself. - Jp

rayetter
09-30-2012, 22:17
A motorcycle safety course will provide a bike and instruction. They start out very slow, and they are patient and helpful folks. I bought my wife a 250 virago after she completed her course. She wanted a bigger bike in less than two months. Best bet is the course, if she decides it isnt for her, then you arent out 2 grand and a bike you wont ride. hope this helps. Keep the shiny side up.

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cdog533
09-30-2012, 22:20
Yeah, have her take a local MSF class and then get her something a little bigger, like a 500 or a 600.

Jim B in CO
09-30-2012, 22:20
The old rule of thumb in the 70's was don't ride anything so heavy you can't pick it up by yourself. - Jp
I think that's still a good idea in 2012. :cool:

Halojumper
09-30-2012, 22:24
The old rule of thumb in the 70's was don't ride anything so heavy you can't pick it up by yourself. - Jp

Even a small girl can "pick up" a full dress Harley.

Hint: it's in the technique, not the strength.

LippCJ7
09-30-2012, 22:26
The 250 rebel is a great entry level bike, you may even find the learn to ride classes I hope you enter your wife in use the rebels or something very close to it, its perfect for small framed people up to a 5'5" or so. They are very forgiving and dependable, when she is ready to upgrade sell it for what you have in it kind of bike, and that is what I think is exactly what will happen, she will want to upgrade.

I can't say I agree with getting her a dirt bike, for a guy sure but not for a woman who will most likely go into oncoming traffic before she willingly tackles dirt on or off the road.

Any learn to ride class with driving as well as classroom should be in order, ABATE and MSF courses are available all over, I would recommend you take it as well if you have not yet as it will most likely decrease your insurance premium.

Be prepared that she may not like riding her own bike though, I wanted my wife to have her own since I am a little more aggressive rider and I get tired of her screaming to SLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOWWWWW DOOOOOOOOOWWWWNNNNN, but it was of no use, now she only whines when I drag the floorboards...

I mean seriously my wife is a better passenger on the R1, I think because she is scared to the point of being breathless....

http://www.transportation.wv.gov/communications/Governors-Highway-Safety-Program/Pages/MotorcycleSafety.aspx

another link that may help.

Good luck!

Javelin
09-30-2012, 22:29
I wouldn't get a Rebel. You will outgrow that bike before you make the first payment.

Trapped_in_Kali
09-30-2012, 22:40
Have her do the MSF course (or what ever the equivalent is in WV). In most states when you pass that you only need to do the written part of the test to get your motorcycle license.
Once she has passed that and gotten her license go to various dealers and have her find which models she is comfortable on (seat height etc). The International Motorcycle show season is starting in a month (I don't know how close to you they will be) and is a great place to sit on lots of bikes and they have test rides for licensed riders.

costanza187
09-30-2012, 22:48
In the 250 cruisers race, you might consider the Yamaha V-Star 250. They look a lot better than the Rebels.

Yes I owned one of those myself.:embarassed: I rode it around for a while, and just decided I'd rather have a car.

250's are not as easy to sell as you might think (around here at least). I thought I got it for a sweet deal, it was below book. It was a 2008 in 2010 with I am thinking about 4k miles. I paid $2100 for it. I ended up selling it for that exact same price (and felt LUCKY to get it). I think the book value was up around $2500. It took me about 4 months to sell it, I first listed it at $2400, and not so much as an inquiry, I dropped it down to $2100 and it sold. I have seen similar bikes on craigslist... and still there a year later. Maybe the market for motorcycles is pretty bleak in general, so it might not be limited to the 250s.

dabigguns357
09-30-2012, 22:48
I wouldn't get a Rebel. You will outgrow that bike before you make the first payment.

I would buy used, the same way I buy cars, cash rules. That's why I was talking to a friend who wants to sell his for 2,000.00.

For now I'm going to get in some classes and see how she likes it first

costanza187
09-30-2012, 22:53
Also...if you are wanting the Rebel, there is a good forum.

http://www.hondarebelforum.com

The people there are very nice, helpful and friendly. Definitely a good resource if you have a Rebel, or entertaining the idea of getting one.

SMOKEin
09-30-2012, 22:55
The best bike for her will be cheap, used, light and 250-500cc's. Highway speed shouldn't be a concern, she should spend plenty of time on back country roads before even hitting the highway.

Annhl8rX
09-30-2012, 23:01
Like many have said...have her take a class. That will determine whether or not she's really interested in riding. If she is, get her something like a used Ninja 500 ( if she's interested in the sporty side), or a Suzuki Savage 650 ( if she's cruiser bound). I'd skip the 250s. There are larger displacement bikes that weigh only negligibly more that will be satisfying for much longer.

sappy13
09-30-2012, 23:03
Have her take the msf course and see how she does/how she likes it. They will use 250 rebels and possibly a 500 cc. Once she has taken the final for her license, see if they will let her take it on the road for a minute to see how it is. I'd suggest a 500 cc to start on. I had a Suzuki gs500 and it was a great first bike. Plus those bikes are cheap and easy to resell for what you paid. I actually sold mine for 500.more.than I originally paid. I had a couple.hundred in tires and other stuff, so it was close enough to a wash.

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dabigguns357
09-30-2012, 23:14
Safety course first, no question there and yes I would go just to brush up.

Sounds weird but I never got rid of my motorcycle license, even though I haven't ridden in years. I guess motorcycles are like guns, ya just gotta let see and feel for them selves

GVFlyer
10-01-2012, 04:56
MSF Course is a great idea, not just for the obvious reasons. I dropped by a course in my area to see one of the instructors new Harley. While I was there, a girl taking the course decided that this riding a motorcycle stuff just wasn't for her and walked over to her car, threw her helmet in the back and drove off.

Geeorge
10-01-2012, 05:31
Even a small girl can "pick up" a full dress Harley.

Hint: it's in the technique, not the strength.

:upeyes:

Mrs.Cicero
10-01-2012, 06:26
Check your local community college for courses (that's where they're offered around here).

Mr.C started with a Virago, with the idea that it was low enough that I could put both feet down flat without a problem (at 5'3" there were a number of bikes I couldn't do that on), and he would trade up and give me that one when he wants to move up. I'm good with that.

And contrary to a few other posts, I would actually prefer to start with a dirt bike, because I could use it all over the property we live on. Also, my daughters both want one. I'd let them take the dirt bike around here before I'd let them anywhere near the highway on a motorcycle. I'm happy on the backroads tooling along at 55, but 70 mph down the interstate doesn't thrill me. Too many looney and distracted drivers, and too much wind. Call me chicken if you want. I'd rather take a horse over a picnic table than a bike down the interstate. it just means we have to take the scenic route to anywhere.

Sharkey
10-01-2012, 08:09
Have her take the MSF class as others have said. If you haven't been, it might be a good idea to go too.

As for what cycle, let her decide for herself what she likes.

ron59
10-01-2012, 09:03
I am 6' tall and started out on a Yamaha 250 street bike 30 years ago. Yeah, I outgrew it quick and went to a 550 Seca, but I really think a woman should start on a small bike.

Buy a used one, let her learn, then sell it and buy her a larger one if she feels comfortable.

You said "Highway use", but I wouldn't have her on an interstate on it. In fact, I'd stick to backstreets with 45MPH limit as much as possible, or country roads with less traffic.

I learned in a parking lot.

If she's never ridden a bicycle with front/rear brakes... she has a lot to learn. Learning how to manipulate those is the hardest part of being safe.

John Rambo
10-01-2012, 09:12
$2000 for a 250? Nah, I wouldn't do it. I spent 700 bucks on my first bike, it was a 750. But it was also really old. A 250 is a very slow and underpowered cruiser. Almost to the point of being dangerous. I'd get her something a little bigger. Great to take your riding test on but no good if you've got highway riding to do.

RC-RAMIE
10-01-2012, 09:30
Even a small girl can "pick up" a full dress Harley.

Hint: it's in the technique, not the strength.

:upeyes:

http://youtu.be/YDR856eBy1c

MSF class than a used Rebel is a great start into the world of motorcycling.

John43
10-01-2012, 09:32
250 is to small for the highway. Need to get up in the 500 class. MSf classes are good but may be too much for a new rider.

fnfalman
10-01-2012, 09:36
To belabor the obvious and to reinforce others have said:

A. Have her take a Motorcycle Safety Foundation Basic Rider course.

B. Start small, light AND well used/cheap.

C. Don't choose the bike for her, she'll know what she wants after the course.

D. Riding gear is your friend. It won't stop you from getting hurt but it will help quite a bit with the severity of the incurred injury.

fnfalman
10-01-2012, 09:37
$2000 for a 250? Nah, I wouldn't do it. I spent 700 bucks on my first bike, it was a 750. But it was also really old. A 250 is a very slow and underpowered cruiser. Almost to the point of being dangerous. I'd get her something a little bigger. Great to take your riding test on but no good if you've got highway riding to do.

Not every 250 is a "cruiser".

eaglefrq
10-01-2012, 09:39
Definitely buy a used one for her first bike. She will drop it, it is a simple fact. Most new riders wind up dropping their bikes while doing low speed maneuvering like tight turning in a parking lot. I've seen new riders (and experienced ones) drop their bikes at a stop sign because they forgot to put their feet down.

I would look at the 500cc bikes, because she will quickly outgrow the 250.

eaglefrq
10-01-2012, 09:41
C. Don't choose the bike for her, she'll know what she wants after the course.

D. Riding gear is your friend. It won't stop you from getting hurt but it will help quite a bit with the severity of the incurred injury.

I completely agree with these statements, especially D. I walked away from a 60mph lowside with only a small spot of road rash on my wrist where my jacket rode up slightly.

Jim B in CO
10-01-2012, 10:06
http://youtu.be/YDR856eBy1c
She looks like a grown woman, not a "small girl".

fnfalman
10-01-2012, 10:24
She looks like a grown woman, not a "small girl".

What about a lady of certain maturity?

http://www.ibmwr.org/otech/pickup4.jpg

RC-RAMIE
10-01-2012, 10:50
She looks like a grown woman, not a "small girl".

http://youtu.be/UZ6_2VqSHBw

http://youtu.be/I5k4Uj3YTnY

Small enough?

fnfalman
10-01-2012, 11:11
Small enough?

I'm willing to bet that those two skinny chicks are actually body building camouflaged to look female and dainty. :whistling:

It takes a real man to lift those big, heavy manly motorcycles. Techniques don't got nuthin' to do with it, it's all pure muscle strength...So them itty bitty wimmin need to stick to them itty bitty bikes and leave the big bikes to the real men.

Happypuppy
10-01-2012, 11:23
Lifting a bike on a flat surface is one thing, doing it in gravel, on a uneven roadside is another. Females in distress do have some advantages

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/12/10/02/utybajyd.jpg


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LAWDOGKMS
10-01-2012, 11:33
A Yamaha XT225 dualsport is what many MSF classes use for class-bikes.. They can be found cheap, have a low seat height, are not intimidating, and can be sold quickly when/if she outgrows it..

We did this a few years back...a DR350 for me, XT226 for her (both plated dualsports)..

She might have ridden with me 5-6 times in 3 years...always had an excuse why she didn't want to...I think she just wasn't that interested in riding..

Finally she told me: "I'd love to hop on the back of yours and go for a ride, but I just don't really have a whole lot of interest in driving myself..it's not really fun for me"..."

So....the idea of his/hers bikes didn't work for us...

As far as gear, get her a good fullface helmet (a flip up will help with claustrophobia if she doesn't like the full face confinement) and a very good biking jacket with armored elbows and back, and good gloves..

LAWDOGKMS
10-01-2012, 11:34
Lifting a bike on a flat surface is one thing, doing it in gravel, on a uneven roadside is another. Females in distress do have some advantages

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/12/10/02/utybajyd.jpg


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Is the blonde the deputy chick from longmire...?

Zukoda
10-01-2012, 11:45
Not to beat a horse to death - but a safety course is your best bet.

If that is not an option though, a big question is can she drive a manual transmission car? Knowing how a clutch and gear shift works will greatly aid in learning how to ride a motorcycle. Yes, there are some automatics out there, but not many and that would limit your choices, especially when looking at used bikes.

Zukoda

Happypuppy
10-01-2012, 11:46
Is the blonde the deputy chick from longmire...?

Yep. Both were on Battlestar Gallactica as well. They really do ride all over the place.


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Just_plinking
10-01-2012, 12:32
I vote for a ninja 250, old or new gen depending on how much you want to spend.

fnfalman
10-01-2012, 12:38
It just make things more difficult, but nothing changes.

BTW, those two chicks wouldn't need any help at all. Cylons are usually stronger than humans.

Lifting a bike on a flat surface is one thing, doing it in gravel, on a uneven roadside is another. Females in distress do have some advantages

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/12/10/02/utybajyd.jpg


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John Rambo
10-01-2012, 12:46
Is the blonde the deputy chick from longmire...?

Thats gender-bender Starbuck.

John Rambo
10-01-2012, 12:47
Not every 250 is a "cruiser".

Very true, but we're talking motorcycles in this thread, not plastic toys.

fnfalman
10-01-2012, 12:48
Very true, but we're talking motorcycles in this thread, not plastic toys.

