Thinking about reloading this winter [Archive] - Glock Talk

PDA

View Full Version : Thinking about reloading this winter


Dakota Carpenter
10-01-2012, 22:30
I have really been think about starting to reload but I have a few questions. First of all, I shoot mainly 9mm, is it really worth buying the equipment and supplies? I shoot roughly a thousand rounds in a around two weeks, but this winter it will slow down a lot. That's why I want to get into reloading over the long winter and save up ammo for next year. Bulk prices aren't bad but can anyone give me a ballpark as to how much I might save? I don't want to have to spend an hour on 20 rounds and shoot them in 20 seconds. Im thinking about an auto loader but roughly how many 9mm rounds can they pump out an hour? I'm completely new to reloading so any info will help.

Thanks

SARDG
10-01-2012, 23:02
I have really been think about starting to reload but I have a few questions... ... I'm completely new to reloading so any info will help.

Thanks
Did you check the Stickies at the top of 'Reloading'?

fredj338
10-02-2012, 01:27
Search &/or visit the stickies but figure @ 3K rds a month, that's 36K rds a year @ $200/1K in bulk/cheap factory = $7200! You could reload the same ammo, actually better quality ammo, for half that buying components in bulk. A top end Dillon 650 w/ case feeder & goodies will set you back, call it $1200 for one caliber. You will pay for the machine in 2m shooting that much ammo. I wouldn't even consider anything cheaper for that kind of volume.
Once you get the process down & understand what you are doing, loading 700rds/hr is pretty simple. Your first go though will be much, much slower if you are smart though, reloading is NOT just pulling the handle. Get the ABCs of Reloading & a good manual like the Lyman #49 & read them thru.

F106 Fan
10-02-2012, 01:41
I have really been think about starting to reload but I have a few questions. First of all, I shoot mainly 9mm, is it really worth buying the equipment and supplies?


Sure! Almost every competitive shooter on the planet either reloads or has a sponsor sending over truck loads of ammo.


I shoot roughly a thousand rounds in a around two weeks, but this winter it will slow down a lot. That's why I want to get into reloading over the long winter and save up ammo for next year. Bulk prices aren't bad but can anyone give me a ballpark as to how much I might save?


9mm is pretty cheap ammo. I didn't spend any time looking for a deal but the first place I came to had 9mm 124 gr FMJ for $215/1000.

It is possible to load 124 gr FMJ for $125/1000. It could be less if you would shoot a lead bullet.


I don't want to have to spend an hour on 20 rounds and shoot them in 20 seconds. Im thinking about an auto loader but roughly how many 9mm rounds can they pump out an hour?


Speed costs money, how fast can you afford to go?

Let's say you shoot 10,000 rounds per year. The savings, based on prices I used above, is around $900/year. You have many choices for equipment, all of which cost less than you would save in a year.

You could load with a single stage press at 100 rounds per hour for, perhaps, $200 in equipment. You could move up to some automation like the Lee Classic Turret and $300 would get you started making perhaps 200 rounds per hour. Next up would be the Dillon 550 which, fully featured, might cost $700 but is able to crank out about 500 rounds per hour. Or, you could really go nuts and buy a Dillon 650 for about $1000 and crank out 800+ rounds per hour.

I absolutely do not recommend the single stage press. Loading 10,000 rounds that way is too grim to contemplate. Any of the other 3 loaders would do fine.

Read the stickies at the top of the list.

Richard

TKM
10-02-2012, 01:46
Reloading 9mm is right up there with making your own pencils.

Sure, it can be done and it will save you some money, but everybody is gonna look at you funny. I just don't tell anybody.:whistling:

Dakota Carpenter
10-02-2012, 07:27
Thanks for the info guys those are the answers I was looking for. I'm thinking of goin with something in the $300-$500 range. I dont need 500+ rounds an hour. Around 200 an hour or a little more would be enough. Like I said I'll be reloading a lot more than shooting this winter, so ill have plenty of time. God damn winter...

