OK...I got a used Dillon 550 [Archive] - Glock Talk

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gunowner1
10-21-2012, 11:18
I was on Craigslist this morning and a guy had a used 550 with a ton of stuff with it. I picked it up cause I am a compulsive idiot who does things like this, see previous posts). It came with the press,odd things is handle says 450 and the press says 550. Also came with Ultra-vibe tumbler, RCBS Range Master scale 750, a Dillon Dial caliper, and a bunch of dies I will never use. Dies are all RCBS in .257 Roberts, .270 Winchester, 357 Magnum, 32 S/W, 44 Mag,.35 Remington, and a few others. Can I sell any of these? I will never reload any of the above calibers. Also came with eight tool heads. Why so many?
I am calling the guy tomorrow so he can come over and help me get it set up. I got a basic idea off Youtube but I know that is not enough info.I need someone to show me hands on. Hopefully I will not get frustrated with the damn thing and throw it all in the trash.LOL
Anyway I walked away with everything for $350.00. Feel free to flame away.

Fwdftw
10-21-2012, 11:26
Man none of that us gonna work at all...go ahead and set it outside and ill pick it up and take it to the dump for you....








You got a great deal....post the dies up here or another forum im sure someone will pick em up if there cheap enough!

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F106 Fan
10-21-2012, 11:33
You might be able to sell the dies but some of those calibers are pretty specialized.

There is an Owner's Manual available at Dillon and there are a LOT of tutorials on YouTube.

What you should look into is which primer setup you have versus what you need.

You didn't mention a powder measure. The expander or powder funnel in the powder measure die is caliber specific.

You also need to check the shell plate number(s) and see if you need to order a caliber conversion kit.

If you post which calibers you are going to reload, someone around here can tell you which shellplate and powder die you will need.

It is normal practice to set up each caliber on its own toolhead. Some folks even leave a powder measure on each toolhead although this certainly adds a few bucks to caliber conversion.

Spend some time at the Dillon site just looking into things like caliber conversions and primer conversions. And download the manual, of course.

Richard

gunowner1
10-21-2012, 11:43
If the powder measure is that tube looking thing that goes on top,I got two of them. I have no idea how that thing measures minute amounts of powder. I'll go to the Dillon site and look around. Worst case scenario I'll find a local reloader and pay him to show me what;s up.I'm not posting a thousand questions here. All that does is aggravate other GT members.
All I really want to reload are 9mm, 45 ACP, and 10mm. Also maybe .223/5.56 when I know what I am doing. Thanks for the responses guys.Every little bit helps.

F106 Fan
10-21-2012, 12:23
If the powder measure is that tube looking thing that goes on top,I got two of them. I have no idea how that thing measures minute amounts of powder.


There is a discussion of the powder measure in the 550B manual. It is good that you have two of them.

Look at the side of your powder measure and compare it to Figure 20 in the manual. Over the years, Dillon has changed the operating crank from a single piece of metal (mine were black) to a dual piece 'fail safe' device (kind of golden colored). If you don't have the fail safe mechanism, you will want to order the upgrade kit. It really does help with getting reliable charges.



I'll go to the Dillon site and look around. Worst case scenario I'll find a local reloader and pay him to show me what;s up.I'm not posting a thousand questions here. All that does is aggravate other GT members.



Not on this forum! There are folks around here that have used the Dillon 550s and the predecessor 450 for decades. We all like the press and I'm confident that you will as well.

As to the 'local reloader': They can only show you what they know. They may be very competent or not...


All I really want to reload are 9mm, 45 ACP, and 10mm. Also maybe .223/5.56 when I know what I am doing. Thanks for the responses guys.Every little bit helps.

Then you will need both the large primer and small primer mechanisms. 9mm and .223/5.56 use small primers. The 10mm uses large primer and so does most of the .45 ACP. The small primer .45 ACP cases are a travesty!

It's good that you have several toolheads. You will need at least 4.

One more thing: Dillon has a FOREVER warranty regardless of ownership. You now have that warranty on your press. If there is anything wrong, anything at all, they will make it right.

Richard

njl
10-21-2012, 13:08
Worst case, you could box it all up (the press and related parts) send it to Dillon, and ask them to look it over / clean / rebuild it as needed and buy any missing parts.

