How often would you change oil based on time as opposed to miles? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Reyn
10-02-2012, 13:07
If you averaged 5,000 miles a year,how often would you change your oil? I've had mine 6 months and still only at 3000 miles.

I did add a quart a month ago because it was low but it will be close to a year before I have 5-6,000 miles.

This is a truck given to me and it has 290k miles on it now 99 GMC.

Chiefret
10-02-2012, 13:10
I drive my Jeep less than 1000 miles a year so I figured once a year was fine.

The Hawk
10-02-2012, 13:14
Once a year will be fine. Congrats to who ever took care of that truck before you. Sounds like it still has someone that wants to keep it going. Good for you!

DanaT
10-02-2012, 13:16
Oil changes are not required.

It is a myth that perpetuated by big oil companies and auto manufacturer affiliated dealerships to rob citizens of billions of dollars each year.

SC Tiger
10-02-2012, 13:18
If you averaged 5,000 miles a year,how often would you change your oil? I've had mine 6 months and still only at 3000 miles.

I did add a quart a month ago because it was low but it will be close to a year before I have 5-6,000 miles.

This is a truck given to me and it has 290k miles on it now 99 GMC.

I'd probably do once/year and use Synthetic 10-30 oil, just because. If Valvoline still makes the Synthetic Max Life, that would be my first choice (synthetics can supposedly cause leaks in older vehicles, and Max Life is supposed to combat that).

Reyn
10-02-2012, 13:23
Once a year will be fine. Congrats to who ever took care of that truck before you. Sounds like it still has someone that wants to keep it going. Good for you!

Yeah,my father in law had it. He bought it from another guy when it had 100k. He has replaced the transmission twice but he pulled some good loads at work on a trailer.

It's a Z71 1500 Sierra. Only thing I replaced was some gaskets in the seats because around that time GMC had these plastic pieces in the seats that would eventually disintegrate due to the grease they used. This caused the seats to move ever so slightly when taking off or stopping.

Guy on eBay sells a kit for like 12 dollars and it works great.

goldenlight
10-03-2012, 04:44
I drive less than 6000 miles per year now.

I just change oil/filter just before the really cold weather hits every year.

I only drive my '88 Toyota Celica about 1000 mile a year now, and I change the oil/filter on that once a year too.

The Machinist
10-03-2012, 05:16
If you averaged 5,000 miles a year,how often would you change your oil?
Every two years.

PhotoFeller
10-03-2012, 06:09
I'm in the low-mileage boat too, and my car is driven less than 2000 miles per year. The dealership says to change annually, but I don't see the logic of that.

This car does get started for a short trip once or twice each month, so the oil is circulated out of the pan and through the filter. It is in the southern US, so there is no exposure to freezing temperatures. The only contaminate getting into the oil might be...what? Condensation?

I'm not opposed to annual changes, but I just don't understand why a modern lubricant would break down under so little use. I really want to know the 'why' behind the annual change recommendation.

Tackle
10-03-2012, 06:12
I usually shoot for once in the fall and once in the spring...about 6 months apart. 2 years ago in a 6 month stretch I only put 900 miles on my daily driver!

DanaT
10-03-2012, 06:14
I really want to know the 'why' behind the annual change recommendation.

I already explained it. It is a conspiracy that is controlled by the Illuminati and New world order to finance the large multinational oil companies which in turn makes you depend upon them and they are controlled by the New World Order and hence it is part of the UN scheme to take over and create a one world government. It all starts with oil.

Oil changes are not required.

It is a myth that perpetuated by big oil companies and auto manufacturer affiliated dealerships to rob citizens of billions of dollars each year.

sheriff733
10-03-2012, 06:17
Once a year.

Dan_ntx
10-03-2012, 06:23
I drive maybe 8000 miles a year, and I have the oil changed every 6 months.

PhotoFeller
10-03-2012, 07:18
There must be a lubricant engineer or a good mechanic out there in GT Land who can explain what happens (or doesn't happen) to oil in an engine that is operated infrequently. Seems to me the answer lies in the basics of internal combustion engine operation and lubrication chemistry.

Psychman
10-03-2012, 07:57
I really want a lucid answer to the OPs question also. One of my cars is driven maybe 2K a year.

ca survivor
10-04-2012, 06:11
I go every 3,500 miles oil and filter, not by time....

