Biggest fear of being a cop [Archive] - Glock Talk

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wrangler_dave9
10-21-2012, 13:33
Just curious as to what your guy's responses will be. What was/is your biggest fear about being a cop when you first decided to become one, or when you first started out on the job?

Right now, mine is being dispatched to a call and having no idea where I'm going.

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RyanNREMTP
10-21-2012, 13:37
Geography is my strong point so not worried there. Mine I think would be not being able to help my partner for some reason if something bad happened.

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kgain673
10-21-2012, 14:00
Getting hit by a car, or a car accident

Bren
10-21-2012, 14:20
Just curious as to what your guy's responses will be. What was/is your biggest fear about being a cop when you first decided to become one, or when you first started out on the job?

Right now, mine is being dispatched to a call and having no idea where I'm going.

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When I was one, the only things I ever feared were getting sent to prison for something related to excesive force and people trying to set me up or lie about me.

Stang_Man
10-21-2012, 14:21
I graduate the academy VERY soon!

My biggest fear is encountering a situation, and not knowing what to do.

I know this type if wisdom comes with experience. I have a level head and often look at things from many angles, so I think I'll be just fine.

rsagona1
10-21-2012, 14:24
I agree with Stang. I graduate soon and I can think of a couple already:

1. Being hit by another vehicle while on a traffic stop
2. Having my gun taken away from me
3. As Stang said, not knowing what to do in a situation.

Patchman
10-21-2012, 14:29
That I wouldn't get off each and every Thanksgiving Day, the Friday after Thanksgiving, Christmas eve, Christmas Day, New Years eve, New Years day, Labor Day weekend and Labor Day, for the next 20-years.

DaBigBR
10-21-2012, 14:58
I graduate the academy VERY soon!

My biggest fear is encountering a situation, and not knowing what to do.

Get used to it. It's going to happen every day for a while, then every couple days, every week, every couple weeks, etc. The most important thing is that you do SOMETHING, and be able to articulate why you did it.

wrangler_dave9
10-21-2012, 15:14
I graduate the academy VERY soon!

My biggest fear is encountering a situation, and not knowing what to do.

I know this type if wisdom comes with experience. I have a level head and often look at things from many angles, so I think I'll be just fine.

That's one of mine too. Congrats on the academy! I start in January.

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Butcher
10-21-2012, 15:52
My biggest fear in the academy was to be assigned to the "worst" district in the city, notorious for its drugs/gangs/violence. Of course, I was assigned there, but after four years, I can't imagine working anywhere else. Best police in the country IMO. No offense to anyone else ;)


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Patchman
10-21-2012, 16:19
My biggest fear in the academy was to be assigned to the "worst" district in the city, notorious for its drugs/gangs/violence. Of course, I was assigned there, but after four years, I can't imagine working anywhere else.

I was in a similar situation. But looking back, I realized it was the best thing ever! First, because as a brand new New Jack, I didn't know better and thought the "worst" was normal. So career wise, anywhere you go after that, it's like being on a mini-vacation.

Second, working in the "worst," nobody comes around to bother you about the little things, like wearing white socks with your uniform, no hat, or boots slightly in need of a polish. They're just glad you showed up for work!

Finally, of course, you learn more police work in a much shorter period of time than anyone else. And you can always say with pride "yeah, I was a cop for X years in that district."


Best police in the country IMO. No offense to anyone else ;)

Yeah, I'll disagree but understand your sentiment. :supergrin:

:wavey:

Hack
10-21-2012, 16:50
Working in corrections there are some differences, yet also a lot of similarities.

For example, a call for assistance to an officer comes over the radio, and knowing the worst things that can be done have happened. And, us not being able to do a thing, but to clean up the mess. I still get this way from time to time, although not as often.

In the agency I work, we have had people loose their lives, (not often). More often it is for health issues. The last fellow had a widow maker, yet was one of the most in shape officers I knew. I mean he was in excellent shape from all appearances. Yet, he lost his life while training, and died in hospital, or on the way to it. Everyone of us who heard about it and knew him had that helpless demoralized feeling, realizing it could have been one of us.

Of the times I went down, each time was something that could have killed me, yet for some reason G-d spared me from passing on. Yet, someone who is healthy, and young is killed from some other issue. Everytime I have asked G-d, "Why?", knowing it is not for us to understand all of G-d's thoughts on these matters, nor to question Him as to why He would allow someone else with a wife and kids to go from this world.

