where does your electricity come from? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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raven11
10-02-2012, 14:39
I received my "Environmental Disclosure" letter from my electric company. While there are 2-3 out of six nuclear power plants in the state near my home nuclear power only makes up 35% of the power I get while coal generates 50%.


the local news talked about how the EPA regulations for 2013 might force some of the coal plants to shut down in our area and how energy prices might rise. I assumed I was safe from a rate change because I live a couple of miles from a nuclear power plant. I guess not

Ragnar
10-02-2012, 14:40
My electricity comes from the wall outlet.

Morris
10-02-2012, 15:55
Hydro.

pac201
10-02-2012, 15:57
mine comes from the electricity fairy, for free...:whistling:

TucsonGlocker
10-02-2012, 16:12
Mine comes from my neighbor's house.. A well placed 100' extension cord and voilą, I no longer have an electric bill! :tongueout:

jtull7
10-02-2012, 18:53
Lightening?

boozer
10-02-2012, 19:18
With my neighboring states filing lawsuits over sulphur emissions and the acidifying their rain water, my power plants have switched from coal to natural gas.

The ancient ones have shut down, just as they would have if coal burning wasn't becoming environmentally prohibitive.

The coal mines in the Ohio valley are selling to China, they have no problems burning it and spewing tons of sulpher and mercury into their atmosphere.

Ferdinandd
10-02-2012, 19:21
Mostly coal here in Ohio. We have plenty of the stuff.

fwm
10-02-2012, 20:04
Mostly coal here in Ohio. We have plenty of the stuff.

until the obama lead epa outlaws coal fired plants.

DaneA
10-02-2012, 20:42
Dunno, I would presume nuclear or hydro since I have 3 nuke plants within 50 miles and a hydro plant about 2 miles up the street.

SC Tiger
10-03-2012, 06:44
My electricity comes from the wall outlet.

Beat me to it. :rofl:

Seriously, probably the nuke plant (Oconee Nuclear Station) 10 miles away, though there is also a hydro plant about 20-30 miles away (Duke Power Bad Creek).

ETA - I think FullClip is actually right about the power "mixing." IIRC there are three major power grids in the US - Eastern, Western, and Texas. I think Alaska buys their power from Canada.

FullClip
10-03-2012, 07:20
Once the electricty from a power plant hits the grid, it "mixes" with all the other power plants, so unless you are on an island with only one source, you're getting a mix of sources.
I haven't found anything in the USA that shows that mix in real time, but here is a link to the national grid in Spain, that shows in real time, what percentage of the total power on the grid is coming from what type of source.

https://demanda.ree.es/demandaEng.html


Had to use this a lot when I was over there testing new power plants to get a window where I could vary the load without causing too many problems for the dispatchers.

Ironbar
10-03-2012, 07:22
100% Columbia River hydro.

uptomyneck
10-03-2012, 08:20
I get most of my power from my PV panels.

http://i48.tinypic.com/2hi88b4.jpg

mgs
10-03-2012, 08:28
Coal, Natural Gas & a Nuke......I'm good with all. They get the job done. One is cleaner but more of a danger. All are dangerous if run by idots.

FFR Spyder GT
10-03-2012, 09:15
Whatever you use it gets from the power plant to your house by cable that was made in the USA by Union workers.

.264 magnum
10-03-2012, 10:24
Once the electricty from a power plant hits the grid, it "mixes" with all the other power plants, so unless you are on an island with only one source, you're getting a mix of sources.
I haven't found anything in the USA that shows that mix in real time, but here is a link to the national grid in Spain, that shows in real time, what percentage of the total power on the grid is coming from what type of source.

https://demanda.ree.es/demandaEng.html


Had to use this a lot when I was over there testing new power plants to get a window where I could vary the load without causing too many problems for the dispatchers.

In Texas we have a stupid marketing ploy such that people may buy power from a company like Green Mountain Energy. GME make power from wind mostly and sells at a premium of course. End users may pay special and higher rates to buy from GME.

The funny thing is most people - my neighbor being one - buys from GME. She is convinced that every electron alternation into her house comes from GME windmills. I gave up trying to explain long ago.

Drain You
10-03-2012, 10:26
I get most of my power from my PV panels.

http://i48.tinypic.com/2hi88b4.jpg


How unsightly and seemingly affected by wind that looks. I thought you put those down on the roof?

Steel Head
10-03-2012, 10:26
Hydro and wind farms.

gjk5
10-03-2012, 10:34
How unsightly and seemingly affected by wind that looks. I thought you put those down on the roof?

