Carry Your Retirement Badge? [Archive] - Glock Talk

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Jim
10-26-2012, 15:00
How many of you retired guys who have one, actually carry it like you did the real tin while active?

My small dept actully gave me two, a full size version that looks just like the active badge except the number is replaced by "Ret", and a smaller one about 1/3 size.

If I carry just the retired ID card and Qual card, that satisfies LEOSA. Problem is, Illinois is the ony state with NO provision for citizens to carry concealed.

In Illinois, anyone with a gun gets automatically classified as "Cop" or "Crook". In the confusion of an actual problem, the words "Police Retired" and the ret badge might be better than just the words alone. We can sort out the details later, just being sure that I don't come across as claiming to be an active officer when I'm not.

OTOH, the ID cards alone can be kept deep in my wallet where an armed robber won't find them on the scene, so that gives me the possibility of acting like just another guy who carries illegally.

Comments?

Sgt127
10-26-2012, 15:23
I think anyone that retired earned the right to carry the badge. Yeah, if things went to poop, I think having a badge to hold up may keep you from getting a hole poked in you by responding cops.

blueiron
10-26-2012, 18:40
Been retired for five years now and I don't carry it.

Arizona has Constitutional carry for all honorable citizens and I have a CWP. The retirement badge means nothing to any one any more, since I am not part of the gov't and I do not have government authority to act under color of authority. Citizens who see a badge assume that the carrier is a gov't agent/employee and to me, is is effectively a challenge coin.

There has to be a mental sea change when one retires. One is no longer part of the police who are responsible for the world, just an alumni responsible for one's self.

Anyone can carry a badge [including a fictitious one]. An ID card is very hard for an impersonator to fake. An ID card means you are 99.85% real.

BudMan5
10-26-2012, 19:50
I am also in Illinois.

I do not carry my retired star.

I was once tempted to stop an in progress shop lifting and decided after that to leave it at home. I don't need an impersonation charge.

I managed to stop the shop lifting by whipping out my iphone and popping pictures of them. That was enough to dissuade them and they decided not to come after me,

It's pretty hard to put away the reaction and think of the weapon as just for personal defense only but I am dealing with it.

The star does look good in the "I Love Me" room though <GRIN>

Jim
10-26-2012, 22:48
Been retired for five years now and I don't carry it.

Arizona has Constitutional carry for all honorable citizens and I have a CWP. The retirement badge means nothing to any one any more, since I am not part of the gov't and I do not have government authority to act under color of authority. Citizens who see a badge assume that the carrier is a gov't agent/employee and to me, is is effectively a challenge coin.

There has to be a mental sea change when one retires. One is no longer part of the police who are responsible for the world, just an alumni responsible for one's self.

Anyone can carry a badge [including a fictitious one]. An ID card is very hard for an impersonator to fake. An ID card means you are 99.85% real.

Perhaps my original post was not clear.

Unlike Arizona, Illinois does NOT have any provision for civilian carry, and that's what I have to deal with. The use of the retirement badge, along with the words "retired police", might prevent me from being mistaken for a criminal when I'm merely trying to defend myself/family.

Under the law, I have no police authority and don't plan to exercise any.

Today, anyone with a computer can make a good looking but fake ID card, probably easier than they can buy a fake badge.

blueiron
10-26-2012, 23:13
I fail to see the point of a badge then.

Jim
10-27-2012, 06:19
The old saying is "You can accomplish more with a kind word and a gun, than with just a kind word."

The possible variation is "You can be better identified with a retired card and a badge, than with just a retired card."

Maybe.

We'll see what other people come up with for suggestions, and possibly some real life stories. My mind is open on this, I'm hoping for lots of responses.

Java Junky
10-27-2012, 06:41
'Wallet considerably thinner as a result of your back'n forth.
My right cheek salutes you!
Thanks.