Sorry for the rant and hijacking your post. I guess the question provoked some things I have not thought about for a good while.

DustyJacket
10-21-2012, 17:17
When I first became a cop, I had no fear of anything.

It was only later in my last department that I worried about anything.

Kingarthurhk
10-21-2012, 18:23
I didn't think I had anything to worry about until I got older, wiser, married and had kids. Now, I don't want to screw something up and disgrace my position. I take even minor screw ups personally.

I think I was happier when I was young, dumb, and blissfully ignorant..

3Speedyfish3
10-21-2012, 20:56
I like DBBR's reply.

After 25 years and half my life in LE, I worry most about leaving the ones I love behind after all they've been through with me. After finding a friend and officer gunned down and having others I know shot and killed or wounded, I long ago accepted it could happen to me. Keeps you sharp. But do your job.

I just want to make it through to spend time with my loving wife. That not happening scares me most.

Randall

nikerret
10-21-2012, 22:24
When I first became a cop, I had no fear of anything.

First, was this^

Mine I think would be not being able to help my partner for some reason if something bad happened.


With this^

When I was one, the only things I ever feared were getting sent to prison for something related to excesive force and people trying to set me up or lie about me.

Now, it's this^

Mine I think would be not being able to help my partner for some reason if something bad happened.


With this^

My biggest fear in the academy was to be assigned to the "worst" district in the city, notorious for its drugs/gangs/violence.

Never this^ I want to be in the worst area with the worst people with the worst crime. If there are going to be bad people, let me stand in their way. Instead, I work in an area where the "bad" people are lazy.

I want to be the first in every door, the first in every fight. Usually, I get nothing. I make a lot of arrests, but the people known for running and fighting don't run nor fight with me. The other night, I had someone actually stop in a foot pursuit when I yelled at them. I'm the opposite of a poo magnet, but I don't want to be.

Now, one of my biggest fears is dying of boredom.

CAcop
10-21-2012, 22:42
My biggest fear was screwing up. Especially something pretty basic.

lawman800
10-21-2012, 22:47
Not knowing what to do in a situation is common, and expected, but what you are supposed to do is use common sense and your working knowledge of the law/policy to resolve it. You're not a walking computer and nobody can expect you to know everything and anyone who does is an idiot. It's how you handle the unknown that makes you a good cop.

Agent6-3/8
10-21-2012, 23:00
For me it would be making my wife a widow or being maimed/crippled. Next if getting hemmed up in someone else's mess. Most everything else I can deal with.

For the guys getting ready to hit the road, don't worry about knowing what to do or how to get to a call. That's what you've got an FTO for. Just focus on good officer safety and soaking up the knowledge your training officer is trying to pass on to you.


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Trigger Finger
10-21-2012, 23:02
I was almost 22 years old when I graduated from the academy and I wanted to go to the worst, most violent crime ridden part of the city, To prove to myself that I truly had what it takes to work in the biggest city on the west coast.

My main fear after listening to my training officers was to be taken prisoner by a bunch of ex-cons in the biggest most violent city on the west coast!! :wow:

indigent
10-21-2012, 23:10
I live in the city that i work in and I'm also a single parent.... My biggest fear is that I'll end up running into someone that's not happy to see me and I'm off duty w/ my kid..... I take as many precautions as I can, but Mr. Murphy is certainly not my friend....

I have the wrecks, being maimed, etc fears, but I try to keep those in check.

floorburn_21
10-22-2012, 01:37
Leaving my wife behind with what ifs.
Legal issues. Everyone is sure happy these days and one mistake could be the last.

I'm a CO right now but am post certified and scored high on the road deputy test for the agency I work for so hopefully I'll get to be an outside dog soon enough.

Tilley
10-22-2012, 01:56
Piece of crap Beretta M9 not firing when I need it to go bang. I've had a lot of dreams about this over the years.

Next would be getting lied about by some mook to get me in trouble. That's why I'm always wired up.

Lastly, seeing something I shouldn't and letting the chips fall where they will. There is a saying, "I will trust you with my life, but never with my badge." I hate drama...

ditchdoc24
10-22-2012, 02:26
Since I can now announce that my wife is pregnant with our 2nd child, I'm scared of not being there for her and our kids.

cowboywannabe
10-22-2012, 03:04
working for a chief like they have in most of the big liberal cities is my biggest fear. those poor saps have to wear their trauma plates on their backs.

collim1
10-22-2012, 05:05
Call it youthful enthusiasm (ignorance), but I was 100% fearless when I started out.