The extra toolheads are because it's pretty standard practice to put a set of dies into the toolhead, get them properly adjusted, and then leave them there. When you setup to load another caliber, you remove the tool head, and put in another with that caliber's dies. The really lazy people will keep powder measures on the caliber specific toolheads so there's one less thing to mess with, but the costs of doing that add up.

shotgunred
10-21-2012, 13:21
Post pictures and we will tell you what you have and don't have.

Start your education on the Dillon 550 here.
How to reload with a Dillon RL 550B Part 1 - YouTube

F106 Fan
10-21-2012, 14:21
^^^^

That's a great series of videos (5 in all) and they cover everything a new reloader needs to know.

Richard

gunowner1
10-21-2012, 15:03
The shell plate on my Dillon doesn't have the extension to attach the fail safe rod. I have two powder delivery attachments.One has the gold parts #17838 and #17839. I'm still looking at alot of money to get this up and running. I have to find out if the shell plates will work for what I want to reload and buy dies for those calibers. This is going to take awhile. Dies run $63.95 a piece and if I need new shell plates they are $33.95 a piece.

F106 Fan
10-21-2012, 15:16
The powder measure rod doesn't attach to the shell plate. There is a little return bracket #13885 where the rod fits through the slot and the spring and plastic nut are on the underside. Figure 6 on page 8 of the manual shows the bracket. Oddly, I didn't see a figure that shows the rod as it is assembled.

However, this page at Dillon shows the assembly:
http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/23594/catid/1/RL_550B

What you need to know is which powder funnels, shell plates and locator pins you have along with the primer mechanism(s).

You do need to use Dillons powder die and funnel. You can use anybody's dies for stations 1, 3 & 4. Lee die sets are a lot cheaper but Lee want to sell their Factory Crimp Die in the 4 die sets and most around here don't like that die. Lee does make a taper crimp die. So, buy the Lee 3 die set and buy a separate taper crimp die. I don't know that this saves a lot of money but it is something.

If you bought the 550B new, you would still need to buy dies separately.

Richard

F106 Fan
10-21-2012, 15:18
If you don't have the return bracket (and my memory fails as to whether this is part of the fail safe upgrade or was originally included), it will be included with an upgrade for your second powder measure:

http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/25712/catid/6/Powder_Measure_Failsafe_kit_for_RL550

Richard

ken grant
10-21-2012, 15:21
A world of people out there use cheaper dies on their Dillon Press set ups.

Lee will be the cheapest and nothing wrong with them.
Some guys loading pistols will use the Lee Factory Crimp Die even when using Dillon's Dies elsewhere

F106 Fan
10-21-2012, 15:33
Ah yes, back to the discussion on dies...

If you are going to be reloading brass that has been shot through a Glock, you may want to use a Lee sizing die because it will size a little farther down the case. This is because the radius at the nose of the die is a little smaller than on Dillon dies.

However, this reduced radius doesn't make high speed operation go better. Sometimes the case just doesn't line up well enough. More time spent messing around with that little paperclip looking spring at station 1. But it works!

I use the Lee die for 9mm because I pick up free-range brass.

Station 2 probably needs to be a Dillon powder die and powder funnel but there may be other dies that both bell the case and operate some kind of powder measure. Given that the powder measures are Dillon, it makes no sense to go elsewhere.

Station 3 seating die can be anybody's. Lee will work. It isn't as easy to clean up after loading lubed lead bullets as is the Dillon but it will work. The Dillon die is just plain superior!

That said, some folks like the micrometer adjustment of a Redding seating die. This makes experimenting a lot easier.

Station 4 is a taper crimp die, not a Factory Crimp Die! It doesn't matter who makes the die. Dillon makes a nice die but the Lee will work.

Add up the costs for the available options and then decide. I'm not sure it is worth saving $30 to buy Lee instead of Dillon. Then again, it's not my money we're talking about.