F106 Fan
10-02-2012, 07:48
A popular choice is the Lee Classic Turret (200 rounds/hour) from Kempf:
https://kempfgunshop.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=shop.flypage&product_id=630&category_id=190&manufacturer_id=0&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=41

Select the Upgrade to the Pro Auto Disc Powder Measure.

The Kempf kit doesn't include the Lee measuring scale and that's a good thing. There is a better one at Dillon:

http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/25215/catid/7/Dillon__039_s___039_Eliminator__039__Scale

It's useful to have a case gauge for checking completed rounds:

http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/25548/catid/3/Dillon_Handgun_Case_Gages

A tumbler or vibratory case cleaner is useful:

http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1445537

A pair of calipers:

http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1445504

The Lee Taper Crimp Die is a better choice for crimping than the Lee Factory Crimp Die:

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/274765/lee-taper-crimp-die-9mm-luger

You will also need loading manuals. Speer, Hornady Lyman are all recommended:

http://www.midwayusa.com/find?userSearchQuery=reloading+manuals+

"ABCs of Reloading" gives a good overview. It is also available as an eBook from Amazon.

Jacketed bullets from Precision Delta or Montana Gold, powder and primers (in quantity) from Powder Valley.

Richard

Colorado4Wheel
10-02-2012, 07:55
You save about 40% reloading 9mm.

Hoser
10-02-2012, 08:09
The 550 is a kick butt machine.

F106 Fan
10-02-2012, 08:53
The 550 is a kick butt machine.

Yes, a far faster and more versatile solution than the Lee Classic Turret. Also a couple of hundred dollars more costly.

It is worth reviewing the YouTube videos for the LCT and the 550. One thing to note: It takes 4 handle strokes to complete a single round with the LCT versus just 1 with the 550.

Funding available, the 550 is a much better choice.

Richard

fredj338
10-02-2012, 09:42
Reloading 9mm is right up there with making your own pencils.

Sure, it can be done and it will save you some money, but everybody is gonna look at your funny. I just don't tell anybody.:whistling:

The problem is it would cost me 5x the cost of a pencil to make it, not so w/ 9mm ammo. If I could make my own pencils & save 50% I would. If I could make anything & save 50% I would.:dunno: Reality, if you already own equip, it costs dies & a shell plate to be relaoding 9mm for 45-50% less than factory, not sure why C4W 9mm cost so much.

Beware Owner
10-02-2012, 09:58
Who doesn't like to save money?

Colorado4Wheel
10-02-2012, 10:10
The problem is it would cost me 5x the cost of a pencil to make it, not so w/ 9mm ammo. If I could make my own pencils & save 50% I would. If I could make anything & save 50% I would.:dunno: Reality, if you already own equip, it costs dies & a shell plate to be relaoding 9mm for 45-50% less than factory, not sure why C4W 9mm cost so much.


What do you mean?

F106 Fan
10-02-2012, 10:29
Who doesn't like to save money?

We have this discussion all the time - without resolution, I might add!

I maintain that we don't save a dime by reloading, at least in terms of overall budget and expenses. All that happens is we shoot more for the same money. Shooting more is a good thing.

I don't think I would open a bank account to accumulate all the money I save...

It seems to me that once I pour the reloads into an ammo can, the costs are forgotten. It's not like I open a box that still has a price tag from Wally World. The costs are sunk and the ammo is now 'free'. Shoot at will...

Richard

HexHead
10-02-2012, 10:31
Yes, a far faster and more versatile solution than the Lee Classic Turret. Also a couple of hundred dollars more costly.

It is worth reviewing the YouTube videos for the LCT and the 550. One thing to note: It takes 4 handle strokes to complete a single round with the LCT versus just 1 with the 550.

Funding available, the 550 is a much better choice.

Richard

Or start with the 550 Basic Loader. Less expensive as it doesn't have priming system, powder dispenser. You can add those later on to turn it ino a full 550. I'd buy it in a heartbeat over a LCT, use a hand primer and a Lee Auto disk powder drop with it if I was on a budget.

I was going to go that route, but came into some extra money and ordered the full 550b and glad I did.

Beware Owner
10-02-2012, 10:33
We have this discussion all the time - without resolution, I might add!