2-8 Marine
10-27-2012, 06:49
I mounted one of my retirement badges in a case on my rec-room wall and the other I don't carry on my person but keep in the console of my car. Seems to work for me these past 12 years.

k9medic
10-27-2012, 06:54
Retired under LEOSA allows you to still carry concealed just as you would if you were still working.

I personally would carry the smaller badge. Although you don't plan on taking action, there may come a day when you need to and the extra ID might keep you from being shot.


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leadbutt
10-27-2012, 09:17
Department issued 2, one went into the shadow box, and the other rides in the concealed wallet with the qual cards and ID, niether is seen unless, asked for during stops , one wallet so no problem carry, don't carry, each to his own

fastbolt
10-27-2012, 09:37
I do, mostly (especially when armed).

I don't carry my retirement ID card in a regular wallet. Don't want anything in the wallet to ID me as retired LE. (I even carry an expired DL in the "regular" wallet.)

I carried a flat badge wallet for too many years (plainclothes assignment) and stopped carrying a regular wallet. I've always found the fat lump (pocket brick) wallets carried by most men of my acquaintance to be odd, anyway.

My active badge was flagged as retired and now sits in my safe.

So, now that I'm retired I carry my ID & DL in my flat badge wallet, with an issued LEOSA document from my agency, along with the approved flat badge I carried for so many years, now flagged "retired". Habit.

My "new" regular wallet is something that caught my eye (fancy handmade custom leather) one day after I retired, and I use it to carry a few cards which won't fit in my flat badge wallet.

My ID/flat badge wallet is carried on my off-side hip, where reaching for it is more natural for me if I'm holding a weapon in my strong hand.

Of course, having any sort of badge (active, retired, regular, flat, etc) certainly isn't a guarantee some arriving cop won't shoot you. I can think back over the years of doing quals and seeing how quickly some cops have unexpectedly come upon a "No Shoot" picture target and shot the portrayed "person" holding out a "badge/ID card", only later realizing their mistake.

Just like being UC, plainclothes or off-duty, you have to be very careful if circumstances ever force you to draw & present (let alone fire) a retirement weapon, since arriving LE might only see the weapon (threat focus).

FWIW, I know retired folks who do different things in this regard, including those who never plan to carry a badge, ID card or weapon again.

Suit yourself (as long as it's within policy for the agency who issued the retired ID card and badge, of course ;) ).

cowboywannabe
10-27-2012, 09:40
most of the retired guys i know just carry their i.d. card hidden in their wallet behind some other stuff.

Kingarthurhk
10-27-2012, 09:57
Retired under LEOSA allows you to still carry concealed just as you would if you were still working.

I personally would carry the smaller badge. Although you don't plan on taking action, there may come a day when you need to and the extra ID might keep you from being shot.


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Yeah, but then they have the hassle of having to show up to quals every quarter. It would seem easier just to get a CCL, and enjoy being retired.

k9medic
10-27-2012, 13:30
I thought hisissue was the fact that he was in Illinois and they don't allow normal ccw?


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Kingarthurhk
10-27-2012, 14:27
I thought hisissue was the fact that he was in Illinois and they don't allow normal ccw?


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Sounds like it would be time for a warmer freer state.:supergrin:

seanmac45
10-27-2012, 17:27
Carry a shield and ID with me wherever I go.

I earned the right.

CJStudent
10-27-2012, 19:52
I'm a long ways from retirement, but my grandfather is retired from the county I live in, and currently part-time in the adjacent county he lives in now. He carries his retired badge actually more than his current one (though I'm pretty sure he keeps his current agency ID on him); I guess it's a sentimental thing with him. He does carry off duty, but rarely.

Jim
10-27-2012, 20:28
Yeah, but then they have the hassle of having to show up to quals every quarter. It would seem easier just to get a CCL, and enjoy being retired.
LEOSA required qual is once per year, and provides a ton of benefits beyond a CCL:
Good throughout the United States and possessions.
Exempts you from most state restrictions except on government property.

I've had a Florida CCL for many years, but having the LEOSA is so much better.