Richard

gunowner1
10-21-2012, 15:44
If I don't buy the upgrade for the powder delivery system can I use the older manual one?

shotgunred
10-21-2012, 15:50
The shell plate on my Dillon doesn't have the extension to attach the fail safe rod. I have two powder delivery attachments.One has the gold parts #17838 and #17839. I'm still looking at alot of money to get this up and running. I have to find out if the shell plates will work for what I want to reload and buy dies for those calibers. This is going to take awhile. Dies run $63.95 a piece and if I need new shell plates they are $33.95 a piece.

The first thing is to figure out what parts you have. Each shell plate has a number on it. Some cross over to multiple calibers. The shell plate for 40sw will also work for the 357 sig and the 9mm.

shotgunred
10-21-2012, 15:53
Dillon 550 manual.
http://www.dillonhelp.com/manuals/english/Dillon-RL550B-Manual-May-2007.pdf

F106 Fan
10-21-2012, 16:10
If I don't buy the upgrade for the powder delivery system can I use the older manual one?

I thought that the return bracket and return rod had been around for a long time before the fail safe mechanism was introduced. In the old days, there was a double spring wrapped in a circle at the rear of the powder measure. There is a stud protruding from the powder bar and a white plastic stop on the measure housing. The springs were wrapped around them.

So, I don't know the answer! I'm pretty sure my press had the return bracket for a very long time before I upgraded to the fail safe mechanism.

You can also buy the return bracket separately and you can buy the rod, spring and nut separately. I believe the rods are different so the only one you can probably buy is for the fail safe mechanism.

I wouldn't use the measure with the black operating mechanism. Dillon made the upgrade for a reason and I really like the way the fail safe mechanism helps to prevent under/over charging. This is a really big deal!

Richard

gunowner1
10-21-2012, 16:28
I'll try to figure all this crap out later.I got the basic idea but that's it.My head hurts! I haven't even figured out what primer tubes I have.All these primers, 8 boxes of Winchester #215 Large Magnum rifle primers and ten boxes of CCI 400 small rifle primers are,I believe,useless for 10mm,9mm, or 45 ACP. Also what do I do with the three jugs of Hodgdon H50BMG rifle powder that came with this thing.
I'm going to call Space Coast bullets on Tuesday to see about powder,primer,bullets,and dies. If they have nothing,I'll order online.I gotta find someone locally who knows more about this then me. I really want to do this reloading thing but buying used may not have been the wisest move. I'm taking my headache and going inside. Thanks guys.Hope I didn't raise anybodies blood pressure.

F106 Fan
10-21-2012, 16:39
All these primers, 8 boxes of Winchester #215 Large Magnum rifle primers and ten boxes of CCI 400 small rifle primers are,I believe,useless for 10mm,9mm, or 45 ACP. Also what do I do with the three jugs of Hodgdon H50BMG rifle powder that came with this thing.


I would spend about 10 minutes asking around the local gun range to see if anybody wants the powder and primers.

If not, I would see if they can be dropped off at the local Hazardous Material dropoff station.

The CCI 400 small rifle primers are useful for .223 but that's about it.

Richard

gunowner1
10-21-2012, 16:41
Last thing.LOL I am a memeber of a private range,Martin County Sportsmans Assoc. but I don't really know anyone on a personal basis there.Many of the guys live about twenty miles away and expecting anyone to just come over to help me seems to be asking alot. There really isn't any sense in having someone come over till I have everything to load a bullet. If Space Coast Bullets doesn't have everything I need to get set up to load at least one caliber I'll have to order online after I figure out what I need.

F106 Fan
10-21-2012, 17:17
Pick a caliber and concentrate on that. 9mm will be the cheapest to load.

I don't want to rekindle the lead bullets vs Glock barrels thing so just plan on starting with either plated or jacketed bullets. The 124 gr FMJ are popular. Plated bullets take different load data and none of it is published. If you want to buy plated, be certain to read the reloading advice at the manufacturer's web site. I would skip plated for now. They are no cheaper than jacketed when buying in volume.

You probably aren't ready to order in multiple thousands from Precision Delta so find a place to buy 100. Cabela's has Winchester 124 gr FMJ for $14/100. They're only $85/1000 (essentially 2000 minimum) at Precision Delta but we're talking about getting started, not making bulk ammo.

