Installing a pre-hung door [Archive] - Glock Talk

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gatorboy
10-21-2012, 10:18
I'm installing a Brazilian Mohagany (?) entry door in a concrete block entry. The frame or jamb (?) is also wood, unsealed. I know it must be sealed. I've got a jar of DIY bedliner I used for coating a trailer. Would that be good, ideal, bad? If not what would you suggest? Door was $1,300, weighs 160# and is beautiful. Don't want to screw this up. Thanks.

RenoF250
10-21-2012, 10:35
What do you mean by unsealed? You mean bare wood? Why would you put bedliner on Mohagany? Use a high end urethane/spar varnish. UV stable as possible so the sun does not tear it up. You could oil it as well but then you have to keep oiling it and you cannot change your mind and go to urethane later.

pipedreams
10-21-2012, 10:51
I believe he not talking about the Mahogany door but the ("The frame or jamb (?) is also wood, unsealed.") The unfinished wood that is used to anchor the door the the concrete blocks. I guess it depends on where you live and personal choice. If you have a lot moisture or insect/termite problems you may want treat the wood.

mj9mm
10-21-2012, 10:55
do a little more research and find out what adhere's to the materials the best. bedline is made to adhere to metal

RenoF250
10-21-2012, 10:58
I believe he not talking about the Mahogany door but the ("The frame or jamb (?) is also wood, unsealed.") The unfinished wood that is used to anchor the door the the concrete blocks. I guess it depends on where you live and personal choice. If you have a lot moisture or insect/termite problems you may want treat the wood.

Yeah, I am slow. If the jam is not Mohagany and you want it a solid color paint it with the same paint you paint your house trim. You may want to thin the first coat a bit so it soaks in more.

gatorboy
10-21-2012, 11:00
I believe he not talking about the Mahogany door but the ("The frame or jamb (?) is also wood, unsealed.") The unfinished wood that is used to anchor the door the the concrete blocks. I guess it depends on where you live and personal choice. If you have a lot moisture or insect/termite problems you may want treat the wood.

Yes, that's right, sorry for not being clear. We live in N. Florida. It's hot, humid and buggy most of the year with freezing temps. possible about three, maybe four months a year. Usually get less than 20 nights below freezing though. We do have a month of gorgeous weather in between though! Door and jamb are sealed but jamb is not on areas that won't be seen (the outside sides). Any namebrands? Thanks.

pipedreams
10-21-2012, 11:10
Yes, that's right, sorry for not being clear. We live in N. Florida. It's hot, humid and buggy most of the year with freezing temps. possible about three, maybe four months a year. Usually get less than 20 nights below freezing though. We do have a month of gorgeous weather in between though! Door and jamb are sealed but jamb is not on areas that won't be seen (the outside sides). Any namebrands? Thanks.

I'm not a expert by any means on this subject but would treat it or paint it the same as any other wood that is exposed to the outside.

gatorboy
10-21-2012, 12:28
Alrighty, appreciate the help. I'll just add this for a bump if anyone has any brilliant advice.

For the cost of this door you'd think this was covered. True, it may need to be hit with a belt sander in a few places but not likely. They make them a bit smaller and 'filler' and shims usually need to be used. Thanks, I may post a pic when it's up, probably wed. or thurs. I've done this before but doors and jambs (?) were fiberglass and/or steel, and not this expensive, I'm a little scared. e-how is pretty good but I know GT'rs have varied occupations so... :shocked:

Kevin108
10-21-2012, 13:15
The proper method is to embed the bottom of the door in caulk. That way the threshold and underside of the jamb is protected from moisture and sealed against blown-in water. I usually set the door in place unsecured, mark where the edges are inside and out and run multiple beads of caulk back and forth within that area. OSI Quad is by far my favorite but it's not easy to clean up if you get it on something you don't want it on. If you want easy water clean up with a top-shelf caulk, try to find Siroflex Duo-Sil.

No matter what, stay away from silicone caulk. It doesn't adhere anything like acrylic urethane or synthetics.

stolenphot0
10-21-2012, 14:29
The proper method is to embed the bottom of the door in caulk. That way the threshold and underside of the jamb is protected from moisture and sealed against blown-in water. I usually set the door in place unsecured, mark where the edges are inside and out and run multiple beads of caulk back and forth within that area. OSI Quad is by far my favorite but it's not easy to clean up if you get it on something you don't want it on. If you want easy water clean up with a top-shelf caulk, try to find Siroflex Duo-Sil.

No matter what, stay away from silicone caulk. It doesn't adhere anything like acrylic urethane or synthetics.

I just installed 2 doors a few weeks ago for a guy and they cost about $4000 each. Kevin108 is right, use a urethane based caulk. It stinks and is a pain to clean up but it's the best stuff out there. Just know, once the door is set, leave it in there. :whistling: House we were working on the guy didn't care which side the doors were installed on, until he realized they opened different directions and wanted them swapped.

You can also place sill plate foam under the door too, but if you use the urethane caulk you'd be in pretty good shape. Does the door have a nailer strip? if so (even if not) wrap some of this around the edges.

http://www.homedepot.com/buy/protecto-wrap-bt25xl-window-door-sealing-tape-roll-size-6-in-x-50-ft-d897206.html#.UIRabY60LzI