As for moving, we travel all over the country now and also spend much of winter in Florida. Nice, but Illinois is summer is nicer. YMMV.

Rex G
10-27-2012, 23:27
Though I can keep it, if honorably retired, I am specifically prohibited from carrying my PD-issued badge after retirement. IIRC, it must be mounted, such as on a plaque, or in a shadowbox. I could have a "retired" badge made, at my own expense, but I tend to doubt I would carry it, as I often do not carry my badge when off the clock nowadays.

Actually, this reminds me that I had once considered having a traditional Texas Ranger-style badge from a Mexican Cinco Peso piece of appropriate vintage, simply engraved as "Texas Peace Officer" rather than as a Texas Ranger badge. I have seen some peace officers wearing these, when working security gigs, when their employing agencies would not allow them to wear the issued uniforms and badges when working extra employment. Perhaps I should see about having one made with "Retired"
engraved on it, though I cannot see myself displaying it in
public. It would be more of a novelty item.

fastbolt
10-28-2012, 10:11
Carry a shield and ID with me wherever I go.

I earned the right.

Simply & elegantly stated.

True.

banger
10-28-2012, 13:59
I never carried a badge off duty when I was working,,,why start now.

For me, it was always about the I.D., the badges meant nothing, show me the I.D..

Edit: For me, it's like "P.B.A." shields in cars...More fakes than real.

Bruce M
10-28-2012, 16:36
Carry a shield and ID with me wherever I go.

I earned the right.

Simply & elegantly stated.

True.
:agree::goodpost:

Hack
10-28-2012, 17:24
Most retired ID cards out there probably doesn't have a smart chip in it. Neither do badges. Badges can be made pretty cheaply as a fake, but then so can an ID card. So, what to do? If there is some inkling that you are dealing with a whacker, (retired type at that), call the last person's place of employment in LE.

I retire in about four to six years, give or take a few months. So, as you can imagine I am thinking about things, and looking into some things now.

Already in the BOP we don't have off duty badges, with possibly some exceptions. We do have access to something to wear around with us that is shaped like a badge, but isn't a badge. And, the business only sells these items to verified BOP employees. There is no number on it, or any sold with the word retired. Although, they have probably thought about it.

The law is already written in LEOSA, and that is mainly what I go by now. My pocket brick that I was given as a souvenir at work, (yeah, we were told something like that), carries my two card credentials in it, and has the medallion that is shaped like a badge affixed to the inside. I also carry a neck shield, (medallion), that also has a smaller ID card in it, once in a while. Occasionally I even wear my belt shield, (medallion), but not often.

Retired I will probably just carry the card hidden in some area of the wallet, and make sure it is in decent condition. Maybe I will even get it replaced occasionally, (if they don't mind doing that for retirees), in order to have a fairly current picture in it. Probably about every ten years or so. And, I will carry card sized copies of my yearly LEOSA qualifications in the wallet.

TreverSlyFox
10-28-2012, 22:26
I carry my badge and retired ID card. Dept only gave me my full size badge so that is what I carry and they retired my badge number.

As far as Identifying a wannabe with a fake badge is very simple for most types. Just ask them for their ORI (Originating Agency Identifier) Number since they would have typed it a million times on reports and documents. My old Department was MI43XXX and it's a number that I will never forget.

They should be able to rattle it off the top of their heads or I'd start looking a little bit deeper into who they are.

puckhead
10-28-2012, 22:42
We don't use our ORI number at all and I have no idea what mine is. We do get an extra state issued card that says we are post certified. Again, you could duplicate it though.

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Hack
10-28-2012, 23:24
I carry my badge and retired ID card. Dept only gave me my full size badge so that is what I carry and they retired my badge number.

As far as Identifying a wannabe with a fake badge is very simple for most types. Just ask them for their ORI (Originating Agency Identifier) Number since they would have typed it a million times on reports and documents. My old Department was MI43XXX and it's a number that I will never forget.

They should be able to rattle it off the top of their heads or I'd start looking a little bit deeper into who they are.