You'll need some small pistol primers. Try to buy just 100 locally. My LGS splits up boxes of 1000 so it might be possible for you as well. Sure, buying 1000 or 5000 makes more sense but it doesn't improve cash flow. You may have a problem finding small pistol primers. There's an election coming up. It's been in all the papers...

Get a pound of Unique powder. This will make about 1500 rounds so you'll be good for a while. Don't let the LGS talk you into Bullseye or Titegroup! It is far better to start with a slower burning powder that more completely fills the case. A double charge will often overflow the case when using Unique. It's just a safety thing. Unique should be available anywhere.

Get one or more reloading manuals: Hornady 8th Edition, Speer #14 and or Lyman 49th. As the fellow said in the video, you need a lot of manuals! You can also use the Alliant Powder web site to get reloading info but, unfortunately, they only give a max load, not a starting load:
http://www.alliantpowder.com/reloaders/recipedetail.aspx?gtypeid=1&weight=124&shellid=23&bulletid=26

EDIT: Add...

Near the bottom of this page there is a note to reduce the published load by 10% for a starting load:
http://www.alliantpowder.com/reloaders/default.aspx

END


If you search this forum, there was a lengthy thread quite recently regarding 9mm loads:
http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1445697

Somewhere around 5 gr of Unique with a 124 gr FMJ seems to be what the folks were talking about. That's good because Alliant says 5.8 gr is max for a Gold Dot HP and that's a different bullet than a real FMJ. Speer shows 5.2 to 5.8 gr as a cross check. You may need to get to 5.2 to cycle the gun so make a few (5, not 50) at 4.8 gr, 5.0 gr, 5.2 gr and, maybe, 5.4 gr. See how they shoot. Speer shows an OAL of 1.135" for the 124 gr TMJ RN.

Richard

iLift45's
10-21-2012, 17:38
You stole that thing!! A new one is $440. Lifetime warranty. I own one and absolutely love it!! Great engineering and so smooth to operate. All the tool heads are for fast change out between calibers. It eliminates the need to adjust the dies once you have everything set. Take your time and if you have any questions call Dillon. They are a class act!

gunowner1
10-21-2012, 17:41
Rickard you are a Godsend. I am going down south to Palm Beach tomorrow to see a pretty little lady I haven't seen in a while.I will have a list of the items you mentioned and will see what they have available. I will also check smaller shops for things. I'll google "reloading" in Palm Beach and see what comes up. The Hornady 7th edition came with the set up and I will buy a book tomorrow if I can find one. Thanks for all the help. I'm not going to give up on this project.

F106 Fan
10-21-2012, 18:17
One thing that was mentioned in the video but I have omitted above is the matter of Check Weights. You really need to be absolutely certain that your scale is getting the right answer.

There are two sets at the top of this page. I have the larger set but the smaller is just fine for most reloading.

http://www.midwayusa.com/find?userSearchQuery=rcbs+check+weights

You want to use the various weights to get as close as possible to your load. Maybe even check on both sides of the desired weight.

It's always good to keep in mind that smokeless powder is made from nitrocellulose and/or nitroglycerin:

From Wikipedia:
Currently, propellants using nitrocellulose (detonation velocity (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Explosive_velocity) 7,300 m/s) (typically an ether-alcohol colloid of nitrocellulose) as the sole explosive propellant ingredient are described as single-base powder.

Propellants mixtures containing nitrocellulose and nitroglycerin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitroglycerin) (detonation velocity (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_of_explosive_detonation_velocities) 7,700 m/s) as explosive propellant ingredients are known as double-base powder.


Unique is, AFAICT from the MSDS, a double-base powder. Accurate measurement is imperative.

Richard

shotgunred
10-21-2012, 18:59
Watching the video should answer most of your questions about the press and setting it up.

You would be surprised if you asked for help. I know that I have driven 30 miles to set up a guys press and get him started.

I have also had a guy I didn't know at my club teach me to build an AR. A lot of gun guys are willing to pay it forward.

gunowner1
10-22-2012, 12:03
It took three stores,but I got what I wanted. 100 rnds. Hornady 124gr FMJ. 100 rnds unprimered Winchester brass. 1 LB. Alliant Unique powder and Lyman 49th Edition manual. Dies, conversion kits, and powder dispenser upgrade kit are on order from Dillon. The waiting game begins.