I maintain that we don't save a dime by reloading, at least in terms of overall budget and expenses. All that happens is we shoot more for the same money. Shooting more is a good thing.

I don't think I would open a bank account to accumulate all the money I save...

It seems to me that once I pour the reloads into an ammo can, the costs are forgotten. It's not like I open a box that still has a price tag from Wally World. The costs are sunk and the ammo is now 'free'. Shoot at will...

Richard

If it costs you less to produce the same amount of ammo, you're saving money. Now, if you choose to shoot more because you're saving money, well, you're still saving money. Whatever you choose to do after that is on you. You're still saving money if you shoot twice as much by reloading.

HexHead
10-02-2012, 10:34
It seems to me that once I pour the reloads into an ammo can, the costs are forgotten. It's not like I open a box that still has a price tag from Wally World. The costs are sunk and the ammo is now 'free'. Shoot at will...

Yep, when I go to the range, I don't bring a couple of boxes, I take a couple of ammo cans. No more ammo anxiety.

F106 Fan
10-02-2012, 10:51
If it costs you less to produce the same amount of ammo, you're saving money. Now, if you choose to shoot more because you're saving money, well, you're still saving money. Whatever you choose to do after that is on you. You're still saving money if you shoot twice as much by reloading.

Yup! That's the other argument.

But in terms of cash flow, you haven't saved a dime if you just shoot twice as much.

Richard

M24C
10-02-2012, 10:55
The 9mm will have the smallest savings due to it is cheaper. But also easy to get brass for it. For me the cost per load is about .15 a cartridge. If I would shot lead and went with a real fast powder I could get that much lower. I save more on shooting 40 S&W, But as pointed out I just end up shooting more!

If I was starting new I'd get the Dillon 650, I have the 550 works great, but the 650 is a bit nicer 5 station and faster. Anyways good luck in your search!

Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

SARDG
10-02-2012, 13:05
Reloading 9mm is right up there with making your own pencils.

Sure, it can be done and it will save you some money, but everybody is gonna look at you funny. I just don't tell anybody.:whistling:
We have dozens of competitors at my club (myself included) who reload 9mil. The only thing close to what I am shooting with my 9mil reloads is Atlanta Arms and Ammo. Remanufactured 147s are 13.95/box (50) plus shipping. Their new ammo uses Starline Brass and VV powder (like I am using) and costs much more.

Plus I had to develop another 124gr round for my racegun that had to run the compensator, but still shoot as softly as possible. Shaved 100fps off the factory 124 load I was using.

Reloading (9 or otherwise) is the only way to get a preferred match round at an anywhere reasonable cost. If I didn't shoot competition, I wouldn't be reloading - I'd just buy factory in bulk and be done with it.

fredj338
10-02-2012, 13:26
What do you mean?

Just hacking Steve. Depending on how you buy & component type & cost, you can get to 50% of cheaper factory in any bullet wt.:wavey:

Colorado4Wheel
10-02-2012, 14:36
Yeah, I have seen some pretty good bulk buys on 9mm so I went with 40%. Me. I load it for $3.5 per hundred.

Beware Owner
10-02-2012, 14:39
Yeah, I have seen some pretty good bulk buys on 9mm so I went with 40%. Me. I load it for $3.5 per hundred.

About what I load my .357 Sig for.

ron59
10-02-2012, 16:28
I load 1000 9mm for $110.

I can load 100 in maybe 7 minutes on my Dillon 650.
I could load 100 in 10 minutes on my Dillon 550.

A good press isn't cheap, but if you see yourself shooting for a few years, it will more than pay for itself.

To get your prices down, you have to buy in BULK! I buy 20,000 primers at a time from Powder Valley... 10,000 would be my minimum. Add 8 pounds of powder too.

I also shoot Bear Creek moly bullets, 147grainers. I get them for $71 or so per 1000. I feel they are every bit as accurate as the jacketed bullets I used previously, Montang Gold or Precision Delta.