Us regular folks in the BOP don't even do anything with ORI, so most of us are not going to know the half dozen numbers that we have.

But, if you call the institution name given by one of our people someone may know of the retired fellow. Some also may even have a listing for off duty hours, but it is not required of us. Day time may get you to where you can contact their human resources department, since they issued the ID card they should have record of it at their home institution.

merlynusn
10-29-2012, 06:59
I have no idea what my ORI is. It's all electronic and I have only filled it out on a specific form that goes to the state. I have to look it up every time since it's not a common everyday form.

Sharkey
10-29-2012, 08:54
I never carried a badge off duty when I was working,,,why start now.

For me, it was always about the I.D., the badges meant nothing, show me the I.D..

Edit: For me, it's like "P.B.A." shields in cars...More fakes than real.

Exactly. Carrying a badge in the hopes of not getting shot by responding police seems to be wishful thinking at best.

Carry your ID, carry your gun, maintain situational awareness and hope the day doesn't come when you have to show the ID to a uniformed officer.

Hugo R
10-30-2012, 00:13
Carry a shield and ID with me wherever I go.

I earned the right.

Exactly!

HR:cool:

Glock Holliday
10-30-2012, 06:40
I, too agree with seanmac45. Any LEO retired for service has earned the right to carry his retirement badge. It's just a matter of personal preference.

Anyone that has been a LEO for awhile can spot a poser... most wouldn't know what an ORI is.

mikegun
10-31-2012, 09:55
I carry my ret buzzer in the car, in case of a shooting, i want reasponding cops to know as best they can,,,,it could save my life, but on my person only ret id and leosha card, in the event i saw a cop in trouble i will always stop, just the way i feel....

lndshark
10-31-2012, 10:27
The only time I use our ORI for any document that isn't originated online is to sign off tickets. Even then, I keep it scribbled on the inside cover of my notepad. I'm sure if I was 23 instead of x3 I'd be able to remember it. I do know that it starts with "81-...." :rofl:


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Chuck54
10-31-2012, 16:41
No I don't carry it. It is in my shadow box.

Hack
10-31-2012, 22:40
I just don't get the thing where there are folks thinking we should know our ORI, (regardless of agency). Not everyone knows about those even in LE. Someone who has been retired for a number of years isn't going to remember it, unless there is some reason that he think he should.

You want to verify the retired LEOS, it tells you by law what you have to work with. And ID Card with a number that belongs to the bearer of the ID, and qualification papers or card of the retired officer's state of residence. You don't need a shield; you don't need an ORI; and for that matter if a person has been retired long enough you may not even be able to reach someone where the guy used to work who knows the old codger.

So, what about qualification records. Are you going to try to verify those at a road side stop as well?

OK, I'm a little ticked off at some folks being anal. I understand that anyone being anal is trying to do his job and prevent the whackers of whackerdom from packing heat illegally. But, unless there is standardized state ID how you are going to tell anything is legitimate?

Rabbi
10-31-2012, 23:44
As far as Identifying a wannabe with a fake badge is very simple for most types. Just ask them for their ORI (Originating Agency Identifier) Number since they would have typed it a million times on reports and documents. My old Department was MI43XXX and it's a number that I will never forget.



I also think the ORI number is a bad idea. My agencies report writting software doesnt require me to enter my ORI. There are a few reports/documents we do outside of our system (Crashes for the most part) and on those I have to enter the ORI...and I almost always look up at the "big list of important crap" that is on the board next to the computer to check...the ORI number.

TreverSlyFox
11-02-2012, 00:57
WOW, I must be older than I think.

I typed our ORI number so many times on reports, it's a number I doubt I'll ever forget. Of course I typed it on an IBM Selectric typewriter so that ought to tell you something. Never thought about all you guys that have the software do it for you and you don't know it by heart.