PhotoFeller
10-04-2012, 06:55
To change oil on the basis of time suggests that there is a 'shelf life' after which the lubricant loses it's effectiveness. Do constituents of the oil evaporate somehow in the vehicle's closed lubrication system? Do constituents break down over time, diminishing the oil's lubricating qualities?

When I visually check oil that has been in my vehicle after 2 years of very low mileage, it looks just like it did coming out of the original can. When the engine is started, oil is circulated through a quality filter that should remove any contaminates. I'm just thinking that a mileage-based oil change program makes the most sense; if a 2 or 3 year max time criteria is also followed just to be on the safe side, that seems reasonable, too.

CitizenOfDreams
10-04-2012, 07:15
My rule is "once a year" for dyno oil and "whenever I feel like it" for synthetic.

GIockGuy24
10-04-2012, 07:41
I'd probably do once/year and use Synthetic 10-30 oil, just because. If Valvoline still makes the Synthetic Max Life, that would be my first choice (synthetics can supposedly cause leaks in older vehicles, and Max Life is supposed to combat that).

All motor oils rated GF-4 and GF-5 now have seal conditioner. It was not a requirement of the older GF-3 rating. Synthetic oils have all had seal conditioner longer ago that that but it's true the early synthetic oils had no seal conditioner and didn't swell rubber seals as much as conventional oils. Now synthetic and conventional oils all have seal conditioner.

I have two vehicles. I put about 5000 miles a year on them now. I used to drive a lot more though. I used to change oil every 3 months, then every 4 months, more recently ever 6 months and this year was the first year for 12 months, using extended drain synthetic oil. It still doesn't "look" very dirty.

GVFlyer
10-04-2012, 07:49
Annually on everything; it's required to maintain the warranties on the BMWs.

LEO/Dad
10-04-2012, 08:04
There must be a lubricant engineer or a good mechanic out there in GT Land who can explain what happens (or doesn't happen) to oil in an engine that is operated infrequently. Seems to me the answer lies in the basics of internal combustion engine operation and lubrication chemistry.

Engines don't reach high operating temperatures on short trips. Moisture and contaminants from combustion in your oil will not get hot enough from your engine to burn these off. Anyway, this is the way it was explained to me. I change my truck oil twice a year, while I only drive 2000 miles a year.

Psychman
10-04-2012, 08:07
We are still waiting for the oil expert.

JDennis
10-04-2012, 08:13
I change mine once a year in my hot rods since they see maybe 1-3k miles a year, I go every 6 months in my truck since it is driven about 4k a year and still under warranty, my beater I go 5k miles per oil change time doesn't matter on that one since I drive it 12-15k a year

SC Tiger
10-04-2012, 08:30
All motor oils rated GF-4 and GF-5 now have seal conditioner. It was not a requirement of the older GF-3 rating. Synthetic oils have all had seal conditioner longer ago that that but it's true the early synthetic oils had no seal conditioner and didn't swell rubber seals as much as conventional oils. Now synthetic and conventional oils all have seal conditioner.

I have two vehicles. I put about 5000 miles a year on them now. I used to drive a lot more though. I used to change oil every 3 months, then every 4 months, more recently ever 6 months and this year was the first year for 12 months, using extended drain synthetic oil. It still doesn't "look" very dirty.

I was not aware of that. I was always told that Synthetic can lead to leaks in older cars because the seals were intended to swell with conventional oil and did not do so reliably with synthetic.

PhotoFeller
10-04-2012, 08:38
My 2011 Toyota Sequoia maintenance schedule calls for oil changes every 5,000 miles or EVERY 6 MONTHS, which says that normal driving (12,000 miles/yr) under all road/weather/long and short trip conditions would require two changes per year.

I don't want to sound like I'm arguing on this topic. I'm really trying to understand what I need to do to protect my engines without being wasteful.

Caver 60
10-04-2012, 08:43
Engines don't reach high operating temperatures on short trips. Moisture and contaminants from combustion in your oil will not get hot enough from your engine to burn these off. Anyway, this is the way it was explained to me. I change my truck oil twice a year, while I only drive 2000 miles a year.

IMO this.

That kind of driving is what is known as 'severe driving.' It not only affects the oil, it's bad on other components such as exhaust, etc.

Come home at 5, park it in the driveway in case you want to go somewhere later, go out at 11:00 PM, start it and pull in the garage for the night, then shut it off. That is 'severe driving' and is probably harder on the engine than putting 200 or 300 miles a day on it.