Exactly. Cruisers aren't real motorcycles. That's why they're referred to as "scooters" regardless of engine displacement and weight.

John Rambo
10-01-2012, 12:56
Exactly. Cruisers aren't real motorcycles. That's why they're referred to as "scooters" regardless of engine displacement and weight.

Scooters are what fat chicks ride.

Halojumper
10-01-2012, 13:07
She looks like a grown woman, not a "small girl".

Look on the ride like a pro video. He uses a smaller woman to demonstrate it there.

fnfalman
10-01-2012, 14:12
Scooters are what fat chicks ride.

Scooters are what fat dudes in assless chaps ride as well.

ray9898
10-01-2012, 14:27
As above....a MSF course is a must but I don't think a rider with zero experience would do well. She will need something just to learn the controls so she will be comfortable before a class.

I know several guys who got their wives involved. The ones who succeeded picked up small 250's which helped build confidence while they learned the basics. Two still ride them this day, the rest sold them later on for pretty much what they had in them. I know two who started with a full size cruisers and neither took to it because they were never comfortable learning on a heavy bike.

Bren
10-01-2012, 15:05
My wife took the MSF basic class in 2008, never having ridden a motorcycle of any kind before. She got a Harley 883 Sportster and has been riding it ever since. Not difficult.

fnfalman
10-01-2012, 15:24
My wife took the MSF basic class in 2008, never having ridden a motorcycle of any kind before. She got a Harley 883 Sportster and has been riding it ever since. Not difficult.

The class is definitely not difficult, but it has enough technical difficulty to weed out those who can't throttle/clutch/brake/balance at the same time. Or at least give them a heads-up on their wants anyway.

Though chances are after failing the MSF course, they'd head down to the local joint and pick up an 800-lbs cruiser/175-HP Hayabusa anyway because those pricks in the class don't know that they are really mature and can really handle motorcycles, and the drills are stupid anyway.

sappy13
10-01-2012, 18:58
having her take a msf course also has another HUGE plus. You dont have to teach her on your bike or the one you buy for her. That 250 bucks for the class pays for it self with just that simple fact. They expect people to drop those bike and possibly have a small wreck, so if it happens it happens. And no tension between the 2 of you if she is having a hard time doing something you try to teach her since the instructors will be doing all that.

dabigguns357
10-01-2012, 20:38
having her take a msf course also has another HUGE plus. You dont have to teach her on your bike or the one you buy for her. That 250 bucks for the class pays for it self with just that simple fact. They expect people to drop those bike and possibly have a small wreck, so if it happens it happens. And no tension between the 2 of you if she is having a hard time doing something you try to teach her since the instructors will be doing all that.


Sounds like money well spent.

We don't have a lot of deallers around here and the one we went by wasn't terribly helpfull as all they had was high end dirtbikes and road kings,and no used ones.

I guess the season is kinda gone for the used ones,thats ok we still need safety courses and the spring time.

Jack23
10-01-2012, 20:53
In my nearly 40 years riding I've ridden with several groups that had some of the more petite ladies riding the Honda Rebels. They look great and perform great. They are great bikes. I never saw anyone have any problems.

eaglefrq
10-01-2012, 21:04
Sounds like money well spent.

We don't have a lot of deallers around here and the one we went by wasn't terribly helpfull as all they had was high end dirtbikes and road kings,and no used ones.

I guess the season is kinda gone for the used ones,thats ok we still need safety courses and the spring time.

Unfortunately, that is all to common. It seems like motorcycle dealerships are more than willing to sell the big heavy cruisers and sport bikes to brand new riders who obviously can't handle them.

On the flip side, I have seen (rarely) a salesman try and talk someone out of a certain bike and the person is adamant and won't accept the advice of the dealer.

If you know someone that is knowledgeable about bikes, I would check craigslist and have your friend go with you to look at them.

The Maggy
10-01-2012, 21:46
Start small and pass the MSF.

It doesn't matter if her feet can touch the ground, how loud the pipes are, how much the bike weighs, how much chrome is on the engine, ect...

What matters is the first time some one cuts her off in traffic or she gooses the throttle coming up to an intersection. Bigger bikes are going to be less tolerant of beginner mistakes. That rebel 250 may not be able to handle highway speeds (it tops out at 75-80) but if she freezes or freaks out, she's not going to be straddling a rocket ship.

1)Good training with practice after the course is over. The MSF gives you a ground level to build off of. They teach you the basics, the basics need to be practiced.

2)Good gear that you actually researched (not all gear is the same)

3)A well maintained bike that she can handle (both physically and mentally.)

GVFlyer
10-01-2012, 21:49
Unfortunately, that is all to common. It seems like motorcycle dealerships are more than willing to sell the big heavy cruisers and sport bikes to brand new riders who obviously can't handle them.

On the flip side, I have seen (rarely) a salesman try and talk someone out of a certain bike and the person is adamant and won't accept the advice of the dealer.

If you know someone that is knowledgeable about bikes, I would check craigslist and have your friend go with you to look at them.

It's always a balancing act - I sold motorcycles while I was in college and also rode them competitively during that period. I would always try to sell a person who was new to motorcycling as large a bike as I though they could handle, just so they wouldn't quickly outgrow a smaller motorcycle.

dabigguns357
10-01-2012, 21:58
Once we get the safeties out of the way and find her a comfortable bike,i have the perfect road to get her some experience on.


Rural route 2 that spans from Huntington Wv all the way up to Mason,WV,about 2 hours by car.

Farms on the right and Ohio river on the left as far as the eye can see with suprisingly little traffic.What i would call perfect for beginners including me,and it's only 2 miles from my house.

Halojumper
10-01-2012, 22:24
http://youtu.be/UZ6_2VqSHBw

http://youtu.be/I5k4Uj3YTnY

Small enough?

That's fake. No real Harley guy would let you lay his bike down on the chrome like that. Oh wait, it was a Sportster. Never mind!

fnfalman
10-01-2012, 22:24
Unfortunately, that is all to common. It seems like motorcycle dealerships are more than willing to sell the big heavy cruisers and sport bikes to brand new riders who obviously can't handle them.

They're there to sell things legally and not to be nursemaids.

On the flip side, I have seen (rarely) a salesman try and talk someone out of a certain bike and the person is adamant and won't accept the advice of the dealer.

The customer is always right, especially the ones that don't listen to advice.

HollowHead
10-01-2012, 22:28
Very true, but we're talking motorcycles in this thread, not plastic toys.

Now you've done it!!!

















<<Hyosung GT-250 whore...

fnfalman
10-01-2012, 22:42
<<Hyosung GT-250 whore...

You didn't even have the decency to go Japanese...:steamed:

HollowHead
10-01-2012, 22:46
You didn't even have the decency to go Japanese...:steamed:

Korea never bombed Pearl Harbor! HH

Halojumper
10-01-2012, 22:50
Korea never bombed Pearl Harbor! HH

Touché!

GVFlyer
10-02-2012, 00:49
Korea never bombed Pearl Harbor! HH

It was the Germans.

"Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?"

GVFlyer
10-02-2012, 01:00
You didn't even have the decency to go Japanese...:steamed:

I decided that it was time to get something that was made in America into my garage.

http://i444.photobucket.com/albums/qq166/GVFlyer/Harley-1.jpg?t=1347212938

What is that in your avatar and what advantages did it bring to the table to cause you to bring it home?

RHVEtte
10-02-2012, 01:18
having her take a msf course also has another HUGE plus. You dont have to teach her on your bike or the one you buy for her. That 250 bucks for the class pays for it self with just that simple fact. They expect people to drop those bike and possibly have a small wreck, so if it happens it happens. And no tension between the 2 of you if she is having a hard time doing something you try to teach her since the instructors will be doing all that.

Couple of things. First, definitely take a class. Especially because, at least here in IN, the ABATE course was only $75. Saved that much on two months of insurance payments, so just get it over with. Also, if you fail the ABATE course, you honestly shouldn't be allowed within 100 yds of a motorcycle. It was pretty much the absolute basics.

Second thing. Do not be afraid to spend money on gear once you've decided you want to get on the road. I bought an $80 Fulmer helmet for the ABATE course since you need one to take it and I wasn't sure I'd even like it, having never ridden a motorcycle before. Considering that I know we didn't break 30 and maybe didn't even break 20, I feel safe recommending an entry level helmet for that. But definitely go up a step or two before heading out on the road. The noise reduction and comfort are astounding. In the same vein, you can do the ABATE course with minimal gear. A light jacket, gloves, jeans, and boots are all you need; stuff you can probably scavenge from your existing wardrobe. NONE of that stuff is good enough for actual road use. Buy a good armored jacket, buy armored pants, buy better gloves and boots with proper support and protection.

Bren
10-02-2012, 05:42
Once we get the safeties out of the way and find her a comfortable bike,i have the perfect road to get her some experience on.


Rural route 2 that spans from Huntington Wv all the way up to Mason,WV,about 2 hours by car.

Farms on the right and Ohio river on the left as far as the eye can see with suprisingly little traffic.What i would call perfect for beginners including me,and it's only 2 miles from my house.

It better be a lot different than the other roads around there. Last year I volunteered to help out a JROTC competition south of Huntington and I probably averaged 25 MPH in my truck on those roads. Made "the Dragon" look like an expressway.

You might try taking MSF basic, then getting a bike, then taking MSF ERC (like basic, but on your own motorcycle). That's what my wife did. The ERC only cost us $25 for a 1-day class, all on the track.

dabigguns357
10-02-2012, 07:13
It better be a lot different than the other roads around there. Last year I volunteered to help out a JROTC competition south of Huntington and I probably averaged 25 MPH in my truck on those roads. Made "the Dragon" look like an expressway.

You might try taking MSF basic, then getting a bike, then taking MSF ERC (like basic, but on your own motorcycle). That's what my wiofe did. The ERC only cost us $25 for a 1-day class, all on the track.

We are getting some gear first, then I'm going to sign us both up for classes. We have decided to wait for springe to buy bikes

Clutch Cargo
10-02-2012, 07:19
It isn't about the engine size, rather it's about seat height. I learned to ride at age 10. When stopping, I had to lean the bike over very far just so I could put a foot down. Small women handle big bikes fine, they just can't hold them up if having to lean to put down a foot.

Eurodriver
10-02-2012, 07:24
I took the MSF course.

I have to say - I thought it was going to be extremely stupid (and the first 20 minutes or so on the track is. "Touch the horn button. Now press the horn for 2 seconds BEEEEEEP. Okay people, now that you've used the horn, touch the high beam switch etc etc"

But the 2nd half of day 1 and all of day 2 were great. The quick braking, swerving, etc. Its not an INCREDIBLE course, but its great with the fundamentals.

Now would be a good time of year to take it. I took it in early July. It was only about 95 but the humidity was over 90%...it jumped up to 100% when it rained but at least the temp dropped to 85. It felt great in jeans, a long sleeve shirt, gloves, full face helmet, boots, etc.

Halojumper
10-02-2012, 07:29
It isn't about the engine size, rather it's about seat height. I learned to ride at age 10. When stopping, I had to lean the bike over very far just so I could put a foot down.

LOL, I still have to do that! :)

fnfalman
10-02-2012, 08:52
Korea never bombed Pearl Harbor! HH

Yeah, but Pusan gave plenty of American sailors the clap.

fnfalman
10-02-2012, 08:55
We are getting some gear first, then I'm going to sign us both up for classes. We have decided to wait for springe to buy bikes

The MSF course usually lends out helmets as well as motorcycles. All you have to do is come with long sleeve shirt, some sort of gloves and boots.

Before you commit to buying gears and spending money, I'd suggest for the old lady to: a) pass the course first, and b) WANTS to ride.

fnfalman
10-02-2012, 08:58
I decided that it was time to get something that was made in America into my garage.
What is that in your avatar and what advantages did it bring to the table to cause you to bring it home?

First of all, it's a joke between me and HollowHead.

Secondly, the thing in my avatar is the Aprilia SR50 Factory - 50-cc of killer two-strokes racing scooter. The advantages did it bring to the tables are: a) it's an Aprilia, b) it's a scooter, c) it's a cool scooter that can take some mean corners, d) it's economical to run about town when I don't have to get on the freeway, e) chicks dig it. And that's why I bought it.

PS Erik Buell Racing (EBR) may just give me a reason to buy American. We shall see how his street motos are going to turn out.

dabigguns357
10-02-2012, 15:28
The MSF course usually lends out helmets as well as motorcycles. All you have to do is come with long sleeve shirt, some sort of gloves and boots.

Before you commit to buying gears and spending money, I'd suggest for the old lady to: a) pass the course first, and b) WANTS to ride.

Oh yea she wants to ride which is real strange because we never really talked about till last summer and now again this year but with more intensity

fnfalman
10-02-2012, 15:56
Oh yea she wants to ride which is real strange because we never really talked about till last summer and now again this year but with more intensity

I'd still suggest to see if she wants to ride after the MSF course. Some people change their minds because they can't master the mechanics of multi-tasking (manipulating various levers and things at the same time, paying attention to the front, the rear, the left and the right at the same time).

I've seen people who quit in the middle of the course, or after the course, said too much hassle.