Not so much these days, I worry about a lot more and am much more likely to wait on backup and think things through instead of charging in.

GRIMLET
10-22-2012, 05:30
My biggest fear when I first got hired, none. That says wayyyyy too much right there.
As I am nearing retirement in 34 months, its staying uninjured and still in the game long enough to retire.
Last month I went head first into the water, full uniform, gun rig and all, no life jacket. It was a "dynamic entry" into an inhospitable environment. It scared the hell out of me. Of course it also sent me to the doc for a shoulder injury. Arghhhhh!!!!

owl6roll
10-22-2012, 07:09
Kepping traffic off of a guy changing a flat, a few years ago and an 18 wheeler crashes and almost took us all out. Up until that point I'd not thought about it, but getting run over is at the top of the list.

RussP
10-22-2012, 07:12
Since I can now announce that my wife is pregnant with our 2nd child, I'm scared of not being there for her and our kids.Congratulations, and I've talked to many cops in the last two+ weeks who share your concern about not being there...

Java Junky
10-22-2012, 07:34
'Z young, invulnerable'n invincible.(Read: STUPID.)
Older . . family and reality seemed'da grind my face in just how mere-mortal I was.
But, somehow luckin'-out, 'n out from under that harness at this point'a my life . . what I most remember was not so much the possibility of not makin' it through, as much as, in the later years, the constant weight'a the legal after-the-fact that could blind-side you as you did the job.
'Always felt that they were tryin'a save me belt space by havin' me wear the cuffs.

indigent
10-22-2012, 07:56
'Z young, invulnerable'n invincible.(Read: STUPID.)
Older . . family and reality seemed'da grind my face in just how mere-mortal I was.
But, somehow luckin'-out, 'n out from under that harness at this point'a my life . . what I most remember was not so much the possibility of not makin' it through, as much as, in the later years, the constant weight'a the legal after-the-fact that could blind-side you as you did the job.
'Always felt that they were tryin'a save me belt space by havin' me wear the cuffs.

Huh??

lawman800
10-22-2012, 08:34
Next would be getting lied about by some mook to get me in trouble. That's why I'm always wired up.

That's one thing, but having your coworkers do that to you to try to get you fired is another.:crying:

merlynusn
10-22-2012, 08:34
Being seriously injured and becoming paralyzed or a total burden on my family. I'd rather be dead than a quadriplegic. It would be less of a burden on my family.

Java Junky
10-22-2012, 09:03
"Huh??"
Get that alot Ind'. No problem.

Polak
10-22-2012, 09:17
Getting fired.

GRIMLET
10-22-2012, 10:17
Getting fired.

Just do whats right, follow policy and avoid politics/rumormill.
Dont hesitate to protect yourself or the public and come home every night.

kayl
10-22-2012, 10:30
I agree with those who said their biggest fear isn't being there for their wife and kids...

I try to never go to work angry with my wife and give kisses and hugs every day on my way out the door.

Hack
10-22-2012, 11:07
working for a chief like they have in most of the big liberal cities is my biggest fear. those poor saps have to wear their trauma plates on their backs.

It is more that way than it used to be with my agency. I am looking forward to retirement because of it.

Sent from my communicator.

Moravia
10-22-2012, 12:06
My biggest fear in the academy was to be assigned to the "worst" district in the city, notorious for its drugs/gangs/violence. Of course, I was assigned there, but after four years, I can't imagine working anywhere else. Best police in the country IMO. No offense to anyone else ;)


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Amen, Brother. I'm working the New Eastern District (NED). Field trained in NWD and was shocked at the difference. As crazy as things get, I have gotten used to my nights being screwed up. Love it.

DVeng
10-22-2012, 13:05
As many of you know, I have just over five years as a reserve officer (no longer employed in that capacity) and am trying to get on full-time. I am in process with one agency.

My biggest fear at present is getting injured before or during an academy and having my full-time start delayed or prevented entirely.

If I am fortunate enough to make it on somewhere again, I think my biggest fear is what the job may do to my family. I have a very supportive wife and I don't want her payback for that support to be hardship - either through tragedy or just the realities of being married to a cop.