Instead of driving 3 blocks to the corner store, buying something then coming back home, just walk or ride a bike. In other words every time you start the engine it should be brought up to full operating temperature. That will take several miles at least.

I'm not an automotive engineer, nor did I stay at a Holiday Inn last night.

Glock30Eric
10-04-2012, 08:51
Oil changes are not required.

It is a myth that perpetuated by big oil companies and auto manufacturer affiliated dealerships to rob citizens of billions of dollars each year.

What car do you have? Have you changed your car's oil ever since? How is it going? I am trying to open my mind with your perspective.

SC Tiger
10-04-2012, 09:07
IMO this.

That kind of driving is what is known as 'severe driving.' It not only affects the oil, it's bad on other components such as exhaust, etc.

Come home at 5, park it in the driveway in case you want to go somewhere later, go out at 11:00 PM, start it and pull in the garage for the night, then shut it off. That is 'severe driving' and is probably harder on the engine than putting 200 or 300 miles a day on it.

Instead of driving 3 blocks to the corner store, buying something then coming back home, just walk or ride a bike. In other words every time you start the engine it should be brought up to full operating temperature. That will take several miles at least.

I'm not an automotive engineer, nor did I stay at a Holiday Inn last night.

One thing on the warm-up is that modern cars warm up really fast. My Civic will go from dead cold to operating temperature within a mile or two. I think automakers are refining the thermostat and cooling systems to hit OT earlier and maintain it better. The cooling fan in this thing will literally kick on for 20-30 seconds at a time and shut off.

SC Tiger
10-04-2012, 09:08
Oil changes are not required.

It is a myth that perpetuated by big oil companies and auto manufacturer affiliated dealerships to rob citizens of billions of dollars each year.

Don't forget the quickie-lubes.

Z71bill
10-04-2012, 09:29
Changing oil more than once per year - 5-6K miles on a 1999 Z-71 with 290K miles on it is a waste --

IIRC (I had a 1999 Chevy Z-71 with the 5.3L) the manual calls for 1 per year / 7,500 miles.

I can maybe see wanting to do more frequent maintenance on a new vehicle that you plan to keep a long time -

6 months 1,000 miles seems like extreme waste of resources for most vehicles (always an exception).

Maybe the people posting what they do should also -

Indicate what the owners manual says the oil change internal should be.

My Tahoe calls for 12 month 10K miles - I followed this while under warranty -

I am out of warranty now - have always used Mobile-1 and AC Delco filters.

Last change was 20 months - 5,500 miles. Main reason I changed it was I was about to take a vacation and drive 2,000+ miles.

Back in the days of carburetors - short trips in cold temps caused oil to get contaminated quick. Mostly unburned gas / water (condensation) getting in the oil.

Fuel injection & computer controlled ignition have reduced this WAY down. It is 2012 not 1962. :rofl:

wlkjr
10-04-2012, 09:39
We are still waiting for the oil expert.

Probably won't find one here. Most everyone already has their mind made up so advice won't change it. For those who are not sure visit
http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=cfrm

SPIN2010
10-04-2012, 09:44
Once a year or 10k whichever comes first (using Shell Rotella synthetic) here.

GIockGuy24
10-04-2012, 13:13
One of my neighbors is a retired Pennzoil oil engineer. He used Mobil 1 0W40 European even though his cars aren't European but he claims it's one of the best motor oils available. He recently switched to Pennzoil Ultra since they upgraded it with the change from the SM version to the current SN version which uses a higher grade base oil. He says even though Pennzoil doesn't market as an extended drain oil it does have an extended drain additive package and now uses a higher grade base oil than Pennzoil Platinum, which isn't a "bad" oil itself. Previously the SM version used the same base oil as Pennzoil Platinum but with an extended drain additive package. Pennzoil Platinum and Quaker State synthetic use the a similar base oil but the Quaker State version uses a cheaper additive package that is prepared and sold by the chemical company to meet certain standards while Pennzoil Platinum uses a custom additive package with additives from different companies, none of them are the one that makes the additive package for Quaker State though.

DanaT
10-04-2012, 13:29
Don't forget the quickie-lubes.

No, they are just pawns of big oil.

Glock30Eric
10-04-2012, 14:08
No, they are just pawns of big oil.

I am waiting for your response to my questions.