Glockdude1
10-02-2012, 15:56
Get her a dirt bike and have her learn to ride on that before she ever ventures out on the street.

Excellent advice!!

:thumbsup:

HollowHead
10-02-2012, 16:34
PS Erik Buell Racing (EBR) may just give me a reason to buy American. We shall see how his street motos are going to turn out.

He's going to have to do something about the price. At $45K...it's twice the price of a Panigale S. HH

GVFlyer
10-02-2012, 16:53
First of all, it's a joke between me and HollowHead.


No offense intended.


Secondly, the thing in my avatar is the Aprilia SR50 Factory - 50-cc of killer two-strokes racing scooter. The advantages did it bring to the tables are: a) it's an Aprilia, b) it's a scooter, c) it's a cool scooter that can take some mean corners, d) it's economical to run about town when I don't have to get on the freeway, e) chicks dig it. And that's why I bought it.


I couldn't tell scale from your avatar. I was at a local motorcycle shop this weekend and saw huge motor scooters there - among them, the Honda SilverWing and the Yamaha Majesty. The salesman said that not only were they fast, but also that they were technological marvels.

They look pretty cool, but I'm not riding anything that sports a modesty panel.
;)

http://images01.olx.com/ui/12/97/53/f_433129453-652507581.jpeg


PS Erik Buell Racing (EBR) may just give me a reason to buy American. We shall see how his street motos are going to turn out.

I hope Erik Buell makes it this time.

fnfalman
10-02-2012, 17:00
He's going to have to do something about the price. At $45K...it's twice the price of a Panigale S. HH

Those are racing bikes though. I think that his street motos are going to be maybe in the mid to high teens.

fnfalman
10-02-2012, 17:03
I couldn't tell scale from your avatar. I was at a local motorcycle shop this weelend and saw huge motor scooters there - among them, the Honda SilverWing and the Yamaha Majesty. The salesman said that not only were they fast, but also that they were technological marvels.

They look pretty cool, but I'm not riding anything that sports a modesty panel.
;)


I don't get the point of maxi scooters either. The whole point of riding a scooter is that it's small and tend to be less expensive than a regular motorcycle. These maxi scooters are just as big and heavy if not heavier than a moto, yet have crappier handling.

However, apparently there's some value in it because BMW and Aprilia had just joined the Japanese in the maxi scooter field.

Bflying
10-02-2012, 17:19
As others have said, course first. Then pick up something "mid-range" with easy handling characteristics, but still enough power to get out of a situation. My vote leans toward the little Honda Shadow 750.

http://powersports.honda.com/street/cruisers/shadow-line.aspx

berto62
10-02-2012, 17:29
He's going to have to do something about the price. At $45K...it's twice the price of a Panigale S. HH


Some recent story's about Eric. has 3 new street bikes coming soon.

http://cyclenews.coverleaf.com/cyclenews/20120911?#pg74

http://www.motorcyclepowersportsnews.com/Item/104903/erik_buell_racing_expands.aspx

fnfalman
10-02-2012, 23:08
Some recent story's about Eric. has 3 new street bikes coming soon.

http://cyclenews.coverleaf.com/cyclenews/20120911?#pg74

http://www.motorcyclepowersportsnews.com/Item/104903/erik_buell_racing_expands.aspx

Yep, sounds like he has three different designs for the street: sport, naked and adventure/touring (something like that).

Hopefully they would come out OK without any glaring issues and if the prices are reasonable (mid to high teens), I'd love to snap up a naked bike. I thought about the 1125CR before Harley-Davidson ditched the whole shebang, but then I couldn't bring myself to be seen at an H-D dealership for purchasing or servicing. The thought of having to wear assless chaps and leatherette vests was simply too frightening for me to overcome.

GVFlyer
10-03-2012, 00:07
Yep, sounds like he has three different designs for the street: sport, naked and adventure/touring (something like that).

Hopefully they would come out OK without any glaring issues and if the prices are reasonable (mid to high teens), I'd love to snap up a naked bike. I thought about the 1125CR before Harley-Davidson ditched the whole shebang, but then I couldn't bring myself to be seen at an H-D dealership for purchasing or servicing. The thought of having to wear assless chaps and leatherette vests was simply too frightening for me to overcome.

I resisted buying a Harley for a long time because I didn't want everybody to think I was an accountant or a lawyer.

Bren
10-03-2012, 06:21
I resisted buying a Harley for a long time because I didn't want everybody to think I was an accountant or a lawyer.

I am a lawyer, so it doesn't bother me.

Since I was 5 or 6 I've never been interested in anything but a Harley and other stuff in the same subculture (Indian, custom choppers and bobbers, etc.), even though I have owned Hondas. By the time I was in first grade I had chopper models, magazines and trading cards, Evel Knievel toys, etc. I would be embarrassed to be seen on a sport bike - not meant as an insult, just the literal truth. I'm somewhat embarrassed to admit to people that my little brother used to ride sport bikes.

DanaT
10-03-2012, 06:30
Motorcycles are not comfortable. If I am going to tolerate the uncomfortableness of a motorcycle it better do something a car wont.

Therefore a harley makes no sense to me what-so-ever.

Of the recent crop of bikes, the only ones that make sense to me are S1000RR, ZX14, GSX13, K1300S, and a Duc 1199 Panigale.

DanaT
10-03-2012, 06:32
Since I was 5 or 6 I've never been interested in anything but a Harley and other stuff in the same subculture (Indian, custom choppers and bobbers, etc.), even though I have owned Hondas.

Y The thought of having to wear assless chaps and leatherette vests was simply too frightening for me to overcome.

:whistling:

dabigguns357
10-03-2012, 06:34
I am a lawyer, so it doesn't bother me.

Since I was 5 or 6 I've never been interested in anything but a Harley and other stuff in the same subculture (Indian, custom choppers and bobbers, etc.), even though I have owned Hondas. By the time I was in first grade I had chopper models, magazines and trading cards, Evel Knievel toys, etc. I would be embarrassed to be seen on a sport bike - not meant as an insult, just the literal truth. I'm somewhat embarrassed to admit to people that my little brother used to ride sport bikes.

At this point I would be happy just ride a scooter. It's been a while since I been on anything and have that desire again. Y'all make me jealous in a good way

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 07:08
First of all, it's a joke between me and HollowHead.

Secondly, the thing in my avatar is the Aprilia SR50 Factory - 50-cc of killer two-strokes racing scooter. The advantages did it bring to the tables are: a) it's an Aprilia, b) it's a scooter, c) it's a cool scooter that can take some mean corners, d) it's economical to run about town when I don't have to get on the freeway, e) chicks dig it. And that's why I bought it.

PS Erik Buell Racing (EBR) may just give me a reason to buy American. We shall see how his street motos are going to turn out.


A racing scooter! Hahahah! :rofl:

Bren
10-03-2012, 07:41
:whistling:

People whose bikes are ridden for short distances in warm dry weather tend to make fun of the gear worn for many years by those who spend full days riding hundreds of miles across the country. Hit the highway for 11-12 hours on a 45 degree day and you'll quickly understand what the chaps are for. A leather superhero suit is only practical for guys who are going home to change in a few hours, so chaps give you protection that you can take off and put in a saddlebag when you get where you are going. I've left home in the rain at below 40 degrees for a 700 miles ride - a whole different thing than zipping around town on a sport bike.

Vest? Gives me pockets, holds my gun/phone/wallet/knife/magazines/etc. and gives me a good shield against the wind on a long ride. Not to mention being a good place for club patches.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 07:50
A racing scooter! Hahahah! :rofl:

It's something that you geezer glide riders don't understand:
taking tight radius corners at breakneck speed.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 07:52
People whose bikes are ridden for short distances in warm dry weather tend to make fun of the gear worn for many years by those who spend full days riding hundreds of miles across the country. Hit the highway for 11-12 hours on a 45 degree day and you'll quickly understand what the chaps are for. A leather superhero suit is only practical for guys who are going home to change in a few hours, so chaps give you protection that you can take off and put in a saddlebag when you get where you are going. I've left home in the rain at below 40 degrees for a 700 miles ride - a whole different thing than zipping around town on a sport bike.

Vest? Gives me pockets, holds my gun/phone/wallet/knife/magazines/etc. and gives me a good shield against the wind on a long ride. Not to mention being a good place for club patches.

Riders who actually ride long distances (i.e. myself) have gears dedicated for that and it doesn't involve chaps and vests.

An Aerostitch suit is perfect for long or short ride, gives plenty of protection from the elements and decent protection in crashes. A full face helmet gives protection from the elements, crashes, bug strikes, gravel strikes, and a host of other nasty things that true long riders have to endure.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 07:53
Of the recent crop of bikes, the only ones that make sense to me are S1000RR, ZX14, GSX13, K1300S, and a Duc 1199 Panigale.

Speed is what motorcycling is all about. Unless you're a typical American rider then it's geezer glide all the way because you wanna look like SAMCRO.

RC-RAMIE
10-03-2012, 08:03
I find the I won't ride certain brands or types of bikes attitude confusing, I can't think of a single bike I have rode and got off of unhappy.

DanaT
10-03-2012, 08:06
I find the I won't ride certain brands or types of bikes attitude confusing, I can't think of a single bike I have rode and got off of unhappy.

go back to the beginning of the thread...try a rebel 250 and come back saying that..

DanaT
10-03-2012, 08:10
Not to mention being a good place for club patches.

How could I be so silly as to forget that patches are one of the important motorcycle accessories?

Sharkey
10-03-2012, 08:10
A racing scooter! Hahahah! :rofl:

They race Yamaha TMax in Europe all the time. If you put an after market variator on it, they haul a**. I use to leave the line on my Burgman 650 a lot quicker than other motorcyclists.

The fairing is great for the weather. The under seat storage is great. You just have to get over the stigma of riding a "scooter" ........................ that can go over 100mph.

DanaT
10-03-2012, 08:11
by those who spend full days riding hundreds of miles across the country. Hit the highway for 11-12 hours

I got cleaver and learned of this invention called an AIRPLANE. It gets me across country in somewhere between 2 and 6 hours depending upon how far I go. I can even make over oceans.

RC-RAMIE
10-03-2012, 08:16
go back to the beginning of the thread...try a rebel 250 and come back saying that..

I have and I enjoyed it.

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 08:19
I got cleaver and learned of this invention called an AIRPLANE. It gets me across country in somewhere between 2 and 6 hours depending upon how far I go. I can even make over oceans.

And you get to go to second base with a complete stranger on your way into the plane! :wavey:

Sportbike riders can't understand the concept of cruising to cruise. Some of the sport tourers might...but straight crotch rockets? Good god, who would ever want to cruise on one of those?

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 08:23
Sportbike riders can't understand the concept of cruising to cruise. Some of the sport tourers might...but straight crotch rockets? Good god, who would ever want to cruise on one of those?

Cruising is for cage. But then probably that's why you have the two-wheeled equivalence of a sofa.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 08:25
How could I be so silly as to forget that patches are one of the important motorcycle accessories?

Patches? We don't need no steenkeeng patches!!!

xMyazXtr3me
10-03-2012, 08:29
Soon getting a Suzuki GSXR 750.


Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 08:30
Soon getting a Suzuki GSXR 750.


Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

People keep talking about the 1-liter sport bikes, but they tend to forget about the original mid-weight.

DanaT
10-03-2012, 08:37
And you get to go to second base with a complete stranger on your way into the plane! :wavey:

You must be doing it wrong...

I never have issues.

DanaT
10-03-2012, 08:40
Sportbike riders can't understand the concept of cruising to cruise.

Sure I get the idea of "cruising". It is to enjoy the trip and not care about the destination.

In fact, I am going to do that here in 5 minutes. The difference is if I am going to just be driving, it will be like I am doing in a few minutes.

No traffic (holiday) and give some gas so I can enjoy some speed. 125mph shouldnt be any issue today.

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 08:44
Cruising is for cage. But then probably that's why you have the two-wheeled equivalence of a sofa.

My two wheeled sofa has enough power to ride circles around your scooter. And be comfortable and look good doing it. :wavey:

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 08:45
Sure I get the idea of "cruising". It is to enjoy the trip and not care about the destination.

In fact, I am going to do that here in 5 minutes. The difference is if I am going to just be driving, it will be like I am doing in a few minutes.

No traffic (holiday) and give some gas so I can enjoy some speed. 125mph shouldnt be any issue today.

Speed kills. Speed kills a lot more on a motorcycle. which isn't to say I don't like hauling ass - thats why I bought the bike I did. But not so much on public roads. Thats not cruising.

Gonzoso
10-03-2012, 09:13
I agree with everyone else that starting her at the MSF class is the best plan. See if she's into it and then let her pick out a bike.

I really think buying the 250 is not the best choice for most people.

However some people need a small bike. Some new riders are intimidated by larger bikes and the 250 will ease their minds while riding it, and comfort with the machine will encourage progress.

For most people though a 500cc+ cruiser is a good starting point I think. I learned on a Suzuki Marauder 805 and it was perfect. I bought it cheap, dropped it once on a turn, and now I'm selling it and I just bought the bike I really wanted, a 2012 KLR 650.

