take your time, you'll get it. [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Bill Powell
10-06-2012, 09:21
Here's one that may trip you up a little. It's the car facing in from the left.

el_jewapo
10-06-2012, 09:30
I don't know, all the cars in that picture are serving 1 purpose. They're blocking my escape route from stealing that Shelby.

Bill Powell
10-06-2012, 09:43
That mustang is the original King Cobra drag car. It only has about 6,000 miles on it, 1/4 mile at a time.

Rabbi
10-06-2012, 10:07
The car with the Boyce on it?

DanaT
10-06-2012, 10:13
Sorry. I have been doing something more useful than trying to identy cars from a partial picture.

I have been writing some algorithms to alter boost based upon the output of a flex fuel sensor. I have to decouple the amplitude from the pulse width because the combination the two give fuel temp/alcohol content. Controlling boost requires a DC signal that then inturn goes bake to a PWM signal to control a solenoid.

lethal tupperwa
10-06-2012, 10:14
Bill I remember 3 of those at a drag strip in York Pa.

Getting their clocks cleaned by a Vett form S&S in Philly.

Bill Powell
10-06-2012, 10:19
When you're really good a partial picture is all you need. besides, you can put a pilot control on that solenoid and make it work whenever you want.

RenoF250
10-06-2012, 10:24
Sorry. I have been doing something more useful than trying to identy cars from a partial picture.

I have been writing some algorithms to alter boost based upon the output of a flex fuel sensor. I have to decouple the amplitude from the pulse width because the combination the two give fuel temp/alcohol content. Controlling boost requires a DC signal that then inturn goes bake to a PWM signal to control a solenoid.

So what is there to work on? DC <-> PWM is easy sounds like a job for a little micro. 15 minutes and done. :tongueout:

Bill Powell
10-06-2012, 10:38
here you go

Rabbi
10-06-2012, 10:43
A National?

DanaT
10-06-2012, 10:46
When you're really good a partial picture is all you need. besides, you can put a pilot control on that solenoid and make it work whenever you want.

Not really. The problem comes down to knowing the octane of the fuel. A mixture of E85 and premium can be anywhere from 91 octane to about 105. To be able to run highest boost possible, the alcohol content is needed to know how hard it can be pushed.

Sure, the boost map can simply be re-programmed with every tank (or always run summer blend E85...but even that might not be 81% ethanol..or always run 91 octane fuel). But what I want to do is have the car know how much boost it can run based on the octane of fuel in it. Automatically adjust.

Its sort of like a trabant. Yes. one CAN measure fuel level with a stick, but that gas gauge thingy is a pretty slick alternative...

DanaT
10-06-2012, 10:48
So what is there to work on? DC <-> PWM is easy sounds like a job for a little micro. 15 minutes and done. :tongueout:

Not that hard, just having to make sure everything is scaled correctly.

jtull7
10-06-2012, 10:50
That is one beautiful car.

Gareth68
10-06-2012, 11:11
Franklin?

Bill Powell
10-06-2012, 13:16
Usually by post fifteen I will identify it. Remember all those Brewster bodied Springfield Rolls Royces. Well Brewster also built some complete cars. This is a 1915 Brewster knight Landaulet. The Knight designation means it has a Knight sleeve valve engine. It was called the Silent Knight because it had sleeves for valves.

Bill Powell
10-07-2012, 10:27
this is not really a bump. Brewster went into business in 1810 and was in business til the late thirties.

Here is the Brewster most recognizible.

Altaris
10-07-2012, 10:30
Is it a Honda Civic?

Bill Powell
10-07-2012, 20:32
I'm pretty sure it's not a Honda Civic.

HollowHead
10-07-2012, 20:38
Pierce Arrow? HH

Bill Powell
10-08-2012, 07:56
Nope, not a Pierce Arrow.

Haldor
10-08-2012, 10:15
I have been writing some algorithms to alter boost based upon the output of a flex fuel sensor. I have to decouple the amplitude from the pulse width because the combination the two give fuel temp/alcohol content. Controlling boost requires a DC signal that then inturn goes bake to a PWM signal to control a solenoid.

Total topic swerve, but I had to solve an almost identical problem recently.

For measuring the PWM duty cycle of a variable amplitude signal, you might want to consider using an RS-232 receiver IC like a MAX1489. RS-232 receiver ICs are designed to measure the pulse width of waveforms that have varying amplitudes (from +3V to +25V) .

I needed to condition the output of a variable speed, 3 phase AC drive to let me measure the frequency of the drive (I was designing a conveyor controller and needed to slave my conveyors speed to the customers upstream conveyor). I used a pulse transformer, an RC low pass filter and a MAX1489 for this purpose. The circuit worked great and was very inexpensive.

Bill Powell
10-08-2012, 10:17
Yeah, what he said.

Haldor
10-08-2012, 10:21
this is not really a bump. Brewster went into business in 1810 and was in business til the late thirties.

Here is the Brewster most recognizible.

Looks like that would be a great car for Australia with that built in roo catcher.

This guy is definitely ready for the roo-apocalypse.

http://www.tuffbullbars.com/media/SITE_19/media/images/product/enlarge/110800.jpg

Bill Powell
10-08-2012, 10:38
That's cool, but what if they're airborne when you nail them and they kick both feet through your windshield? I guess the bright side is it wouldn't scuff your Roo-bar. Like Crazy Cora said in Quigley, God sure played a rotten trick on that animal.

GlockinNJ
10-08-2012, 10:44
this is not really a bump. Brewster went into business in 1810 and was in business til the late thirties.

Here is the Brewster most recognizible.

Brewster Ford Town car from 1934-36, I believe.

At least that's the filename of the pic. :tongueout:

Bill Powell
10-08-2012, 10:58
Yes, that's the picture I submitted as a sample Brewster. That and Brewster Buick are the best known. Brewster did most of the Springfield Rolls Royces but there was no distinctive brewster trade mark.

Here's a 1937 Brewster Buick town car. Brewster was bought by a guy named Inskip, So this one probably the Inskip body tag, but it is still pure Brewster.

Tvov
10-08-2012, 11:47
here you go

First thing I thought of was Chitty Chitty Bang Bang:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chitty_Chitty_Bang_Bang_%28car%29

Bill Powell
10-09-2012, 07:27
Here's the real, the original Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang. It's a Mercedes with like a 28 liter engine. The only thing they had going for them was cubic inches.