F106 Fan
10-22-2012, 12:06
It took three stores,but I got what I wanted. 100 rnds. Hornady 124gr FMJ. 100 rnds unprimered Winchester brass. 1 LB. Alliant Unique powder and Lyman 49th Edition manual. Dies, conversion kits, and powder dispenser upgrade kit are on order from Dillon. The waiting game begins.

Check Weights?
Midway USA has them.

njl
10-22-2012, 12:07
Buying Hornady bullets 100 at a time, and new brass, you've probably already spent more on those components than it would have cost to buy the same amount of loaded ammo at Walmart.

F106 Fan
10-22-2012, 12:37
Buying Hornady bullets 100 at a time, and new brass, you've probably already spent more on those components than it would have cost to buy the same amount of loaded ammo at Walmart.

It was intended as an experiment for a new user of a used reloader. It makes all the sense in the world to get established before ordering 10,000 primers, 8# of powder and 10,000 bullets.

Get everything working and then expand the scale.

I probably would have bought the Winchester bullets from Cabela's because they are cheaper but, for the first 100, who cares? And there would be shipping to consider. Anyway, it's just an experiment.

The pound of powder will make about 1400 rounds so that is covered. For the next evolution, it might make sense to just buy 1000 primers locally. The HazMat fee is pricey unless the order is substantial; like 5000 primers. Besides, Powder Valley is out of the most popular small pistol primers (CCI, Federal).

So, the next 'big' purchase would probably be 2,000 bullets from Precision Delta for $170. At this stage, it probably makes sense to stay with jacketed bullets. Some time down the road it is worth considering lead bullets depending on the firearm.

Richard

gunowner1
10-22-2012, 14:26
Even if it was the same price for the same amount of ammo from Walmart I would continue through with this project. Ammo availability is sketchy at times. Once I'm established, and know what I am doing my ammo will always be available.

ron59
10-22-2012, 14:38
I would be surprised if, after watching those videos... you needed someone to come over and help you.

It was from watching those videos back in 2009 that convinced me that reloading wasn't rocket science. Sure, you need to have attention to detail and take some precautions, but it's really a simple process. I ordered my 550 that very same day.

Between that video and the manual, you should be good. The one thing I think he does wrong is put the fail safe rod in from the wrong side? (That's the metal rod that attaches vertically between the powder measure and press.)

The only other thing you need to decide is what reloading components you're going to need and a starting load. Use something like Unique or maybe WSF. And go.

SBray
10-22-2012, 16:15
I think the Dillion Installation Video would be all that is needed to set it up. I just took my laptop out in the garage and watched the video as I put my 550 together. I would do one step at a time, and pause it until I was ready for the next step. Of course I had already watched all the YouTube videos I could find.

Steve

F106 Fan
10-22-2012, 17:03
Between that video and the manual, you should be good. The one thing I think he does wrong is put the fail safe rod in from the wrong side? (That's the metal rod that attaches vertically between the powder measure and press.)



I think you are correct. I would install it like the photo on the cover of the manual or the schematic on page 3 of the manual.

Richard

unclebob
10-22-2012, 18:08
Donít know why but that is one of my pet peeves when I see the rod installed the wrong way. It is installed left to right and you move the powder measure so as the rod is as straight up and down as it can be.

gunowner1
10-22-2012, 18:21
I figured out how to change the cup size for the primers this afternoon. I did end up having both large primer cup and the small primer cup. An issue that has me perplexed though is when I drop a primer into the primer tube it falls right out the bottom. What holds the primer in the tube until the primer cup is cycled back to recieve a primer? I want to get it adjusted right. I may take the whole thing to the range tomorrow and pray it's one of the cool R.O.'s on who will look it over.

F106 Fan
10-22-2012, 18:55
Look at page 5 of the manual. The primer tube is two concentric pieces: The outer shield and block #20263 and the size appropriate primer tube itself (there are two, one large and one small) #14003.

In the block at the bottom of the outer tube #20263, there is a pin #14051 that keeps the primers in the primer tube #14003.