I'd hate to have dropped the new bike...

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 09:14
My two wheeled sofa has enough power to ride circles around your scooter. And be comfortable and look good doing it. :wavey:

I seriously doubt it. Your geezer glide probably wheezes its way up to 55-MPH.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 09:15
Speed kills. Speed kills a lot more on a motorcycle. which isn't to say I don't like hauling ass - thats why I bought the bike I did. But not so much on public roads. Thats not cruising.

Some of us are born old in spirit. Some of us are hot blooded even though we're old.

The day I can't ride a fast bike is the day I hang it all up.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 09:17
II really think buying the 250 is not the best choice for most people.

Why not?

Is there a law that says these people can't sell off their 250s after they've gotten good with the basic riding skills?

Mayhem like Me
10-03-2012, 09:21
:upeyes:

yeah no kidding...:rofl:

RC-RAMIE
10-03-2012, 09:22
Why not?

Is there a law that says these people can't sell off their 250s after they've gotten good with the basic riding skills?

Especially this Rebel for 2K that bike still books at $2900 hell trade in value is $2300. He could ride for a year or two and get his $2000 back out of it.

JimIsland
10-03-2012, 09:26
Get her a dirt bike and have her learn to ride on that before she ever ventures out on the street.

Bingo!

All good riders I know started on a dirtbike. I bought my wife a Yamaha TTR 125L and she really took to it nicely. After that, a 883 Sportster was fairly easy to handle once got over the fear of actually being on the street instead of the woods.

Personally I would pass on the Rebel 250. Not much power there at all which can actually do more harm than good.

Mayhem like Me
10-03-2012, 09:33
Cruising is for cage. But then probably that's why you have the two-wheeled equivalence of a sofa.

I have done both, knee dragging and sport touring and they go to different moods.

Sport riding is fun and challenging.

Sport touring allowed me to enjoy the open air sun on my face and a sprited run through beautiful scenery.

Bikes I owned
ninja 900
GPZ1100 (fuelie)
RM370
AMF Sportster 1000 (and I never had an issue with it)
VF1000 f2
zx10 that was tuned by muzzy.

Concourse.. stock with a seat and a pipe.

I also rode a FXRS-SP at work , and while It could do impressive things once I learned to ride it, it would not be my choice for any type of all day riding.

I agree with the Rebel as a good first bike.

Just recenty rode a friends R1...WOW small fast and very capable, I am glad I dont sport ride anymore.....:crying:

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 09:37
Especially this Rebel for 2K that bike still books at $2900 hell trade in value is $2300. He could ride for a year or two and get his $2000 back out of it.

Exactly.

You buy these things, beat the hell out of them and sell them off for pretty much what you got into it.

I laugh whenever people reasoned, "Yeah, but I'll outgrow the bike." No, you're not going to outgrow the bike any time soon, and by then you'd probably have a better idea of what kind of bike you'd be interested in.

When I got back into motorcycling eight years ago after a long hiatus, I thought that I was going to get me a "reasonable" bike that would fit a fellow of certain maturity. Something that doesn't make me look like a crotch rocketeer. So I bought a BMW. Three months later, I realized that: a) I hate heavy beasts, b) I hate slow, heavy beasts, c) The Roundel ain't all that. I would have been better off on an el cheapo something until I discovered that I still have the hots for fast Italian machines like I did when I was younger and rode a Ducati.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 09:53
I have done both, knee dragging and sport touring and they go to different moods.

Sport riding is fun and challenging.

Sport touring allowed me to enjoy the open air sun on my face and a sprited run through beautiful scenery.


I fully agree. My Aprilia Tuono is my sport touring bike. You can ride in relative comfort and when you get to where you're going, you can still cut the curve. Or disconnect the lights and hit the track. Then put everything together and pack up to ride back.

When I was younger, I started out with the Kawasaki EX500 (aka Ninja 500). Didn't take any class so I crashed a lot, but I was too macho to admit that I couldn't ride. Nosiree.

Then I went to a Dyna Glide because only real riders and real men ride Harleys. The fact that it was a slow, heavy, ungainly beast didn't deter me. Then at Daytona Beach, I saw my first Ducati in red. That stirred something in me so I traded the heavy beast in for an Italian stallion - a PASO 750.

Sold them all when I got out of Uncle Sam's service and went to college. College was done, worked for a while, paid off the loans, bought me a convertible sports car but something is still missing. The call of the road beckoned, so I took the MSF (I don't wise up much, but I do a bit now and then) and it was a revelation. Told myself that I'm old enough to know better, so I'd best get me a geezer glide so that I'd appear responsible. Didn't want to wear vests and assless chaps so I went with a German geezer glide - a BMW Rockster (still have it). After a few months of "cruising", I still felt something was missing. I'm not getting my rocks off. Riding in a straight line is just simply boring.

Some of the dudes told me to go canyon carving. Wow, what a revelation!!! So, now I gotta have a new bike. But what? Ducati? Nah, too common. Aprilia...hmm...Italian, red, V-twin, reliable - a bright red Tuono found her home with me.

Next thing I know, I was canyon carving, commuting and touring on my Aprilia with the BMW being well neglected.

Then some dude took me to the track. Wow, what a revelation!!! Next thing I know, there's an Aprilia Mille in the garage.

Then some dude took me offroading a bit. Wow, what a revelation!!! But I don't want to buy a true blued offroad machine that has to be carted in the back of a pickup truck or towed on a trailer. Next thing I know, there's a KTM Adventure in my garage.

Then I saw a bunch of cute chicks riding around on scooters. Hmm...lightweight, small, easy on the gas and maintenance. Next thing I know there's an Aprilia buzzbomb in my garage.

One day I went to a 2-smokes gathering, checking out the Aprilia RS250, the Suzuki RG500, ad infinitum. Took a ride on an Aprilia RS250 and...WOow, what a revelation!!! Next thing I know there's an Aprilia RS125 (1 out of 150 ever imported) in my garage; slightly massged, of course.

I'm getting older and my homeys are getting older but we can't seem to get off the fast bikes mentality. Oh well, one of these years we'll grow up and get us some geezer glides.

Mayhem like Me
10-03-2012, 10:02
I fully agree. My Aprilia Tuono is my sport touring bike. You can ride in relative comfort and when you get to where you're going, you can still cut the curve. Or disconnect the lights and hit the track. Then put everything together and pack up to ride back.

When I was younger, I started out with the Kawasaki EX500 (aka Ninja 500). Didn't take any class so I crashed a lot, but I was too macho to admit that I couldn't ride. Nosiree.

Then I went to a Dyna Glide because only real riders and real men ride Harleys. The fact that it was a slow, heavy, ungainly beast didn't deter me. Then at Daytona Beach, I saw my first Ducati in red. That stirred something in me so I traded the heavy beast in for an Italian stallion - a PASO 750.

Sold them all when I got out of Uncle Sam's service and went to college. College was done, worked for a while, paid off the loans, bought me a convertible sports car but something is still missing. The call of the road beckoned, so I took the MSF (I don't wise up much, but I do a bit now and then) and it was a revelation. Told myself that I'm old enough to know better, so I'd best get me a geezer glide so that I'd appear responsible. Didn't want to wear vests and assless chaps so I went with a German geezer glide - a BMW Rockster (still have it). After a few months of "cruising", I still felt something was missing. I'm not getting my rocks off. Riding in a straight line is just simply boring.

Some of the dudes told me to go canyon carving. Wow, what a revelation!!! So, now I gotta have a new bike. But what? Ducati? Nah, too common. Aprilia...hmm...Italian, red, V-twin, reliable - a bright red Tuono found her home with me.

Next thing I know, I was canyon carving, commuting and touring on my Aprilia with the BMW being well neglected.

Then some dude took me to the track. Wow, what a revelation!!! Next thing I know, there's an Aprilia Mille in the garage.

Then some dude took me offroading a bit. Wow, what a revelation!!! But I don't want to buy a true blued offroad machine that has to be carted in the back of a pickup truck or towed on a trailer. Next thing I know, there's a KTM Adventure in my garage.

Then I saw a bunch of cute chicks riding around on scooters. Hmm...lightweight, small, easy on the gas and maintenance. Next thing I know there's an Aprilia buzzbomb in my garage.

One day I went to a 2-smokes gathering, checking out the Aprilia RS250, the Suzuki RG500, ad infinitum. Took a ride on an Aprilia RS250 and...WOow, what a revelation!!! Next thing I know there's an Aprilia RS125 (1 out of 150 ever imported) in my garage; slightly massged, of course.

I'm getting older and my homeys are getting older but we can't seem to get off the fast bikes mentality. Oh well, one of these years we'll grow up and get us some geezer glides.

LMAO... yup,, I have been on a self imposed Haitus from fast bike owning for 8 or so years... I am wanting to do it again, but the last bike I had to lay down was my ninja 900 , and I was much younger then 1984... I have been lucky and vigilant enough not to be wrecked over the years even racing motocross...
I really like the Ducs and Aprillas I have seen and am lusting after a sporty weekend rider...The TUONO is calling my name so is the Panigale..

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 10:11
LMAO... yup,, I have been on a self imposed Haitus from fast bike owning for 8 or so years... I am wanting to do it again, but the last bike I had to lay down was my ninja 900 , and I was much younger then 1984... I have been lucky and vigilant enough not to be wrecked over the years even racing motocross...
I really like the Ducs and Aprillas I have seen and am lusting after a sporty weekend rider...The TUONO is calling my name so is the Panigale..

I am ambivalent about the Tuono V4 because I don't like the fact that Aprilia had adopted the Japanese mentality to water down the naked bike's engine output from the sport bike's engine output. The Tuonos have been nothing but a Mille with a handlebar and no fairing. Detune the engine by 10-HP is a transgression against God and Man. Granted, it's still a 140-HP + to the rear wheel but the thought of a detuned Tuono just galls me so and that's why I haven't bought one yet. Not to mention that the current two colors are matte black and yellow. No red, WTF, over?

I'll give Aprilia another year to see if they're going to do something different for the V4 Tuono. If not then I'll buy something else, like maybe a KTM 990 Supermoto. Talk about a machine that's the equivalence of viagra that you can kill yourself on.

GVFlyer
10-03-2012, 10:46
I am a lawyer, so it doesn't bother me.

Since I was 5 or 6 I've never been interested in anything but a Harley and other stuff in the same subculture (Indian, custom choppers and bobbers, etc.), even though I have owned Hondas. By the time I was in first grade I had chopper models, magazines and trading cards, Evel Knievel toys, etc. I would be embarrassed to be seen on a sport bike - not meant as an insult, just the literal truth. I'm somewhat embarrassed to admit to people that my little brother used to ride sport bikes.

Funny.

This is the bike I gave to the DAV to make room in my garage for my Dyna Super Glide. I rode it all over Europe, but riding tucked in was going to get me killed in the U.S..

http://i444.photobucket.com/albums/qq166/GVFlyer/IMG_1811copy.jpg

I briefly considered, alright - almost bought, this Ducati, but see above, I figured that with a 462 lb bike with 162 hp, it would only be a matter of time before I became a grease spot on the highway.

http://www.bikeexif.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/ducati-diavel-carbon.jpg

So, I bought my Harley and have come to love it. I'll be out riding it in a few minutes.

http://i444.photobucket.com/albums/qq166/GVFlyer/xm813/Harley2-1.jpg

DanaT
10-03-2012, 10:55
Speed kills. Speed kills a lot more on a motorcycle. which isn't to say I don't like hauling ass - thats why I bought the bike I did. But not so much on public roads. Thats not cruising.

Funny. I see lots of speed and not so much kill. On public roads none the less.


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Mayhem like Me
10-03-2012, 11:04
Funny. I see lots of speed and not so much kill. On public roads none the less.


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it's not the speed, it's the sudden unintended stopping that kills.

GVFlyer
10-03-2012, 13:09
Funny. I see lots of speed and not so much kill. On public roads none the less.


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You're cheating Dana, you live in Germany.

When I lived there I could safely and easily average 100 mph (or better) on a trip from, say, Heidelberg to Wien, Österreich including the Zoll and Esso stops.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 13:13
You're cheating Dana, you live in Germany.

When I lived there I could safely and easily average 100 mph (or better) on a trip from, say, Heidelberg to Wien, Österreich including the Zoll and Esso stops.

Okay, I'll buy that. Most Americans can't drive to save their lives. But then that doesn't explain your choice of a motorcycle with mediocre brakes and handling. If safety is so paramount then why don't you get a motorcycle that is more agile, more maneuverable and better braking & handling skills?

No, I'm not talking about crotch rockets either. Just a plain old standard motorcycle with decent power, decent chassis and decent brakes.

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 13:13
I seriously doubt it. Your geezer glide probably wheezes its way up to 55-MPH.

1900 V-Twin pushing out 125ft/lbs. What does your little toy put out again?

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 13:22
1900 V-Twin pushing out 125ft/lbs. What does your little toy put out again?

6-HP out of a 50-cc displacement. All muscles and no fat like yours.

A 1900-cc engine that barely puts out 125-lbft of torque. :rofl: I noticed that you didn't even bother to post the horsepower.

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 13:24
6-HP out of a 50-cc displacement. All muscles and no fat like yours.

