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malleable
10-21-2012, 16:27
I'm single and trying to learn how to cook.
For arguments sake, lets say you have milk that you know will go bad in 12 hrs. If you cook with it, would that end product then have to be consumed within 12 hrs?

el_jewapo
10-21-2012, 16:37
I would think cooking the milk would add a few days to it. Not sure about using it uncooked. I'd guess you'd want to eat that pretty quick.

But really, the bacteria in milk or anything else don't have a calender. Expiration dates are just a rule of thumb type thing. As long as it smells ok, it's fine. I've seen milk just fine a day or two past the date and I've seen it bad a day or two before.

Averageman
10-21-2012, 16:37
I'm single and trying to learn how to cook.
For arguments sake, lets say you have milk that you know will go bad in 12 hrs. If you cook with it, would that end product then have to be consumed within 12 hrs?
I make Alfredo from scratch, it is easy and you can make some good stuff relatively easy.
That being said it's pretty much a one shot deal as the Milk, butter and cheese mixture isnt the same after refrigeration.
In that case I would have to say No, not if you are making sauce.

Dave.1
10-21-2012, 16:39
I'm guessing you are going by the date on the container. If properly stored you usually have several days after that.

If the milk tastes OK than it shouldn't matter if you're cooking with it, your dish will be fine.If it tastes "off" you shouldn't use it.

Dave

snubfan
10-21-2012, 16:44
How are you coming up with 12 hours from going bad? The use by date is just a reccommendation if that's what you're going by. Does it pass the sniff test? Does it taste OK?

Averageman
10-21-2012, 16:45
If I was learning to cook all over again, I would Master the Crcok Pot first. To be honest it is a Single Man's best freind.
Fairly forgiving and you can turn it on and go to work and when you come home its done and time to eat.
As far as Milk and the expiration date, thats kind of a best guess; this is where you hold your nose and do the taste test.

dango
10-21-2012, 17:04
Cream of pig-knuckle and beef tounge soup.....:supergrin:

Nicky D
10-21-2012, 17:53
Like others have said, the date is just a guideline. It depends on how well the milk is kept & even then, there is no guarantee. As long as it smells & tastes good then use it.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

malleable
10-21-2012, 18:04
I realize the use by date is just a guideline, that's why i said for arguments sake 12 hrs.
Obviously the 12 hrs isn't literal, I was just wondering if once you cook with the milk the spoil window would be extended?

el_jewapo
10-21-2012, 18:09
I realize the use by date is just a guideline, that's why i said for arguments sake 12 hrs.
Obviously the 12 hrs isn't literal, I was just wondering if once you cook with the milk the spoil window would be extended?

I think as long as it's heated to a certain temperature, you're going to kill off the bacteria that would cause it to spoil effectively resetting the clock. Then a new clock starts on whatever you made. If it's some sauce or something where you're not actually cooking the milk, it's probably subject to the same expiration date of the original milk.

USMCsilver
10-21-2012, 18:27
Cream of pig-knuckle and beef tounge soup.....:supergrin:

Oddly enough, that actally sounds more appetizing than cream of moose-knuckle and camel-toe chowder. :rofl:

sappy13
10-21-2012, 18:28
you should be good if you cook a dish with it. i wouldnt worry too much about it. Oh yeah, and if you dont have milk and a recipe calls for it, typically you can get away without using milk and it will still taste great. I make hamburger helper and tons of pasta at work in the microwave and never have milk. Butter isnt needed either.

MtBaldy
10-21-2012, 19:05
I realize the use by date is just a guideline, that's why i said for arguments sake 12 hrs.
Obviously the 12 hrs isn't literal, I was just wondering if once you cook with the milk the spoil window would be extended?

If it gets to boiling I'm pretty sure you have extended it's life. Plain old pasteurized milk is heated to 161 degrees so anything above that should kill bacteria. As for the expiration date, if it still smells and tastes good it's probably good.

holesinpaper
10-21-2012, 19:54
If you have hamburger that expires today.

Cook it, and the finished product will stay good for the standard 4 or 5 days in the fridge -- which will be past the official 'use by' date.

That's my story, I'm stick'n to it.

USMCsilver
10-21-2012, 20:06
If you have hamburger that expires today.

Cook it, and the finished product will stay good for the standard 4 or 5 days in the fridge -- which will be past the official 'use by' date.

What about sausages that were left out on the counter overnight? :dunno::embarassed::whistling:

el_jewapo
10-21-2012, 20:30
What about sausages that were left out on the counter overnight? :dunno::embarassed::whistling:

How hungry are you? How good were the sausages the day before? Do you have strong alcohol to chase it down with? All variables you need to answer before we can answer your question.

Adjuster
10-21-2012, 20:46
It should also be noted that 'best if used by' and 'expiration dates' are for unopened factory sealed products. Once you open the product and allow air and bacteria to enter your expiration time can be a matter of days for instance milk or almost unlimited for something thats cured for instance pickles and olives.


/

Zonny
10-21-2012, 20:58
How come when I bake a cake and make homemade frosting using milk, the cake can sit on the counter un-refrigerated for days and you don't get curdled frosting and no one dies?

Things that make you go "Hmmmmm" :dunno:

Adjuster
10-21-2012, 21:30
How come when I bake a cake and make homemade frosting using milk, the cake can sit on the counter un-refrigerated for days and you don't get curdled frosting and no one dies?

Things that make you go "Hmmmmm" :dunno:


What kind of homemade frosting do you make with milk? I have only made cream cheese/butter type frostings. Also are you cooking the milk for your frosting? Cooking the milk will remove all bacteria giving you plenty of countertop time before new bacteria can be introduced and culture/grow.


/

holesinpaper
10-21-2012, 21:31
What about sausages that were left out on the counter overnight? :dunno::embarassed::whistling:

A-OK!


(as long as you maintain between a 35-39 degree temp in your home).

Zonny
10-21-2012, 21:34
What kind of homemade frosting do you make with milk? I have only made cream cheese/butter type frostings. Also are you cooking the milk for your frosting? Cooking the milk will remove all bacteria giving you plenty of countertop time before new bacteria can be introduced and culture/grow.


/

No cooking. Powdered sugar, butter, milk, vanilla, pinch of salt; cocoa if it's chocolate or flavorings of choice.

Buttercream frosting.

RWBlue
10-21-2012, 22:07
I'm single and trying to learn how to cook.
For arguments sake, lets say you have milk that you know will go bad in 12 hrs. If you cook with it, would that end product then have to be consumed within 12 hrs?

From what I have see recently....
1. The good by date on milk is WAY OFF. I have bought milk and had it go bad very quickly, but recently it has been going much longer.
2. It depends. Put milk in a bread or a cake and it is good for a long time. Put milk in a sauce, and I would eat it in 24 hours regardless of the milk expiration.

glock_19guy1983
10-21-2012, 22:29
I like to make cottage cheese with milk that is just about to go out of date.

lethal tupperwa
10-22-2012, 06:57
rice pudding

inthefrey
10-22-2012, 07:04
Spoiled milk is cottage cheese...:D