As the primer slide #13920 moves to the rear (and the cup moves under the primer tube), the pin #14051 is pushed back against the flat spring #13929. This releases a primer and, with luck, it falls into the cup #13824. How far the slide can move back is limited by the adjustment screw #13961.

So, as you lower the handle to raise the ram, the operating rod #13869 pushes the slide under the primer housing #20263 and causes it to pick up a primer.

When you subsequently raise the handle to lower the ram, the primer slide return spring #13928 (see page 3) pulls the slide and primer back under the shell plate and positions the primer such that it can be pushed into the primer pocket.

That's pretty much all there is to it.

Richard

gunowner1
10-22-2012, 19:28
Ok.....with all the stuff going on with this thing I had downloaded the wrong manual. I don't have those insert tubes. I'll call Dillon tomorrow and add them to my order. All I got with the press are a bunch of aluminum rods with white plastic tips. I tried to insert them into the metal primer housing and they didn't fit. One step at a time. Thanks again Richard,

Colorado4Wheel
10-22-2012, 19:41
If the powder measure is that tube looking thing that goes on top,I got two of them. I have no idea how that thing measures minute amounts of powder. I'll go to the Dillon site and look around. Worst case scenario I'll find a local reloader and pay him to show me what;s up.I'm not posting a thousand questions here. All that does is aggravate other GT members.
All I really want to reload are 9mm, 45 ACP, and 10mm. Also maybe .223/5.56 when I know what I am doing. Thanks for the responses guys.Every little bit helps.

The best way to learn is to read the manual. Its on Dillons website. Also. Dillon will rebuild it for about $50 and make it look like new again.

gunowner1
10-22-2012, 19:46
The best way to learn is to read the manual. Its on Dillons website. Also. Dillon will rebuild it for about $50 and make it look like new again.

Now that I have downloaded the right manual I should be good to go.:supergrin: I'm reading that manual,Hornady 7th Edition, and the Lyman 49th edition I picked up today. I haven't read this much since college! Also watching Youtube videos. I can't wait till I can put a fixed toolhead on this thing and crank out some rounds. No, I do not plan on doing that for a long time but I am still looking forward to it. No more buying factory! Hopefully in a few months I'll be setup for every caliber i have.

Colorado4Wheel
10-22-2012, 20:36
Down load the Dillon 550 User Manual from the Dillon website. That tells you how to use the press.

gunowner1
10-24-2012, 06:10
The machine came with two primer bars ( 20263). If I am setting up to load small pistol primers is it necessary to switch out the big bar to the smaller bar?

Colorado4Wheel
10-24-2012, 06:22
Do yourself a favor a read the manual.

wdphillips
10-24-2012, 06:41
...
Anyway I walked away with everything for $350.00. Feel free to flame away.

Wow, that is a great deal. Enjoy. I guess I need to be looking at Craig's List again!

HexHead
10-24-2012, 06:47
I think the Dillion Installation Video would be all that is needed to set it up. I just took my laptop out in the garage and watched the video as I put my 550 together. I would do one step at a time, and pause it until I was ready for the next step. Of course I had already watched all the YouTube videos I could find.

Steve

Great advice. The Dillon video is excellent.

Colorado4Wheel
10-24-2012, 07:07
The video does not go over a lot of the things in the manual. Read the manual . Your only cheating yourself in the end. His answer is on page 9.

unclebob
10-24-2012, 08:05
About 95% of the questions asked here are in the manual. I have never seen the video but Iím sure that the video does not cover everything that is in the manual. Read the manual.

gunowner1
10-24-2012, 08:07
This thing has sat for a long time. I am trying to take it apart without damaging anything. I have to change out these tubes and it isn't as simple as the videos with the "brand new parts"!

F106 Fan
10-24-2012, 08:11
The machine came with two primer bars ( 20263). If I am setting up to load small pistol primers is it necessary to switch out the big bar to the smaller bar?

The way I see it, 20263 is the Primer Feed Body with Shield. Normally, the press only comes with one.

According to page 9 of the manual, the press comes with two primer bars. One will be set up for small primers, the other for large. Just pick the right one and install it following the instructions on page 9.