A 1900-cc engine that barely puts out 125-lbft of torque. :rofl: I noticed that you didn't even bother to post the horsepower.


I hear the same line of crap from every little 17 year old ricer driving a Honda on the road. Wanna know what they and you have in common? You're in my rearview mirrors.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 13:28
I hear the same line of crap from every little 17 year old ricer driving a Honda on the road. Wanna know what they and you have in common? You're in my rearview mirrors.

Who do you race with your geezer glide? Bicylists?

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 13:33
Who do you race with your geezer glide? Bicylists?

Considering it runs high 11s...a whole damn lot of things. What do you race with your scooter? The fat chicks who should be on it?

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 13:35
Considering it runs high 11s...a whole damn lot of things. What do you race with your scooter? The fat chicks who should be on it?

By the time you unload it from the trailer or the back of the pickup, I'd be well gone across the finish line.

BTW, fat chicks ride on the back of Harleys, not Italian stallions.

High 11s? That's all you can do from a 1900-cc displacement engine? My 1000-cc displacement bike can do high 11s in its sleep.

HollowHead
10-03-2012, 13:38
A racing scooter! Hahahah! :rofl:

Have you never heard of scooter racing? HH

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 13:39
By the time you unload it from the trailer or the back of the pickup, I'd be well gone across the finish line.


Trailer or pickup? Sonny, I gear up, roll it outta the garage, press the starter, and away I go. Its a regular ol' bike.


BTW, fat chicks ride on the back of Harleys, not Italian stallions.


And fat chicks ride on the front of scooters. Way to go.


High 11s? That's all you can do from a 1900-cc displacement engine? My 1000-cc displacement bike can do high 11s in its sleep.

So you've got a halfway decent crotch rocket and you're on here banging your chest about a little 50cc scooter? Open the garage door the next time you turn on your bike, dude. :dunno:

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 13:39
Have you never heard of scooter racing? HH

No, I haven't. It sounds :rofl:

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 13:41
No, I haven't. It sounds :rofl:

Of course you haven't heard of scooter racing. I don't expect geezer gliders to know much about motorsports at all, especially the types that involves taking corners at extremely high speed and lean angles.

GVFlyer
10-03-2012, 13:44
Okay, I'll buy that. Most Americans can't drive to save their lives. But then that doesn't explain your choice of a motorcycle with mediocre brakes and handling. If safety is so paramount then why don't you get a motorcycle that is more agile, more maneuverable and better braking & handling skills?

No, I'm not talking about crotch rockets either. Just a plain old standard motorcycle with decent power, decent chassis and decent brakes.

I've had them. See my post 124 in this thread and this one:

http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showpost.php?p=19451187&postcount=27

For me, safety is about dialing me back. If I can't get the front wheel off the pavement for three gears or get serious road rash on my boots with the bike I'm riding, it goes a long way towards encouraging me to act my age.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 13:46
Trailer or pickup? Sonny, I gear up, roll it outta the garage, press the starter, and away I go. Its a regular ol' bike.

Sure it is.

And fat chicks ride on the front of scooters. Way to go.

And fat dudes ride on the front of geezer glides too. What a sight!

So you've got a halfway decent crotch rocket and you're on here banging your chest about a little 50cc scooter? Open the garage door the next time you turn on your bike, dude. :dunno:

A halfway decent crotch rocket? I ain't riding a rice burner, gramps.

My 50-cc scooter is all I need to outrun geezer glides. My crotch rocket is for racing against real motorcycles.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 13:47
it goes a long way towards encouraging me to act my age.

If that's how you feel then that's how you feel.

As for me, I'm too immature to ever grow up.

HollowHead
10-03-2012, 13:48
Considering it runs high 11s...

Out of 1900cc's? That's disappointing. HH

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 13:52
Out of 1900cc's? That's disappointing. HH

I do believe that your supposed "chick bike"; as classified by a typical Harley rider, would go faster than that with some very minor mods and a lot less displacement.

Mayhem like Me
10-03-2012, 13:54
Out of 1900cc's? That's disappointing. HH

I had a bike in 1984 that ran mid/high 10's stock.....1098cc

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 13:59
Out of 1900cc's? That's disappointing. HH

Name one factory V-Twin besides the VROD that beats it?

There ain't one. The M109 will give it a run for its money.


I owned a Honda Magna before. 750 v4 and it screamed. But theres just something about the instant gratification of peak torque off idle that warms a man's heart.

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 14:00
Of course you haven't heard of scooter racing. I don't expect geezer gliders to know much about motorsports at all, especially the types that involves taking corners at extremely high speed and lean angles.

Scooters taking corners at extremely high speeds and lean angles?! :rofl: You're a riot!

Mayhem like Me
10-03-2012, 14:07
Scooters taking corners at extremely high speeds and lean angles?! :rofl: You're a riot!

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=scooter+racing&hl=en&sa=X&rlz=1I7ADBR_enUS206&biw=1024&bih=587&tbm=isch&prmd=imvns&tbnid=2P425g9UYiqCZM:&imgrefurl=http://www.cbr250.net/forum/honda-cbr250-general-discussion/6205-friendly-riders-i-got-shot-down-lol-4.html&docid=0Qi5pUFc45DLYM&imgurl=http://www.bmrc.bm/2006pictures/june4/cover.jpg&w=480&h=390&ei=4JpsUOupEYuk8gST24HoBA&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=250&sig=116462971284756201517&page=1&tbnh=108&tbnw=190&start=0&ndsp=16&ved=1t:429,r:11,s:0,i:122&tx=172&ty=48

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 14:12
http://www.google.com/imgres?q=scooter+racing&hl=en&sa=X&rlz=1I7ADBR_enUS206&biw=1024&bih=587&tbm=isch&prmd=imvns&tbnid=2P425g9UYiqCZM:&imgrefurl=http://www.cbr250.net/forum/honda-cbr250-general-discussion/6205-friendly-riders-i-got-shot-down-lol-4.html&docid=0Qi5pUFc45DLYM&imgurl=http://www.bmrc.bm/2006pictures/june4/cover.jpg&w=480&h=390&ei=4JpsUOupEYuk8gST24HoBA&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=250&sig=116462971284756201517&page=1&tbnh=108&tbnw=190&start=0&ndsp=16&ved=1t:429,r:11,s:0,i:122&tx=172&ty=48


:rofl:


For reference, here is a high speed corner at a serious lean angle.

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3184/4064752750_44d8c7085a_z.jpg

DanaT
10-03-2012, 14:21
You're cheating Dana, you live in Germany.

When I lived there I could safely and easily average 100 mph (or better) on a trip from, say, Heidelberg to Wien, Österreich including the Zoll and Esso stops.

That is not entirely true. My house wife and kid are in CO along with my bike and cars. I technically live on the USA. I spend 3 weeks Germany then two weeks CO.

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RC-RAMIE
10-03-2012, 14:29
We comparing ET I can play.

9.45 147MPH
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DanaT
10-03-2012, 14:32
I hear the same line of crap from every little 17 year old ricer driving a Honda on the road. Wanna know what they and you have in common? You're in my rearview mirrors.

Would you like to put some money on that statement?

DanaT
10-03-2012, 14:34
Considering it runs high 11s...a whole damn lot of things. What do you race with your scooter? The fat chicks who should be on it?

What is really funny, is that I see MANY MANY more hot chicks riding scooters than I see on Harleys (or sport bikes). It is not hard to find a very nice looking woman riding a scooter.

Most motorcycle mamas I have on the back of Harleys are old women who dress like 17 year old hookers and think that they look hot.

Most girls I see on the back of sport bikes typically are decent looking, but at least not old.

DanaT
10-03-2012, 14:36
I've had them. See my post 124 in this thread and this one:

http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showpost.php?p=19451187&postcount=27

For me, safety is about dialing me back. If I can't get the front wheel off the pavement for three gears or get serious road rash on my boots with the bike I'm riding, it goes a long way towards encouraging me to act my age.

I going on 17..

DanaT
10-03-2012, 14:40
Name one factory V-Twin besides the VROD that beats it?


Honda RC51

Suzuki TL1000R

Suzuki TL1000S

Ducati 748

Ducati 916

Duacti 888

Aprilla RSV Mille

shall I continue?????

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 14:41
Honda RC51

Suzuki TL1000R

Suzuki TL1000S

Ducati 748

Ducati 916

Duacti 888

Aprilla RSV Mille

shall I continue?????

Good catch, I should've specified cruisers. Trying to compare the performance of a cruiser to a sportbike is like trying to compare the performance of fn's 50cc scooter to a cruiser.

John Rambo
10-03-2012, 14:41
Would you like to put some money on that statement?

On what? A Honda or a scooter?

DanaT
10-03-2012, 14:53
On what? A Honda or a scooter?

"Wanna know what they and you have in common? You're in my rearview mirrors."

That statement. That I would be in your rear view mirror.

HollowHead
10-03-2012, 15:37
Name one factory V-Twin besides the VROD that beats it?

There ain't one.

I think many Ducatis are in the high nines and they're all v-twins. HH

Halojumper
10-03-2012, 16:05
Good catch, I should've specified cruisers. Trying to compare the performance of a cruiser to a sportbike is like trying to compare the performance of fn's 50cc scooter to a cruiser.

So you're saying that among the slowest of bikes, you're happy that yours is the fastest?

Halojumper
10-03-2012, 16:07
Speed is what motorcycling is all about. Unless you're a typical American rider then it's geezer glide all the way because you wanna look like SAMCRO.

Have you seen the new ad on SOA? You can go to www.H-D.com/SOA and build your own just like the ones on the show!

Halojumper
10-03-2012, 16:08
I got cleaver and learned

Beaver or Wally? :)

Halojumper
10-03-2012, 16:09
Considering it runs high 11s...a whole damn lot of things.

My geriatric geezer "sport bike" will do that with 1256 CC's

HollowHead
10-03-2012, 16:13
So you're saying that among the slowest of bikes, you're happy that yours is the fastest?

I'm a multiple Harley owner, and I approve of this message! :rofl: HH

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 16:13
Good catch, I should've specified cruisers. Trying to compare the performance of a cruiser to a sportbike is like trying to compare the performance of fn's 50cc scooter to a cruiser.

I know. It isn't fair because on a downhill twisty or on a go-kart track, my 50-cc scooter would beat your 1900-cc scooter.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 16:17
Name one factory V-Twin besides the VROD that beats it?

There ain't one. The M109 will give it a run for its money.


Since that V-twin sport bikes would make for unfair comparison, how about the Ducati Diavel? A V-twin cruiser that would leave your geezer glide in the dust.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 16:18
:rofl:


For reference, here is a high speed corner at a serious lean angle.

Either way, it ain't you doin' the knee draggin'.

Java Junky
10-03-2012, 16:22
Dab, I'll be the last guy to steer you away from bikes, but if the two of you are going to get separate units, have you considered getting a raggtopp sportscar?
'Makes for a much more civilized joint trip, you can talk (or not as the mood moves you), most rain will pass over the cockpit and you won't have to wear a helmet (if your state requires one).
'Just wouldn't wanna see'yuh miss dottin' all your "i's" and crossin' all your "t's".
'Best'a luck however'yuh go brutha.

HollowHead
10-03-2012, 16:30
Dab, I'll be the last guy to steer you away from bikes, but if the two of you are going to get separate units, have you considered getting a raggtopp sportscar?
'Makes for a much more civilized joint trip, you can talk (or not as the mood moves you), most rain will pass over the cockpit and you won't have to wear a helmet (if your state requires one).
'Just wouldn't wanna see'yuh miss dottin' all your "i's" and crossin' all your "t's".
'Best'a luck however'yuh go brutha.

A drive in a great car will never come close to a ride on a crappy motorcycle. HH

Java Junky
10-03-2012, 16:42
'Do both on a regular basis HH.
'Wouldn't turn anybody off to either, but I also wouldn't wanna see anybody make a decision without coverin' all'a bases.
The ol' "I should'a hadd'a V8".
Y'know?

jeepinbandit
10-03-2012, 16:44
I owned a Miata. If for some reason I couldn't ride a motorcycle anymore I'd own another one.

My prefered rides are "standards" and "Sport Tourers". Right now I'm on a BMW F800ST but have owned

79 Suzuki GS1000 (still have it)
2000 Suzuki Bandit 1200
2007 Kawasaki KLR 650
2005 BMW R1150R
2004 Yamaha FJR1300
2007 Yamaha FZ6
1998 Suzuki DR350SE (Still have this one too)
2007 BMW F800ST

dabigguns357
10-03-2012, 17:15
Dab, I'll be the last guy to steer you away from bikes, but if the two of you are going to get separate units, have you considered getting a raggtopp sportscar?
'Makes for a much more civilized joint trip, you can talk (or not as the mood moves you), most rain will pass over the cockpit and you won't have to wear a helmet (if your state requires one).
'Just wouldn't wanna see'yuh miss dottin' all your "i's" and crossin' all your "t's".
'Best'a luck however'yuh go brutha.

We actually had a Chevy tracker 2 door with a rag top until we had our third child. We are looking for some bikes for fun but also for commuting .