I've also never seen one mounted that high and we have a LOT of solar here.

Glock20 10mm
10-03-2012, 11:07
From these...
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-YLo8Tr57bDM/UFIlaemX2ZI/AAAAAAAAAKY/MRptSjOCYuw/s1600/DSC00646.JPG

To these...
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0rVU6vTs13c/UFIlUlzlfuI/AAAAAAAAAJ8/KzU1Xab8bJY/s1600/DSC00641.JPG

To this...
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-RQlJM7Wl-8Q/TlZrRRcm_FI/AAAAAAAAAKQ/X_OXnPkp3ZY/s1600/Electrical-Outlet-Covers-16.jpg

I produce my own. These images (exception of the outlet) are from a bit back when I was still tuning the system. The wiring is much cleaner now and all the panels are installed.

Glock20 10mm
10-03-2012, 11:13
How unsightly and seemingly affected by wind that looks. I thought you put those down on the roof?

It appears they were mounted on the "backside" and angled to meet the sun. I have seen this before in other installations... and it is unsightly, I agree. As for wind... it should be fine for most ares, but where I live... mount something like that on your roof you'll be watching it fly away.

SC Tiger
10-03-2012, 11:15
From these...
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-YLo8Tr57bDM/UFIlaemX2ZI/AAAAAAAAAKY/MRptSjOCYuw/s1600/DSC00646.JPG

To these...
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0rVU6vTs13c/UFIlUlzlfuI/AAAAAAAAAJ8/KzU1Xab8bJY/s1600/DSC00641.JPG

To this...
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-RQlJM7Wl-8Q/TlZrRRcm_FI/AAAAAAAAAKQ/X_OXnPkp3ZY/s1600/Electrical-Outlet-Covers-16.jpg

I produce my own. These images (exception of the outlet) are from a bit back when I was still tuning the system. The wiring is much cleaner now and all the panels are installed.

Are you 100% "off the grid"?

Cali-Glock
10-03-2012, 11:15
I am at work - most of the power for our 50k sq foot building comes from PV panels.

Dennis in MA
10-03-2012, 11:32
Based on my electric bill, I'd guess hydro - only b/c they "buy" electricity in my local muni electric company from the Canadanaians.

Honestly, with a grid, do they really know where "my" power comes from??? I've got 3 stations generating within 15 miles of my home. But the credit goes to the Canadians. The locals are mostly gas-fired with one coal-fired that ran during this hot summer and hasn't run in earnest in a month. (Coal is 'spensive.)

Glock20 10mm
10-03-2012, 11:41
Are you 100% "off the grid"?

Yup. No power from any source other than solar and occasionally our generator. Soon we will have a 750W 24V wind turbine for winter power production as well.

http://mcdianpower.blogspot.com/2011/08/in-beginning-we-had-idea.html

eracer
10-03-2012, 12:00
I get most of my power from my PV panels.

http://i48.tinypic.com/2hi88b4.jpgYou, sir, are a thief!

You steal free energy from the sun and steal profits from the pockets of the kind-hearted providers of monetized energy.

Many plants had to die to make the fossil fuels that companies like Exxon collect and sell to make billions of dollars.

For shame, sir....for shame.:fred:

gjk5
10-03-2012, 12:15
Yup. No power from any source other than solar and occasionally our generator. Soon we will have a 750W 24V wind turbine for winter power production as well.

http://mcdianpower.blogspot.com/2011/08/in-beginning-we-had-idea.html

would you mind pointing me in the direction of some good forums for this kind of info? I really want to upgrade my cabin's system (100% off grid) and would like some kind of aux power at my house as well.

Glock20 10mm
10-03-2012, 12:23
would you mind pointing me in the direction of some good forums for this kind of info? I really want to upgrade my cabin's system (100% off grid) and would like some kind of aux power at my house as well.

I didn't frequent any forums so I can't help you with suggestions there. I spent a lot of time reading then I took what I read and applied it to a simple 12V system. Once I understood by doing I was ready to move up to a more efficient system.

While not forums here are some resources I used:

http://www.hardysolar.com/off-grid/
http://www.siliconsolar.com/off-grid-solar-systems.html
http://www.off-grid.net/
http://www.wholesalesolar.com/products.folder/systems-folder/OffGridPackages.html

And of course my own experiences...
http://mcdianpower.blogspot.com/2011/08/in-beginning-we-had-idea.html

http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-product-design/generating-off-grid-power-the-four-best-ways.html

http://modernsurvivalonline.com/survival-database-downloads/off-grid-power/

http://www.mikebrownsolutions.com/OffGridSystem.htm

Many of these are sources I used in my research of off-grid systems. If you have questions PM me and I'll get you an e-mail address we can communicate with.