DVeng

JC2317
10-22-2012, 13:28
When I was young and stupid, I feared nothing. Then after getting married and having the kids, not coming home to them was the biggest fear. After getting over that, getting promoted and becoming an FTO gave me my biggest fear, that someone I trained, or someone I supervised, would not go home to his or her family. Now retired, that is still my biggest fear.

Schaffer
10-22-2012, 13:57
I graduate the academy VERY soon!

My biggest fear is encountering a situation, and not knowing what to do.

I know this type if wisdom comes with experience. I have a level head and often look at things from many angles, so I think I'll be just fine.

still is part of my fear. Try and keep and open mind and a level head is most important. Just remember to do something and be able to articulate why.


This is also part of the reason why i assist neighboring depts on calls as much as i can. seeing how someone handles a simple or BS call has opened my eyes on how to do alot of things differently than i sometimes would.

SAR
10-22-2012, 14:01
My biggest fear to this day has always been administrative rather than operational or tactical. I'd rather dodge bullets than get a call over the radio, "Captain needs to see you in his office immediately!"

CJStudent
10-22-2012, 14:55
......I'm the opposite of a poo magnet, but I don't want to be.

................

Come work with me sometime; I tend to be one. I've actually seriously considered buying the Milspec Monkey patch at wearing it on my jacket some days.

RGbiker
10-22-2012, 16:30
As a retired Corrections Officer (Lieutenant), I feel the biggest fear any street cop could endure is being sent to a state Prison as an inmate. He would require placement into segregated or restricted housing to keep him alive because every inmate in population would want a piece of him.

In my experience, child molesters and former LEO do very hard time in prison.

Hack
10-22-2012, 22:03
As a retired Corrections Officer (Lieutenant), I feel the biggest fear any street cop could endure is being sent to a state Prison as an inmate. He would require placement into segregated or restricted housing to keep him alive because every inmate in population would want a piece of him.

In my experience, child molesters and former LEO do very hard time in prison.

That must be an Arizona thing. With us it varies by prison facility. Chomos don't do so well, but former CO's and other LEOS can get by OK, depending on whether they have any they are listed as being sep status from, both inside and the camp.

golls17
10-22-2012, 22:43
(not currently on a dept)
An officer walking up to my door to talk to my wife when I'm late getting off my shift...

cowboywannabe
10-22-2012, 23:17
my biggest fear to this day has always been administrative rather than operational or tactical. I'd rather dodge bullets than get a call over the radio, "captain needs to see you in his office immediately!"

i second this! I get more #$%& from the brass over trivial, petty, errand,special project, do this for me, do that for me bullscat than i do from crapheads on he streets.

There is a reason they say : Dayshift, the hours are great but the duty sucks.

Brandon G
10-22-2012, 23:58
I have been working in the Law enforcement field for 2 years now and I just recently have gotten married. Before the wedding I never worried about anything, I am very situational aware, very profecient with hands on and with weapons so I knew I was good to go. But now that I'm married i worry about someone taking a fight with me to the next level and going after my wife. I am trying to get her prepaired for the worse but she is a little blonde and just doesnt think the same way I do. She has no clue of whats going on around her on a daily basis. She is the extreme Southern bell, she thinks everyone is a good person and nothing will ever happen to us in this little country town. How do I get her to think differently? sorry to Highjack this thread

Brandon G
10-23-2012, 00:00
(not currently on a dept)
An officer walking up to my door to talk to my wife when I'm late getting off my shift...

I am with you on this

lawman800
10-23-2012, 00:34
My biggest fear to this day has always been administrative rather than operational or tactical. I'd rather dodge bullets than get a call over the radio, "Captain needs to see you in his office immediately!"

Yep, you been on long enough and you learn to fear the inside of the station more than the streets.

4teecal
10-23-2012, 02:25
Yep, you been on long enough and you learn to fear the inside of the station more than the streets.

Ooooh yeah. 18 years on and my fights are before I walk out the door.:steamed:

Bruce M
10-23-2012, 05:48
Over the years I have had a few short lasting fears of not finding an address or not knowing what to do when I get there or not being able to do what I need to do when I get there. But the fears that remain the most consistent over the last three decades (or at least since I started reading here) are either being shot by a jealous husband as I am retreating in a hurry out the bedroom window with no trousers or taking a murderer into custody and then realizing that I was not wearing my hat so the arrest is invalidated and the case is dismissed.

cowboywannabe
10-23-2012, 06:16
Over the years I have had a few short lasting fears of not finding an address or not knowing what to do when I get there or not being able to do what I need to do when I get there. But the fears that remain the most consistent over the last three decades (or at least since I started reading here) are either being shot by a jealous husband as I am retreating in a hurry out the bedroom window with no trousers or taking a murderer into custody and then realizing that I was not wearing my hat so the arrest is invalidated and the case is dismissed.

yer right, i almost lost track of some hot chick i was following 7 miles outside of my jd....scarey moment for sure.

nikerret
10-23-2012, 08:03
Yep, you been on long enough and you learn to fear the inside of the station more than the streets.