GVFlyer
10-03-2012, 17:35
Of course you haven't heard of scooter racing. I don't expect geezer gliders to know much about motorsports at all, especially the types that involves taking corners at extremely high speed and lean angles.

I found this with guys getting all Pasolini on their scooters.

http://www.blogcdn.com/www.autoblog.com/media/2011/12/scooter-racing.jpg

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 19:53
A drive in a great car will never come close to a ride on a crappy motorcycle. HH

Yep. Chop a car's entire roof off, do away with the A & B pillars and it still isn't the same.

There's nothing like the visceral feeling of a motorcycle on the move in a rapid manners. Add some lean angles and it's nirvana.

fnfalman
10-03-2012, 19:56
Unfortunately there's not much in the US. I went to two meets and then that was it. The series was no more.

Talk about bumping elbows while juggling for position on a go-kart track.

I found this with guys getting all Pasolini on their scooters.

http://www.blogcdn.com/www.autoblog.com/media/2011/12/scooter-racing.jpg

Java Junky
10-03-2012, 20:00
"Verily, rush doth come in many flavors."
('Think that was Ecclesiastes 4 through 9 if I'm not mistooken fn.)

GVFlyer
10-03-2012, 23:43
Yep. Chop a car's entire roof off, do away with the A & B pillars and it still isn't the same.

There's nothing like the visceral feeling of a motorcycle on the move in a rapid manners. Add some lean angles and it's nirvana.

I tune ride to road; it would take Stephan Bradl to keep up with me in the twisties when I'm having an A Game day in my S2000.

http://i444.photobucket.com/albums/qq166/GVFlyer/GeneralAtomics/Privat/317.jpg

Java Junky
10-04-2012, 04:36
'Seem'da share'a love for more than just Glocks GV.
http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u21/JavaJunky429/IMG_0114-2.jpg
('S'not me drivin'. 'Kids just wanted to borrow the car.)

OP, just so you know that I wouldn't steer you from bikes:
http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u21/JavaJunky429/IMG_0093-1.jpg
And may your rides provide what you require . . and be free of traffic and those bluemen in the Hemi-Chargers. (They've got the chase-instincts of Rottweilers.)

GVFlyer
10-04-2012, 07:29
I like that interior only slightly less than the pups...and I like them a lot!

JEEPX
10-04-2012, 11:24
Wife went from a 250cc to a 2010 Triumph Scrambler. She moved beyond the 250 very quickly. So fast, that it was almost like wasted money.
I went from my Yammie 125( I miss the bumble bee colors) to my fathers Honda 750 back in the 80's.
I do wonder if we baby women and actually start them on bikes that are too small.

Sent from Droid Razr Maxx using Tapatalk 2

DanaT
10-04-2012, 11:51
I had a 125cc bike and I suspect that bike was more than 99.9% of GT riders could ever hope to exploit...

Java Junky
10-04-2012, 11:57
Mr. Scott: would you be so kind as to engage the cloak of disclaimer?
'Always felt that starting on the smaller side of things was good insurance. 'Builds comfort and eventually experience.
'Been in the motorcycle game for some years, some'a those in a dealership with much experience with new riders.
'Seen too many who came in thinking that if they could drive a car, they could surely handle and needed the biggest and the baddest. Many never made it oud'a the parkin' lot.
Ledd'em get comfortable on something that isn't too much of a handful to throw around. Something that'll scare'em (It should scare'em!) but not too much.
If I hadda opine the procedure, I guess I'd start with a 250 (and I'm talkin' any new rider, not just a lady) enduro, upgrade from that no further than a 550, ma-a-a-a-aybe'a 650.
Today's 600's easily pack more of a punch than what our old 1000's had too.
No.
I don't think that allowing new-meat to work their way up to even the medium-sized bikes is the wrong way to go.

DanaT
10-04-2012, 12:01
Lets see who the first person to identify this person is:

http://wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net/80450F/gator995.com/files/2012/04/s03e19_01-txlkc1.jpg

HollowHead
10-04-2012, 12:01
I do wonder if we baby women and actually start them on bikes that are too small.


Go to a gun shop with a woman, play the quiet observer and let the hilarity ensue... HH

jeepinbandit
10-04-2012, 12:35
Lets see who the first person to identify this person is:

http://wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net/80450F/gator995.com/files/2012/04/s03e19_01-txlkc1.jpg

Guy from Spongebob Squarepants isn't it?

DanaT
10-04-2012, 12:48
Guy from Spongebob Squarepants isn't it?

But what is his name???

GVFlyer
10-04-2012, 13:03
I had a 125cc bike and I suspect that bike was more than 99.9% of GT riders could ever hope to exploit...

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4071/4363884263_c0586fe0e6.jpg

Yamaha RA31A 125cc V4 in Imatra memorial GP 2010 - YouTube

xMyazXtr3me
10-04-2012, 13:13
I tune ride to road; it would take Stephan Bradl to keep up with me in the twisties when I'm having an A Game day in my S2000.

http://i444.photobucket.com/albums/qq166/GVFlyer/GeneralAtomics/Privat/317.jpg

Great looking car. My friend has a white S2K.




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fnfalman
10-04-2012, 14:35
I do wonder if we baby women and actually start them on bikes that are too small.

Sent from Droid Razr Maxx using Tapatalk 2

I wonder how much better riders would be; both men and women, if they were to start on a 250-cc something and truly learn how to ride before they move up to something bigger and better?

fnfalman
10-04-2012, 14:38
If I hadda opine the procedure, I guess I'd start with a 250 (and I'm talkin' any new rider, not just a lady) enduro, upgrade from that no further than a 550, ma-a-a-a-aybe'a 650.
Today's 600's easily pack more of a punch than what our old 1000's had too.
No.
I don't think that allowing new-meat to work their way up to even the medium-sized bikes is the wrong way to go.

Yep.

People think that since they can balance, stop and go, and that somehow means that they've mastered or conquered and outride a 250-cc motorcycle's capability.

GVFlyer
10-04-2012, 15:13
Great looking car. My friend has a white S2K.

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Thanks! I think white with a red interior would be sharp.

tantrix
10-04-2012, 15:19
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4071/4363884263_c0586fe0e6.jpg

Yamaha RA31A 125cc V4 in Imatra memorial GP 2010 - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODH2nwWO-ds)

Love me some V4. I rode my uncle's 80's model Honda Magna years ago and ended up buying a '95 Honda Magna earlier this year. 750cc 4-cylinder. It hangs with my buddy's Victory Hammer 1800cc V-Twin from redlight to redlight. It really sucks Honda discontinued it.

dabigguns357
10-04-2012, 16:51
Today we had free time and lots of it.No kids no hassles and a great lunch.We took off in search of the perfect start to the perfect bike/bikes.

First we went over to the Ashland Community college for a talk/tour of the place and what we will need for the training and safety course.Total cost will be 185.00 per person and it's a 3 day class,totally worth it and I enrolled both of us to be on the safe side.Training dates are Oct 26th thru the 28th.

Then 3 bike shops later and many new and used bikes,we(she)sat on 2 650's,a 750,a used sportster 883,a v-star 500 used, and my friends rebel 250.

The 2 she felt most comfortable was the 250 and the 500.Anything past that and she couldn't hardly lift it or stand flat footed.Now she did like the 500 butshe loved and felt the most at ease on the 250,said it fit her perfectly.

I talked it over with my friend and he said he would hold on to it till she took the course.

Now everything is in line and set up,what kind of helmet/glasses would be good for her.Actually if she got a helmet with a full face mask why would she need further eye protection.

Java Junky
10-04-2012, 17:22
'Can't emphasize a full-face helmet enough.
I wear glasses, so visor-up is common for me, but I've hit'a bee at speed and it bent and took the lens out of my glasses.
What I'm gettin' at is don't take your eyes lightly.
'Call is, of course, yours.
'Sounds like youze guys're on your way dab.

fnfalman
10-04-2012, 17:24
Then 3 bike shops later and many new and used bikes,we(she)sat on 2 650's,a 750,a used sportster 883,a v-star 500 used, and my friends rebel 250.

The 2 she felt most comfortable was the 250 and the 500.Anything past that and she couldn't hardly lift it or stand flat footed.Now she did like the 500 butshe loved and felt the most at ease on the 250,said it fit her perfectly.

Sizes matter not (just ask Yoda) ONCE a person becomes an experienced rider. However, between now and then sizes matter quite a bit. Take me for an instance, I rode for several years (never learned to ride properly but I rode), then took a hiatus of about 11-years. When I got back, despite my better judgment AND MSF training, I bought a BMW R1150R Rockster. It wasn't too particularly powerful but it was heavy as hell. I dropped that mutha about five times. Fast forward a year later, I could have rode anything. I am 5ft6 with 26" actual insteam (pants inseam of 30") and I ride a big ass KTM dual sport with 33" inseam. I ballerina that mutha on the tip of my left toe.

So, stick with small until she's comfortable enough to move up and handle something heavier & taller.

And don't saddle her with a cruiser either. There are several 250 and 500 bikes that aren't cruisers (or crotch rockets).

Now everything is in line and set up,what kind of helmet/glasses would be good for her

First of all, most of the helmets meet DOT and/or Snell and/or SHARP/ECE (British & Euro ratings which are a lot more stringent than US). When you buy a more expensive helmet, you don't truly buy for the extra protection unless the helmet is SHARP/ECE rated because these ratings are more stringent than DOT or Snell. What you buy is the higher degree of comfort and durability.

A $80 Chinese helmet may be DOT rated, but the visor flops around, the liner is thin and tears off after two weeks' worth of wearing, vent pieces fall off after a couple of rides, etc.

Set your price range and then shop within that price range. If money is no object, then look at the Japanese brands like Arai and Shoei. If money is an object then look at the Korean, American and Italian brands like KBC, Scorpion, Bell, AVG, Vemar, etc. There are even helmets from the Portugal too. If money is truly an issue then buy the el cheapo Chinese helmets. Like I said, they're DOT rated.

MOST IMPORTANTLY - get a helmet that fits. A $1000 carbon fiber Shoei racing helmet ain't gonna do squat for her head if it doesn't fit her head well. This is why you should wait until after the class to go helmet shopping. By then you should know what a well fitted is like because an instructor would tell you what to look for and you'd probably get to wear a crappily fitted helmet and know what tht feels like.

Don't let anybody tells you that you have an "Arai head" or "Shoei" head, or whatever. Try a bunch of helmets on until you find some that fits you really well. Everybody has different head shapes and some manufacturers (like Arai for example) would have a few different helmet lines that are pre-shaped for a certain head shape (long oval, oval, etc.). However, most manufacturers aren't like Arai, they would make their helmets shaped in some sort of general shape. European helmets tend to fit white Americans well because of the caucasian head shape.

.Actually if she got a helmet with a full face mask why would she need further eye protection.

No, she wouldn't, unless she wants to ride with the visor up. Sometimes you want to do that for even more ventilations or because your visor is fogged up. Then glasses are highly recommended.

And don't forget earplugs. In training is one thing, but on the streets, you go deaf real quick. You don't realize how loud the streets are until you go out there on your moto.

dabigguns357
10-04-2012, 17:45
Sizes matter not (just ask Yoda) ONCE a person becomes an experienced rider. However, between now and then sizes matter quite a bit. Take me for an instance, I rode for several years (never learned to ride properly but I rode), then took a hiatus of about 11-years. When I got back, despite my better judgment AND MSF training, I bought a BMW R1150R Rockster. It wasn't too particularly powerful but it was heavy as hell. I dropped that mutha about five times. Fast forward a year later, I could have rode anything. I am 5ft6 with 26" actual insteam (pants inseam of 30") and I ride a big ass KTM dual sport with 33" inseam. I ballerina that mutha on the tip of my left toe.

So, stick with small until she's comfortable enough to move up and handle something heavier & taller.

And don't saddle her with a cruiser either. There are several 250 and 500 bikes that aren't cruisers (or crotch rockets).



First of all, most of the helmets meet DOT and/or Snell and/or SHARP/ECE (British & Euro ratings which are a lot more stringent than US). When you buy a more expensive helmet, you don't truly buy for the extra protection unless the helmet is SHARP/ECE rated because these ratings are more stringent than DOT or Snell. What you buy is the higher degree of comfort and durability.

A $80 Chinese helmet may be DOT rated, but the visor flops around, the liner is thin and tears off after two weeks' worth of wearing, vent pieces fall off after a couple of rides, etc.

Set your price range and then shop within that price range. If money is no object, then look at the Japanese brands like Arai and Shoei. If money is an object then look at the Korean, American and Italian brands like KBC, Scorpion, Bell, AVG, Vemar, etc. There are even helmets from the Portugal too. If money is truly an issue then buy the el cheapo Chinese helmets. Like I said, they're DOT rated.

MOST IMPORTANTLY - get a helmet that fits. A $1000 carbon fiber Shoei racing helmet ain't gonna do squat for her head if it doesn't fit her head well. This is why you should wait until after the class to go helmet shopping. By then you should know what a well fitted is like because an instructor would tell you what to look for and you'd probably get to wear a crappily fitted helmet and know what tht feels like.