Glock20 10mm
10-03-2012, 15:49
So I got curious about something and did some quick calcs....

With my current electrical load at an average rate of $0.15/kWh I come to roughly $23.00 a month I would be paying in a utility bill. Now I am off grid so that means I will see a payback of my roughly $7,500.00 investment in like 31 years... that sucks.

But looking at what if I connected to PG&E... well the initial hook up (I called them an hour ago) for our property would run us $46,500.00. That's just to get power from the pole that is 10 feet from our property line AND has a transformer already installed, down to the main house. Then there is the smart meter hook-up fee (since we don't have a meter installed...) then we would get the monthly bill like everyone else... and on top of that, where we live is prone to power outages during foul weather... so you have to contend with power loss during the winter, which means you have to have a back-up power supply that will last up to 2 weeks as it may take that long to get power back up.

Anyhow... just tossing that out there. Right now our electrical load is less that 5kWh/day and most of that is refrigeration/deep freeze. Drop those two off, or convert them to DC compressors (efficiency gain as I wouldn't need an inverter for them). Which is what the plan is for the main house. I and a friend of mine are going to build a custom deep freeze and fridge that run @ 24VDC using Dan Foss compressors. It's actually pretty easy to do... but not cheap.

Paul53
10-03-2012, 21:25
El Paso Electric, natural gas, but there's a twist. They built 2 power plants both of which straddle the New Mexico/Texas border. They supply to both states, but straddling the border means they can charge higher rates to supply power interstate.

Louisville Glocker
10-03-2012, 21:37
Awesome pix guys....really enjoy it. I suppose I'm somewhat of an expert here. I teach Alternative and Traditional Energy class at my local college. Just today, I had a senior executive from Duke Energy (now the largest electrical energy supplier in the US after their recent merger) speaking in my class. It was a good hour and a half of vigorous discussion. (I have some good students with plenty of questions).

In short, here in Kentuckiana (I live in Kentucky -Louisville, but teach in Southern Indiana), we get virtually all of our electricity from coal. There is some hydroelectric on the Ohio river (right there in Louisville), and a bunch of windmills up in Northern Indiana (near Purdue, just north of Lafayette), but we're really in coal country.

On a related note, if anyone my area is free Saturday, there is a Louisville Solar Tour, where we'll be touring 30 sites around town of different solar, wind, geothermal, and other alternative energy structures. Fun stuff. Please pm me for more info if you're interested. I'm getting about half my class there, and there is a bus to run us around town. I'll cover costs if anyone here is interested.

P.S. Louisville electricity is about $0.075/KWH, just across the river, Duke charges $0.10/KWH.

Louisville Glocker
10-03-2012, 21:46
So I got curious about something and did some quick calcs....

With my current electrical load at an average rate of $0.15/kWh I come to roughly $23.00 a month I would be paying in a utility bill. Now I am off grid so that means I will see a payback of my roughly $7,500.00 investment in like 31 years... that sucks.

But looking at what if I connected to PG&E... well the initial hook up (I called them an hour ago) for our property would run us $46,500.00. That's just to get power from the pole that is 10 feet from our property line AND has a transformer already installed, down to the main house. Then there is the smart meter hook-up fee (since we don't have a meter installed...) then we would get the monthly bill like everyone else... and on top of that, where we live is prone to power outages during foul weather... so you have to contend with power loss during the winter, which means you have to have a back-up power supply that will last up to 2 weeks as it may take that long to get power back up.

Anyhow... just tossing that out there. Right now our electrical load is less that 5kWh/day and most of that is refrigeration/deep freeze. Drop those two off, or convert them to DC compressors (efficiency gain as I wouldn't need an inverter for them). Which is what the plan is for the main house. I and a friend of mine are going to build a custom deep freeze and fridge that run @ 24VDC using Dan Foss compressors. It's actually pretty easy to do... but not cheap.

That is a very LOW amount of electricity you're using per month! Much much less than most of us in this country, who are up around 1000 KWH/month (that'd be $150 at your high local rates, half that at mine). Actually, I think the average in the US is more than KWH/month per household. (depends on season). You're not grid tied, so you can't sell excess back unfortunately. Both IN and KY and most states require utilities to buy back excess electricity that you generate.

certifiedfunds
10-03-2012, 22:57
I have a friend who bought a private jet at age 40 from trading electricity. He just trades. I don't understand it.