DanaT
10-04-2012, 14:34
What car do you have? Have you changed your car's oil ever since? How is it going? I am trying to open my mind with your perspective.

I just push the start button. Sometimes I have to add fuel.

Glock30Eric
10-04-2012, 16:47
I just push the start button. Sometimes I have to add fuel.

Ok I get it.

Jake514
10-07-2012, 15:45
Engines don't reach high operating temperatures on short trips. Moisture and contaminants from combustion in your oil will not get hot enough from your engine to burn these off. Anyway, this is the way it was explained to me. I change my truck oil twice a year, while I only drive 2000 miles a year.

I agree with short trips not allowing high enough operating temps to properly rid the system of moisture.
I am not the "oil expert," but until he shows up:
*Synthetic oil does not gather moisture from the atmosphere like dino oil, so in theory if you use synthetic your oil should last longer.
*The large trucking company I worked for many years ago was afraid to use synthetic oil in their wheel bearings as they were told the seals would start to leak. They tried synthetic wheel lube and the seals actually swelled up tighter and the wheel seal failures dropped.
*Depends somewhat on if you car is stored indoors or outdoors.

ede
10-07-2012, 16:43
I change the oil once a year in my truck that gets less than 2500 miles a year and my tractor that gets less than 25 hours a year.

TransAm-98
10-07-2012, 17:37
I drive my Trans Am 1k miles or less a year and I just change the oil out once a year. My Trailblazer takes the majority of the abuse and I change the oil about every 10k miles. The car probably see's at least 20k a year. I use Amsoil in both cars. Technically, I can prabably drag my oil changes out even longer in the Trans Am. But there is a lot of money in that car and with the car just sitting for most of the year, attracting moisture and potentially breaking down even a little bit, swapping it out once a year is preventative maintenance as far as I'm concerned.

loum
10-07-2012, 21:45
Sort of related:

Do any of you who drive so very few miles have any problems with the batteries staying charged? Do you keep them on a trickle charger between runs, or is this unnecessary if you make frequent short runs? I'm just curious as to how much engine running is needed to maintain a charge.

noway
10-08-2012, 01:31
The car mfg'er are always going to have tighter suggested intervals. if you really want to know how your oil is doing in your car and in your environment and under your conditions,


Invest in a NDI lab and a oil analysis

http://www.blackstone-labs.com/

Oil changes are cheap and I never heard of anyone complaining of to many oil changes.With that said my 3rd vehicle which is hardly driven, get's about 1-2 oil changes per year. I basically change the oil due to it's color and not by any miles driven.

sputnik767
10-08-2012, 02:23
We are still waiting for the oil expert.

bobistheoilguy.com

PhotoFeller
10-08-2012, 07:09
Sort of related:

Do any of you who drive so very few miles have any problems with the batteries staying charged? Do you keep them on a trickle charger between runs, or is this unnecessary if you make frequent short runs? I'm just curious as to how much engine running is needed to maintain a charge.

I use a trickle charger from AAA that cycles on and off depending on the battery's charge level. This device saves batteries in seldom driven vehicles. For an investment of $25-$35, trickle chargers preserve battery functionality, extend battery life and avoid lots of grief.

CitizenOfDreams
10-08-2012, 07:15
Do any of you who drive so very few miles have any problems with the batteries staying charged?

I did with my old generator (the brushes were pretty much gone). With a properly working generator, a few miles should be enough to top up the battery. How many miles exactly, depends on the car and the specifics of the trips.

loum
10-08-2012, 07:17
Thanks. I thought that might be a good idea.

GIockGuy24
10-08-2012, 07:39
Sort of related:

Do any of you who drive so very few miles have any problems with the batteries staying charged? Do you keep them on a trickle charger between runs, or is this unnecessary if you make frequent short runs? I'm just curious as to how much engine running is needed to maintain a charge.

Batteries age and get old. As they age they put a higher load and stress on the charging system. Even if they still start the engine, they should be replaced at least every 5 years. Even the long life premium ones will start to stress the charging system if they are left to get too old. Cheap batteries may fail sooner, but 5 years isn't a terrible expensive for a good battery. 5 years on the first one and the second one may last until the car is 10 years old.

On newer cars, the electrical systems drain the battery, even when the car is not in use, which is separate from battery life and replacement, but if driven very little or stored for long periods, the battery is will drain if not disconnected.