Adjustments to the primer system are, in my view, the most critical for success with the press. There are two adjustable stop screws. One is the exposed Allen head cap screw that adjusts how far the primer goes under the shell plate and the other that is partially obscured by the flat spring that determines how far the primer bar moves back to pick up the primer.

Make sure the proper Magazine Tube Assembly (large or small primer) is installed. Obviously, large primers won't fit in the small tube but small primers will not be aligned properly in the large tube.

Richard

Colorado4Wheel
10-24-2012, 08:53
This thing has sat for a long time. I am trying to take it apart without damaging anything. I have to change out these tubes and it isn't as simple as the videos with the "brand new parts"!

So send it in to Dillon for a refurb. It will look and run like new. They will probably replace nearly every part besides the frame and some of the other big parts. But it will be repainted and be better then when it left the factory all those years ago (because of the safety upgrades).

SBray
10-24-2012, 09:34
The video does not go over a lot of the things in the manual. Read the manual . Your only cheating yourself in the end. His answer is on page 9.

Excellent advice!

As my father would say, "If all else fails, read the instructions (manual)!"

The video covers only the basic setup, the details have to be read in the manual. By the way, it is an excellent manual, with sharp photos, and great parts diagram.

SARDG
10-24-2012, 13:49
I bought my 650 used and set up for .38 Spl. The seller had the Dillon DVD, but couldn't find it so I took it all home, ordered the 9 and 45 dies and quick change kits and simply read the manual to set it all up with those using the manual only. After I had been loading a couple of weeks, the seller found and gave me the DVD - that I never watched.

Being a Glock armorer, and seeing some of those butchers pounding on Glocks on YouTube gives me pause. I hardly trust anything on YouTube without verifying things several times.

And we say... RTFM. :courtsie: I still use the manual frequently as reference.

gunowner1
10-27-2012, 07:55
Parts will be in on Monday for the 550. I have components for 100 rounds of 9mm to start. I ordered 500 rounds of 10mm brass from Starline. Can someone please tell me what a good "starter" bullet would be for the 10mm? I only need FMJ as I will be reloading for target practice. As Richard has stated before, I only want to load nice,safe,middle of the road loads. Not looking to stretch the limits of the 10mm....ever. Money is starting to become an issue because the cost of the whole set up. I would like to get 500 10mm bullets to start.

F106 Fan
10-27-2012, 14:21
You can use the 180 gr FMJ-FN from Precision Delta ($122/1000, 2000 minimum) with the load data from Hornady 8th Edition Page 962

There was a recent discussion on this forum re: 10mm which essentially degenerated into talking about loading 10mm +P+++++. However, some of the folks had powder recommendations and another fellow commented that 10mm should be 180 at 1080 - kind of easy to remember. So, somewhere around 1100 fps.

I don't load this caliber but if I did, I would use the 1100 fps column from Hornady and I would look for powders like Blue Dot or 800-X that can deliver much higher velocity. That way I wouldn't be anywhere near a max load with that powder.

Still, I would start at the minimum and work up carefully. Middle of the road, that me!

However, I'm not going to recommend a powder because I just don't load 10mm. I don't know anything about it.

There is a separate forum here on Glock Talk for 10mm loads but they talk too much about 10mm +P+++++. Personally, I would stay clear of any of that nonsense!

The concept of 180 @ 1080 would work for me. If I wanted hot SD loads, I would just buy them. Except I probably wouldn't... There just isn't a SD scenario where my Sig P220 in .45 ACP is inadequate. Or even my Glock G21SF.

Richard

F106 Fan
10-27-2012, 14:25
I didn't properly address your low volume requirement.

Try Midway $77/500 plus shipping. Precision Delta includes shipping.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/1165212114/hornady-bullets-40-s-and-w-10mm-auto-400-diameter-180-grain-full-metal-jacket-flat-nose

Richard

gunowner1
10-27-2012, 20:24
Richard can I use the unique that I bought? There is load data for unique in both the Lyman 49th edition and the Hornady 7th edition. I think if I stay in the 5.8gr - 6.2gr I should be alright. I am going to see if i can find another manual tomorrow. Then I'll have three to go by. Is the load data for a 180gr. HP the same for a 180gr. FMJ?

shotgunred
10-27-2012, 22:28
Richard can I use the unique that I bought? There is load data for unique in both the Lyman 49th edition and the Hornady 7th edition. I think if I stay in the 5.8gr - 6.2gr I should be alright. I am going to see if i can find another manual tomorrow. Then I'll have three to go by. Is the load data for a 180gr. HP the same for a 180gr. FMJ?