How to reload with a Dillon RL 550B Part 1 - YouTube
5 videos of 10 minutes each. Shows how easy it is to do. Watching these, I ordered my 550B that same day.

stak
10-02-2012, 16:31
A popular choice is the Lee Classic Turret (200 rounds/hour) from Kempf...

Compared the Kempf kit:
$222.90 kit @ Kempf
+$29.67 (Kempf shipping)
+$11.99 (Midway taper crimp)
+$3.00 (Midway special handling)
+$4.67 (Midway shipping)
=$272.23

Get it all from Midway w/ the 3 die and taper crimp, leaving out the FCD all together:
$233.58
+$20.90 (shipping)
=$254.48

Colorado4Wheel
10-02-2012, 16:38
Interesting.

geoemery
10-02-2012, 16:41
Using Berry's 124 gr round nose, primers, and choice of powder, it cost me about $0.14 per round. If on sale the cheapest 9mm I can get is $0.18. At 500 rounds a week, you save about $20 per week. Assuming 26 weeks of shooting, you have $520 for start up of reloading equipment to break even. The second year you are that much ahead.

I use a LCT and can load about 50 rounds an hour. It was the least expensive way to start when I wasn't sure I wanted or could reload. The biggest single problem is finding low cost powder and primers due to additional fees to ship.

SARDG
10-02-2012, 16:44
Compared the Kempf kit:....
stak- What are you doing over here in 'Reloading' lately? :wavey:

k

F106 Fan
10-02-2012, 16:48
oops

Richard

shotgunred
10-02-2012, 16:52
For the volume you are talking the Dillon 550 or 650 are the best choices. the Lee cast turret and single stages would be to slow.

Everyone in my IDPA club except one single marine reloads. At least 15 of them, me included reload 9mm. I am currently reloading 124 gr 9mm for $117 a K or $5.85 cents a box of 50. A quick look at Cabelas shows 123gr American eagle 50 pack for $15.99.

So yes it pays to reload. Now a note of caution the only way to get the price most of us have listed is to buy in bulk. SO if you buy your components in bulk, buy a 550 and the other stuff you need you are looking at around a grand upfront. The rate that you are shooting you would pay for your equipment in no time.

JaPes
10-02-2012, 16:52
IFirst of all, I shoot mainly 9mm, is it really worth buying the equipment and supplies?

Yes it is worth it. You'll go into it intending only to load 9mm, but you'll end up loading for other calibers. Once you make the initial investment in equipment, consumables for a single caliber, adding calibers is a matter of buying dies.

There is also the indescribable quasi-mad-scientist satisfaction from shooting your own handloads.

Bulk prices aren't bad but can anyone give me a ballpark as to how much I might save?

http://www.handloads.com/calc/loadingCosts.asp

Input your local prices for powder & primer. Search for your desired projectile via an online vendor. Use the Hodgdon Reloading Data center (http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp) to estimate your charge weight. What projectile do you want to use? FMJ, Copper Plated, Lead (hard cast)?

I input the cost of components used for my current batch of 9mm. $0.081 per round

$4.07 per 50

$81.39 per 1,000

You can estimate your own reloading costs & compare them to the prices you pay for bulk ammo.

stak
10-02-2012, 17:57
stak- What are you doing over here in 'Reloading' lately? :wavey:

k

oops

Richard

You know how I love numbers and spreadsheets!

:rofl: LOL

I've been lurking a long time and decided it is about time to start my next hobby.

-Mike

SARDG
10-02-2012, 20:29
...I've been lurking a long time and decided it is about time to start my next hobby.

-Mike
Wanna buy a 650?? :whistling:










j/k - what's not to luv about my 650? :supergrin:

stak
10-02-2012, 21:14
Are you going to get a 1050?

If I were a couple thousand miles closer I would probably take you up on it.
Wanna buy a 650?? :whistling:










j/k - what's not to luv about my 650? :supergrin:

Dakota Carpenter
10-02-2012, 21:37
Thanks again you guys are really helpin me out. I plan on loading FMJ, either 115 or 124. Being that the cold is coming soon, shooting will drastically slow down so I should be able to save up the cash to get started soon. I'm thinking the Dillon 550 is the way to go. One question, how many of you check every completed round with a caliper or gauge? I know it's important but damn! The YouTube link was great by the way.