That was day one.

Patchman
10-23-2012, 08:13
that I'm responding to a call for service but can't find my hat anywhere...

lawman800
10-23-2012, 08:19
yer right, i almost lost track of some hot chick i was following 7 miles outside of my jd....scarey moment for sure.

I am always thinking about what is my probably cause to conduct this stop... and will it be invalidated because I did not make an appointment. Out here in SoCal, we don't wear hats, but we do have to make appointments. Everyone got people. My people will contact your people. That's how it works.

BigSpenda864
10-23-2012, 09:02
At first, I was just scared of not knowing what to do in a given situation. Then I realized I could pretty easily BS my way through just about anything long enough to figure out what to do. After that, I had no real fears on the street but I avoid the station like the plague.

RMolina628
10-23-2012, 11:33
I think I said it in a previous thread, but some of the kids that a regional academy is turning out right now makes me worry that my life may depend one of these sad excuses for a police officer. I am far from perfect, however, the standard seems to be lowered every class which makes you think who is more dangerous?

Chowser
10-23-2012, 19:11
Divorce.

That was my biggest fear when I started looking into this job.

After 15 years on the job and 17 years of marriage, it's over (marriage that is.)

PinkoCommie
10-23-2012, 19:53
Get used to it. It's going to happen every day for a while, then every couple days, every week, every couple weeks, etc. The most important thing is that you do SOMETHING, and be able to articulate why you did it.

Here is a secret... most of us don't know what to do most of the time. That's why we take a moment to think through a situation, ask what the stories are, then make up our mind as to the next step.

The important thing is that you develop a quick standard response for most situations where you need to act quickly. The first thing I usually do as I scramble out of the car and walk up to some weird **** going down is tell people to sit down. I walk into a house and I don't feel safe, same thing -- sit down. On the floor. Couches are great for hiding weapons.

I am not saying that that's the perfect solution. It isn't. But if I can't think of something better to do right at the moment, I tell everybody to sit down, which gives me a moment to think about the next step. It also immediately tells me which *******s are going to be a problem. Those who comply right away and sit down are usually OK. Those who have a problem with my request right away will need extra attention.

Oh, and you'll be fine. Just do what your FTO tells you to do, and don't be afraid to fill in where he fails to provide specific instructions.

Tilley
10-23-2012, 21:44
Ooooh yeah. 18 years on and my fights are before I walk out the door.:steamed:

My secret to longevity:

1. Stay out of the station.

2. Trust no one with your career.

3. Stay out of other cop's drama, BS or gossip.

4. Do your job.

5. Leave your emotions and prejudices in the locker room.

6. Have a blast being a cop!

7. Stay out of the station.

SCSU74
10-23-2012, 21:57
Just curious as to what your guy's responses will be. What was/is your biggest fear about being a cop when you first decided to become one, or when you first started out on the job?

Right now, mine is being dispatched to a call and having no idea where I'm going.

Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine

Losing my pension, oh wait... That happend today


Sent from my iPhone... which probably auto-corrected something wrong

larry_minn
10-23-2012, 23:26
I am not/never was a LEO. I have delt with some of the folks they do and got them punished.
My fear was them taking it out on my family. I guarded my "home" address well. I had a apt in city 140 miles away off and on. That was address given to anyone who had a halfway decent reason to ask. (then forwarded to me by landlord, I picked it up when in area) (long before computers/internet search engines)

JBaird22
10-24-2012, 10:03
I agree with keep yourself away from the station. Nothing but political maneuvering occurs there.

I'm a horribly bad alpha male and refuse to admit my fears. I just realized that. But on the list would be having to rely on a guy with less than a year to save my bacon.

ditchdoc24
10-24-2012, 11:58
My secret to longevity:

1. Stay out of the station.

2. Trust no one with your career.

3. Stay out of other cop's drama, BS or gossip.

4. Do your job.

5. Leave your emotions and prejudices in the locker room.

6. Have a blast being a cop!

7. Stay out of the station.

This is absolutely the truth. I have to come to the office to write reports and such but most of the time I like to be out on the road. Sometimes I'll just patrol, riding the dark areas to see what I find and sometimes I work traffic. I keep my head down the best I can and do my job. I make my cases, do what I need to do and go home at the end of my shift.