The load data for a 180gr. HP is different than for a 180gr. FMJ.
The hollow point will produce more pressure as it is a longer bullet and seats deeper with the same OAL. But for all practical purposes it wont matter to you as long as you start your load development low and work up. If you want to just start at max (like some guys) then it may be the difference between an OK load and a KB.

With a new load always start low and work up!

F106 Fan
10-28-2012, 08:31
Richard can I use the unique that I bought? There is load data for unique in both the Lyman 49th edition and the Hornady 7th edition. I think if I stay in the 5.8gr - 6.2gr I should be alright. I am going to see if i can find another manual tomorrow. Then I'll have three to go by. Is the load data for a 180gr. HP the same for a 180gr. FMJ?

According to Hornady 8th Ed, the load is the same for the HP-XTP and FMJ-FP ENC (whatever ENC means...). Turns out that even the OAL is the same for these bullets.

For Unique, the range is 5.8 gr up to 7.1 gr in Hornady. I wouldn't go near the 7.1 gr even though it is at 1100 fps which is about the velocity I would want. For this velocity, I would use 800-X or Blue Dot. Unique at 6.2 gr should be around 1000 fps which should have enough recoil to cycle the gun.

I am concerned about the ENC thing and how it relates to a more traditional FMJ-FP. In .40 S&W, Hornady discontinued their regular 180 gr FMJ-FP.

Speer #14 gives Unique data for their 180 gr TMJ-FP and it starts beyond where Hornady maxes out and goes up from there!

I would start at 5.8 gr with an OAL of 1.260" (assuming it would fit the chamber and magazine) and work up slowly. I would stop short of 7.1 gr, probably around 6.7 gr and 1050 fps from Hornady 8th. As soon as the gun cycled reliably and the grouping was acceptable, I would stop. If I wanted a bit more, I would change powder.

If I wanted to move into the fire-breathing region, I would be using a chronograph to plot velocity versus charge. As soon as the curve either a) flattened out (no change in velocity for a change in charge) or b) started to spike (an excessive change in velocity for a change in charge), I would back off a little.

The idea that you can determine anything about overcharge from the apperance of the primer is put to rest starting on page 59 of Speer #14. By the time there is noticeable damage to the primer, you are likely 20% overpressure. Or so they say...

Like most of this reloading stuff, you are unlikely to be using the exact components and therefore, you are on your own. You need to start light and work up until performance is acceptable. Even the light loads will go bang but they may not cycle the gun. So, shoot them up one at a time (you only made 5 each, right?) and recover the cases.

One other thought in passing: drop a loaded round into the chamber (out of the gun, of course) and rotate it. Make sure the bullet isn't hitting the rifling at your selected OAL. The case should spin on the case mouth. You can color the case mouth and bullet with a Sharpie and the drag marks should show up pretty easy.

Richard

Rich22
10-28-2012, 10:08
I'll try to figure all this crap out later.I got the basic idea but that's it.My head hurts! I haven't even figured out what primer tubes I have.All these primers, 8 boxes of Winchester #215 Large Magnum rifle primers and ten boxes of CCI 400 small rifle primers are,I believe,useless for 10mm,9mm, or 45 ACP. Also what do I do with the three jugs of Hodgdon H50BMG rifle powder that came with this thing.
I'm going to call Space Coast bullets on Tuesday to see about powder,primer,bullets,and dies. If they have nothing,I'll order online.I gotta find someone locally who knows more about this then me. I really want to do this reloading thing but buying used may not have been the wisest move. I'm taking my headache and going inside. Thanks guys.Hope I didn't raise anybodies blood pressure.

If you want to get rid of these let me know. I don't have a use for them at the moment but a .223 or 300 BLK is in my future so I am sure I have something to trade that you could use since I load 9mm. Could get you a few more components you can actually use.

Rich