SARDG
10-02-2012, 21:57
Are you going to get a 1050?
1050? :cool: Not right away though - I'm actually looking for a larger house, in which case I'd likely keep the 650, too.

Richard and unclebob say I should get a 1050 sometime, so who am I to argue... :shocked:

SARDG
10-02-2012, 22:11
Thanks again you guys are really helpin me out. I plan on loading FMJ, either 115 or 124. Being that the cold is coming soon, shooting will drastically slow down so I should be able to save up the cash to get started soon. I'm thinking the Dillon 550 is the way to go. One question, how many of you check every completed round with a caliper or gauge? I know it's important but damn! The YouTube link was great by the way.
Just make sure you have your load developed and are confident it works perfectly for you - before the winter chill sets in and you load 10,000 rounds. :)

I try to case gauge every round I'll use in an important match (after they are all loaded) - but sometimes just can't get a Round Tuit and it doesn't get done. I'll pull an occassional completed cartridge out of the bin as I'm going along and measure the OAL and crimp, and I'll pull an occassional case off the press and measure the powder drop on a digital scale. All this probably explains why my production rate doesn't near approach the advertised rate of the press.

F106 Fan
10-02-2012, 22:12
Thanks again you guys are really helpin me out. I plan on loading FMJ, either 115 or 124. Being that the cold is coming soon, shooting will drastically slow down so I should be able to save up the cash to get started soon. I'm thinking the Dillon 550 is the way to go. One question, how many of you check every completed round with a caliper or gauge? I know it's important but damn! The YouTube link was great by the way.

The 550 will be an excellent choice. You can start with the basic machine and add the strong mount stuff later. It's nice to get the press up higher but it isn't compelling. The strong mounts, bullet tray and output bin add about $120 of deferrable costs. I still don't use the roller handles...

The nice thing about Dillon is that the products are guaranteed FOREVER and the warranty transfers. That's why the stuff sells for a premium on the used market.

I check the first few rounds when I start making a batch to be certain my bullet seating die is correct. This is important when loading cast lead bullets because the bullet lube fouls the die and bullets tend to load short. Not a problem with FMJ. For cast bullets, it might be worth checking one every hundred or so. Maybe every time the primer tube needs to be filled.

I also run a few through a case gauge to be certain the resizing die and taper crimp die are doing their jobs.

I check several charges before I start loading and I check again every few hundred rounds if I think about it.

These are machines; once they are properly adjusted, consistency should be pretty automatic.

Now, competitive shooters take a different view and they will drop every match round in the chamber (barrel removed, of course) just to be absolutely certain they don't have a failure during an event. Practice rounds are seldom checked.

Richard

njl
10-02-2012, 22:16
If you can afford to buy all your components in bulk and have a cheap supply of brass, you can reload 9mm for a little more than half the cost of buying it at Wal-Mart.

By bulk, I mean ordering primers by at least the case (5k) if not multiple cases, preferably combined with powder (4lb, 8lb, etc.) so you get them on one hazmat charge, and bullets at least 2-3k at a time.

If you buy your supplies 1lb of powder, 100 bullets, and a few hundred primers at a time at Bass Pro or Gander Mountain, you probably won't save any $ over Wal-Mart. If you buy new brass there too, you may actually spend more making your first reloads than buying factory ammo.

Hopefully, you planned ahead and have been saving your used brass for some time. I saved my brass for years, knowing that I wanted to get into reloading eventually.

Dakota Carpenter
10-02-2012, 22:41
I have thousands and thousands of rounds saved that should last me a while. For buying supplies in bulk, what are some good sites to order from? I've used Midway USA for other things and I see they advertise reloading supplies.