ChrisYZFR1
10-24-2012, 14:20
I think Patchman hit the nail on the head for me.


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lawman800
10-24-2012, 20:56
Even working weekends and nights, I stay out of the station. Who knows which bored supervisor might just swing by for kicks because they have nothing else to do?

Metro566
10-25-2012, 03:03
I used to fear lighting up that scrotum in the county roads and being led back to an ambush point....then I also had a fear of not knowing where I was during a foot pursuit or something. How do you call it out in the sticks? "566 Metro, I'm in foot pursuit...we just jumped over the big log and trudged through the swampy marsh passed the third dirt hump". I got over it by not chasing anyone into the woods unless it was absolutely necessary.

Now, as luck would have it, no one runs from me (as much as I'd like it to happen from time to time). I had some anus tell me that I'm known around the ****bag circles for being faster than I look and that "when Deputy 566 (name withheld) catches you, he brings a WHOLE lotta ass whoopin' with him" so everyone complies :(

Now my fear is being thrown in front of the bus by admin or sold out by some co-worker so they can advance the ladder.

Bruce M
10-25-2012, 10:32
Yep, you been on long enough and you learn to fear the inside of the station more than the streets.

My secret to longevity:

1. Stay out of the station.

...
3. Stay out of other cop's drama, BS or gossip.

...
7. Stay out of the station.


Them: "According to our records your vest is past the five year expiration date."

Me: "Ok."

Them: "You will have to get a new one."

Me: "Ok if you want to spend the money. But I really only need the back half of the vest."

Napalm561
10-26-2012, 20:14
I'm with Bren. I just have this fear that I'll get sent to prison and have to spend a long period of time with some of the turds I've placed in jail.

VA27
10-27-2012, 20:50
Retirement. It just gives me the shudders.

4teecal
10-27-2012, 22:02
My secret to longevity:

1. Stay out of the station.

2. Trust no one with your career.

3. Stay out of other cop's drama, BS or gossip.

4. Do your job.

5. Leave your emotions and prejudices in the locker room.

6. Have a blast being a cop!

7. Stay out of the station.
Unfortunately being a supervisor I cannot do 1 or 7, and 4 always ends up getting wound into 3, but I concur with everything you say.

Rex G
10-28-2012, 00:03
Well, that being almost 29 years ago, I have forgotten.

Now, one of my biggest fears is dropping the ball in a way that jeopardizes my ability to retire honorably. It would be a shame to make it this far, and then fall. While I think I am immune from falling into temptation, I know that it can be difficult. My PD is under a microscope right now due to recent highly-publicized civil rights violations, and outright crimes committed by officers.

Another big one is to be falsely accused of one of those things that is difficult to prove or disprove, and would cause me to be under a lingering cloud, regardless of the outcome.

I reckon the biggest fear, however, right now, is being physically unable to assist a fellow officer, as I get older and slower, and some parts of the body just cannot do some things they could just a few years ago. For now, as hiring is not keeping up with attrition, and every division and shift has unfilled vacancies, I know that I am not displacing a more able-bodied person, so I don't have to worry about taking up a spot that could be filled by a more physically-able officer. Even so, my ability to lift or drag a fallen colleague is severely diminished, and I worry about that.

FWIW, my duty belt is still at the same setting as it was in early 1984. It is not the same belt, but I have set-up each new belt exactly the same as its predecessor. Yes, it takes will-power!

lawman800
10-28-2012, 01:45
Retirement. It just gives me the shudders.

You kidding? Give it a few years and you won't be able to wait for retirement.

OFCJIM40
10-28-2012, 05:44
Every shift fear: Having stupid calls keep me from getting a good hot sit down meal at a restaurant before it closes, or getting screwed with by Admin.
Dream fear: Gun not firing or I somehow couldn't pull the trigger hard enough.
Recent fear: Some of these rookies are really dumb and I might have to bail them out of the world of feces they just stupidly got us in to.
Honest fear: My first child will be here in 6 weeks and I'll be damned if anyone or anything takes me away from my wife or child, so it's the fear of the ultimate screw up.