Any Army Paratroopers on here? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Detectorist
10-09-2012, 03:40
We jumped at 1200'. This guy is going a tad higher. Hopes he makes it.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/09/us/skydiver-record-attempt/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

Halojumper
10-09-2012, 06:11
I'm a retired one but the highest I've gone is about 20k

Gallium
10-09-2012, 06:27
Tad higher is a tad of an understatement. :)

Airborne Infantryman
10-09-2012, 06:59
Holy Mother of God...... :faint:

m2hmghb
10-09-2012, 07:12
I guess there is HALO and then there is REALLY HIGH HALO.

Averageman
10-09-2012, 07:22
My Dad was a Paratrooper back when it was a bit different. He was very proud to have attended "Paratrooper" School rather than "Airborne" School.
He explained like all old Soldiers they did it differently in the early 50's and were a lot tougher.

bocaboca
10-09-2012, 07:45
Mission control for the jump...live feed


http://www.redbullstratos.com/live/

Hines57
10-09-2012, 07:49
Not real big on physics, so I will ask a dumb question. Will he slow down the lower he gets?

Bren
10-09-2012, 07:50
My Dad was a Paratrooper back when it was a bit different. He was very proud to have attended "Paratrooper" School rather than "Airborne" School.
He explained like all old Soldiers they did it differently in the early 50's and were a lot tougher.

No offense to him, but they are still called "paratroopers" and he attended "Airborne" school and wore a tab over his unit patch that said "AIRBORNE" just like today. It has been called "Airborne" school since 1946 and "Paratrooper" has never been used in the name.

I went back when it was called the 1st Airborne Training Battalion (although Wikipedia says it was called "The School Brigade" then - never heard it called that and it's not on my certificate) and the companies were numbered, instead of lettered. I was in 43rd company.

nmk
10-09-2012, 08:10
My Dad was a Paratrooper back when it was a bit different. He was very proud to have attended "Paratrooper" School rather than "Airborne" School.
He explained like all old Soldiers they did it differently in the early 50's and were a lot tougher.

Why does every generation say this about previous generations...

nikerret
10-09-2012, 08:33
Why does every generation say this about previous generations...

With technoligical advances, it's true.

TxDoubleAgent
10-09-2012, 08:45
US Army 18th Airborne Corps here 1987-1991

Jumper
10-09-2012, 08:49
Man, his static line has to be incredibly long :whistling:

When I was in, there were 5 jump chumps that wore the wings and an AIRBORNE tab. Then there were the "paratroopers" in the 82nd, the 75th Ranger Reg, etc. Its still a valid distinction if you ask me.

Detectorist
10-09-2012, 08:59
Man, his static line has to be incredibly long :whistling:

When I was in, there were 5 jump chumps that wore the wings and an AIRBORNE tab. Then there were the "paratroopers" in the 82nd, the 75th Ranger Reg, etc. Its still a valid distinction if you ask me.

I just did my 5. Not enough to get comfortable with it.

bocaboca
10-09-2012, 10:14
one hour before live jump

Bren
10-09-2012, 12:13
Man, his static line has to be incredibly long :whistling:

When I was in, there were 5 jump chumps that wore the wings and an AIRBORNE tab. Then there were the "paratroopers" in the 82nd, the 75th Ranger Reg, etc. Its still a valid distinction if you ask me.

That is true - if you haven't served in an airborne unit, you are just "airborne qualified" not a "paratrooper." However, you don't wear an "airborne tab" - it's part of the unit patch of airborne units, not an individual tab like Ranger/Sapper/SF and President's Hundred. So the guys who are not assigned to airborne units better not be wearing one.

bmoore
10-09-2012, 12:18
Aborted due to wind gusts.

nmk
10-09-2012, 14:03
With technoligical advances, it's true.


How is every generation less tough than the previous generation? I guess we should define "tough". And how do these differences relate to paratroopers?

Detectorist
10-09-2012, 14:28
How is every generation less tough than the previous generation? I guess we should define "tough". And how do these differences relate to paratroopers?

There is no doubt in my mind that the present day Airborne course is much easier than when I went though it.

nikerret
10-09-2012, 14:45
My Dad was a Paratrooper back when it was a bit different. He was very proud to have attended "Paratrooper" School rather than "Airborne" School.
He explained like all old Soldiers they did it differently in the early 50's and were a lot tougher.

How is every generation less tough than the previous generation? I guess we should define "tough". And how do these differences relate to paratroopers?

Every generation has things less tough than the ones preceding them. Not necessarily referring to a specific course; every day life.

Throuhg time, survival has become more easy.