Dakota Carpenter
10-02-2012, 22:47
Any opinions on the Lee Pro 1000 progressive press? I see its a lot cheaper and has a casing feeder. The only disadvantage I see is that you may not be able to change calibers. Is that true?

njl
10-02-2012, 22:48
I've gotten powder/primers from Grafs mostly, also Wideners. Bullets (jacketed) from Shooters Connection, Precision Delta, and Montana Gold.

shotgunred
10-03-2012, 05:54
Any opinions on the Lee Pro 1000 progressive press? I see its a lot cheaper and has a casing feeder. The only disadvantage I see is that you may not be able to change calibers. Is that true?

It is a lot cheaper for a reason. Quality! Lee presses tend to need a lot of attention and tinkering to keep them running. A Lee Pro 1000 progressive press vs a Dillon is like comparing a harbor freight saw vs a Dewalt worm drive.

Hoser
10-03-2012, 06:15
Any opinions on the Lee Pro 1000 progressive press?

Many opinions. None of them favorable.

F106 Fan
10-03-2012, 07:19
I have thousands and thousands of rounds saved that should last me a while. For buying supplies in bulk, what are some good sites to order from? I've used Midway USA for other things and I see they advertise reloading supplies.

All of the major suppliers sell reloading supplies but they are ALL overpriced compared to the manufacturers and specialty suppliers.

For jacketed bullets, Precision Delta is the place to go:
http://precisiondelta.com/product.php?indx=5

Montana Gold is another great supplier:
http://www.montanagoldbullet.com/

For powder and primers, Powder Valley is the place to go:
http://powdervalleyinc.com/

There's another thread running on cast lead bullets:
http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1445834

There is a 'suppliers' sticky at the top of the forum.

When you order powder or primers there is a HazMat fee involved in shipping. Powder Valley charges $27.50 for 48# (I believe) of mixed powder and primers. It pays to fill up the order, cash flow permitting. Ten thousand primers (about $300) and 8# of powder (about $120) is enough to make about ten thousand rounds. Prices in () are just a guess and, of course, they are all dependent on which primers and which powder. But basically, you need to buy a few hundred dollars worth to make the HazMat fee become insignificant. You can't buy just 1000 primers ($30) and then pay the HazMat fee ($27.50) and come out ahead of just buying at the LGS.

Search the forum for other suppliers of jacketed bullets. Zero bullets are pretty nice. I got them from:
http://czcustom.com/zero-bullets.aspx

Richard

F106 Fan
10-03-2012, 07:40
Any opinions on the Lee Pro 1000 progressive press? I see its a lot cheaper and has a casing feeder. The only disadvantage I see is that you may not be able to change calibers. Is that true?

Adding a case feeder definitely improves productivity. The Dillon 550 may be 500 rounds per hour while the 650 does 800. Is the extra 300 rounds per hour worth the extra $300? Absolutely! Cash flow permitting, of course.

That's why SARDG is the smartest of us all. She went right for the 650 and didn't waste a lot of time and money stepping up through various incantations of reloading machines.

Here's a selector for Dillon machines:
http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/customize-reloader.html

I added a 650 to my collection for loading .223 and 9mm. I bought all of the options except the handle and I believe it came to almost exactly $1000. FWIW, I ordered if from BrianEnos.com for the same price as buying direct from Dillon except shipping is FREE. That's about $30 or another 1000 primers!

On the low end, dollar wise, for reloading machines, folks around here are willing to suggest the Lee Classic Turret. It works well enough, it's cheap enough and the production rate isn't truly grim. But it's still 4 handle strokes per loaded round.

However, most everyone here would rather see newcomers load with Dillon machines. And almost everyone around here does exactly that. They like their machines, they have iterated through other machines and are pretty convinced that Dillon is the way to go.

It is also true that Dillon machines are relatively expensive and sometimes hard to justify. And why would a newcomer take it on faith and ramblings on the Internet that, indeed, Dillon is the way to go?

I suggest that newcomers take a longer view of reloading. As long as I shoot, I will be reloading. And I might as well have the right equipment for the job.

Richard

fredj338
10-03-2012, 11:13
Lee makes regressive loaders, Dillon makes progressive loaders. There, pretty much cleared that one up. The Lee can be made to run but most struggle & end up loading something like 250rds/hr anyway. All that to save a couple $100, just not worth it. Buy quality once, it will last you until you die. Unless that is next year, you are always better off w/ quality tools. If you are all thumbs & not mechanically inclined, hate tinkering w/ equip, then the Lee will only frustrate you. If you just want to take the press out of the box & start reloading, Dillon all the way.

