Death penalty - this guy deserved it [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Louisville Glocker
10-10-2012, 23:09
http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/us-supreme-court-refuses-block-texas-execution-17449012#.UHZT9cXA_N1

He got what he deserved. Prayers to the family of the victim.

CLoft239
10-11-2012, 02:09
To the deepest depths of hell with him!

Sent from the Titanic. I named my phone "The Titanic" so when I plug it into the computer it says "The Titanic is syncing".

eruby
10-11-2012, 05:08
I'm sorry it took so long to execute this maggot.

skew12
10-11-2012, 05:14
It's too bad he couldn't feel the pain of his poor victim.

johnd
10-11-2012, 05:51
No he didnt deserve that, he deserves a death sentence yes but then these people need to get handed to the survivors of the victims to do whatever they want with them that results in their death.
Id bet that if we had sentences like that, a whole lot more of those living la vida buena on death row will be gone or be crapping their pants in anticipation of how they are going to be leaving this planet.

Scott3670
10-11-2012, 20:58
I've never understood the argument that lethal injection constitutes "cruel and unusual punishment". Really? How about the method used to execute the victim(s)? I agree with the poster above who stated that the condemned should be turned over to the victim's family for punishment in any manner that they choose with no penalty. And I don't give a crap how bad the condemned "person" suffers or how long it takes to end their existence. Does this make me a bad person? Am I evil and no longer worthy of the respect of my peers? I'm not certain that I care. The main point is that monsters such as this person need to be killed - plain and simple.

Gun Shark
10-11-2012, 21:17
I've never understood the argument that lethal injection constitutes "cruel and unusual punishment". Really? How about the method used to execute the victim(s)? I agree with the poster above who stated that the condemned should be turned over to the victim's family for punishment in any manner that they choose with no penalty. And I don't give a crap how bad the condemned "person" suffers or how long it takes to end their existence. Does this make me a bad person? Am I evil and no longer worthy of the respect of my peers? I'm not certain that I care. The main point is that monsters such as this person need to be killed - plain and simple.

What if he is innocent? What if you personally kill a man that was wrongfully convicted? Now you have to live with whatever way you decided to kill him for the rest of your life. I'll take it a step farther. What if you or someone you know is wrongfully arrested of a crime that you or they didn't commit. The deck was stacked against you from the beginning.

Not to hijack the thread, but,

I personally am against the death penalty unless it is absolutely 100% without any doubt the person who committed the crime(a conviction doesn't mean that) There is no going back, no "we are sorry, we made a mistake" dead is dead.


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Scott3670
10-11-2012, 22:56
What if he is innocent? What if you personally kill a man that was wrongfully convicted? Now you have to live with whatever way you decided to kill him for the rest of your life. I'll take it a step farther. What if you or someone you know is wrongfully arrested of a crime that you or they didn't commit. The deck was stacked against you from the beginning.

Not to hijack the thread, but,

I personally am against the death penalty unless it is absolutely 100% without any doubt the person who committed the crime(a conviction doesn't mean that) There is no going back, no "we are sorry, we made a mistake" dead is dead.


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I understand your concerns and respect your views. However, it seems that, with the extensive and lengthy appeals process, those cases that are questionable will be discovered and addressed accordingly. Now, once the appeals process has been completed (fairly and competently) then all bets are off. In no way do I advocate or excuse the execution of someone who could be innocent. Granted, mistakes have been made, but with technology today the chances are far less likely that an innocent person will get executed. Finally, I stick with my original statement - subjecting the condemned person to the retribution meted out by the victim's family is perfectly fine with me and won't cause me to lose a wink of sleep.

JW1178
10-12-2012, 00:05
Personally, I feel that if someone has earned the death penalty, then death is too good for that individual. Instead, keep them alive, just barely, but make them wish for death.

This guy claimed he has these mental issues, well, he could be used to medically study this kind of thing.

One thing about being executed in Texas. I hate laying on those cold tables so when you lay on that table it's still warm from the last guy that was on it. :rofl:

Bren
10-12-2012, 03:44
What if he is innocent? What if you personally kill a man that was wrongfully convicted? Now you have to live with whatever way you decided to kill him for the rest of your life. I'll take it a step farther. What if you or someone you know is wrongfully arrested of a crime that you or they didn't commit. The deck was stacked against you from the beginning.


Well, I have actually played a part in executions and about 6 feet away from the guy being executed from start to finish. I say, "so what" - some mistakes will be made and I know that and accept it without hesitation. Honestly, an execution is about as big a deal as watching some paint dry and less of an emotional experience than mowing my yard.

The deck is stacked against you? That must be why these guys get millions of taxpayer dollars and 20+ years of fighting, regardless of how clear their guilt is, before we're allowed to execute them.

I understand your concerns and respect your views.
That makes one of us - I don't respect his views. I have to deal with the whining little hippies who side with these murderers, and think everythign is a conspiracy against them, every day. They disgust me and, honestly, if I could choose to execute an anti-death penalty activist, in place of the killer, I'd probably go about 50/50 on letting the murderers go and executing them.

Most interesting letter from the anti-execution nuts this week? We haven't done enough to make sure there are no adverse reactions between the executions drugs and any prescription the inmate may be taking. Not joking.:upeyes:

badge315
10-12-2012, 06:17
Something I don't understand is why would being mentall ill disqualify one from being executed? I understand how that could be an issue during the trial, but once a person is duly convicted, what difference does it make what his state of mind is at the time of execution?:dunno:

aircarver
10-12-2012, 06:24
...
Most interesting letter from the anti-execution nuts this week? We haven't done enough to make sure there are no adverse reactions between the executions drugs and any prescription the inmate may be taking. Not joking.:upeyes:

...Not a problem if several bullets are used ...

/

eracer
10-12-2012, 06:29
What if he is innocent? He wasn't.

Hyksos
10-12-2012, 06:41
He wasn't.

Bingo.

The dog led officers to the girl's body, stuffed inside a laundry bag in the home and wedged into a corner behind a piece of furniture. Green contended someone else had placed the body there and that he was being set up.

Evidence at his trial indicated he had tried to burn the body, buried it in a shallow grave, then removed it when detectives left to obtain the search warrant. DNA from her remains tied him to the slaying. A carpet fiber from her panties found in the woods was traced to a carpet in his home.

Dennis in MA
10-12-2012, 07:19
OK, this was just LOL'able in the story.

Speaking of when they started the lethal injection:
"It's hurting me bad." But almost immediately he began snoring loudly.

mgs
10-12-2012, 07:20
Green's lawyer, James Rytting, said his client hallucinated about the "ongoing spiritual warfare between two sets of voices representing good and evil."

Too bad! You did it and paid the price. If it was my daughter I would have shot him personally and saved the state taxpayers some cash.

Bren
10-12-2012, 07:44
Something I don't understand is why would being mentall ill disqualify one from being executed? I understand how that could be an issue during the trial, but once a person is duly convicted, what difference does it make what his state of mind is at the time of execution?:dunno:

I don't get it either - personally, I'd rather have mentally ill murderers executed than people who had a reason (even a bad reason). Then again, I don't care for insanity as a defense, either. Any rational person knows which one is more dangerous in the future.

Bilbo Bagins
10-12-2012, 08:45
I know I should say it but sometimes I can understand why someone would murder someone. They are in a fit of jealous rage, they hate the person, they are killing them for money, or because they witnessed them commiting another crime.

Its all wrong but logicallic I can understand it.

However killing a innocent little kid, I just don't get it. I hope the SOB suffered before he died and that he burns in hell.