Glock Holliday
11-02-2012, 02:53
Yeah, I still remember the ORI from the last two agencies I worked for. We have to enter our ORI into the Datamaster before administering the breath test so it's kinda hard to forget.

banger
11-02-2012, 06:11
WOW, I must be older than I think.

I typed our ORI number so many times on reports, it's a number I doubt I'll ever forget. Of course I typed it on an IBM Selectric typewriter so that ought to tell you something. Never thought about all you guys that have the software do it for you and you don't know it by heart.


Whoa, whoa, whoa, You had typewriters... You lucky dog...

We had to chisel the info into stone tablets when I was working.:rofl:

All joking aside. I could not begin to count the number of reports I had to write out by hand, in printing.

Then they would complain that they could not read a word here or there.

However, when we got "written up", that they typed, for the guy's nothing.

Seriously, when I started, the SENIOR man on the shift got the car with the AM radio!

Most of the cars did not even come equipped with radios....Hey. we don't pay you guys to listen to the radio.

At first no "walkies", later in a two man car, the senior guy would get a "walkie", none for the junior.

itslucky
11-02-2012, 06:34
Attempted execution ... BECAUSE HE IS A COP! At noon today, 29 Oct., San Diego Police Officer Les Stewart, 57, was enjoying his afternoon off - he was at an ATM when a thug came up from behind him and forced him to lay down at gunpoint. As the gunman rummaged through Ofc. Stewart's wallet, he found our Brother's badge ... at that point, this scumbag shot Ofc. Stewart in the back of his head, in an attempt to execute him! Employees at the Credit Union pulled Ofc. Stewart to safety, called for help and tended to his critical injury. By the grace of God, the bullet just grazed Ofc. Stewart's skull, but may have bruised his brain. Our Warrior Brother, is being tended to at the hospital. Ofc. Les Stewart, who has given us 27 years of dedicated service, is set to retire in December. Please keep him and his family, both of blood and of Blue, in your thoughts.



The suspect, believed to be dressed as a security guard, had a silver handgun. He fled the scene, heading south on Escondido Boulevard toward Felicita Avenue. A manhunt is ongoing.
:steamed::steamed:

Glock Holliday
11-03-2012, 03:53
Badges and guns go together. I never carry my badge without a gun but there are times in the summer when I carry one of my J Frames without a badge. (I do have a CWP though.)

TLHelmer
11-03-2012, 07:53
I agree 100%!:cop:

I think anyone that retired earned the right to carry the badge. Yeah, if things went to poop, I think having a badge to hold up may keep you from getting a hole poked in you by responding cops.

25pd
11-05-2012, 20:57
As a LEOSA Firearms Instructor, I say always carry yuou retired I.D. and Retired Badge and Qual. Card at all times when out and about as you never know whenm the **** will huit the Fan so be prepared at all times to show the badge to responding Officers....:wavey:

Rex G
11-06-2012, 03:25
I carry my badge and retired ID card. Dept only gave me my full size badge so that is what I carry and they retired my badge number.

As far as Identifying a wannabe with a fake badge is very simple for most types. Just ask them for their ORI (Originating Agency Identifier) Number since they would have typed it a million times on reports and documents. My old Department was MI43XXX and it's a number that I will never forget.

They should be able to rattle it off the top of their heads or I'd start looking a little bit deeper into who they are.

I have never had to know my agency's ORI number, from 1984 to today.

series1811
11-06-2012, 09:43
I've got the two of mine I was allowed to keep (one has "retired" added to it and one doesn't) on my wall.

I didn't carry one, just my LEOSA ID card during the year I was actually retired. Now, I've got a new badge at my new job, so it doesn't mater (but, I still carry my LEOSA card in my new credentials :supergrin:).

Jim
11-06-2012, 19:50
I guess we can put this one to bed.

Thanks for all the replies and comments. Educational, as usual.
For those who don't want to do the math, it looks like the "Carry It" replies outnumbered the "Don't" replies by about 50%. That's not exact, as some of the replies were general comments rather than a statement of what the author currently does, or will do when retired.

Stay safe in retirement, too.