M24C
10-03-2012, 11:43
Get a 550 or 650 Dillon and don't look back. I've had my 550 for 20 years! If you get the 650 it will be faster.

Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

Dakota Carpenter
10-21-2012, 19:00
Got the Dillon 550 on Friday and shot my first batch of reloads today! They shot just as good or maybe even better than factory. I tried out some different powders and primers before I buy bulk. So far I like Unique the best. Thanks again everyone for getting me started


Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

shotgunred
10-21-2012, 19:05
Great choice. You will enjoy it for years.

ADK_40GLKr
10-21-2012, 19:54
You save about 40% reloading 9mm.

What quantity in supplies saves 40%?

1000? Or greater than 1000?

Is a pound of powder good for about 1K rounds?

SARDG
10-21-2012, 20:38
What quantity in supplies saves 40%?

1000? Or greater than 1000?

Is a pound of powder good for about 1K rounds?
One lb = 7,000 grains, so...

For all your components, you'll have to do the math for various quantities of factory vs. reloads. Because of haz-mat fees you'll have to order more primers/powder, rather than less. Certainly, the more you can order, the more you will save per round - but again, you'll need to do the math for various quantities, and figuring in any shipping and haz-mat fees.

My last order to PV was about $900 for primers/powder only.

njl
10-21-2012, 22:14
My last order to PV was about $900 for primers/powder only.

That's gotta hurt, but unless you're retired and shooting full time, you probably do such an order less than once a year.

F106 Fan
10-21-2012, 22:34
What quantity in supplies saves 40%?

1000? Or greater than 1000?

Is a pound of powder good for about 1K rounds?

My preferred suppliers:

Powder Valley for primers and powder
Precision Delta for jacketed bullets
Dillon for S&S Casting lead bullets
Montana Gold for jacketed bullets

If you load 5 grains then 7000 / 5 => 1400 rounds per pound of powder.

The HazMat fee is strictly on primers and powder. It's $27.50 plus whatever the shipping comes to when you buy from Powder Valley. My LGS wants something like $45/1000 for primers and PV wants $30. By the time I buy 2000 primers, the HazMat fee is covered. If I buy 3000, even the shipping is covered.

I buy primers in lots of 5000 and throw in 8# of so of powder. I might also add in individual 1# cans of powder I want to test. In effect, the HazMat fee and shipping become insignificant.

It gets pretty insane to buy 10,000 primers (about $300) and 8# of powder (about $120) but that's enough to make 10k rounds of ammo with some powder left over. That's only $40/1000 plus whatever the bullets cost. It's pretty easy to keep the cost of 9mm jacketed down below $130/1000 when Precision Delta sells 124 gr FMJ for $85/1000 shipped (in lots of 2000).

The cash flow isn't pretty! You spend about $600 on supplies right up front and add another $680 for buy the next 8k bullets (later) and you're into it for $1280 to make 10,000 rounds. So, right at $0.128/round or $6.40/box.

You could reduce that cost by $17/1000 buying S&S Casting lead bullets from Dillon. You can probably find them even cheaper.

I don't think anyone wants to do the math beyond $0.12/round. It gets scary when you actually consider blowing up $1200 worth of ammo in a year!

Richard

SARDG
10-21-2012, 22:55
That's gotta hurt, but unless you're retired and shooting full time, you probably do such an order less than once a year.
Yes, that should last about one year - maybe a bit longer for the primers, less for the powder. It's that darn N320; ka-ching, ka-ching...

shotgunred
10-22-2012, 06:06
You have to shop around. A local mom n pop gun store sells me powder for the same price as Powder Valley as long as buy it in 4 or 8 pound jugs. Primers are the only thing that I have to pay hasmat on. I just buy at least 10 k at a time and don't worry about it. When you buy in bulk you can afford to wait until they have a sale or offer free shipping which they do several times a year.