Don't let anybody tells you that you have an "Arai head" or "Shoei" head, or whatever. Try a bunch of helmets on until you find some that fits you really well. Everybody has different head shapes and some manufacturers (like Arai for example) would have a few different helmet lines that are pre-shaped for a certain head shape (long oval, oval, etc.). However, most manufacturers aren't like Arai, they would make their helmets shaped in some sort of general shape. European helmets tend to fit white Americans well because of the caucasian head shape.



No, she wouldn't, unless she wants to ride with the visor up. Sometimes you want to do that for even more ventilations or because your visor is fogged up. Then glasses are highly recommended.

And don't forget earplugs. In training is one thing, but on the streets, you go deaf real quick. You don't realize how loud the streets are until you go out there on your moto.

OK and wow,lots to think about.The reason i brought up the helmet is in the pamplet it says to bring eye wear,helmet is provided but we may bring our own.She gets a bit creeped out about using a Used helmet,her words not mine.Oh and she did make a joke about the pamplet not including a hair brush in the things to bring.

Over all she is very excited,lets hope she will be during,after the class.

Java Junky
10-04-2012, 17:59
'Pamphlet didn't mention'a joys'a helmet-hair either.
Did it.

HollowHead
10-04-2012, 18:01
'Pamphlet didn't mention'a joys'a helmet-hair either.
Did it.

Gaelic? Welsch? HH

jeepinbandit
10-04-2012, 20:00
But what is his name???


IIRC when my boy used to watch SBSP it was Patchy the Pirate or somethign like that.

Java Junky
10-04-2012, 20:27
'S'jus' 'Joizey HH. No 'fense intended.

LippCJ7
10-05-2012, 00:30
Let me make the Helmet issue easy for you,

Full face Helmet with Clear visor makes riding at at night a no brainer, simply wear Sun Glasses during the day and at night take the sunglasses off and flip the clear visor down.

Full Face helmets are warmer also.

open face can be nice but you have to think about the night time riding situation, either have a helmet with a clear visor that can be snapped on or take night riding glasses with you.

I have both, but I have been riding a very long time, you may just have to jump in one way or the other and figure out which is for you and the Lady. Sometimes I don't wear a helmet at all its my choice and I exercise it.

JuneyBooney
10-05-2012, 02:12
I would suggest the little Rebel is fine for classes and riding around the neighborhood but it will be too small for road trips other than the 7 eleven. But in reality cycles are very deadly and you should stick with four wheels. I have ridden for years but not as much recently because of an eye injury. Cars are si much easier and they have metal around them for protection. Good luck in your decision.

Bren
10-05-2012, 04:45
Let me make the Helmet issue easy for you,

Full face Helmet with Clear visor makes riding at at night a no brainer, simply wear Sun Glasses during the day and at night take the sunglasses off and flip the clear visor down.

Full Face helmets are warmer also.

open face can be nice but you have to think about the night time riding situation, either have a helmet with a clear visor that can be snapped on or take night riding glasses with you.

I have both, but I have been riding a very long time, you may just have to jump in one way or the other and figure out which is for you and the Lady. Sometimes I don't wear a helmet at all its my choice and I exercise it.

I usually don't wear a helmet, but I still have 4 - full-face, half, 3/4 and novelty half. The 3/4 is a good all around helmet, for riding into a helmet state, or for riding in a big group ride where somebody might run over me or for riding when on military duty status and a helmet is required. But the full face is by far the best for rain, cold and distance without a windshield. Going to South Dakota next summer I have a route through non-helmet states, but I'll take the full-face along, just for bad weather.

For after dark, I have chrome sogftail toolboxes on both sides of my bike and I keep clear safety glasses in one (also good for locking up my gun if I need to).

My 3/4 Bell 500 helmet and the toolbox where I keep clear glasses.
http://www.fewpb.net/~brenn/medragonsm.jpg

Halojumper
10-05-2012, 05:24
I usually don't wear a helmet, but I still have 4 - full-face, half, 3/4 and novelty half. The 3/4 is a good all around helmet, for riding into a helmet state, or for riding in a big group ride where somebody might run over me or for riding when on military duty status and a helmet is required. But the full face is by far the best for rain, cold and distance without a windshield. Going to South Dakota next summer I have a route through non-helmet states, but I'll take the full-face along, just for bad weather.

For after dark, I have chrome sogftail toolboxes on both sides of my bike and I keep clear safety glasses in one (also good for locking up my gun if I need to).

My 3/4 Bell 500 helmet and the toolbox where I keep clear glasses.
http://www.fewpb.net/~brenn/medragonsm.jpg

That's like the guys who say they only carry when they're going to need it, as though it's something you can predict.

Java Junky
10-05-2012, 06:02
It's kind'a like the rationale of keeping a loaded gun in the house because keeping an unloaded one ain't gonna do'yuh'a hell'uv'a lodda good in the kind of situation that requires such measures.
I've found that goin' down, while it thankfully doesn't happen but once in'a blue moon, never gives me time to blink, let alone put on'a helmet.
But, that said, I am in total agreement with one's right to exercise their right to wear, or, not to wear a helmet.

Inconvenient at times? 'Sure is.
But, all it takes is the once.
'Don't wanna wear a helmet'n still be protected?
Sportscar.

dabigguns357
10-05-2012, 06:47
We both found some really nice full face helmets last night along with 2 pair of riding gloves and jackets, even got her some riding glassed that have 3 different tint shades.


Even is doesn't take up riding after the course she will still need them when she rides with me

Gonzoso
10-05-2012, 07:21
I think the helmet with a clear visor is best. This allows you to put on shades in the day and ride at night.

I also like to carry clear riding glasses, because sometimes when it gets foggy I pop the visor.

My first helmet had tinted lens, that sucked at night!

I had to wear a 3/4 helmet for a little bit once. I've also ridden a few times with no helmet to see what it was like.

Not my cup of tea. Don't know why everyone is so into that, I took bugs to the face, got hit by a stone in the interstate and it hurt like hell, and over 80 I just kept thinking about my head hitting the pavement and blowing my brains over the highway like a watermelon.:wow:

jeepinbandit
10-05-2012, 09:22
Helmet with internal drop down sun visor is where it's at. Some helmets don't really allow for sun glasses. And the internal shield is a half second flick of a switch and you have it either down or up out of the way.

Eurodriver
10-05-2012, 09:55
Full face helmet.

Tinted visor.

Scala G9.

/now that we can end this conversation about helmets...what kind of jackets do you guys wear for high 50s-60s temps?

dabigguns357
10-05-2012, 10:10
It's kind'a like the rationale of keeping a loaded gun in the house because keeping an unloaded one ain't gonna do'yuh'a hell'uv'a lodda good in the kind of situation that requires such measures.
I've found that goin' down, while it thankfully doesn't happen but once in'a blue moon, never gives me time to blink, let alone put on'a helmet.
But, that said, I am in total agreement with one's right to exercise their right to wear, or, not to wear a helmet.

Inconvenient at times? 'Sure is.
But, all it takes is the once.
'Don't wanna wear a helmet'n still be protected?
Sportscar.

Full face helmet.

Tinted visor.

Scala G9.

/now that we can end this conversation about helmets...what kind of jackets do you guys wear for high 50s-60s temps?
Leather bomber jackets and chaps over jeans

fnfalman
10-05-2012, 10:35
OK and wow,lots to think about.The reason i brought up the helmet is in the pamplet it says to bring eye wear,helmet is provided but we may bring our own.She gets a bit creeped out about using a Used helmet,her words not mine.Oh and she did make a joke about the pamplet not including a hair brush in the things to bring.

Over all she is very excited,lets hope she will be during,after the class.

They do clean the helmets if hygiene is what you and the missus worry about.

I'm not going to debate helmet versus no helmet. That's an individual decision, at least in states with no helmet laws.

Full face is best for protection and comfort.

3/4" is less. Half is even less. Turtle shell is nearlhy worthless.

Then there's the flip-up that gives full face comfort with near full face protection (still have a joint that is a weakness instead of a true solid design).

It's all about degrees of comfort versus convenience.

Whenever I toot around town, I'd wear the 3/4" helmet. Whenever I hit the freeway, I'd go full face. But that's me. Everybody has to weigh their needs and desires. We're all big boys and big girls.

DanaT
10-05-2012, 10:40
They do clean the helmets if hygiene is what you and the missus worry about.

You can also use a hood (balaclava) if you worry about that.

It is also nice to switch them out one hot days. Keeps your own helmet much cleaner.

jeepinbandit
10-05-2012, 13:27
Full face helmet.

Tinted visor.

Scala G9.

/now that we can end this conversation about helmets...what kind of jackets do you guys wear for high 50s-60s temps?

Same one I wear in temps from 40s to 100+. Just throw in a windblocking layer for Temps under 60ish. Any temps below 40 or 50 and I switch to my "winter" jacket which has a better liner system and maybe even break out the electric heated jacket for longer trips.

fnfalman
10-05-2012, 13:30
Let's not get too crazy about gear configuration. Let the lady pass the MSF course first.

Java Junky
10-05-2012, 13:39
'Godda go with clear visors.
Sooner or later you're gonna get caught out after dark.
Tinted visors and dark don't mix. (Okay, okay. So they mix once.)

http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u21/JavaJunky429/truckhelmet5.jpg

jeepinbandit
10-05-2012, 14:47
Again internal visors are where it's at. Decent low cost helmet with an internal visor........Scorpion EXO 500.

tantrix
10-05-2012, 15:14
Ironically, today I got mowed down by an SUV on my bike...I was getting into a turning lane and some ass**** decides he wants in too at the last minute. Only problem is, he didn't see me whatsoever until he had already hit me and damn near run me over.

Road rash on left forearm and broken pinky finger was the result. I'll ride again (tomorrow probably). I'm just glad he didn't run me over or it could have been a lot worse.

dabigguns357
10-05-2012, 15:21
Let's not get too crazy about gear configuration. Let the lady pass the MSF course first.

I understand,but even if she doesn't drive a motorcycle she will be riding with me and she will still need all the gear.So pass or not she will have it and enjoy the ride one way or another.

Java Junky
10-05-2012, 15:23
That he stopped is unusual, 'leastwize, it is here in 'Joizey.
'Glad yer alright 'trix.

tantrix
10-05-2012, 16:24
That he stopped is unusual, 'leastwize, it is here in 'Joizey.
'Glad yer alright 'trix.

I'm ok...the road rash on my left forearm is deep, but is burning a little less now. But, my left knee and pinky are still throbbing (pinky is broken, knee they're not sure yet). When he hit me I low-sided and slid about 5 feet.

I'm going to be laying up for the rest of the day/night for sure.

Eurodriver
10-05-2012, 16:24
Ironically, today I got mowed down by an SUV on my bike...I was getting into a turning lane and some ass**** decides he wants in too at the last minute. Only problem is, he didn't see me whatsoever until he had already hit me and damn near run me over.

Road rash on left forearm and broken pinky finger was the result. I'll ride again (tomorrow probably). I'm just glad he didn't run me over or it could have been a lot worse.

And your response to his idiocy?

Did you beat his ass?

jeepinbandit
10-05-2012, 16:26
Were you wearing any protective gear? If so what kind so we know to avoid it.

tantrix
10-05-2012, 16:31
Were you wearing any protective gear? If so what kind so we know to avoid it.

Just a half-helmet, but my head never hit the pavement. It's really hot down here so leathers on the arms are almost impossible. I just had a short-sleeve shirt on. Had I been wearing winter gear I could have avoided all the road rash on my forearm, but like I said it's just not doable right now until winter comes.

I'll admit, I took the chance with no leather over my arms, and I paid for it.

Java Junky
10-05-2012, 17:08
'Trix, I share your need for leather to feel right on'a bike. And summer up here's brutal in leathers, I can't imagine what it's like down there.
Some years back I tripped on these mesh jackets and pants by Vanson. (I'm sure by now everybody's godd'em.)
It might not be just wearing a tee, but it's damn close.
Summer nights in one'a these Victoria's Secret outfits will have you shivering.
As for their usefulness in'a tank-slapper . . I can only go by what I've read about them.
But, they might be worth checkin' out.
(Yeah, yeah. I know. Why couldn't I've mentioned that yesterday.)
Think healing thoughts.

Not to be totally cold . . but what's the damage to your ride? (Hey. Rides don't heal's why I ask.)

tantrix
10-05-2012, 17:37
And your response to his idiocy?

Did you beat his ass?

That was actually my first reaction after I picked my bike up, I headed towards his vehicle to yank him out and whip his ass but a state trooper a few cars behind us witnessed the entire thing and calmed me down. I'm kind of glad for the adrenaline though, as the pain from my injuries didn't kick in until later. Now, I'm hurting pretty good.

I know, not the best reaction but I was beyond pissed.



Not to be totally cold . . but what's the damage to your ride? (Hey. Rides don't heal's why I ask.)


Not bad...clutch lever was straightened completely out, rash on the exhaust, grip, and footpeg. The bike actually took less damage than I did. No worries though, his insurance is going to pay for it anyway. I lived, the bike survived, all is well.