Is the current AIRBORNE training easier or harder than ten, twenty, fifty years ago? The only way to know, for sure, is to have the same person go through both courses without knowledge of the other course and while in the same mental and physical condition while entering the course.

Detectorist
10-09-2012, 15:40
Every generation has things less tough than the ones preceding them. Not necessarily referring to a specific course; every day life.

Throuhg time, survival has become more easy.

Is the current AIRBORNE training easier or harder than ten, twenty, fifty years ago? The only way to know, for sure, is to have the same person go through both courses without knowledge of the other course and while in the same mental and physical condition while entering the course.

Actually, all one has to do is to compare the present program, which is posted on the Airborne web site, with the older program. Major difference, at least from 1976.

Jumper
10-09-2012, 15:51
That is true - if you haven't served in an airborne unit, you are just "airborne qualified" not a "paratrooper." However, you don't wear an "airborne tab" - it's part of the unit patch of airborne units, not an individual tab like Ranger/Sapper/SF and President's Hundred. So the guys who are not assigned to airborne units better not be wearing one.

Although its not the norm there are plenty of exceptions. For instance, there are a lot of support units in 18th Airborne Corps that wear the tab but barely leave their desk. And in my first unit I wore the tab but never jumped and wasnt on jump status. And probably the most obvious example is the 101st Airborne Division: Screamin Eagle unit patch, AIRBORNE tab above it, no one on in the whole division on jump status (maybe/probably a small pathfinder unit or two who are).

Averageman
10-09-2012, 17:37
No offense to him, but they are still called "paratroopers" and he attended "Airborne" school and wore a tab over his unit patch that said "AIRBORNE" just like today. It has been called "Airborne" school since 1946 and "Paratrooper" has never been used in the name.

I went back when it was called the 1st Airborne Training Battalion (although Wikipedia says it was called "The School Brigade" then - never heard it called that and it's not on my certificate) and the companies were numbered, instead of lettered. I was in 43rd company.
I think his quote was that "If a Woman can do it it isn't Paratrooper School, it's Airborne School."
He was very proud of his service and it definatly impressed me enough to seek out a Military career; I kind of pissed him off becomming a Tanker.
My Brother however has worn my Dads jump wings and passed them down to one of his Sons.

Halojumper
10-09-2012, 19:00
Why does every generation say this about previous generations...

Standard SF quote "I went to the last hard class".

Tim151515
10-09-2012, 19:10
wtf was up with the whole "super duper paratrooper" thing they did in school. is that sop, or just some kind of joke our instructers had with us?

Glockwork Orange
10-09-2012, 19:11
<-----21st MP Co (ABN) Fort Bragg 96-2001

briarpatch
10-09-2012, 19:53
1970 "All the way Sir"

chargingzebra
10-09-2012, 20:05
Still jumping, have one on Friday.

The Maggy
10-09-2012, 20:32
Although its not the norm there are plenty of exceptions. For instance, there are a lot of support units in 18th Airborne Corps that wear the tab but barely leave their desk. And in my first unit I wore the tab but never jumped and wasnt on jump status. And probably the most obvious example is the 101st Airborne Division: Screamin Eagle unit patch, AIRBORNE tab above it, no one on in the whole division on jump status (maybe/probably a small pathfinder unit or two who are).

An entire Artillery unit in the 101 is still on jump status. For the rest of the division, Air Assault the next branch up the tree, technologically speaking, from the old round parachute days... Airborne Infantry is Airborne Infantry. and the grandfather unit for airborne combat now falls under the 101.

The Maggy
10-09-2012, 20:40
Not real big on physics, so I will ask a dumb question. Will he slow down the lower he gets?

Yes, at the low end of the atmosphere the slowest speed by humans is around 80mph, the fastest is somewhere between 325-350mph.

The normal safe deployment speed for a modern parachute is below 150mph. While he will cross the sound barrier as the top end, the lower he gets he will encounter more and more resistance from the air and he will gradually slow to normal free fall speeds.

Historian
10-09-2012, 21:43
Lt. Joe Kittenger, USAF, was my the guy who lived next door to us when I was a kid.

Free fall Colonel Joe Kittinger, the highest skydive record from space - YouTube

102,800 ft. I think he aimed for Texas.

Big Bird
10-10-2012, 07:49
I was a 7 jump chump. 5 in Airborne School and 2 in Ranger School. Other than that they never really figured out how to drop an M1A1 or a Bradley. And the Sheridan. when it was in service never worked right after you dropped one.

My unit was OPCON to the 18th Airborne Corps during Desert Shield/Storm and saw more combat than the entire 101st if that counts..