LippCJ7
10-05-2012, 17:41
Ok on Gear, that kinda goes with the style riding, I have always worn leather, didn't matter if I was racing a sport bike in Dainese Leathers or my Harley acting all johnny bada** Weekend Warrior in Black Leathers, my Wife has her own set as well as a passenger, just because she is not operating means nothing. Helmets and Leathers is one area where I believe you get what you pay for but anything is better then nothing, I have gone down at well over 100 MPH and I can tell you its not fun but amazing that after skipping for a hundred feet the first thing you do is stand up to go check your bike, which is when you suddenly realize your still sliding at 20 MPH and do your own rendition of a Lawn Dart.

Leather has become something of a fashion statement but I cannot tell you the value of mitigating road rash.

Just ask Tantrix....

BTW Tantrix, Sorry about the bad luck.

tantrix
10-05-2012, 17:50
Leather has become something of a fashion statement but I cannot tell you the value of mitigating road rash.

Just ask Tantrix....

BTW Tantrix, Sorry about the bad luck.

Oh, no doubt if I had had leather on my arms today I wouldn't be in the shape I'm in. Oh well...like they say...it's not if, it's when.

Java Junky
10-05-2012, 19:24
Amen to that.
But beware crap leather that isn't up to a snag on'a nail, let alone protection for'yuh while yer becomin' one with the roadside scenery.
I'm not gonna embarrass myself by tryin'a remember what mil was the good stuff. But, trust me on this: there's leather that'll save'yer a . . ahem . . hide and there's a whole lodda thinner, wannabee leather out there that's good for Halloween'n not much else.
Like the ol' knight said: choose wisely.

jeepinbandit
10-05-2012, 20:31
Mesh gear in my area of the country (I'm in a Scorpion Master Mesh right now) works year round. I switch to solid textile during the full blown winter months but I've ridden in well vented textile gear during 100+ days also. You sweat a bit but honestly you are much better off core temp wise if you are sweating a little and having it stay around for a bit then you are ridding without and having the sweat evaporate instantly.

I also wear long sleeve sweat wicking shirts under my riding gear.

Java Junky
10-05-2012, 21:01
I'd also tried some of those ballistic-material suits (don't ask how many years ago that was) and, I'd suspect that they've improved, but after having worn only leather . . they were "dirty".
The air smoothly slips around leather.
The wind grabs hold'a those ballistic suits'n tries to drag you off the back end'a the bike.
Lots'a touring'n cruiser guys are very happy with the ballistic suits, but to a sportbike rider . . kind'a like screen-doors on'a submarine.
Y'know?

Good leather gives me that snug, secure feelin' tha'cha get from'a good pair'a lace-up boots . . all over.

jeepinbandit
10-05-2012, 21:14
I'd also tried some of those ballistic-material suits (don't ask how many years ago that was) and, I'd suspect that they've improved, but after having worn only leather . . they were "dirty".
The air smoothly slips around leather.
The wind grabs hold'a those ballistic suits'n tries to drag you off the back end'a the bike.
Lots'a touring'n cruiser guys are very happy with the ballistic suits, but to a sportbike rider . . kind'a like screen-doors on'a submarine.
Y'know?

Good leather gives me that snug, secure feelin' tha'cha get from'a good pair'a lace-up boots . . all over.


I rode a CBR600RR for a while and never had that issue in a one piece textile and one piece mesh suit.

sappy13
10-05-2012, 21:17
Iv never had any issues at with the wind catching me and pulling me off my bike when iv ridden with my mesh suit.

JuneyBooney
10-05-2012, 23:13
My wife and I have been talking about buying 2 motorcycles,one for each one of us.I have mine picked out but i haven't got a clue about hers.

I've owned 2 in the past but she has never been on one.So how do I go about getting her in some classes or something to help her get road ready(we have till spring).

A friend has a 2009 Honda rebel 250 for sale like the one in the pic.My question is this,wouldn't something this little be a bit small for highway or just right for her and her small size.

Any advice would be great before I spend 2,000 on a bike she may or may not be able to handle.

http://i427.photobucket.com/albums/pp354/dabigguns357/99130945_4thumb_550x410.jpg
http://i427.photobucket.com/albums/pp354/dabigguns357/99130945_2thumb_550x410.jpg

Now to be serious. I started riding as a teenager and raced on the dirt until my twenties. Then I started riding street and it was on a Harley Low Rider. I found the Harleys to be very forgiving motorcycles. I then rode some rice rockets and they were very fast and fun. Now that traffic is very bad I make these suggestions...

the Rebel is fine for class and they do provide the bikes at the classes. I would suggest a Harley for you and probably the Fat Boy types with the large tires as they are easier to ride slowly. The wife could get a small 883 Sportster or larger depending on how well she learns. Also check your pocketbook and what you have to take care of...like kids, dogs etc. That will sway your decision.

Also, be extra cautious when people are making left turns in front of you and don't drink and ride and watch out at intersections. Good luck in your decisions.

dabigguns357
10-06-2012, 01:29
the Rebel is fine for class and they do provide the bikes at the classes. I would suggest a Harley for you and probably the Fat Boy types with the large tires as they are easier to ride slowly. The wife could get a small 883 Sportster or larger depending on how well she learns. Also check your pocketbook and what you have to take care of...like kids, dogs etc. That will sway your decision.

Also, be extra cautious when people are making left turns in front of you and don't drink and ride and watch out at intersections. Good luck in your decisions.

We don't drink so drinking and driving is out,car,bike or anything else.For the first 3 -4 months we will spend burning up old country road,with lots of stops at Hillbilly hotdogs along the way.:supergrin:

Once she gets up to speed after the class,we'll look for something.

Now I have decided to go ahead and get geared up,her and I both.I'm passing that class and i'm riding,she'll either ride behind me or beside to me.

Oh and who ever said to call about insurance,great idea.With the class(passing)my insurance,full coverage will only be a $135.62 a year (for both bikes hopefully)

ride sally ride :motorcycle:

JuneyBooney
10-06-2012, 01:32
We don't drink so drinking and driving so thats out,car bike or anything else and for the first 3 -4 months will be spent old country road,with lots of stops at Hillbilly hotdogs along the way.:supergrin:

Once she gets up to speed after the class,we'll look for something.

Now I have decided to go ahead and get geared up,her and I both.I'm passing that class and i'm riding,she'll either ride behind me or beside to me.

Oh and who ever said to call about insurance,great idea.With the class(passing)my insurance,full coverage will only be a $135.62 a year for both bikes(hopefully)

ride sally ride :motorcycle:


Insurance on cruisers was always cheaper for me so check those first. Good luck and have fun and stay safe.

:cool:

Java Junky
10-06-2012, 06:06
'Sorry if I wasn't clear Jeep.
I was not referring to the Victoria's Secret summer mesh.
The stuff that grabbed the wind very noticeably was (come on memory . . you can do it) . . 'think that it was one of the early First Gear suits.
I'll admit to taking some "artistic license" with my drag'yuh off the back'a the bike, but facts is facts: rapidly-passin'-air grabs you considerably more with anything other than leather.
And a side note closely related to all of this (though later tests may have been done, and considering that man-made fibres may've improved some . . I'd go with the later tests) but leather came out on top of all the other contenders in the early hit-the-pavement tests. (If nothin' else . . it'll best keep all your body parts in one bag, y'know?)

jeepinbandit
10-06-2012, 10:10
I'll be the first to admit that leather is superior to most textile and mesh garments in the area of abrasion resistance. Most textile and mesh gear is going to be one time use with very few exceptions.

And I wouldn't qualify most mesh gear as "Victoria's Secret Mesh". This is the Mesh jacket I wear for most of the year with exception of full on "winter" (I'm in Texas it's subjective lol).

http://www.bobscycle.com/prodimg/1039311.JPG

I think my next gear purchase will be a 2 piece Aerostitch.

Java Junky
10-06-2012, 10:25
Methinks the Jeep's just a mite cantankerous today.
Okay, okay . . it's not Victoria's Secret.
Yer jus' not gonna let me get away with anything, are'yuh?

('Curious: di'juh get the matching purse? Joke! Joke! Easy big fella!)

Whoa!
Aerostitch!
That was it! That suit was an Aerostitch, not First Gear.
'S'up in'a attic someplace.

Eurodriver
10-06-2012, 12:37
That was actually my first reaction after I picked my bike up, I headed towards his vehicle to yank him out and whip his ass but a state trooper a few cars behind us witnessed the entire thing and calmed me down. I'm kind of glad for the adrenaline though, as the pain from my injuries didn't kick in until later. Now, I'm hurting pretty good.

I know, not the best reaction but I was beyond pissed.

Dude - I'm glad I'm not the only one. I hear so many stories of d-bags on cell phones hitting bikers and I just dread that day. Not for the pain, road rash, etc. But because just thinking about it makes me want to make that inattentive driver 124 grains heavier. Damn careless cagers. Luckily the trooper was there. I can just see myself getting pushed off the road - the driver who hits me keeps going and I have to go through my own insurance company OR I get hit by someone with no insurance. For being in a bike wreck you did pretty well...all things considering.

Not bad...clutch lever was straightened completely out, rash on the exhaust, grip, and footpeg. The bike actually took less damage than I did. No worries though, his insurance is going to pay for it anyway. I lived, the bike survived, all is well.

Thats very good news.


.....

fnfalman
10-06-2012, 21:29
I'd also tried some of those ballistic-material suits (don't ask how many years ago that was) and, I'd suspect that they've improved, but after having worn only leather . . they were "dirty".
The air smoothly slips around leather.
The wind grabs hold'a those ballistic suits'n tries to drag you off the back end'a the bike.
Lots'a touring'n cruiser guys are very happy with the ballistic suits, but to a sportbike rider . . kind'a like screen-doors on'a submarine.
Y'know?

Good leather gives me that snug, secure feelin' tha'cha get from'a good pair'a lace-up boots . . all over.

You do know that many track day organizations allow for the use of Aerostitch suit in lieu of leather suit?

fnfalman
10-06-2012, 21:33
Not bad...clutch lever was straightened completely out, rash on the exhaust, grip, and footpeg. The bike actually took less damage than I did. No worries though, his insurance is going to pay for it anyway. I lived, the bike survived, all is well.

I'm glad to hear that the bike will be OK.:embarassed:

tantrix
10-06-2012, 22:00
I'm glad to hear that the bike will be OK.:embarassed:

:rofl:

Java Junky
10-06-2012, 22:26
'Ain't been any kind'a track denizen in some years 'falman.
'Wasn't aware'a Aerostitch's acceptance as a leather substitute. 'Says alot for the Aerostitch, but, as well made as that stuff is, I'm not surprised.
Thanks for the heddzupp.

fnfalman
10-06-2012, 22:51
'Ain't been any kind'a track denizen in some years 'falman.
'Wasn't aware'a Aerostitch's acceptance as a leather substitute. 'Says alot for the Aerostitch, but, as well made as that stuff is, I'm not surprised.
Thanks for the heddzupp.

BUT it is no substitute for race leathers. Nobody approves Aerostitch for racing, just for track days and that depends on the local organizations too.

fnfalman
10-06-2012, 22:53
:rofl:

Obviously you're OK, otherwise you wouldn't be posting.:supergrin:

Reminds me of a conversation I had with one of the ex-chicks:

"Hey, I got into a car accident yesterday!!!"

"How's the car?"

"F THE CAR!!! How the hell am I?"

"Obviously you're OK, otherwise we wouldn't be talking."

"YOU INSENSITIVE &*&^%%&!!!"

"Hey, it's a nice 944 Turbo!"

CLICK!!!

Java Junky
10-06-2012, 23:10
Similarly'da aircraft, any "landin" tha'cha can walk away from is a good one.

And as an addition to the "advice" column for the new rider, something that a many-years-of-experience departing motorcycle magazine editor once left in his parting remarks: "Beware the Volvo . . even if it's parked."

DanaT
10-07-2012, 00:29
You do know that many track day organizations allow for the use of Aerostitch suit in lieu of leather suit?

I mostly ride with a Kevlar jacket. Yes. I am not confused. It is a complete kevlar shell. I feel no less safe in that than in leather. If you look a long time ago racing gloves went away from studded palms to kevlar re-inforced palms. Why? abrasion resistance. Try to to abrade kevlar (or cut it) and come back with a report how well that worked.

Kevlar is a PITA to cut and very abrasion resistant.

harleyhawk
10-07-2012, 17:42
A 650 Savage would be a pretty good choice. Most inexperienced riders get into trouble around curves, they try to brake at curves rather than lean the bike. Watch your wife on curves and be sure she can sit on the bike SHE chooses flat footed!

fnfalman
10-07-2012, 18:39
A 650 Savage would be a pretty good choice. Most inexperienced riders get into trouble around curves, they try to brake at curves rather than lean the bike. Watch your wife on curves and be sure she can sit on the bike SHE chooses flat footed!

Hence the MSF Basic Rider Course.

It may not turn you into a road racer, but it sure helps you go around the corner with alacrity.

Smithers
10-07-2012, 19:57
Even a small girl can "pick up" a full dress Harley.

Hint: it's in the technique, not the strength.

Maybe a small girl elephant. C'mon now.

Halojumper
10-07-2012, 20:58
Maybe a small girl elephant. C'mon now.

Did you read the whole thread? There were videos posted of girls doing just that.